Слова на букву mich-ocke (29) Historical Dictionary of Renaissance
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Слова на букву mich-ocke (29)

Michelangelo
(1475-1564)    Probably the greatest and certainly the most versatile of the three artists commonly held to represent the peak of High Renaissance art. Born in a small Tuscan ...
Middle Ages
   Historical term used in all Western languages to des-ignate the thousand-year period from the disintegration of the ancient Roman political and social system in the fourth ...
Middleton, Thomas
(1580-1627)    English dramatist, a younger contemporary of William Shakespeare. He often wrote in collabo-ration with other playwrights such as William Rowley and Thomas ...
Milan
   Principal city of the Lombard plain from late Roman times through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. In the 12th century, when the cities of northern Italy resisted the ...
Milton, John
(1608-1674)    English poet, political figure, and au-thor of tracts on political and religious issues. Though his life is to-tally contained in the 17th century and so falls ...
Montaigne, Michel de
(1533-1592)    French moral philoso-pher and author, commonly regarded as the inventor of the personal essay as a literary genre. His father was a wealthy lawyer who had risen ...
Montefeltro, House of
   Italian noble family, originally counts of a district in east-central Italy known as the Marches, who came to the city of Urbino as imperial and later as papal vicars. ...
Montemayor, Jorge de
(1520-1561)    Portuguese-born poet, prose author, and singer in the imperial chapel at Madrid. He spent most of his career in the service of Philip II of Spain. His poems on ...
Monteverdi, Claudio
(1567-1643)    Italian composer, best known as one of the developers of the opera in the modern sense of the term. Born and trained in Cremona, he spent the first part of his ...
Montreuil, Jean de
(1354-1418)    Chancellor of France in the early 15th century. Though commonly associated with the French Middle Ages, he was not only a contemporary but a friend and ad-mirer ...
Morata, Olimpia
(ca. 1530-1555)    Italian humanist and Lutheran refugee. The daughter of Fulvio Pellegrino Morata, physi-cian to the duke of Ferrara in the early 16th century, she grew up at ...
More, Thomas
(ca. 1478-1535)    English humanist, lawyer, polit-ical figure, and Roman Catholic martyr. Born in London, the son of a prominent lawyer, he received an excellent ...
Morison, Richard
(ca. 1510-1556)    English humanist, politi-cian, and religious reformer. Educated at Eton and the new Cardinal College founded by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey at Oxford, he also ...
Münster, Sebastian
(1489-1552)    German geographer, edu-cated at Tübingen and Heidelberg. He became a Franciscan in 1505 but was converted to Protestantism in 1529 and moved to Switzer-land, ...
Mussato, Albertino
(1261-1329)    Italian scholar and lawyer, conventionally classed as one of the early North Italian "pre-humanists," but in some recent scholarship discussed as one of the ...
Mutianus Rufus
(1470-1527)    German humanist, born as Kon-rad Mut at Homburg in Hesse, son of a prosperous merchant. He studied at the famous Latin grammar school of St. Lebwin in Deven-ter, ...
Nanni di Banco
(ca. 1384-1421)    Florentine sculptor of the early 15th century. He was contemporary with the pioneering Renaissance sculptor Donatello but showed a strong classicizing ...
Naples
   Principal city of southern Italy, and also the kingdom for which the city served as capital. In the 12th and earlier 13th centuries, it was politically linked with the ...
Nebrija, Elio Antonio de
(1441-1522)    Spanish humanist, born at Lebrija (or Nebrija) near Seville, son of a Hidalgo family. He adopted the forename Elio (Aelius) as a symbol of his claim to Ro-man ...
Neoplatonism
   Philosophical system (or group of systems) derived from the ancient Athenian philosopher Plato (428-348 B.C.); it is called Neoplatonism rather than Platonism because it ...
Niccoli, Niccolo de'
(1364—1437)    Florentine humanist. His home at Florence became one of the principal gathering-places of en-thusiasts for ancient literature, and through his widespread ...
Nicholas of Cusa
(1401-1464)    German philosopher, theolo-gian, mathematician, church reformer, and cardinal. Born Niklas Krebs at Kues in western Germany, he received the nickname Cu-sanus ...
Nicholas V
(Tommaso Parentucelli, 1397-1455, elected pope in 1447)    Born at Sarzana in northwestern Italy, the son of a physician, and orphaned at an early age, he studied at the ...
Nogarola, Isotta
(1418-1488)    One of the earliest female hu-manists. The daughters of a noble family of Verona, she and her sister Ginevra were given a humanistic education on orders of ...
Nostradamus
(Michel de Notredame, 1503-1566)    French physician and prophet. After the death of his wife and children from plague, he spent many years as an itinerant plague doctor. Like ...
Núñez de Toledo y Guzman, Hernán
(ca. 1475-1553)    Spanish classical scholar, born at Toledo and often known as Pin-ciano or Pintianus, a name derived from the Latin name for Toledo. The son of an official at ...
Nuremberg Chronicle
   A history of the world from the Cre-ation to the end of the 15th centry, compiled by Hartmann Schedel, a physician and collector of books. It was published in both a Latin ...
Occultism
   See Astrology; Magic
Ockeghem, Johannes
(ca. 1421-1497)    Flemish composer, born in the county of Hainaut. Nothing is known of his musical edu-cation, though he may have been a pupil of Gilles de Binchois, in which ...


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