Слова на букву pco -post (2629) Medical dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  Medical dictionary →  (2,4-ance anch-basi basi-chem chem-culi culi-dttp du b-extr extr-hemi hemi-inso insp-line line-metr metr-noe noem-pco pco -post post-retr retr-spas spas-tawa taxa-ulce ulce-℞


Слова на букву pco -post (2629)

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>
pesticemia
Bacteremia due to Yersinia pestis. [L. pestis, plague, + G. haima, blood]
pesticide
General term for an agent that destroys fungi, insects, rodents, or any other pest.
pestiferous
SYN: pestilential.
Pestilence
The pestilence referred to the bubonic plague and it now refers to any epidemic disease that is highly contagious, infectious, virulent and devastating. The plague was, a ...
pestilential
Relating to or tending to produce a pestilence. SYN: pestiferous.
pestis
SYN: plague (2). [L.] - p. ambulans SYN: ambulant plague. - p. bubonica (pes′tis boo′bon′ik-a) SYN: bubonic plague. - p. fulminans SYN: bubonic plague. - p. major SYN: ...
Pestis (plague)
An infectious disease due to a bacteria called Yersinia pestis. Y. pestis mainly infects rats and other rodents. Rodents are the prime reservoir for the bacteria. Fleas ...
Pestivirus
A genus of viruses (family Flaviviridae) composed of the hog cholera virus and related viruses. [L. pestis, plague, + virus]
pestle
An instrument in the shape of a rod with one rounded and weighted extremity, used for bruising, breaking, grinding, and mixing substances in a mortar. [L. pistillum, fr. pinso, ...
PET
Abbreviation for positron emission tomography.
PET scan
Positron emission tomography, a highly specialized imaging technique using short-lived radioactive substances. This technique produces three-dimensional colored images. PET ...
peta-
Prefix used in the SI and metric system to signify multiples of one quadrillion (1015).
petechiae
Minute hemorrhagic spots, of pinpoint to pinhead size, in the skin, which are not blanched by pressure. [Mod. L. form of It. petecchie] - calcaneal p. traumatic hemorrhage into ...
petechial
Relating to, accompanied by, or characterized by petechiae.
Peter Pan syndrome
Term coined by pop psychology author Dan Kiley in his book "Peter Pan syndrome: Men Who Have Never Grown Up." Peter Pan is in reference to J. M. Barrie's classic 1904 play in ...
Peters
Hubert, Austrian obstetrician, 1859–1934. See P. ovum. Albert, German physician, 1862–1938. See P. anomaly.
Petersen
C.F., German surgeon, 1845–1908.
pethidine
SYN: meperidine hydrochloride.
petiolate, petiolated
Having a stem or pedicle. SYN: petioled. [L. petiolus]
petiole
SYN: petiolus.
petioled
SYN: petiolate.
petiolus
A stem or pedicle. SYN: petiole. [L. dim. of pes (foot), the stalk of a fruit] - p. epiglottidis SYN: stalk of epiglottis.
Petit
Jean L., Paris surgeon, 1674–1750. See P. hernia, P. herniotomy, P. lumbar triangle. Francois du, French surgeon and anatomist, 1664–1741. See P. canals, under canal, P. ...
Petit mal
A form of epilepsy with very brief, unannounced lapses in consciousness. A Petit mal seizure involves a brief loss of awareness, which can be accompanied by blinking or mouth ...
Petri
Julius, German bacteriologist, 1852–1921. See P. dish, P. dish culture.
petrifaction
Fossilization, as in conversion into stone. [L. petra, rock + facio, to make]
pétrissage
A manipulation in massage, consisting in a kneading of the muscles. [Fr. kneading]
petro-
Stone; stone-like hardness. [L. petra, rock; G. petros, stone]
petroccipital
SYN: petrooccipital.
petrolatum
A yellowish mixture of the softer members of the paraffin or methane series of hydrocarbons, obtained from petroleum as an intermediate product in its distillation; used as a ...
petroleum
A mixture of liquid hydrocarbons found in the earth in various parts of the world and believed to be derived from fossilized animal and plant remains; the source of petrolatum, ...
petroleum jelly
SYN: petrolatum.
petromastoid
Relating to the petrous and the squamous portions of the temporal bone, which are usually united at birth by the petrosquamosal suture. SYN: petrosomastoid.
petrooccipital
Denoting the cranial suture between the occipital bone and the petrous portion of the temporal. SYN: petroccipital.
petropharyngeus
See musculus p..
petrosa
The petrous portion of the temporal bone. [L. fr. petra, rock]
petrosal
Relating to the petrosa. SYN: petrous (2).
petrosalpingostaphylinus
Obsolete term for the levator veli palatini muscle. [ petrosa + G. salpinx, trumpet, + staphyle, uvula]
petrositis
An inflammation involving the petrous portion of the temporal bone and its air cells. SYN: petrousitis.
petrosomastoid
SYN: petromastoid.
petrosphenoid
Relating to the petrous portion of the temporal bone and to the sphenoid bone.
petrosquamosal, petrosquamous
Relating to the petrous and the squamous portions of the temporal bone. SYN: squamopetrosal.
petrostaphylinus
Obsolete term for the levator veli palatini (muscle). [G. petra, stone, + staphyle, uvula]
petrous
1. Of stony hardness. 2. SYN: petrosal. [L. petrosus, fr. petra, a rock]
petrousitis
SYN: petrositis.
Pette
H.H. German neuropathologist, 1887–1964. See P.- Döring disease.
Pettit
Auguste, French physician, 1869–1939. See Bachman-P. test.
Peutz
J.L.A., Dutch physician. See P.- Jeghers syndrome, Jeghers-P. syndrome.
Peutz-Jeghers syndrome
A genetic condition characterized by polyps in the intestines and freckle-like spots on the lips, mouth and fingers. People with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome are at increased risk for ...
pexin
SYN: chymosin.
pexinogen
SYN: prochymosin.
pexis
Fixation of substances in the tissues. [G. p., fixation]
Peyer
Johann K., Swiss anatomist, 1653–1712. See P. glands, under gland, aggregated lymphoid nodules of small intestine, under nodule.
peyote, peyotl
Aztec name for Lophophora williamsii, a small cactus indigenous to Mexico and the southwestern United States and used in Native American tribal ceremonies, where it produces a ...
Peyronie
Francois de la, French surgeon, 1678–1747. See P. disease.
Peyronie disease
A condition of uncertain cause in which a plaque (a hard lump) forms on the upper or lower side of the penis in layers containing erectile tissue resulting sometimes in severe ...
Peyrot
Jean J., French surgeon, 1843–1918. See P. thorax.
Pezzer
O. de. See de P..
Pfannenstiel
Hermann Johann, German gynecologist, 1862–1909. See P. incision.
Pfaundler
Meinhard von, German physician, 1872–1947. See P.- Hurler syndrome.
Pfeiffer
Richard F.J., German physician, 1858–1945. See Pfeifferella, P. phenomenon, P. syndrome.
Pfeiffer syndrome
A form of craniosynostosis that results in multiple physical defects, including broad thumbs and great toes; depressed nasal bridge and generally flat profile; low-set, slanted ...
Pfeifferella
An obsolete genus of bacteria, the type species of which, P. mallei, formerly was placed in the genus Actinobacillus and now is in the genus Pseudomonas. [R. F. J. Pfeiffer]
PFFD
Abbreviation for proximal femoral focal deficiency.
Pflüger
Eduard F.W., German anatomist and physiologist, 1829–1910. See P. law.
PFOB
Abbreviation for perfluorooctyl bromide.
PFT
Pulmonary function test, a test designed to measure how well the lungs are working. PFTs gauge how the lungs are doing their jobs — of expanding and contracting (when a person ...
Pfuhl
Eduard, German physician, 1852–1905. See P. sign.
PG
Abbreviation for prostaglandin.
pg
Symbol for picogram.
PGA (polyglandular autoimmune syndrome)
A genetic autoimmune disease with an extraordinary array of clinical features but characterized most often by at least 2 of the following 3 findings: hypoparathyroidism — ...
PGA, PGB, PGC, PGD
Abbreviations, with numeric subscripts according to structure, often used for prostaglandins. Letters A, B, etc., indicate the nature of the cyclopentane ring (substituents, ...
PGR
Abbreviation for psychogalvanic response.
Ph
Symbol for phenyl.
pH
Symbol for the negative decadic logarithm of the H+ ion concentration (measured in moles per liter); a solution with pH 7.00 (1 × 10−7 g molecular weight of hydrogen per ...
pH, urine
The acidity or alkalinity of urine. The pH of any fluid is the measure of the hydrogen ion (H-) concentration. A pH of 7 is neutral. The lower the pH, the more acidic the urine. ...
pH-stat
A device for continuously sensing the pH of a solution and automatically adding acid or alkali as necessary to keep the pH constant; used to follow the time course of reactions ...
Ph.D.
Doctor of Philosophy. (From the New Latin, philosophiae doctor). Ph.D.'s are involved in clinical care (as in clinical psychology), biomedical research (as in the Genome ...
Ph.G.
1. Abbreviation for Pharmacopoeia Germanica; German Pharmacopoeia. 2. Abbreviation for Graduate in Pharmacy, a degree no longer offered in the U.S.
Ph1
Abbreviation for Philadelphia chromosome.
PHA
Abbreviation for phytohemagglutinin.
phaco-
1. Lens-shaped, relating to a lens; 2. Birthmark; as in phacomatosis. [G. phakos, lentil (lens), anything shaped like a lentil]
phacoanaphylaxis
Hypersensitivity to protein of the lens of the eye.
phacocele
Hernia of the lens of the eye through the sclera. [ phaco- + G. kele, hernia]
phacocyst
SYN: capsule of lens. [ phaco- + G. kystis, bladder]
phacocystectomy
Rarely used term for surgical removal of a portion of the capsule of the lens of the eye. [ phaco- + G. kystis, bladder, + ektome, excision]
phacodonesis
Tremulousness of the lens of the eye. [ phaco- + G. doneo, to shake to and fro]
Phacoemulsification
A type of contemporary cataract surgery. Most cataract surgeries today are performed using phacoemulsification, a procedure in which the lens with the cataract is broken up by ...
phacoerysis
Extraction of the lens of the eye by means of a suction cup called the erysophake. [ phaco- + G. erysis, pulling, drawing off]
phacofragmentation
Rupture and aspiration of the lens.
phacoid
Of lentil shape. [ phaco- + G. eidos, resemblance]
phacolysis
Operative breaking down and removal of the lens. [ phaco- + G. lysis, dissolution]
phacolytic
Characterized by or referring to phacolysis.
phacoma
A hamartoma found in phacomatosis; often refers to a retinal hamartoma in tuberous sclerosis. SYN: phakoma. [ phaco- + G. -oma, tumor]
phacomalacia
Softening of the lens, as may occur in hypermature cataract. [ phaco- + G. malakia, softness]
phacomatosis
A generic term for a group of hereditary diseases characterized by hamartomas involving multiple tissues; e.g., von Hippel-Lindau disease, neurofibromatosis, Sturge-Weber ...
phacoscope
An instrument in the form of a dark chamber for observing the changes in the lens during accommodation. [ phaco- + G. skopeo, to view]
Phaenicia sericata
A common species of yellowish or metallic green blowfly (family Calliphoridae, order Diptera); an abundant scavenger feeding on carrion or excrement, and implicated in sheep ...
phaeo-
See pheo-.
phaeohyphomycosis
A group of superficial and deep infections caused by fungi that form pigmented hyphae and yeastlike cells in tissue, i.e., dematiaceous fungal infections other than ...
Phage
Short for bacteriophage, a virus that lives within a bacteria. Bacteriophages have been very important and heuristic in bacterial and molecular genetics. Phages were studied by ...
phagedena
Obsolete term for an ulcer that rapidly spreads peripherally, destroying the tissues as it increases in size. [G. phagedaina, a canker] - p. gangrenosa severe gangrene with ...
phagedenic
Obsolete term for relating to or having the characteristics of phagedena.
Phagedenic gingivitis
This is trench mouth, a progressive painful infection with ulceration, swelling and sloughing off of dead tissue from the mouth and throat due to the spread of infection from the ...
phago-
Eating, devouring. [G. phago, to eat]
Phago- (prefix)
Eating, devouring. From the Greek "phago" meaning "to eat." Examples of words starting with phago- include: phagocyte, a cell that can engulf particles; and phagophobia, an ...
phagocyte
A cell possessing the property of ingesting bacteria, foreign particles, and other cells. Phagocytes are divided into two general classes: 1) microphages, polymorphonuclear ...
phagocytic
Relating to phagocytes or phagocytosis.
phagocytin
A very labile bactericidal substance that may be isolated from polymorphonuclear leukocytes.
phagocytize
SYN: phagocytose.
phagocytoblast
A primitive cell developing into a phagocyte. [ phagocyte + G. blastos, germ]
phagocytolysis
1. Destruction of phagocytes, or leukocytes, occurring in the process of blood coagulation or as the result of the introduction of certain antagonistic foreign substances into ...
phagocytolytic
Relating to phagocytolysis. SYN: phagolytic.
phagocytose
To perform phagocytosis, denoting the action of phagocytic cells. SYN: phagocytize.
phagocytosis
The process of ingestion and digestion by cells of solid substances, e.g., other cells, bacteria, bits of necrosed tissue, foreign particles. SEE ALSO: endocytosis. [ phagocyte + ...
phagodynamometer
A device for measuring the force required to chew various foods. [ phago- + G. dynamis, force, + metron, measure]
phagolysis
SYN: phagocytolysis (1).
phagolysosome
A body formed by union of a phagosome or ingested particle with a lysosome having hydrolytic enzymes.
phagolytic
SYN: phagocytolytic.
phagophobia
Morbid fear of eating. [ phago- + G. phobos, fear]
phagosome
A vesicle that forms around a particle (bacterial or other) within the phagocyte that engulfed it, separates from the cell membrane, and then fuses with and receives the contents ...
phagotype
In microbiology, a subdivision of a species distinguished from other strains therein by sensitivity to a certain bacteriophage or set of bacteriophages. [ phago- + G. typos, ...
phako-
For words so beginning and not listed here, see phaco-.
phakoma
SYN: phacoma.
phakomatosis
SYN: phacomatosis.
phalangeal
Relating to a phalanx.
phalangectomy
Excision of one or more of the phalanges of hand or foot. [phalang- + G. ektome, excision]
Phalanges
The bones of the fingers by Aristotle in the 4th century B.C. (and since extended to the bones of the toes) because they were arrayed like Greek soldiers for battle. There are ...
Phalanx
Anatomically, any one of the bones in the fingers or toes. (The plural of phalanx is phalanges.) There are 3 phalanges (the proximal, middle, and proximal phalanx) in most of ...
phall-, phalli-, phallo-
The penis. [G. phallos]
phallalgia
SYN: phallodynia. [phall- + G. algos, pain]
phallectomy
Surgical removal of the penis. SYN: penectomy. [phall- + G. ektome, excision]
phallic
1. Relating to the penis. 2. In psychoanalysis, relating to the penis, especially during the phases of infantile psychosexuality. SEE ALSO: p. phase. [G. phallos, penis]
phallicism
Worship of the male genitalia. SYN: phallism.
phalliform
SYN: phalloid.
phallism
SYN: phallicism.
phallo-
See phall-.
phallocampsis
Curvature of the erect penis. SEE ALSO: chordee. [ phallo- + G. kampsis, a bending]
phallocrypsis
Dislocation and retraction of the penis. [ phallo- + G. krypsis, concealment]
phallodynia
Pain in the penis. SYN: phallalgia. [ phallo- + G. odyne, pain]
phalloid
Resembling in shape a penis. SYN: phalliform. [ phallo- + G. eidos, resemblance]
phalloidin
Best known of the toxic cyclic peptides produced by the poisonous mushroom, Amanita phalloides; closely related to amanitin.
phallolysin
A glycoprotein that is the heat-sensitive (destroyed in cooking) toxin of the mushroom Amanita phalloides.
phalloncus
A tumor or swelling of the penis. [ phallo- + G. onkos, mass]
phalloplasty
Surgical reconstruction of the penis. [ phallo- + G. plastos, formed]
phallotomy
Surgical incision into the penis. SYN: penotomy. [ phallo- + G. tome, a cutting]
phallotoxins
A class of heterodetic cyclic heptapeptides present in Amanita phalloides; together with the amatoxins, the main toxin components of this fungus.
phallus
SYN: penis. [L.; G. phallos]
phanero-
Visible, obvious. [G. phaneros]
phanerogenic
Denoting a disease, the etiology of which is manifest. Cf.:cryptogenic. [ phanero- + G. genesis, origin]
phaneromania
Obsolete term for constant preoccupation with some external part, as plucking the beard, pulling the lobe of the ear, picking at a pimple, etc. [ phanero- + G. mania, frenzy] ...
phaneroscope
A lens used to concentrate the light from a lamp upon the skin, to facilitate examination of lesions of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. [ phanero- + G. skopeo, to view]
phanerosis
The act or process of becoming visible. [ phanero- + G. osis, condition] - fatty p. presumed unmasking of previously invisible fat in the cytoplasm of cells; marked fatty ...
phanerozoite
An exoerythrocytic tissue stage of malaria infection other than the primary exoerythrocytic stages ( cryptozoite and metacryptozoite generations); consists chiefly of ...
phanquone
An amebicide.
phantasia
SYN: fantasy. [G. appearance]
phantasm
The mental imagery produced by fantasy. SYN: phantom (1). [G. phantasma, an appearance]
phantasmagoria
A fantastic sequence of haphazardly associative imagery.
phantasmology
The study of spiritualistic manifestations and of apparitions. [G. phantasma, an appearance, + logos, study]
phantasmoscopia, phantasmoscopy
A rarely used term for the delusion of seeing phantoms. [G. phantasma, an appearance, + skopeo, to view]
phantom
1. SYN: phantasm. 2. A model, especially a transparent one, of the human body or any of its parts. SEE ALSO: manikin. 3. In radiology, a mechanical or computer-originated ...
Phantom limb syndrome
In the phantom limb syndrome, a person continues to feel sensations, usually including pain, in an arm or leg long after the limb has been amputated. Phantom sensations can ...
phantomize
In psychiatry, to create mental imagery by fantasy.
Pharm. D.
Abbreviation for Doctor of Pharmacy.
pharmacal
SYN: pharmaceutic.
pharmaceutic, pharmaceutical
Relating to pharmacy or to pharmaceutics. SYN: pharmacal. [G. pharmakeutikos, relating to drugs]
pharmaceutics
1. SYN: pharmacy (1). 2. The science of pharmaceutical systems, i.e., preparations, dosage forms, etc.
pharmaceutist
SYN: pharmacist.
Pharmacist
A professional who fills prescriptions, and in the case of a compounding pharmacist, makes them. Pharmacists are familiar with medication ingredients, interactions, cautions, and ...
pharmaco-
Drugs. [G. pharmakon, medicine]
Pharmaco-epidemiology
The study of the use of drugs in society. The process of identifying and responding to safety issues about drugs. Pharmaco-epidemiology has been called pharmaco-vigilance. For ...
pharmacochemistry
SYN: pharmaceutical chemistry.
pharmacodiagnosis
Use of drugs in diagnosis.
pharmacodynamic
Relating to drug action.
pharmacodynamics
The study of uptake, movement, binding, and interactions of pharmacologically active molecules at their tissue site(s) of action. [ pharmaco- + G. dynamis, force]
pharmacoendocrinology
The pharmacology of endocrine function.
pharmacoepidemiology
The study of the distribution and determinants of drug-related events in populations, and the application of this study to efficacious drug treatment.
Pharmacogenetics
The convergence of pharmacology and genetics dealing with genetically determined responses to drugs. For example, after the administration of a muscle relaxant commonly used in ...
Pharmacogenomics
The study of how an individual's genetic inheritance (their genome) affects their body's response to drugs. The term "pharmacogenomics" comes from the words pharmacology and ...
pharmacognosist
One skilled in pharmacognosy.
pharmacognosy
A branch of pharmacology concerned with the physical characteristics and botanical and animal sources of crude drugs. SYN: pharmaceutical biology. [ pharmaco- + G. gnosis, ...
pharmacography
A treatise on or description of drugs. [ pharmaco- + G. graphe, description]
pharmacokinetic
Relating to the disposition of drugs in the body ( i.e., their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination).
pharmacokinetics
Movements of drugs within biologic systems, as affected by uptake, distribution, binding, elimination, and biotransformation; particularly the rates of such movements. [ ...
Pharmacologic stress test
There are a diversity of pharmacologic stress tests. Here this refers specifically to a pharmacologic cardiac stress test in which certain medications are administered that ...
pharmacologic, pharmacological
1. Relating to pharmacology or to the composition, properties, and actions of drugs. 2. Sometimes used in physiology to denote a dose (of a chemical agent that either is or ...
Pharmacologist
A specialist in the study of medications and their effects on the body. * * * A specialist in pharmacology. - clinical p. a p. who has undergone training in basic pharmacology, ...
Pharmacology
The study of drugs, their sources, their nature, and their properties. Pharmacology is the study of the body’s reaction to drugs. It emerged as a major area in American medicine ...
pharmacomania
Morbid impulse to take drugs. [ pharmaco- + G. mania, frenzy]
Pharmacopeia
Also spelled pharmacopoeia, an official authoritative listing of drugs. Aspirin has, for example, long been in the pharmacopeia. By extension, a pharmacopeia is a collection or ...
Pharmacopeia, Pharmacopoeia
A work containing monographs of therapeutic agents, standards for their strength and purity, and their formulations. The various national pharmacopeias are referred to by ...
pharmacopeial
Relating to the Pharmacopeia; denoting a drug in the list of the Pharmacopeia. SEE ALSO: official.
pharmacophilia
Morbid fondness for taking drugs. [ pharmaco- + G. phileo, to love]
pharmacophobia
Morbid fear of taking drugs. [ pharmaco- + G. phobos, fear]
Pharmacopoeia
An official authoritative listing of drugs. Aspirin has, for example, long been in the pharmacopoeia. By extension, a pharmacopoeia is a collection or stock of drugs.
pharmacopsychosis
Rarely used term for a psychosis causally related to taking a drug. [ pharmaco- + psychosis]
pharmacotherapy
Treatment of disease by means of drugs. SEE ALSO: chemotherapy. [ pharmaco- + G. therapeia, therapy]
Pharmacy
A location where prescription drugs are sold. A pharmacy is constantly supervised by a licensed pharmacist. * * * 1. The practice of preparing and dispensing drugs. SYN: ...
Pharmacy, compounding
A facility that both makes and sells prescription drugs. A compounding pharmacy can often concoct drug formulas that are specially tailored to patients: for example, liquid ...
pharyng-
See pharyngo-.
phos-
Light. [G. phos]
phosgene
Carbonyl chloride; a colorless liquid below 8.2°C, but an extremely poisonous gas at ordinary temperatures; it is an insidious gas, since it is not immediately irritating, even ...
phosph-, phospho-, phosphor-, phosphoro-
Prefixes indicating the presence of phosphorus in a compound.See phospho- for specific usage of that prefix. [G. phos, light; phoros, carrying]
phosphagen
Energy-rich guanidinium or amidine phosphate, serving as an energy store in muscle and brain; e.g., phosphocreatine in mammals, phosphoarginine in invertebrates. Other ...
phosphagenic
Phosphate-producing.
phosphamic acid
R–NH–PO3H2, one of the three types of high-energy phosphates (the others being phosphophosphoric acids and phosphosulfuric acids).
phosphamidase
SYN: phosphoamidase.
phosphastat
A conceptual mechanism whereby the parathyroid hormone is increased when the levels of phosphorus rise to an above-normal level; there is as yet no satisfactory evidence for ...
phosphatase
Any of a group of enzymes (EC 3.1.3.x) that liberate orthophosphate from phosphoric esters. SEE ALSO: phosphohydrolases. - acid p. a p. with an optimum pH of less than 7.0 (for ...
Phosphatase, acid
Acid phosphatase is an enzyme that works under acid conditions and is made in the liver, spleen, bone marrow and the prostate gland. Abnormally high serum levels of the enzyme ...
Phosphatase, alkaline
An enzyme made in the liver, bone, and the placenta and normally present in high concentrations in growing bone and in bile. Alkaline phosphatase is released into the blood ...
Phosphate
A form of phosphoric acid. Calcium phosphate makes bones and teeth hard. * * * 1. A salt or ester of phosphoric acid. For individual phosphates not listed here, see under the ...
phosphate acetyltransferase
An enzyme-catalyzing transfer of an acetyl moiety from acetyl-CoA to orthophosphate, forming acetyl phosphate and coenzyme A. SYN: phosphoacylase, phosphotransacetylase. ...
phosphated
Containing phosphates.
phosphatemia
An abnormally high concentration of inorganic phosphates in the blood. [phosphate + G. haima, blood]
phosphatic
Relating to or containing phosphates.
phosphatidal
Older trivial name for alk-1-enylglycerophospholipid; plasmenyl.
phosphatidase
SYN: phospholipase A2.
phosphatidate
A salt or ester of a phosphatidic acid. - p. phosphatase an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of p. producing orthophosphate and 1,2-diacylglycerol; this enzyme ...
phosphatide
Former name for 1) phosphatidic acid and 2) phosphatidate.
phosphatidic acid
1,2-Diacylglycerol phosphate; a derivative of glycerophosphoric acid in which the two remaining hydroxyl groups of the glycerol are esterified with fatty acid s; e.g., ...
phosphatidolipase
SYN: phospholipase A2.
phosphatidyl
The radical of a phosphatidic acid; e.g., phosphatidylcholine.
phosphatidylcholine
See lecithin.
phosphatidylethanolamine
The condensation product of a phosphatidic acid and ethanolamine; found in biomembranes. SEE ALSO: cephalin. - p. cytidylyltransferase a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ...
phosphatidylglycerol
A phosphatidic acid in which a second glycerol molecule replaces the usual choline, or ethanolamine or serine; a constituent in human amniotic fluid that denotes fetal lung ...
phosphatidylinositol
A phosphatidic acid combined with inositol found in biomembranes and a precursor to certain cellular signals. Sometimes referred to as inositide. SYN: phosphoinositide. - p. ...
phosphatidylserine
The condensation product of phosphatidic acid and serine; found in biomembranes. SEE ALSO: cephalin.
phosphaturia
Excessive excretion of phosphates in the urine. SYN: phosphoruria, phosphuria. [phosphate + G. ouron, urine]
phosphene
Sensation of light produced by mechanical or electrical stimulation of the peripheral or central optic pathway of the nervous system. [G. phos, light, + phaino, to show] - ...
phosphide
A compound of phosphorus with valence −3; e.g., sodium p., Na3P.
phosphine
A colorless poisonous war gas with a characteristic garlic-like odor; also the active agent in some rodenticides; formed in small quantities in the putrefaction of organic matter ...
phosphinico-
In chemistry, symmetrically doubly substituted phosphinic acid, R2P(O)OH.
phosphite
A salt of phosphorous acid.
phospho-
Prefix for O-phosphono-, which may replace the suffix phosphate; e.g., glucose phosphate is O-phosphonoglucose or phosphoglucose. SEE ALSO: phosph-, phosphoryl-.
phosphoacylase
SYN: phosphate acetyltransferase.
phosphoamidase
An enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of phosphorus-nitrogen bonds, notably the hydrolysis of N-phosphocreatine to creatine and orthophosphate. SYN: phosphamidase.
phosphoamides
Amides of phosphoric acid (phosphoramidic acids) and their salts or esters (phosphoramidates), of the general formula (HO)2P(O)–NH2; e.g., creatine phosphate.
phosphoarginine
A compound (in particular, a phosphagen) of l-arginine with phosphoric acid containing the phosphoamide bond; a source of energy in the contraction of muscle in invertebrates, ...
phosphocholine
Choline O-phosphate; important in choline metabolism, e.g., in the biosynthesis of lecithins. SYN: phosphorylcholine. - p. cytidylyltransferase an enzyme that catalyzes the ...
phosphocreatine
A phosphagen; a compound of creatine (through its NH2 group) with phosphoric acid; a source of energy in the contraction of vertebrate muscle, its breakdown furnishing ...
phosphodiester
A diesterified orthophosphoric acid, RO–(PO2H)–OR′, as in the nucleic acid s. - p. hydrolases SYN: phosphodiesterases.
phosphodiesterases
Enzymes (EC 3.1.4.x) cleaving phosphodiester bonds, such as those in cAMP or between nucleotides in nucleic acid s, liberating smaller poly- or oligonucleotide units or ...
phosphodismutase
SYN: phosphomutase.
phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase
SYN: phosphop.pyruvic acid carboxykinase.
phosphoenolpyruvic acid
The phosphoric ester of pyruvic acid in the latter's p. form; an intermediate in the conversion of d-glucose to pyruvic acid and an example of a high-energy phosphate ester. - ...
phosphoethanolamine
A key intermediate in the formation of cephalins; formed in liver and brain by phosphorylation of ethanolamine. - p. cytidylyltransferase a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of ...
phosphogalactoisomerase
SYN: UDPglucose-hexose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase.
phosphoglucokinase
An enzyme that, in the presence of ATP, catalyzes the phosphorylation of d-glucose 1-phosphate to form d-glucose 1,6-bisphosphate and ADP; found in yeast and muscle; d-glucose ...
phosphoglucomutase
An enzyme that catalyzes the reversible reaction, α-d-glucose 1-phosphate ⇋ α-d-glucose 6-phosphate, with glucose 1,6-bisphosphate a necessary cofactor; one of the steps in ...
phosphogluconate dehydrogenase
6-phosphogluconic dehydrogenase; an enzyme catalyzing the reaction of 6-phospho-d-gluconate and NAD(P)+ to form 6-phospho-2-keto-d-gluconate and NAD(P)H; a deficiency of this ...
phosphoglyceracetals
SYN: plasmalogens.
phosphoglycerate kinase
An enzyme catalyzing the formation of 3-phospho-d-glyceroyl phosphate and ADP from 3-phospho-d-glycerate and ATP; this enzyme is a part of the glycolytic pathway; a deficiency of ...
phosphoglyceric acid
1. Glyceroyl phosphoric acid; glyceroyl phosphate; an acid anhydride between glyceric acid and phosphoric acid. 2. 2-P.; the deprotonated form, 2-phosphoglycerate, is an ...
phosphoglycerides
Acylglycerol and diacylglycerol phosphates; constituents of nerve tissue, and involved in fat transport and storage.
phosphoglyceromutase
An isomerizing enzyme catalyzing the reversible interconversion of 2-phosphoglycerate and 3-phosphoglycerate with 2,3-bisphosphoglycerate present as a cofactor; a deficiency of ...
phosphohexokinase
SYN: 6-phosphofructokinase.
phosphohexomutase
SYN: glucose-phosphate isomerase.
phosphohexose isomerase
SYN: glucose-phosphate isomerase.
phosphohydrolases
Phosphoric monoester hydrolases; enzymes (EC 3.1.3.x) cleaving phosphoric acid (as orthophosphate) from its esters; trivial name s usually end in phosphate.
phosphoinositide
SYN: phosphatidylinositol.
phosphokinase
A phosphotransferase or a kinase.
phospholipase
An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of a phospholipid. SYN: lecithinase. - p. A1 an enzyme that hydrolyzes a lecithin (1,2-diacylglycerophosphocholine) to a ...
phospholipid
A lipid containing phosphorus, thus including the lecithins and other phosphatidyl derivatives, sphingomyelin, and plasmalogens; the basic constituents of biomembranes.
phosphomutase
One of a number of enzymes (mutases) (EC 5.4.2.x) that apparently catalyze intramolecular transfer because the donor is regenerated ( e.g., phosphoglyceromutase, ...

< 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.030 c;