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Omniscience
All knowledge. Infinite awareness, understanding, and insight. Someone who (supposedly) possesses omniscience is omniscient. From the Latin "omni-" (all) + "scire" (to know) = to ...
omnivorous
Living on food of all kinds, upon both animal and vegetable food. [L. omnis, all, + voro, to eat]
omo-
The shoulder (sometimes including the upper arm). [G. omos, shoulder]
omoclavicular
Relating to the shoulder and the clavicle; denoting an anomalous muscle attached to the coracoid process or upper edge of the scapula and to the clavicle.
omohyoid
SYN: o. (muscle).
omophagia
The eating of raw food, especially of raw flesh. [G. omos, raw, + phago, to eat]
omothyroid
Denoting a band of muscular fibers passing between the superior cornu of the thyroid cartilage and the omohyoid muscle.
OMP
Abbreviation for oligo-N-methylmorpholinium propylene oxide; orotidylic acid; orotidylate; orotidine 5′-monophosphate.
OMP decarboxylase
SYN: orotidylic acid decarboxylase.
OMP pyrophosphorylase
SYN: orotate phosphoribosyltransferase.
OMPA
Abbreviation for octamethyl pyrophosphoramide.
omphal-, omphalo-
The umbilicus, the navel. [G. omphalos, navel (umbilicus)]
omphalectomy
Excision of the umbilicus or of a neoplasm connected with it. [omphal- + G. ektome, excision]
omphalelcosis
Ulceration at the umbilicus. [omphal- + G. helkosis, ulceration]
omphalic
SYN: umbilical. [G. omphalos, umbilicus]
omphalitis
Inflammation of the umbilicus and surrounding parts.
omphalo-
See omphal-.
Omphalo- (combining form)
Omphalo- is a combining form that indicates a relationship to the umbilicus (the navel). For example, "omphal-" combined with "-itis" = omphalitis, inflammation of the ...
omphaloangiopagus
Unequal conjoined twins in which the parasite derives its blood supply from the placenta of the autosite. See conjoined twins, under twin. SYN: allantoidoangiopagus. [ omphalo- ...
Omphalocele
A congenital malformation (a birth defect) in which part of the intestine protrudes through a physical opening in the abdominal wall. The part of the intestine that sticks out is ...
omphaloenteric
Relating to the umbilicus and the intestine.
omphalomesenteric
1. Term denoting relationship of the midgut to the yolk sac. As the head and tail folds of the embryo continue to form, this relationship is diminished and is represented by a ...
omphalopagus
Conjoined twins united at their umbilical regions. See conjoined twins, under twin. SYN: monomphalus. [ omphalo- + G. pagos, something fixed]
omphalophlebitis
Inflammation of the umbilical veins. [ omphalo- + G. phleps, vein, + -itis, inflammation]
omphalorrhagia
Bleeding from the umbilicus. [ omphalo- + G. rhegnymi, to burst forth]
omphalorrhea
A serous discharge from the umbilicus. [ omphalo- + G. rhoia, flow]
omphalorrhexis
Rupture of the umbilical cord during childbirth. [ omphalo- + G. rhexis, rupture]
Omphalos
The omphalos (or omphalus) is also called the umbilicus or navel. "Omphalos" is the Greek word for the navel. The decorative boss protruding from the center of a Greek ...
omphalosite
Underdeveloped twin of allantoidangiopagous twin; joined by umbilical vessels. SYN: placental parasitic twin. [ omphalo- + G. sitos, food]
omphalospinous
Denoting a line connecting the umbilicus and the anterior superior spine of the ilium, on which lies the McBurney point.
omphalotomy
Cutting of the umbilical cord at birth. [ omphalo- + G. tome, incision]
omphalotripsy
Crushing, instead of cutting, the umbilical cord after childbirth. [ omphalo- + G. tripsis, a rubbing]
omphalovesical
SYN: vesicoumbilical.
omphalus
Rarely used term for umbilicus. [G. omphalos, navel]
OMS
Abbreviation for the Organisation Mondiale de la Sante, the French name for the World Health Organization (WHO), a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1948 ...
oncho-
See onco-.
Onchocerca
A genus of elongated filariform nematodes (family Onchocercidae) that inhabit the connective tissue of their hosts, usually within firm nodules in which these parasites are ...
Onchocerciasis
River blindness, a disease caused by a parasitic worm (Onchocerca volvulus) which is transmitted to persons by biting blackflies (buffalo gnats) that breed in fast-flowing ...
onchocercid
Common name for members of the family Onchocercidae.
Onchocercidae
A family of nematode parasites (superfamily Filarioidea) characterized by production of microfilariae; it includes the genera Onchocerca, Wuchereria, Brugia, Loa, and ...
onchocercoma
Nodule containing adult worms of Onchocera volvulus. [Onchocerca, taxonomic term, + -oma]
onchocercosis
SYN: onchocerciasis.
onco-, oncho-
A tumor. [G. onkos, bulk, mass]
Oncocerca
SYN: Onchocerca.
oncocyte
A large, granular, acidophilic tumor cell containing numerous mitochondria; a neoplastic oxyphil cell. [onco- + G. kytos, cell]
oncocytoma
A glandular tumor composed of large cells with cytoplasm that is granular and eosinophilic because of the presence of abundant mitochondria; occurs uncommonly in the kidney, ...
oncofetal
Relating to tumor-associated substances present in fetal tissue, as o. antigens.
oncogene
1. Any of a family of genes that normally encode proteins involved in cell growth or regulation (e.g., protein kinases, GTPases, nuclear proteins, growth factors) but that may ...
oncogenesis
Origin and growth of a neoplasm. [onco- + G. genesis, production]
oncogenic
SYN: oncogenous.
oncogenous
Causing, inducing, or being suitable for the formation and development of a neoplasm. SYN: oncogenic.
oncograph
A recording oncometer, or the recording portion of an oncometer. [onco- + G. graphe, a record]
oncography
Graphic representation, by means of a special apparatus, of the size and configuration of an organ.
oncoides
Intumescence or turgescence. [onco- + G. eidos, resemblance]
oncologist
A specialist in oncology. - radiation o. SYN: radiotherapist.
Oncology
: The field of medicine devoted to cancer. Literally, oncology means the study of tumors. The word comes from the Greek "o(n)glos" (a bulk or mass, or later, a tumor) + "logos" (a ...
oncolysis
Destruction of a neoplasm; sometimes used with reference to the reduction of any swelling or mass. [onco- + G. lysis, dissolution]
oncolytic
Pertaining to, characterized by, or causing oncolysis.
Oncomelania
A medically important genus of amphibious freshwater operculate snails of the family Hydrobiidae ( subfamily Hydrobiinae; subclass Prosobranchiata). In Asia, several subspecies ...
oncometer
1. An instrument for measuring the size and configuration of the kidneys and other organs. 2. The measuring, as distinguished from the recording part of the oncograph. [onco- + ...
oncometric
Relating to oncometry.
oncometry
Measurement of the size of an organ.
oncosis
A condition characterized by the formation of one or more neoplasms or tumors. [G. onkosis, swelling, fr. onkos, bulk, mass]
oncosphere
SYN: hexacanth. [onco- + G. sphaira, sphere]
oncostatin M
An interleukin 6. [onco- + -stat + -in]
oncotherapy
Treatment of tumors.
oncotic
Relating to or caused by edema or any swelling (oncosis).
oncotomy
Rarely used term for incision of an abscess, cyst, or other tumor. [onco- + G. tome, incision]
oncotropic
Manifesting a special affinity for neoplasms or neoplastic cells. [onco- + G. trope, a turning]
Oncovirinae
Term formerly used to designate a now obsolete subfamily of viruses (family Retroviridae) composed of the RNA tumor viruses that contain two identical plus-stranded RNA ...
oncovirus
Term formerly used to describe any virus of the subfamily Oncovirinae. SEE ALSO: oncogenic virus.
ondansetron
A serotonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist used as an antiemetic, particularly in patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment for cancer.
Ondine
German mythological character. See O. curse.
Ondine's curse
Failure from birth of central nervous system control over breathing while asleep. There are usually no breathing problems while awake. The involuntary (autonomic) control of ...
Oneiric
Relating to dreams; dream-like. From the Greek "oneiros" (dream). See oneirophrenia. * * * 1. Pertaining to dreams. 2. Pertaining to the clinical state of oneirophrenia. SYN: ...
oneirism
A waking dream state. [G. oneiros, dream]
oneirocritical
Rarely used term pertaining to the logic of dreams. [G. oneiros, dream, + kritikos, skilled in judgment]
oneirodynia
Rarely used term for an unpleasant or painful dream. [G. oneiros, dream, + odyne, pain] - o. activa SYN: somnambulism (1).
oneirology
The study of dreams and their content. [G. oneiros, dream, + logos, study]
oneirophrenia
A rarely used term for a state in which hallucinations occur, caused by such conditions as prolonged deprivation of sleep, sensory isolation, and a variety of drugs. [G. ...
oniomania
Rarely used term for the morbidly exaggerated need or urge to buy beyond the realistic needs of the individual. [G. onios, for sale, + mania, insanity]
oniric
SYN: oneiric.
onko-
See onco-.
onlay
1. A metal (usually gold) cast restoration of the occlusal surface of a posterior tooth or the lingual surface of an anterior tooth, the entire surface of which is in dentin ...
Onodi
Adolf, Hungarian laryngologist, 1857–1920. See O. cell.
onomatomania
An abnormal impulse to dwell upon certain words and their supposed significance, or to frantically try to recall a particular word. [G. onoma, name, + mania, frenzy]
onomatophobia
Abnormal dread of certain words or names because of their supposed significance. [G. onoma, name, + phobos, fear]
onomatopoiesis
The making of a name or word, especially to express or imitate a natural sound ( e.g., hiss, crash, boom); in psychiatry, the tendency to make new words of this type is said to ...
ontogenesis
SYN: ontogeny.
ontogenetic, ontogenic
Relating to ontogeny.
ontogeny
Development of the individual, as distinguished from phylogeny, which is evolutionary development of the species. SYN: ontogenesis. [G. on, being, + genesis, origin]
ontology
A traditional branch of metaphysics that deals with problems of being, existence, inner nature, meaning, etc. It is fundamental to problems involving normality and disease, ...
Onufrowicz
Wladislaus, Swiss anatomist, 1836–1900. See Onuf nucleus.
onyalai
An acute disease affecting natives of Central Africa, characterized by bloody vesicles of the mouth and other mucous surfaces, hematuria, and melena; defective nutrition may be ...
onych-
See onycho-.
onychalgia
Pain in the nails. [onycho- + G. algos, pain]
onychatrophia, onychatrophy
Atrophy of the nails. [onycho- + G. atrophia, atrophy]
onychauxis
Marked overgrowth of the fingernails or toenails. [onycho- + G. auxe, increase]
onychectomy
Ablation of a toenail or fingernail. [onycho- + G. ektome, excision]
onychia
Inflammation of the matrix of the nail. [onycho- + G. -ia, condition] - o. maligna acute o. occurring spontaneously in debilitated patients, or in response to slight trauma. - o. ...
Onycho- (prefix)
Pertaining to the nails. Examples of medical terms involving "onycho-" include onychodystrophy (abnormal growth and development of the nails), onychomycosis (fungal infection of ...
onycho-, onych-
A finger nail, a toenail. [G. onyx, nail]
onychoclasis
Breaking of the nails. [onycho- + G. klasis, breaking]
onychocryptosis
SYN: ingrown nail. [onycho- + G. krypto, to conceal]
onychodystrophy
Dystrophic changes in the nails occurring as a congenital defect or due to any illness or injury that may cause a malformed nail. [onycho- + G. dys-, bad, + trophe, nourishment]
onychograph
An instrument for recording the capillary blood pressure as shown by the circulation under the nail. [onycho- + G. grapho, to write]
onychogryposis
Enlargement with increased thickening and curvature of the fingernails or toenails. [onycho- + G. gryposis, a curvature]
onychoheterotopia
Abnormal placement of nails.
onychoid
Resembling a fingernail in structure or form. [onycho- + G. eidos, resemblance]
onychology
Study of the nails. [onycho- + G. logos, treatise]
Onycholysis
Loosening of the nail from the nail bed, usually starting at the border of the nail. The nail tends to turn whitish or yellowish, reflecting the presence of air under it. The ...
onychomadesis
Complete shedding of the nails, usually associated with systemic disease. [onycho- + G. madesis, a growing bald, fr. madao, to be moist, (of hair) fall off]
onychomalacia
Abnormal softness of the nails. [onycho- + G. malakia, softness]
Onychomycosis
Fungal infection of the nails. Fungal infections can involve either the toenails or the fingernails. Nail fungal infection is usually caused by the dermatophyte fungi ...
Onychomycosis, proximal white subungual
The rarest form of fungus infection of the finger or toenail. (Fungus infection of the finger or toenail is also called onychomycosis.) The infection begins in the nail fold ...
Onychoosteodysplasia
This is the nail-patella syndrome, an hereditary condition characterized by abnormally formed (dysplastic) or absent nails and by absent or underdeveloped (hypoplastic) kneecaps ...
onychopathology
Study of diseases of the nails.
onychopathy
Any disease of the nails. SYN: onychosis. [onycho- + G. pathos, suffering]
onychophagy, onychophagia
Habitual nailbiting. [onycho- + G. phago, to eat]
onychophosis
A growth of horny epithelium in the nail bed. [onycho- + G. phos, light, + -osis, condition]
onychoptosis
Falling off of the nails. [onycho- + G. ptosis, a falling]
onychorrhexis
Abnormal brittleness of the nails with splitting of the free edge. [onycho- + G. rhexis, a breaking]
onychoschizia
Splitting of the nails in layers. [onycho- + G. schizo, to divide, + -ia, condition]
onychosis
SYN: onychopathy.
onychostroma
SYN: nail matrix. [onycho- + G. stroma, bedding]
onychotillomania
A tendency to pick at the nails. [onycho- + G. tillo, to pluck, + mania, insanity]
onychotomy
Incision into a toenail or fingernail. [onycho- + G. tome, cutting]
onychotrophy
Nutrition of the nails. [onycho- + G. trophe, nourishment]
onyx
SYN: nail (1). [G. nail]
oo-
Egg, ovary. SEE ALSO: oophor-, ovario-, ovi-, ovo-. [G. oon, egg]
oocyesis
SYN: ovarian pregnancy. [G. oon, egg, + kyesis, pregnancy]
oocyst
The encysted form of the fertilized macrogamete, or zygote, in coccidian Sporozoea in which sporogonic multiplication occurs; results in the formation of sporozoites, ...
oocyte
The immature ovum. SYN: ovocyte. [G. oon, egg, + kytos, a hollow (cell)] - primary o. an o. during its growth phase and before it completes the first maturation division. - ...
Oogenesis
The process of egg formation. The second "o" in oogenesis is pronounced separately from the first: o·o·gen·e·sis. The word was created from the prefix " oo-" (Greek oon, egg) ...
oogenetic
Producing ova. SYN: oogenic, oogenous, ovigenetic, ovigenic, ovigenous.
oogenic, oogenous
SYN: oogenetic.
Oogonium
A female ancestral germ cell that divides several times to give rise to an oocyte that, in turn, develops into an ovum (an egg). The second "o" in oogonium is pronounced ...
ookinesis, ookinesia
Chromosomal movements of the egg during maturation and fertilization. [G. oon, egg, + kinesis, movement]
ookinete
The motile zygote of the malarial organism that penetrates the mosquito stomach to form an oocyst under the outer gut lining; the contents of the oocyst subsequently divide ...
oolemma
Plasma membrane of the oocyte. [G. oon, egg, + lemma, sheath]
oomycosis
A mycosis caused by fungi belonging to the class Oomycetes; e.g., rhinosporidiosis.
oophagia, oophagy
The habitual eating of eggs; subsisting largely on eggs. [G. oon, egg, + phago, to eat]
oophor-, oophoro-
The ovary. SEE ALSO: oo-, ovario-. [Mod. L. oophoron, ovary, fr. G. oophoros, egg-bearing]
oophoralgia
SYN: ovarialgia. [oophor- + G. algos, pain]
Oophorectomy
: The removal of one or both ovaries by surgery. * * * SYN: ovariectomy. [G. oon, egg, + phoros, bearing, + ektome, excision]
Oophoritis
Inflammation of the ovary or egg sac. * * * Inflammation of an ovary. SYN: ovaritis. [G. oon, egg, + phoros, a bearing, + -itis, inflammation]
oophoro-
See oophor-.
oophorocystectomy
Excision of an ovarian cyst.
oophorocystosis
Ovarian cyst formation.
oophoron
Rarely used term for ovary. [G. oon, egg, + phoros, bearing]
oophoropathy
SYN: ovariopathy.
oophoropexy
Surgical fixation or suspension of an ovary. [ oophoro- + G. pexis, fixation]
oophoroplasty
Plastic operation upon an ovary. [ oophoro- + G. plastos, formed, shaped]
oophororrhaphy
Suspension of the ovary by attachment to the pelvic wall. [ oophoro- + G. rhaphe, suture]
oophorosalpingectomy
SYN: ovariosalpingectomy.
oophorosalpingitis
SYN: ovariosalpingitis. [ oophoro- + salpingitis]
oophorotomy
SYN: ovariotomy. [ oophoro- + G. tome, incision]
oophorrhagia
Ovarian hemorrhage. [ oophoro- + G. rhegnymi, to burst forth]
ooplasm
Protoplasmic portion of the ovum. [G. oon, egg, + plasma, a thing formed]
oosome
A cytoplasmic body in the ovum that passes into the germ cell. [G. oon, egg + soma, body]
oosporangium
Obsolete term for oogonium (2). [ oospore + G. angeion, vessel]
oospore
A thick-walled fungus spore that develops from a female gamete either through fertilization or parthenogenesis in an oogonium. [see Oospora]
ootheca
1. An egg case found in some lower animals. 2. Rarely used term for ovary. [G. oon, egg, + theke, box, case]
ootid
The nearly mature ovum after the first meiotic division has been completed and the second initiated; in most higher mammals, the second meiotic division is not completed unless ...
ootype
The central portion of the ovarian complex of trematodes and cestodes in which fertilization takes place and the vitellarian or eggshell materials are coated over the egg; this ...
OP
Abbreviation for occipitoposterior position.
opacification
1. The process of making opaque. 2. The formation of opacities. [L. opacus, shady]
opacity
1. A lack of transparency; an opaque or nontransparent area. 2. On a radiograph, a more transparent area is interpreted as an o. to x-rays in the body. 3. Mental dullness. [L. ...
opalescent
Resembling an opal in the display of various colors; denoting certain bacterial cultures. [Fr. fr. L. opalus, opal]
Opalski
Adam, Polish physician, 1897–1963. See O. cell.
opaque
Impervious to light; not translucent or only slightly so. Cf.:radiopaque. [Fr. fr. L. opacus, shady]
open
1. Not closed; exposed, said of a wound. 2. To enter or expose, as a wound or cavity. [A.S.]
Open charting
The practice of making medical charts available to the patient.
Open fracture
A fracture in which the bone is sticking through the skin. Also called a compound fracture. A fracture is a break in the bone or cartilage. It usually is a result of trauma but ...
Open reading frame
(genetics) An open reading frame in DNA has no termination codon, no signal to stop reading the nucleotide sequence, and so may be translated into protein.
Open wound
An injury that is exposed due to broken skin. An open wound is at high risk for infection.
opening
A gap in or entrance to an organ, tube, or cavity. SEE ALSO: aperture, fossa, ostium, orifice, pore. - access o. SYN: access. - aortic o. SYN: aortic hiatus. - o. of aqueduct ...
Opening, vaginal
The opening to the muscular canal extending from the cervix to the outside of the body. The word "vagina" is a Latin word meaning "a sheath or scabbard", a scabbard into which one ...
operable
Denoting a patient or condition on which a surgical procedure can be performed with a reasonable expectation of cure or relief.
operant
In conditioning, any behavior or specific response chosen by the experimenter; its frequency is intended to increase or decrease by the judicious pairing with it of a reinforcer ...
operate
1. To work upon the body by the hands or by means of cutting or other instrument. 2. To perform a surgical procedure. 3. To cause a movement of the bowels; said of a laxative or ...
Operating room
A facility equipped for performing surgery. Abbreviated OR.
Operation
Although there are many meanings to the word "operation", in medicine it refers to a surgical procedure. To put matters more formally, an operation is "an act or series of acts ...
Operation, Blalock-Taussig
A pioneering heart operation named after the American surgeon Alfred Blalock (1899-1964) and the pediatric cardiologist Helen B. Taussig (1898-1986). Dr. Taussig designed and ...
Operation, Macewen
A surgical operation for inguinal hernia designed by Sir William Macewen (1848-1924), a surgeon in Glascow, Scotland who also described Macewen’s sign for the detection of ...
operative
1. Relating to, or effected by means of an operation. 2. Active or effective.
operator
1. One who performs an operation or operates equipment. 2. In genetics, a sequence of DNA that interacts with a repressor of operon to control the expression of adjacent ...
opercular
Relating to an operculum.
operculated
Provided with a lid (operculum); denoting members of the mollusk class Gastropoda (the snails), subclass Prosobranchiata (operculate snails), and the eggs of certain parasitic ...
operculitis
Originating under an operculum. [ operculum + G. -itis, inflammation]
operculum
1. Anything resembling a lid or cover. 2. [TA] In anatomy, the portions of the frontal (o. frontale [TA], frontal o. [TA]), parietal (o. parietale [TA], parietal o. [TA]), and ...
operon
A genetic functional unit that controls production of a messenger RNA; it consists of an operator gene and two or more structural genes located in sequence in the cis position ...
ophiasis
A form of alopecia areata in which the loss of hair occurs in bands along the scalp margin partially or completely encircling the head. [G., fr. ophis, snake]
Ophidia
The snakes, a suborder of the class Reptilia, including the families Colubridae, Crotalidae, Elapidae, Hydrophyidae, and Viperidae. [G. ophidion, dim. of ophis, a serpent] ...
ophidiasis
Poisoning by a snake. SYN: ophidism. [G. ophidion, dim. of ophis, a serpent]
ophidiophobia
Morbid fear of snakes. [G. ophidion, a small snake, + phobos, fear]
ophidism
SYN: ophidiasis.
ophritis
Dermatitis in the region of the eyebrows. SYN: ophryitis. [G. ophrys, eyebrow, + -itis, inflammation]
ophryitis
SYN: ophritis.
ophryogenes
Related to the eyebrows. [Mod. L., fr. G. ophrys, eyebrow, + suffix -genes, arising from]
ophryon
The point on the midline of the forehead just above the glabella (1). SYN: supranasal point, supraorbital point. [G. ophrys, eyebrow]
Ophryoscolecidae
A family of ciliate protozoa occurring in the rumen and reticulum of ruminant animals, characterized by having cilia arranged in spiral membranelles around the mouth (adoral) ...
ophryosis
Spasmodic twitching of the upper portion of the orbicularis palpebrarum muscle causing a wrinkling of the eyebrow. [G. ophrys, eyebrow, + -osis, condition]
ophthalm-
See ophthalmo-.
ophthalmalgia
SYN: oculodynia. [ophthalmo- + G. algos, pain]
Ophthalmia
Inflammation of the eye. Also known as ophthalmitis. * * * 1. Severe, often purulent, conjunctivitis. 2. Inflammation of the deeper structures of the eye. [G.] - catarrhal o. ...
Ophthalmic
Pertaining to the eye. An ophthalmic ointment is designed for the eye. * * * Relating to the eye. SYN: ocular (1). [G. ophthalmikos]
ophthalmic acid
A tripeptide occurring in lens, similar to glutathione but differing in the replacement of cysteine by α-amino-n-butyric acid ( i.e., in the replacement of –SH by –CH3); a ...
Ophthalmic migraine
Migraine involving the eyes but without headache. Migraine, due to a spasm of blood vessels in the brain, usually causes a headache. Flashes of light may appear as jagged lines ...
Ophthalmic veins
The orbital cavity is drained by paired veins called the superior and inferior ophthalmic veins. The superior ophthalmic vein arises at the inner angle of the orbit and follows ...
Ophthalmitis
Inflammation of the eye. Also known as ophthalmia.
ophthalmo-, ophthalm-
Relationship to the eye. SEE ALSO: oculo-. [G. ophthalmos]
ophthalmodynamometer
An instrument to measure the blood pressure in the retinal vessels. [ophthalmo- + G. dynamis, power, + metron, measure] - Bailliart o. an instrument used to measure the blood ...
ophthalmodynamometry
The measurement of blood pressure in the retinal vessels by means of an ophthalmodynamometer. [ophthalmo- + G. dynamis, power, + metron, measure]
ophthalmolith
SYN: dacryolith. [ophthalmo- + G. lithos, stone]
Ophthalmologist
An eye doctor. A physician practicing ophthalmology. An ophthalmologist is an M.D. * * * A specialist in ophthalmology. SYN: oculist.
ophthalmology
The medical specialty concerned with the eye, its diseases, and refractive errors. [ophthalmo- + G. logos, study]
ophthalmomalacia
Abnormal softening of the eyeball. [ophthalmo- + G. malakia, softness]
ophthalmomelanosis
Melanotic discoloration of the conjunctiva and adjoining tissues.
ophthalmometer
SYN: keratometer. [ophthalmo- + G. metron, measure]
ophthalmomycosis
Any disease of the eye or its appendages caused by a fungus. [ophthalmo- + G. mykes, fungus, + -osis, condition]
ophthalmomyiasis
SYN: ocular myiasis.
ophthalmopathy
Any disease of the eyes. SYN: oculopathy. [ophthalmo- + G. pathos, suffering] - endocrine o. SYN: Graves o.. - external o. any disease of the conjunctiva, cornea, or adnexa of ...
ophthalmoplegia
Paralysis of one or more of the ocular muscles. [ophthalmo- + G. plege, stroke] - chronic progressive external o. ( CPEO) a specific type of slowly worsening weakness of the ...
ophthalmoplegic
Relating to or marked by ophthalmoplegia.
ophthalmoscope
A device for studying the interior of the eyeball through the pupil. SYN: funduscope. [ophthalmo- + G. skopeo, to examine] - binocular o. an o. that provides a stereoscopic ...
ophthalmoscopic
Relating to examination of the interior of the eye.
Ophthalmoscopy
Examination of the interior of the eye, including the lens, retina and optic nerve, by indirect or direct ophthalmoscopy. Indirect ophthalmoscopy employs a head lamp device to ...
ophthalmotrope
A model of the two eyes, to each of which are attached weighted cords pulling in the direction of the six extrinsic eye muscles; used to demonstrate the action of the ocular ...
ophthalmovascular
Relating to the blood vessel s of the eye.
opianine
SYN: noscapine.
opianyl
SYN: meconin.
Opiate
A medication or illegal drug that is either derived from the opium poppy, or that mimics the effect of an opiate (a synthetic opiate). Opiate drugs are narcotic sedatives that ...
opine
A derivative of basic amino acid s, produced by crown-gall tumors in plants.
opiocortin
SYN: opiomelanocortin.
Opioid
1. A synthetic narcotic that resembles the naturally occurring opiates. 2. Any substance that binds to or otherwise affects the opiate receptors on the surface of the cell. * * ...
opiomelanocortin
A linear polypeptide of the pituitary gland that contains in its sequence the sequences of endorphins, MSH, ACTH, and the like, which are split off enzymically; the nucleotide ...
opipramol hydrochloride
4-[3-(5H-Dibenz[b.f]azepin-5-yl)propyl]-1-piperazineethanol dihydrochloride; an antidepressant agent.
opisthenar
Dorsum of the hand. [G. back of the hand, from opisthen, behind, + thenar, palm of the hand]
opisthiobasial
Relating to both opisthion and basion; denoting a line connecting the two or the distance between them.
opisthion
The middle point on the posterior margin of the foramen magnum, opposite the basion. [G. opisthios, posterior]
opisthionasial
Relating to the opisthion and the nasion; denoting the distance between the two points.
opistho-
Backward, behind, dorsal. [G. opisthen, at the rear, behind]
opisthocheilia, opisthochilia
Recession of the lips. [ opistho- + G. cheilos, lip]
opisthomastigote
Term now used instead of herpetomonad for the stage of development of certain insect- and plant-parasitizing flagellates to avoid confusion between the stage and the genus ...
opisthorchiasis
Infection with the Asiatic liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini, or other opisthorchids.
opisthorchid
Common name for members of the family Opisthorchiidae.
Opisthorchiidae
A family of trematodes that includes the genera Opisthorchis and Clonorchis.
Opisthorchis
Genus of digenetic trematodes (family Opisthorchiidae) found in the bile ducts or gallbladder of fish-eating mammals, birds, and fish. [ opistho- + G. orchis, testis] - O. ...
opisthotic
Behind the ear. [ opistho- + G. ous (ot-), ear]
opisthotonic
Relating to or characterized by opisthotonos.
opisthotonoid
Resembling opisthotonos.
opisthotonos, opisthotonus
A tetanic spasm in which the spine and extremities are bent with convexity forward, the body resting on the head and the heels. [ opistho- + G. tonos, tension, stretching]
Opitz
John M., U.S. pediatrician, *1935. See Smith-Lemli-O. syndrome, O. BBB syndrome, O. G syndrome.
Opium
An addictive narcotic drug derived from the unripe seedpods of the opium poppy. Preparations of opium were called laudanum. Derivatives of laudanum include paregoric (a drug ...
opo-
1. The face; an eye. SEE ALSO: facio-. 2. Juice, balm. [G. ops]
opobalsamum
SYN: balm of Gilead. [G. opobalsamon, the juice of the balsam tree, fr. opos, juice, + balsamon]
opodidymus
Conjoined twins with a single body having two heads fused at the back with partially separated facial regions. See conjoined twins, under twin. [G. ops, eye, face, + didymos, twin]
Oppenheim
Hermann, Berlin neurologist, 1858–1919. See O. disease, O. reflex, O. syndrome, Ziehen-O. disease.
oppilative
Obstructive to any secretion.
opponens
A name given to several muscles of the fingers or toes, by the action of which these digits are opposed to the others. The o. muscles of the hands act at the carpometacarpal ...
opportunistic
1. Denoting an organism capable of causing disease only in a host whose resistance is lowered, e.g., by other diseases or by drugs. 2. Denoting a disease caused by such an ...
Opportunistic condition
A condition that occurs especially or exclusively in persons with a weak immune system due, for example, to AIDS, cancer or immunosuppressive drugs, such as corticosteroids or ...
Opportunistic infection
An infection that occurs because of a weakened immune system. Opportunistic infections are a particular danger for people with AIDS. The HIV virus itself does not cause death, ...
Opportunistic microorganism
A bacteria, virus, or fungus that takes advantage of certain opportunities to cause disease. Those opportunities are called opportunistic conditions. These microorganisms are ...

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