Слова на букву cele-cont (29) Historical Dictionary of Renaissance
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Слова на букву cele-cont (29)

Celestina
   See Rojas, Fernando de.
Celtis, Conrad
(1459-1508)    German humanist and Latin poet. Born near Würzburg to a peasant family, he acquired a university education despite his poverty, receiving a B.A. degree at ...
Cereta, Laura
(1469-1499)    One of the rare female humanists and authors of Renaissance Italy. She was born to a prominent family of Brescia and educated at home and in a convent school. As ...
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel de
(1547-1616)    With the possible exception of the dramatist Lope de Vega, Cervantes was the greatest literary figure of the Golden Age of Spanish literature. He is world ...
Cesalpino, Andrea
(1525-1603)    Italian physician and botanist, born at Arezzo and educated at Pisa, where he studied both anatomy and botany. In 1565 he became director of the botanical garden ...
Chambers of Rhetoric
   Literary societies formed in many cities of France and the Netherlands in the 15th and 16th centuries by middle-class citizens who wanted to encourage the growth of poetry ...
Chapman, George
(1560-1634)    English poet, dramatist, and translator. His comedies All Fools (1605) and The Widow's Tears (1612) were successful on the London stage, and his classical ...
Chaucer, Geoffrey
(ca. 1340-1400)    The greatest poet of medieval English literature, and the first widely influential poet since Anglo-Saxon times to write mainly in English rather than ...
Cheke, John
(1514-1557)    English humanist and teacher. One of the most brilliant of the Cambridge scholars who fostered the study of Greek, Cheke became the first regius professor of ...
Christian Humanism
   See Humanism.
Christine de Pizan
(1364-1430)    French author. Although born in Venice, Christine moved to France as a child when her father became court astrologer and medical adviser to King Charles V. ...
Christus, Petrus
(ca. 1410-ca. 1472)    Flemish painter, a disciple of Jan van Eyck, some of whose unfinished works he may have completed. His paintings demonstrate some of the earliest ...
Chrysoloras, Manuel
(ca. 1350-1415)    Greek-born scholar, teacher, and diplomat, important in the history of the Renaissance as the first teacher to make a group of Western pupils sufficiently ...
Ciceronianism
   The tendency of Renaissance humanists to define Cicero (106^43 B.C.) as the sole model for good Latin style. Marcus Tullius Cicero was the most influential ancient Roman ...
Ciompi
   Florentine term for unskilled wool-carders employed in the woollen industry, one of the lowest-ranking social and economic groups. Their violent rebellion in 1378 was a ...
City-State
   See Commune.
Civic Humanism
   See Bruni, Leonardo; Commune; Humanism.
Classics
   Some familiarity with the literary works of ancient Rome continued from late antiquity throughout the Middle Ages, but even well-educated medieval scholars were familiar ...
Clement VII, Pope
(Giulio de'Medici, 1478-1534)    Elected pope in 1523. An illegitimate and posthumous son of the murdered Giuliano de'Medici, Giulio was brought up with the sons of his uncle ...
Colet, John
(1467-1519)    English humanist and reformminded clergyman. He was an outspoken (but strictly Catholic) critic of the worldliness and neglect of duty typical of many English ...
Collège Royal
   The present-day Collège de France has long regarded itself as the descendant of the pre-revolutionary Collège Royal and traces its foundation back to a group of lecturers ...
Colonna, Francesco
(ca. 1433-1527)    Italian writer and Dominican friar, educated in Dominican schools and at the University of Padua. The work for which he is remembered, Hypnerotomachia ...
Colonna, Vittoria
(ca. 1492-1547)    Italian poet, born into one of the most ancient and powerful noble families of Rome. She married the marquis of Pescara, ruler of a small principality, and ...
Columbus, Christopher
(in Italian, Cristoforo Colombo; in Spanish, Cristobal Colón; 1451-1506)    Italian-born Spanish navigator, explorer, and colonial administrator, conventionally recognized as ...
Commune
   Italian term for the self-governing city-states of late-medieval and early Renaissance Italy. The commune originated as a spontaneous organization of the citizens of an ...
Complutensian Polyglot Bible
   A six-volume, multilingual edition of both the Old and New Testaments, edited by a group of Spanish scholars working at the new University of Alcalá (in Latin, Complutum) ...
Conciliarism
   The theory that a general council (rather than the pope) is the supreme and ultimate authority in the Christian church. This theory was rooted in the practice of the early ...
Condottieri
   Italian term for the mercenary captains who during the later Middle Ages and the Renaissance provided most of the armed forces of the Italian states. The term is derived ...
Contrapposto
   Italian term for a technique developed by ancient Greek sculptors to represent the human figure standing at ease in a relaxed and natural stance. It was based on an ...


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