Слова на букву flor-giol (29) Historical Dictionary of Renaissance
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Слова на букву flor-giol (29)

Florence
   Principal city of the Italian region of Tuscany, located on the Arno River. Although other cities of northern and central Italy also played an important role in the ...
Florio, John
(ca. 1553-1625)    English author and teacher, best known for his Italian-English dictionary, A World of Words (1598) and for his translations, notably the essays of Michel de ...
Fontana, Lavinia
(1552-1614)    Italian painter, a native of Bologna and daughter of the painter Prospero Fontana. She has the largest extant body of work by any female artist active before ...
Fonte, Moderata
   Pseudonym; see Pozzo, Modesta.
Fra Angélico
(Guido di Pietry, ca. 1400-1455)    Italian Dominican friar and artist, known especially for the frescoes he painted in 1437-1452 for the monastery of San Marco in Florence; ...
Francis I
(1494-1547)    King of France from 1515. His reign is associated with the flowering of Renaissance culture in France. Born to the duke of Angoulême and his wife Louise of ...
Franco, Veronica
(1546-1591)    Venetian courtesan and poet, the daughter of a procuress and a merchant. Because of her father's ancestry, she had a certain degree of social standing and ...
Frequens
   Decree enacted by the Council of Constance in 1417, requiring the pope to convene another general council within five years, a second one seven years after the first, and ...
Froben, Johann
(1460-1527)    Basel printer, head of the greatest northern Renaissance publishing and printing firm of the early 16th century, which continued under the direction of his ...
Fugger Family
   Mercantile and banking family of Augsburg, noted for their role in financing European governments but also as patrons of art and scholarship. Their rise began in the 14th ...
Gabrieli Family
   Prominent musicians of Venice, closely connected with the basilica of St. Mark and distinguished as performers, composers, and teachers. Andrea Gabrieli (ca. 1520-1586) may ...
Gafori, Franchino
(1451-1522)    Italian priest and composer, influential for his writings on musical theory. His Practica musicae (1496) describes current rules for composing and provides ...
Galilei, Galileo
(1564-1642)    Italian mathematician, astronomer, and physicist, one of the principal figures in the 17th-century reconstruction of physical science. His writings and his work ...
Galilei, Vincenzo
(ca. 1520-1591)    Though most famous as the father of the astronomer and physicist Galileo Galilei, Vincenzo was also a prominent musician, active mainly in Florence and ...
Gallicanism
   A set of beliefs and practices in the French Catholic Church that conceived the church in France as an autonomous, self-governing branch of the universal church. It ...
Gama, Vasco da
(ca. 1469-1524)    Portuguese explorer, the commander chosen to lead the expedition of 1497-1499 that reached the port of Calicut in India in May 1498 and thus completed ...
Gansfort, Wessel
(ca. 1419-1489)    Dutch humanist and theologian, closely linked to the spiritual movement known as Devotio Moderna. A native of Groningen, about 1432 he went to Zwolle, where ...
Garcilaso de la Vega
(ca. 1501-1536)    Spanish poet and soldier. His literary output was modest in quantity but decisive in establishing an Italianate poetic style modelled on Petrarch as the ...
Gaza, Theodore of
(ca. 1415-ca. 1476)    Greek humanist and author. Born and educated at Constantinople, Gaza favored the union of the Latin and Greek churches negotiated at the Council of ...
Genevan Academy
   School founded by the city of Geneva in 1559 at the urging of the city's religious leader, John Calvin, who had been a young humanist before his conversion to Protestantism ...
Gentile da Fabriano
(ca. 1370-1427)    Italian painter, generally regarded as the greatest Italian painter of the late-medieval style known as International Gothic. He worked mainly in Venice but ...
Gentileschi, Artemisia
(1593-1652/3)    One of the first female painters since ancient times to attain recognition as an important artist. She was the daughter of a pupil of the artist Caravaggio ...
George of Trebizond
(1396-ca. 1472; Latin name, Trapezuntius)    Humanist and philosopher, born on the island of Crete. He settled in Venice in 1416 and initially worked as a Greek scribe. His ...
Gesner, Conrad
(1516-1565)    Swiss scholar who specialized in natural philosophy. Born in Zurich, a godson of the Reformer Huldrych Zwingli, he studied theology there and Hebrew at ...
Ghibellines / Guelfs
   Party names of the two rival factions that arose in many Italian communes during the wars of the 12th and 13th centuries between the German emperors and the popes. The ...
Ghiberti, Lorenzo
(1378-1455)    Florentine goldsmith and sculptor, known in his own time for his skill in casting bronze statues. His workshop trained a number of leading younger artists, ...
Gibbons, Orlando
(1583-1625)    English composer and keyboard artist. Born at Oxford into a family of musicians and reared in Cambridge, where he took a baccalaureate in music in 1606, he ...
Gilbert, William
(1540-1603)    English scientist, best known for his study of magnetism. In his principal work, De magnete / On the Magnet (1600), he contended that the earth itself is a great ...
Giolito Press
   Venetian publishing firm of the 16th century, active from 1536 to 1606, founded by Giovanni Giolito (d. 1540). Especially in the time of its second director, Gabriele, the ...


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