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Слова на букву metr-noe (2629)

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mogiarthria
Speech defect due to muscular incoordination. [G. mogis, with difficulty, + arthroo, to articulate]
mogilalia
Stuttering, stammering, or any speech defect. SYN: molilalia. [G. mogis, with difficulty, + lalia, speech]
mogiphonia
Laryngeal spasm occurring in public speakers as a result of overuse of the voice. [G. mogis, with difficulty, + phone, voice]
Mohrenheim
Joseph J. Freiherr von, Austrian-Russian surgeon, 1755–1799. See M. fossa, M. space.
Mohs
Frederic E., U.S. surgeon, *1910, who as a medical student devised a system of microscopicaly controlled removal of skin tumors. See M. fresh tissue chemosurgery technique, M. ...
Mohs surgery
A special type of surgery used for the treatment of skin cancer, especially basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma of the skin. The purpose of Mohs surgery is to remove all of the ...
moiety
1. Originally, a half; now, loosely, a portion of something. 2. Functional group. [M.E. moite, a half]
Moisturize
To dampen; to replenish lost liquid; to add vapor; to humidify. "Moisturize" usually suggests that the thing receiving liquid is made slightly wet, but is not saturated. ...
mol
Abbreviation for mole (4).
mol wt
Abbreviation for molecular weight.
molal
Denoting 1 mol of solute dissolved in 1000 g of solvent; such solutions provide a definite ratio of solute to solvent molecules. Cf.:molar (4).
molality
Moles of solute per kilogram of solvent; the molarity is equal to mρ/(1 + mM), where m is the m., ρ is the density of the solution, and M is the molar mass of the solute. ...
Molar
In dentistry, a molar is one of the posterior teeth well adapted to grinding, in keeping with its origin from the Latin mola meaning millstone. * * * 1. Denoting a grinding, ...
molariform
Having the form of a molar tooth. [molar (tooth) + L. forma, form]
molarity
Moles per liter of solution (mol/L). Cf.:molality.
Mold
A large group of fungi (like Penicillium) that cause mold (as on bread or cheese). A common trigger for allergies. * * * 1. A filamentous fungus, generally a circular colony ...
molding
Shaping by means of a mold. - border m. the shaping of an impression material by the manipulation or action of the tissues adjacent to the borders of an impression. SYN: ...
Mole
: 1. A pigmented spot on the skin (nevus). 2. A mass within the uterus (womb) formed by partly developed products of conception. * * * 1. SYN: nevus (2). 2. SYN: nevus ...
molecular
Relating to molecules.
molecularity
The number of reactants in an elementary reaction. For example, a reaction involving one reactant is unimolecular; reactions involving two compounds are bimolecular. M. and ...
Molecule
The smallest unit of a substance that can exist alone and retain the character of that substance. * * * The smallest possible quantity of a di-, tri-, or polyatomic substance ...
Molecules, recombinant DNA
A combination of DNA molecules of different origin that are joined using recombinant DNA technology.
molilalia
SYN: mogilalia. [G. molis, with difficulty (a later form of mogis), + lalia, talking]
molimina
menstrual m. SYN: premenstrual syndrome.
molindone hydrochloride
An antipsychotic.
Molisch
Hans, Austrian chemist, 1856–1937. See M. test.
Moll
Jacob A., Dutch oculist, 1832–1914. See M. glands, under gland.
Mollaret meningitis
Benign recurrent aseptic meningitis. The cause of Mollaret meningitis is not known. Mollaret meningitis is distinguished from viral meningitis by its recurrent character with ...
mollities
1. Characterized by a soft consistency. 2. SYN: malacia. [L. mollis, soft]
mollusc
SYN: mollusk.
Mollusca
A phylum of the subkingdom Metazoa with soft, unsegmented bodies, consisting of an anterior head, a dorsal visceral mass and a ventral foot. Most forms are enclosed in a ...
Molluscipoxvirus
A genus in the family Poxviridae; causes localized wartlike skin lesions. SYN: molluscum contagiosum.
molluscum
A disease marked by the occurrence of soft rounded tumors of the skin. [L. molluscus, soft] - m. contagiosum SYN: Molluscipoxvirus.
Molluscum contagiosum
A contagious disease of the skin marked by the occurrence of rounded soft tumors of the skin caused by the growth of a virus (one that belongs to the virus family called the ...
mollusk
Common name for members of the phylum Mollusca, although usually restricted to the gastropods and bivalves. SYN: mollusc.
Moloney
John B., 20th century U.S. oncologist. See M. virus. Paul J., Canadian physician, 1870–1939. See M. test.
Moloy
Howard C., U.S. obstetrician, 1903–1953. See Caldwell-M. classification.
molt
To cast off feathers, hair, or cuticle; to undergo ecdysis. SEE ALSO: desquamate. SYN: moult. [L. muto, to change]
molybdate
A salt of molybdic acid.
molybdenic, molybdenous
Relating to molybdenum.
molybdenum
A silvery white metallic element, atomic no. 42, atomic wt. 95.94; a bioelement found in a number of proteins ( e.g., xanthine oxidase). See m. target tube. [G. molybdaina, a ...
molybdenum-99
A reactor-produced radioisotope of molybdenum with a half-life of 2.7476 days, used in radionuclide generators for the production of technetium-99m.
molybdic
Denoting molybdenum in the 6+ state, as in MoO3.
molybdic acid
MoO3 H2O; a yellowish crystalline acid, forming molybdates; used in the determination of phosphorus or phosphate.
molybdoenzymes
Enzymes that require a molybdenum ion as a component ( E.G., xanthine oxidase).
molybdoflavoproteins
Proteins that require a molybdenum ion and a flavin nucleotide as a part of its naturally occurring structure ( e.g., aldehyde dehydrogenase).
molybdopterin
A pterin derivative that complexes with molybdenum to form the molybdenum cofactor required by several enzymes.
molybdous
Denoting molybdenum in the 4+ state, as in MoO2.
molysmophobia
Morbid fear of infection. [G. molysma, filth, infection, + phobos, fear]
moment
The product of a quantity times a distance. [L. momentum (for movimentum), motion, m., fr. moveo, to move] - dipole m. the product of one of the two charges of a dipole and the ...
momism
A term relating to excessive or overbearing mothering, especially as attributed to American cultural stereotypes.
mon-
See mono-.
monad
1. A univalent element or radical. 2. A unicellular organism. 3. In meiosis, the single chromosome derived from a tetrad after the first and second maturation divisions. [G. ...
Monakow
Constantin von, Swiss histologist, 1853–1930. See M. bundle, M. nucleus, M. syndrome, M. tract.
monamide
SYN: monoamide.
monamine
SYN: monoamine.
monaminuria
SYN: monoaminuria.
monangle
Having only one angle, denoting a dental instrument that has only one angle between the handle or shaft and the working portion (blade or nib).
monarda
The leaves of M. punctata (family Labiatae), American horsemint, a labiate plant of the U.S. east of the Mississippi; the main commercial source of natural thymol; used as a ...
monarthric
SYN: monarticular.
monarthritis
Arthritis of a single joint.
monarticular
Relating to a single joint. SYN: monarthric, uniarticular.
monaster
The single star figure at the end of prophase in mitosis. SYN: mother star. [mono- + G. aster, star]
monatomic
1. Relating to or containing a single atom. 2. SYN: monovalent (1).
monaural
Pertaining to one ear. [mono- + L. auris, ear]
monaxonic
1. Having but one axis, being therefore elongated and slender. 2. Having one axon. [mono- + G. axon, axle]
Mönckeberg
Johann G., German pathologist, 1877–1925. See M. arteriosclerosis, M. calcification, M. degeneration, M. sclerosis.
Mondini
C., Italian physician, 1729–1803. See M. hearing impairment, M. dysplasia.
Mondonesi
Filippo, Italian physician. See M. reflex.
Mondor
Henri, French surgeon, 1885–1962. See M. disease.
Monera
The prokaryotes, a kingdom of primitive microbial organisms characterized by having no defined nucleus or chromosomes; DNA that is not membrane-bound; and absence of centrioles, ...
moneran
A member of the prokaryote kingdom Monera.
monestrous
Having but one estrous cycle in a mating season.
Monge Medrano
Carlos, Peruvian professor of medicine and high altitude specialist, 1884–1970. See Monge disease.
mongolian
1. Relating to a member of the M. race. 2. Obsolete. Relating to Down syndrome (because of the Asian-appearing facies).
Mongolism
Obsolete name for Down syndrome. Down syndrome refers to the 19th century English physician J. Langdon Down who described the condition in 1866. In great error, Langdon Down ...
monilethrix
An autosomal dominant trichodystrophy in which brittle hairs show a series of constrictions, usually without a medulla. SYN: beaded hair, moniliform hair. [L. monile, ...
Monilia
Generic term for a group of fungi that are commonly known as fruit molds; the sexual state is Neurospora. A few closely related pathogenic organisms formerly classified in this ...
Moniliaceae
A family of Fungi Imperfecti (order Moniliales) which includes Sporothrix schenckii, the causative agent of sporotrichosis.
monilial
Precisely, pertaining to the Monilia, but, in medicine, frequently used incorrectly with reference to the genus Candida.
moniliasis
SYN: candidiasis.
Moniliasis, oral
Yeast infection of the mouth and throat caused by a fungus formerly called Monilia, now known as Candida albicans. This infection is also known as thrush. Yeast organisms are ...
moniliform
Shaped like a string of beads or beaded necklace. [L. monile, necklace, + forma, appearance]
Moniliformis
A genus of the class (or phylum) Acanthocephala, the thorny-headed worms. M. dubius, the common spiny-headed worm of house rats, is transmitted by infected cockroaches, ...
monism
A metaphysical system in which all of reality is conceived as a unified whole. [G. monos, single]
monistic
Pertaining to monism.
monitor
A device that displays and/or records specified data for a given series of events, operations, or circumstances. [L., one who warns, fr. moneo, pp. monitum, to warn] - cardiac m. ...
Monitor, Holter
A type of portable heart monitor. The Holter monitor is a small portable electrocardiogram (ECG) device worn in a pouch around the neck or waist. It keeps a record of the ...
monitoring
1. Performance and analysis of routine measurements aimed at detecting a change in the environment or health status of a population. 2. Ongoing measurement of performance of a ...
monkey-paw
SYN: ape hand.
Monkeypox
A viral disease similar to smallpox. Smallpox no longer occurs following its worldwide eradication in 1980, whereas monkeypox is still seen as a sporadic disease in parts of ...
monkshood
See aconite.
mono-, mon-
The participation or involvement of a single element or part. Cf.:uni-. [G. monos, single]
monoacylglycerol
Glycerol with an acyl moiety esterified to position 1 ( i.e., 1-m.) or position 2 ( i.e., 2-m.); an intermediate in the degradation and synthesis of lipids; 2 monoacylglycerols ...
monoamelia
Absence of one limb.
monoamide
A molecule containing one amide group. SYN: monamide.
monoamine
A molecule containing one amine group. SYN: monamine.
monoamine oxidase
SYN: amine oxidase (flavin-containing).
Monoamine oxidase inhibitor
One of a potent class of medications used to treat depression. Abbreviated MAOI.
monoaminergic
Referring to nerve cells or fibers that transmit nervous impulses by the medium of a catecholamine or indolamine. [ monoamine + G. ergon, work]
monoaminuria
The excretion of any monoamine in the urine. SYN: monaminuria.
monoamniotic
Denoting two or more progeny of a multiple pregnancy that have shared a common amniotic sac.
Monoarticular
Involving just one joint. As opposed to polyarticular (affecting many joints). From the Latin "articulus," meaning a joint.
monoassociated
Denoting a germ-free organism that becomes colonized by a single microbial species.
monoauxotroph
A mutant microorganism that requires a particular nutrient that is not required by the wild-type organism. Cf.:auxotroph, polyauxotroph.
monobactam
A class of antibiotic that has a monocyclic β-lactam nucleus and is structurally different from other β-lactams; e.g., aztreonam.
monobasic
Denoting an acid with only one replaceable hydrogen atom, or only one replaced hydrogen atom.
monobenzone
A melanin-pigment inhibiting agent; used topically for the treatment of hyperpigmentation caused by formation of melanin.
monoblast
An immature cell that develops into a monocyte. [mono- + G. blastos, germ]
monobrachius
The condition of being one-armed. [mono- + G. brachion, arm]
monobromated, monobrominated
Denoting a chemical compound with one atom of bromine per molecule.
monocardian
Having a heart with a single atrium and ventricle.
monocephalus
SYN: syncephalus.
monochlorphenamide
SYN: clofenamide.
monochorial
SYN: monochorionic.
monochorionic
Relating to or having a single chorion; denoting monovular twins. SYN: monochorial.
monochroic
SYN: monochromatic.
monochromasia
SYN: achromatopsia.
monochromasy
SYN: achromatopsia.
Monochromat
A person with one of the many forms of colorblindness.
monochromatic
1. Having but one color. 2. Indicating a light of a single wavelength. 3. Relating to or characterized by monochromatism. SYN: monochroic, monochromic.
Monochromatism
1) Total inability to perceive color. A person with true monochromatism perceives only black, white, and shades of gray. It is due to lack of or damage to the cones of the eye ...
monochromatophil, monochromatophile
1. Taking only one stain. 2. A cell or any histologic element staining with only one kind of dye. SYN: monochromophil, monochromophile. [mono- + G. chroma, color, + philos, fond]
monochromator
A prism or diffraction grating used in spectrophotometry to isolate a narrow spectral range.
monochromic
SYN: monochromatic.
monochromophil, monochromophile
SYN: monochromatophil.
monocistronic
Referring to fully processed mRNA that codes for a single protein.
monocle
A lens used for one eye, usually in the correction of presbyopia.
monoclinic
Relating to crystals with a single oblique inclination. [mono- + G. klino, to incline]
Monoclonal
Pertaining to a single clone of cells, a single cell and the progeny of that cell. As opposed to polyclonal. A monoclonal tumor is one that is derived from a single cell and ...
Monoclonal antibody
An antibody produced by a single clone of cells (specifically, a single clone of hybridoma cells) and therefore a single pure homogeneous type of antibody. Monoclonal ...
monocranius
SYN: syncephalus. [mono- + G. kranion, cranium]
monocrotic
Denoting a pulse the curve of which presents no notch or subsidiary wave in its descending line. [mono- + G. krotos, a beat]
monocrotism
The state in which the pulse is monocrotic. [mono- + G. krotos, a beat]
monocular
Relating to, affecting, or visible by one eye only. [mono- + L. oculus, eye]
monoculus
1. SYN: cyclops. 2. A bandage applied to one eye only. [L. a one-eyed man, a hybrid word fr. G. monos, single, + L. oculus, eye]
Monocyte
A white blood cell that has a single nucleus and can ingest (take in) foreign material. (In other words, a monocyte is thus a mononuclear phagocyte that circulates in the ...
monocytopenia
Diminution in the number of monocytes in the circulating blood. SYN: monocytic leukopenia, monopenia. [mono- + G. kytos, cell, + penia, poverty]
monocytosis
An abnormal increase in the number of monocytes in the circulating blood. SYN: monocytic leukocytosis.
Monod
Jacques L., French biochemist and Nobel laureate, 1910–1976. See M.-Wyman-Changeux model.
monodactyly, monodactylism
The presence of a single finger on the hand, or a single toe on the foot. [mono- + G. daktylos, digit]
monodisperse
Of relatively uniform size; said of aerosol suspensions with size variation of less than ±20%.
monoethanolamine
A surfactant; the oleate is used as a sclerosing agent in the treatment of varicose veins.
monogametic
SYN: homogametic.
monogamy
The marriage or mating system in which each partner has but one mate. [mono- + G. gamos, marriage]
monogenesis
1. The production of similar organisms in each generation. 2. The production of young by one parent only, as in nonsexual generation and parthenogenesis. 3. The process of ...
monogenetic
Relating to monogenesis. SYN: monoxenous.
monogenic
Relating to a hereditary disease or syndrome, or to an inherited characteristic, controlled by alleles at a single genetic locus.
monogenous
Asexually produced, as by fission, gemmation, or sporulation.
monogerminal
SYN: unigerminal.
monoglyceride
SYN: monoacylglycerol.
monograph
A treatise on a particular subject or specific aspect of a subject. [mono- + G. graphe, a writing]
monohydrated
Containing or united with a single molecule of water per molecule of substance.
monohydric
Having but one hydrogen atom in the molecule.
monohydroxysuccinic acid
SYN: malic acid.
monoideism
A marked preoccupation with one idea or subject; a slight degree of monomania. [mono- + G. idea, form, idea]
monoinfection
Simple infection with a single variety of microorganism.
monoiodotyrosine
An intermediate in thyroid hormone synthesis.
monoisonitrosoacetone
SYN: isonitrosoacetone.
monokine
Cytokines secreted by both monocytes and macrophages. These substances influence the activity of other cells. See cytokine. [ monocyte + G. kineo, to set in motion]
monolayers
1. Films, one molecule thick, formed on water by certain substances, such as proteins and fatty acid s, characterized by molecules containing some atom groupings that are soluble ...
monolocular
Having one cavity or chamber. SYN: unicameral, unicamerate. [mono- + L. loculus, a small place]
monomania
An obsession or abnormally extreme enthusiasm for a single idea or subject; a psychosis marked by the limitation of the symptoms rather strictly to a certain group, as the ...
monomaniac
1. One exhibiting monomania. 2. Characterized by or relating to monomania.
monomastigote
A mastigote having only one flagellum. [mono- + Roman mastix, a whip]
monomelic
Relating to one limb. [mono- + G. melos, limb]
monomer
1. The molecular unit that, by repetition, constitutes a large structure or polymer; e.g., ethylene, H2C=CH2, is the m. of polyethylene, H(CH2)nH. SEE ALSO: subunit (1). 2. The ...
monomeric
1. Consisting of a single component. 2. In genetics, relating to a hereditary disease or characteristic controlled by genes at a single locus. 3. Consisting of monomers. [mono- + ...
monometallic
Containing one atom of a metal per molecule.
monomicrobic
Denoting a monoinfection.
monomolecular
1. SYN: unimolecular. 2. Relating to a singular molecular entity.
monomorphic
Of one shape; unchangeable in shape. [mono- + G. morphe, shape]
monomphalus
SYN: omphalopagus. [mono- + G. omphalos, umbilicus]
monomyoplegia
Paralysis limited to one muscle. [mono- + G. mys, muscle, + plege, a stroke]
monomyositis
Inflammation of a single muscle.
mononeme
An unpaired helix of nucleic acid, as occurs in a chromatid.
mononeural, mononeuric
1. Having only one neuron. 2. Supplied by a single nerve.
Mononeuritis
Inflammation of a single nerve. There are many causes of mononeuritis including diabetes mellitus, carpal tunnel syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, and Lyme disease. The treatment ...
Mononeuritis multiplex
Inflammation of two or more nerves, typically in unrelated portions of the body. Mononeuritis multiplex causes a loss of function of the muscle tissue that is innervated by the ...
mononeuropathy
Disorder involving a single nerve. - m. multiplex nontraumatic involvement of two or more portions of the peripheral nervous system ( e.g., roots, plexus elements, nerve trunks), ...
mononuclear
Having only one nucleus; used especially in reference to blood cells.
Mononucleosis
Infection with the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, human herpesvirus 4, HHV-4) in which there is an increase of white blood cells that have a single nucleus (monocytes). The infection ...
mononucleotide
SYN: nucleotide.
monooctanoin
A semisynthetic esterified glycerol used as a solubilizing agent for radiolucent gallstones retained in the biliary tract following cholecystectomy.
monooxygenases
Oxidoreductases that induce the incorporation of one atom of oxygen from O2 into the substance being oxidized.
monoparesis
Paresis affecting a single extremity or part of an extremity.
monoparesthesia
Paresthesia affecting a single region only.
monopathic
Relating to a monopathy.
monopathy
1. A single uncomplicated disease. 2. A local disease affecting only one organ or part. [mono- + G. pathos, suffering]
monopenia
SYN: monocytopenia.
monophagism
Habitual eating of but one kind of food or but one meal a day when the latter is clearly an aberration. [mono- + G. phago, to eat]
monophasia
Inability to speak other than a single word or sentence. [mono- + G. phasis, speech]
monophasic
1. Marked by monophasia. 2. Occurring in or characterized by only one phase or stage. 3. Fluctuating from the baseline in one direction only.
monophenol monooxygenase
1. A copper-containing oxidoreductase that catalyzes the oxidation of o-diphenols to o-quinones by O2, with the incorporation of one of the two oxygen atoms in the product; it ...
monophenol oxidase
SYN: monophenol monooxygenase (1).
monophobia
Morbid fear of solitude or of being left alone. [mono- + G. phobos, fear]
monophthalmos
Failure of outgrowth of a primary optic vesicle with absence of ocular tissues; the remaining eye is often maldeveloped. [mono- + G. ophthalmos, eye]
monophthalmus
SYN: cyclops. [mono- + G. ophthalmos, eye]
monophyletic
1. Having a single cell type of origin; derived from one line of descent, in contrast to polyphyletic. 2. In hematology, relating to monophyletism. [mono- + G. phyle, tribe] ...
monophyletism
In hematology, the theory that all the blood cells are derived from one common stem cell or histioblast. SYN: monophyletic theory. [mono- + G. phyle, tribe]
monophyodont
Having one set of teeth only; without deciduous dentition. [mono- + G. phyo, to grow, + odous (odont-), tooth]
monoplasmatic
Formed of but one tissue. [mono- + G. plasma, thing formed]
monoplast
A unicellular organism that retains the same structure or form throughout its existence. [mono- + G. plastos, formed]
monoplastic
Undergoing no change in structure; relating to a monoplast.
monoplegia
Paralysis of one limb. [mono- + G. plege, a stroke] - m. masticatoria unilateral paralysis of the muscles of mastication ( masseter, temporal, pterygoid).
monoploid
SYN: haploid. [mono- + G. ploides, in form]
monopodia
Malformation in which only one foot is externally recognizable. [mono- + G. pous, foot]
monops
SYN: cyclops. [mono- + G. ops, eye]
monoptychial
Arranged in a single but folded layer, as the cells in the epithelium of the gallbladder or certain glands. [mono- + G. ptyche, fold]
monorchia
SYN: monorchism.
monorchidic, monorchid
1. Having only one testis. 2. Having apparently only one testis, the other being undescended.
monorchidism
SYN: monorchism.
monorchism
A condition in which only one testis is apparent, the other being absent or undescended. SYN: monorchia, monorchidism. [mono- + G. orchis, testis]
monorecidive
Denoting a late or tertiary manifestation of syphilis which takes the form of an ulcerated papule located at the site of the original chancre. [mono- + L. recidivus, relapsing] ...
monorhinic
Single-nosed; used to characterize conjoined twins in which only a single nose cavity is evident. [mono- + G. rhis (rhin-), nose]
monosaccharide
A carbohydrate that cannot form any simpler sugar by simple hydrolysis; e.g., pentoses, hexoses. SYN: monose.
monoscelous
Having only one leg. [mono- + G. skelos, leg]
monoscenism
Morbid concentration on some past experience. [mono- + G. skene, tent (stage drop)]
monose
SYN: monosaccharide.
monosodium glutamate
The monosodium salt of the naturally occurring l form of glutamic acid; used as a flavor enhancer that is a cause or contributing factor to “Chinese restaurant” syndrome; ...
monosome
1. SYN: accessory chromosome. 2. Obsolete term for ribosome. 3. A structure consisting of a single ribosome bound to a molecule of mRNA. [mono- + chromosome]
monosomia
In conjoined twins, a condition in which there are two heads and a single trunk. See conjoined twins, under twin. [mono- + G. soma, body]
monosomic
Relating to monosomy.
monosomous
Characterized by or pertaining to monosomia.
Monosomy
Missing one chromosome from a pair. For example, if a female has one X chromosome (X monosomy) rather than two, Turner syndrome is the result. * * * Absence of one chromosome of ...
monospermy
Fertilization by the entrance of only one spermatozoon into the egg. [mono- + G. sperma, seed]
Monosporium apiospermum
Former name for Scedosporium apiospermum. Telemorph is Pseudallescheria boydii.
Monostoma
Archaic name for a genus of trematodes, based on the presence of a single sucker. [mono- + G. stoma, mouth]
monostome
Common name for digenetic trematodes that possess a single sucker, oral or ventral, rather than both. SEE ALSO: Monostoma. [mono- + G. stoma, mouth]
monostotic
Involving only one bone. [mono- + G. osteon, bone]
monostratal
Composed of a single layer. [mono- + L. stratum, layer]
monosubstituted
In chemistry, denoting an element or radical, only one atom or unit of which is found in each molecule of a substitution compound.
monosymptomatic
Denoting a disease or morbid condition manifested by only one marked symptom.
monosynaptic
Referring to direct neural connections (those not involving an internuncial neuron); e.g., the direct connection between primary sensory nerve cells and motor neurons ...
monosyphilide
Marked by the occurrence of a single syphilitic lesion.
monoterpenes
Hydrocarbons or their derivatives formed by the condensation of two isoprene units, and therefore containing 10 carbon atoms; e.g., camphor; often containing a cyclic structure. ...
monothermia
Evenness of bodily temperature; absence of an evening rise in body temperature. [mono- + G. therme, heat]
monothioglycerol
Used to promote wound healing. SYN: thioglycerol.
monotocous
Producing a single offspring at a birth. [mono- + G. tokos, birth]
Monotremata
An order of egg-laying mammals that have a cloaca or common chamber that receives digestive, urinary, and reproductive products; only Australia has such forms, the duck-billed ...
monotreme
A member of the order Monotremata.
monotrichate
SYN: monotrichous.
monotrichous
Denoting a microorganism possessing a single flagellum or cilium. SYN: monotrichate, uniflagellate.
monovalence, monovalency
A combining power (valence) equal to that of a hydrogen atom. SYN: univalence, univalency.
monovalent
1. Having the combining power (valence) of a hydrogen atom. SYN: monatomic (2), univalent. 2. Pertaining to a m. (specific) antiserum to a single antigen or organism.
monoxenous
SYN: monogenetic. [mono- + G. xenos, stranger]
monoxide
Any oxide having only one atom of oxygen; e.g., CO.
monozoic
Unisegmented, as in cestodarian tapeworms. See polyzoic.
monozygotic, monozygous
SYN: unigerminal. See m. twins, under twin. [mono- + G. zygotos, yoked]
Monozygous twin
Identical twins that originate from a single fertilized egg (a zygote).
Monro
Alexander Sr., Scottish anatomist and surgeon, 1697–1767. See bursa of M.. Alexander, Jr., Scottish anatomist, 1733–1817. See M. doctrine, M. foramen, M. line, M. sulcus, ...
mons
An anatomical prominence or slight elevation above the general level of the surface. [L. a mountain] - m. pubis [TA] the prominence caused by a pad of fatty tissue over the ...
Monson
George S., U.S. dentist, 1869–1933. See M. curve, anti- M. curve.
monster
Outmoded term for a malformed embryo, fetus, or individual. See entries beginning with terato-. See teras. [L. monstrum, an evil omen, a prodigy, a wonder]
montanic acid
SYN: octacosanoic acid. [montan (wax)]
Monteggia
Giovanni B., Italian surgeon, 1762–1815. See M. fracture.
montelukast sodium
A competitive and selective Cys-LT1-receptor antagonist that acts as a blocker of leukotrienes, which are potent endogenous bronchoconstrictors. A prophylactic; not useful to ...
Montgomery
William F., Irish obstetrician, 1797–1859. See M. follicles, under follicle, M. glands, under gland, M. tubercles, under tubercle.
monticulus
1. Any slight rounded projection above a surface. 2. The central portion of the superior vermis forming a projection on the surface of the cerebellum; its anterior and most ...
mood
The pervasive feeling, tone, and internal emotional state of an individual which, when impaired, can markedly influence virtually all aspects of a person's behavior or his or her ...
mood swing
Oscillation of a person's emotional feeling tone between periods of euphoria and depression.
Moon
Henry, English surgeon, 1845–1892. See M. molars, under molar. Robert C., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1844–1914. See Laurence-M. syndrome.
Moore
Charles H., English surgeon, 1821–1870. See M. method. Robert Foster, British ophthalmologist, 1878–1963. See M. lightning streaks, under streak.
Mooren
Albert, German ophthalmologist, 1828–1899. See M. ulcer.
Mooser
Hermann, Swiss pathologist in Mexico, 1891–1971. See M. bodies, under body.

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