Слова на букву labo-luca (29) Historical Dictionary of Renaissance
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Слова на букву labo-luca (29)

Laboderie, Guy Lefèvre de
(1541-1598)    French poet and biblical translator. His mastery of Greek, Hebrew, Arabic, Chaldean, and Syriac brought him into touch with the older scholar and Cabalist ...
Landino, Cristoforo
(1424-1498)    Humanist, professor of poetry at the University of Florence, and prominent member of the Platonic Academy of Florence, an informal association of scholars led ...
Lanyer, Aemilia
(1569-1645)    English poet, the daughter of an Italian musician employed at the court of Queen Elizabeth I and his English wife. She was left alone at age 18 when her mother ...
Laski, Jan I and Jan II
   Uncle and nephew, members of an influential family of Polish nobility who were leaders in the church and also in encouraging Renaissance learning in their country. Jan I ...
Lateran Council, Fifth
(1512—1517)    The last general council of the Western church before the outbreak of the Protestant Reformation. It was summoned to Rome by Pope Julius II in order to ...
Latini, Brunetto
(ca. 1220-1294)    Florentine notary, poet, and political leader. He is best known from his appearance in Canto 15 of Dante's Inferno as one of those punished for sodomy. ...
Lazarillo de Tormes
   Spanish prose novel, published in 1554 and commonly regarded as the first picaresque novel, a genre that became popular in later 16th-century Spain. The name of the author ...
Lefèvre d'Etaples, Jacques
(ca. 1453-1536)    French humanist, known in Latin as Faber Stapulensis. He was a major influence on the "evangelical" religious reformers of the early 16th century and on the ...
Leland, John
(ca. 1506-1552)    English poet, antiquary, and topographer. He studied at St. Paul's school under the humanist grammarian William Lily and then at the universities of ...
Lemaire des Belges, Jean
(1470-1525)    French poet and humanist, a transitional figure between the vernacular rhétoriqueurs of the 15th century and later French humanists. His works reflect growing ...
Leo X, Pope
(Giovanni de'Medici, 1475-1521; pope 1513-1521)    The second son of Lorenzo de'Medici, Giovanni was intended from boyhood for a career in the church. He received a humanistic ...
León, Luis de
(ca. 1527-1591)    Spanish poet, biblical scholar, and monk. Born into a prosperous converso family, he became an Augustinian friar in 1544. He was educated at Salamanca, ...
Leonardo da Vinci
(1452-1519)    Tuscan painter, sculptor, scientist, and engineer, the oldest of the three most famous artists of the Italian Renaissance. He was also a polymath whose ...
Leone Ebreo
(also Hebreo; ca. 1460-1521)    Jewish physician and author, born at Lisbon, the son of a prominent physician and scholar, Isaac Abravanel. In 1483 the father was forced into ...
Lescot, Pierre
(ca. 1515-1578)    French Renaissance architect, best known as the designer of the Cour Carrée / Square Court of the Louvre palace in Paris, begun in 1546 for King Francis I. ...
Leto, Pomponio
(1428-1498)    Calabrian-born humanist, known in Latin as Julius Pomponius Laetus. Born the illegitimate son of a count, he became so profoundly devoted to Roman antiquity ...
Letters of Obscure Men
   Satirical collection of imaginary letters supposedly addressed by several scholastic theologians and monks to Ortwin Gratius, a Cologne humanist who had supported the ...
Lily, William
(ca. 1468-1522)    English humanist and teacher, first grand master of the reorganized St. Paul's school founded by John Colet, dean of St. Paul's cathedral. After graduation ...
Limbourg Brothers
   Three brothers, Paul, Herman, and Jan, active as painters in Paris and at the court of the dukes of Burgundy in the late 14th and early 15th centuries. Not much is known ...
Lippi, Fra Filippo
(ca. 1406-1469)    Florentine painter and Carmelite monk. His early work (for example, Madonna Enthroned, 1437) shows the influence of Masaccio but also suggests the influence ...
Lipsius, Justus
(1547-1606)    Dutch-born humanist, one of the great classical scholars of the late Renaissance, also historically important for his philosophical works advocating a ...
Lollards
   Followers of the 14th-century English theologian and heretic John Wyclif. After Wyclif's death in 1384, the English ecclesiastical courts forced most of his university ...
Longueil, Christophe de
(ca. 1488-1522)    French-Netherlandish humanist, born at Mechelen in Brabant to a local woman and an aristocratic French bishop who was French ambassador to the Netherlands. ...
Lope de Vega
(Lope Félix de Vega Carpió, 1562-1635)    Spanish poet and playwright, commonly regarded as Spain's greatest dramatist, and together with his older contemporary Miguel de ...
Lorenzetti, Pietro
(ca. 1280-ca. 1348) and AMBROGIO (after 1290-1348)    Sienese brothers, prominent artists succeeding to the position of Duccio and Simone Martini as Siena's leading painters. ...
Lorris, Guillaume de
   See Romance of the Rose.
Louvain, University of
   The first and (until the late 16th century) only university in the Netherlands. Founded in 1425 with faculties of liberal arts, law, and medicine, it was authorized in 1432 ...
Lovati, Lovato dei
(1241-1309)    Paduan notary and judge, one of the first Italian poets in several centuries to write in Latin rather than in the literary languages previously current in ...
Lucas van Leyden
(1494-1533)    Dutch painter, active at Leiden and Antwerp. He was especially important for the quality of his woodcuts and engravings, which were strongly influenced by ...


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