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rosin
The solid resin obtained after steam distillation of crude balsam from Pinus palustris and from other species of Pinus (family Pinaceae); used in plasters to render them ...
Ross
Donald N., Br. cardiac surgeon, * 1922; introduced aortic valve replacement using a pulmonic valve autograft. See R. procedure. Sir George W., Canadian physician, 1841–1931. ...
Rossi counter
An instrument used to measure the energy deposited by radiation in microscopic sites such as cells. Named for its creator Harald H. Rossi (1917-2000), a radiobiophysicist who ...
Rossolimo
Grigoriy I., Russian neurologist, 1860–1928. See R. reflex, R. sign.
rostellum
The anterior fixed or invertible portion of the scolex of a tapeworm, frequently provided with a row (or several rows) of hooks. [L. dim. of rostrum, a beak] - armed r. r. with ...
rostrad
1. In a direction toward any rostrum. 2. Situated nearer a rostrum or the snout end of an organism in relation to a specific reference point; opposite of caudad (2). [L. ...
rostral
1. Relating to any rostrum or anatomic structure resembling a beak. 2. At the head end. SYN: rostralis [TA]. [L. rostralis, fr. rostrum, beak]
rostralis
SYN: rostral, rostral. [L. fr. rostrum, beak]
rostrate
Having a beak or hook. [L. rostratus]
rostriform
Beak-shaped. [L. rostrum, beak]
rostrum
Any beak-shaped structure. [L. a beak] - r. corporis callosi [TA] SYN: r. of corpus callosum. - r. of corpus callosum [TA] beak of the corpus callosum, the recurved portion of ...
ROT
Abbreviation for right occipitotransverse position.
rot
To decay or putrify. [A.S. rotian]
rotamase
Enzyme capable of altering the rotational conformation of a molecule.
rotamer
An isomer differing from other conformation(s) only in rotational positioning of its parts, such as cis- and trans- forms.
rotameter
A device for measuring the flow of gas or liquid; the fluid flowing up through a slightly tapered tube elevates a ball or other weight that partially obstructs the flow, until the ...
rotation
1. Turning or movement of a body around its axis. 2. A recurrence in regular order of certain events, such as the symptoms of a periodic disease. 3. In medical education, a ...
rotator
SYN: r. muscle. See rotatores (muscles), under muscle. [L. See rotation] - medial r. a muscle that turns a part medialward. SEE ALSO: invertor. SYN: intortor.
Rotator cuff
A group of four tendons that stabilize the shoulder joint. Each of the four tendons hooks up to a muscle that moves the shoulder in a specific direction. The four muscles whose ...
rotavirus
A group of RNA viruses (family Reoviridae) wheel-like in appearance that form a genus, Rota virus, which includes the human gastroenteritis viruses (a major cause of infant ...
Rotavirus (RV)
A leading cause of severe winter diarrhea in young children, RV each year causes an estimated 500,000 doctor visits and 50,000 hospital admissions in the United States. Almost ...
Rotch
Thomas M., U.S. physician, 1849–1914. See R. sign.
röteln, roetheln
SYN: rubella. [Ger. little red spots, fr. rot, red, + -el, dim. suffix]
rotenone
The principal insecticidal component of derris root, Derris elliptica, D. malaccensis, and other species of D., and from Lonchocarpus nicou (family Leguminosae); used externally ...
Roth
Moritz, Swiss physician and pathologist, 1839–1914. See R. spots, under spot, vas aberrans of R.. Vladimir K., Russian neurologist, 1848–1916. See Bernhardt-R. syndrome. See ...
Rothera
Arthur C.H., English biochemist, 1880–1915. See R. nitroprusside test.
Rothia
A genus of nonmotile, non–spore-forming, non–acid-fast, aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Actinomycetaceae) containing Gram-positive, coccoid, ...
Rothmund
August von, German physician, 1830–1906. See R. syndrome, R.- Thomson syndrome.
Rothmund-Thomson syndrome (RTS)
An hereditary disease characterized by progressive degeneration (atrophy), scarring and abnormal pigmentation of the skin together with stunting of growth, baldness, cataracts, ...
Rotor
Arturo B., 20th century Philippine internist. See R. syndrome.
rotoscoliosis
Combined lateral and rotational deviation of the vertebral column. [L. roto, to rotate, + G. skoliosis, crookedness]
rototome
A rotating cutting instrument used in arthroscopic surgery.
rotoxamine
Active isomer of carbinoxamine; an antihistaminic.
Rouget
Charles M.B., French physiologist, 1824–1904. See R. muscle, R.- Neumann sheath. Antoine D., 19th century French physiologist. See R. bulb.
rough
Not smooth; denoting the irregular, coarsely granular surface of a certain bacterial colony type.
roughage
Anything in the diet, e.g., bran, serving as a bulk stimulant of intestinal peristalsis.
Roughton
Francis J.W., British scientist, 1899–1972. See R.- Scholander apparatus, R.- Scholander syringe.
Rougnon de Magny
Nicholas F., French physician, 1727–1799. See Rougnon-Heberden disease.
rouleau
An aggregate of erythrocytes stacked like a pile of coins. R. formation commonly indicates an increase in plasma immunoglobulin. [Fr. spool, cylinder, fr. rouler, to roll, fr. ...
Roundworm
A type of parasitic worm that hatches in the intestines and lives there. The eggs of the roundworm usually enter the body through contaminated water or food or on fingers placed ...
Roundworm C. elegans genome
All of the genetic information contained in the roundworm C. elegans (Caenorhabditis elegans). The genomes of particular nonhuman organisms such as C. elegans have been studied ...
Rous
F. Peyton, U.S. pathologist and Nobel laureate, 1879–1970. See R. sarcoma, R. sarcoma virus, R. tumor, R.-associated virus.
Roussy
Gustave, French pathologist, 1874–1948. See R.- Lévy disease, R.- Lévy syndrome, Dejerine-R. syndrome.
Rouviere
Henri, French anatomist and embryologist, *1875. See node of R..
Roux
Philibert J., French surgeon, 1780–1854. See R. method. Pierre P.E., French bacteriologist, 1853–1933. See Ro spatula, R. stain. César, Swiss surgeon, 1857–1934. See ...
Rovsing
Niels T., Danish surgeon, 1862–1927. See R. sign.
RPF
Abbreviation for renal plasma flow. See effective renal plasma flow.
rpm
Abbreviation for revolutions per minute.
RPO
1. Abbreviation for right posterior oblique, a radiographic projection. 2. Abbreviation for radiation protection officer.
RPR test
Rapid plasma reagin, a blood test for syphilis that looks for an antibody that is present in the bloodstream when a patient has syphilis. A negative (nonreactive) RPR is ...
rRNA
Ribosomal RNA, a molecular component of a ribosome, the cell's essential protein factory. Strictly speaking, ribosomal RNA (rRNA) does not make proteins. It makes polypeptides ...
RSA
Abbreviation for right sacroanterior position.
RSD
Abbreviation for reflex sympathetic dystrophy.
RSP
Abbreviation for right sacroposterior position.
RST
Abbreviation for right sacrotransverse position.
RSV
Although several standard medical dictionaries indicate only that RSV stands for Rous sarcoma virus, RSV in clinical medicine is the abbreviation for respiratory syncytial ...
RT, rt
Abbreviation for room temperature.
RT-PCR
Abbreviation for reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.
RT3
Symbol for reverse triiodothyronine.
rTMP
Abbreviation for ribothymidylic acid.
RTS (Rothmund-Thomson syndrome)
An hereditary disease characterized by progressive degeneration (atrophy), scarring and abnormal pigmentation of the skin together with stunting of growth, baldness, cataracts, ...
RTT (Rett syndrome)
A genetic disease that is a uniform and striking, progressive neurologic developmental disorder and one of the most common causes of mental retardation in females. After normal ...
Ru
Symbol for ruthenium.
RU-486
The French abortion pill, also known as mifepristone. RU-486 has been used in combination with another drug called misoprostol, terminate pregnancy at an early stage. It is ...
rub
Friction encountered in moving one body in contact with another. - friction r. SYN: friction sound. - pericardial r., pericardial friction r. SYN: pericardial friction ...
Rubarth
Sven, Swedish veterinarian, *1905. See R. disease virus.
rubber
The prepared inspissated milky juice of Hevea brasiliensis and other species of Hevea (family Euphorbiaceae), known in commerce as pure Para r.; used in the manufacture of various ...
rubber policeman
See policeman.
rubeanic acid
Dithiooxamide, which forms complete dark greenish-black complexes with copper in alkaline ethanolic solution; used histochemically for demonstrating pathologic copper deposits, ...
rubedo
A temporary redness of the skin. [L. redness, fr. ruber, red]
rubefacient
1. Causing a reddening of the skin. 2. A counterirritant that produces erythema when applied to the skin surface. [L. rubi-facio, fr. ruber, red, + facio, to make]
rubefaction
Erythema of the skin caused by local application of a counterirritant. [see rubefacient]
rubella
An acute but mild exanthematous disease caused by r. virus ( Rubivirus family Togaviridae), with enlargement of lymph node s, but usually with little fever or constitutional ...
Rubella (historical note)
In 1941 N. M. Gregg, an Australian ophthalmologist, recognized that infection of the mother with rubella (German measles) during early pregnancy could malform an embryo and ...
Rubella immunization
The standard MMR vaccine is given to prevent measles, mumps and rubella (German measles). The MMR vaccine is now given in two dosages. The first should be given at 12-15 ...
Rubella syndrome
The constellation of abnormalities caused by infection with the rubella (German measles) virus before birth. The syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital malformations ...
Rubella vaccine
A vaccine designed to prevent rubella, or German measles. German measles was once seen merely as a child's unpleasant rite of passage. It was thought to be a mild malady that ...
rubellin
A cardiac glycoside with a digitalis-like action, obtained from Urginia rubella (family Liliaceae).
rubeola
A term used for measles; not to be confused with rubella. [Mod. L. dim. of ruber, red, reddish]
Rubeola (measles)
Rubeola is the ordinary measles, an acute highly contagious viral disease with fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and a spreading skin rash. Rubeola (measles) is a ...
rubeosis
Reddish discoloration, as of the skin. [L. ruber, red, + G. -osis, condition] - r. iridis diabetica neovascularization of the anterior surface of the iris in diabetes mellitus.
rubescent
Reddening. [L. rubesco, pr. p. rubescens, to become red]
rubidium
An alkali element, atomic no. 37, atomic wt. 85.4678; its salts have been used in medicine for the same purposes as the corresponding sodium or potassium salts. [L. rubidus, ...
rubidomycin
An antibiotic used as an antineoplastic particularly in acute leukemias; similar to doxorubicin in antitumor activity and in exhibiting cumulative cardiotoxicity.
Rubin
Isidor C., U.S. gynecologist, 1883–1958. See R. test.
rubin S, rubine
SYN: acid fuchsin.
Rubinstein
Jack H., U.S. child psychiatrist and pediatrician, *1925. See R.- Taybi syndrome.
Rubivirus
A genus of viruses (family Togaviridae) that includes the rubella virus. [rubella + virus]
Rubner
Max, German hygienist and biochemist, 1854–1932. See R. laws of growth, under law, R. test.
rubor
Redness, as one of the four signs of inflammation (r., calor, dolor, tumor) enunciated by Celsus. [L.]
rubratoxin
A mycotoxin produced by Penicillium rubrum and P. purpurogenum, which form readily on cereal grains; responsible for outbreaks of toxicosis in the U.S.
rubredoxins
Ferredoxins without acid-labile sulfur and with the iron in a typical mercaptide coordination.
rubriblast
SYN: pronormoblast. [L. ruber, red, + G. blastos, germ] - pernicious anemia type r. SYN: promegaloblast. See erythroblast.
rubric
Section or chapter heading, used with reference to groups of diseases, as in ICD. [M.E. rubrike, title or heading in red, fr. L. ruber, red]
rubricyte
Polychromatic normoblast. See erythroblast. [L. ruber, red, + kytos, cell]
rubrospinal
Relating to the nerve fibers passing from the red nucleus to the spinal cord : the r. tract [TA].
Rubulavirus
A genus in the family Paramyxoviridae; causes mumps. SYN: mumpvirus.
ructus
SYN: eructation. [L. fr. ructo, pp. -atus, to belch]
Rud
Einar, Danish physician, *1892. See R. syndrome.
rudiment
1. An organ or structure that is incompletely developed. 2. The first indication of a structure in the course of ontogeny. SYN: rudimentum. [L. rudimentum, a beginning, fr. ...
rudimentary
Relating to a rudiment. SYN: abortive (2).
rudimentum
SYN: rudiment, rudiment. [L.] - r. hippocampi indusium griseum.
ruff
A collar or ruffle. - pupillary r. the dark-brown, wrinkled rim of the normal pupil, which is the posterior pigment epithelium of the iris showing itself at the pupillary margin.
Ruffini
Angelo, Italian histologist, 1864–1929. See R. corpuscles, under corpuscle, flower- spray organ of R..
rufous
Having a reddish complexion and red hair. SYN: erythristic. [L. rufus, reddish]
ruga
A fold, ridge, or crease; a wrinkle. [L. a wrinkle] - rugae of gallbladder mucosal folds of gallbladder, under fold. - gastric rugae gastric folds, under fold. - r. gastrica ...
rugine
1. SYN: periosteal elevator. 2. A raspatory. [Fr.]
rugitus
A rumbling sound in the intestines. SEE ALSO: borborygmus. [L. a roaring, fr. rugio, to roar]
rugose
Marked by rugae; wrinkled. SYN: rugous. [L. rugosus]
rugosity
1. The state of being thrown into folds or wrinkles. 2. A ruga.
rugous
SYN: rugose.
Ruhemann purple
a blue-violet dye formed in the reaction of ninhydrin with amino acid s.
RUL
Acronym for the right upper lobe (of the lung). The right lung has three lobes: the right lower lobe (RLL), the right middle lobe (RML), and the right upper lobe (RUL). The left ...
rule
A criterion, standard, or guide governing a procedure, arrangement, action, etc. SEE ALSO: law, principle, theorem. [O. Fr. reule, fr. L. regula, a guide, pattern] - Abegg r. ...
ruler
A calibrated strip for measuring plane surfaces. - isometric r. a calibrated scale for eliminating distortion in the measurement of plane surfaces.
rum
A spirit distilled from the fermented juice of the sugar cane.
rum-blossom
SYN: rhinophyma.
ruminant
An animal that chews the cud, material regurgitated from the rumen for rechewing; e.g., the sheep, cow, deer, or antelope.
Rumination
: Regurgitating food after a meal and then swallowing and digesting some of it. Cattle and other ruminant animals have a four-chambered stomach for the rumination of food and so ...
ruminative
Characterized by a preoccupation with certain thoughts and ideas.
Ruminococcus
A genus of anaerobic, Gram-positive coccobacilli isolated from the repiratory tract of humans and the intestinal tract of humans and animals. The type species is R. productus, ...
Rumpel
Theodor, German physician, 1862–1923. See R.- Leede sign, R.- Leede test, R.- Leede phenomenon.
run
A group of successive measurements in an analytic process or during a period of time within which the accuracy and precision of the measuring system are expected to be stable. ...
Rundle
A.T., British physician. See Richards-R. syndrome.
Runeberg
Johan W., Finnish physician, 1843–1918. See R. formula.
Runny nose
Rhinorrhea is the medical term for this common problem. From the Greek words "rhinos" meaning "of the nose" and "rhoia" meaning "a flowing."
runoff
Delayed part of the angiographic examination of a vascular bed, to show small artery patency.
runt
A stunted animal, occurring most frequently in species that give birth to large litters. [A.S.]
rupia
1. Ulcers of late secondary syphilis, covered with yellowish or brown crusts that have been compared in their appearance to oyster shells. 2. Term occasionally used to designate ...
rupioid
Resembling rupia. [G. rhypos, filth (rupia), + eidos, resemblance]
rupture
1. SYN: hernia. 2. A solution of continuity or a tear; a break of any organ or other of the soft parts. [L. ruptura, a fracture (of limb or vein), fr. rumpo, pp. ruptus, to ...
Rupture, uterine
A tear of the uterus, an uncommon but very serious situation that may result in hysterectomy, urologic injury to the woman, a need for blood transfusion, maternal death, and ...
Ruptured spleen
Rupture of the capsule of the spleen, an organ in the upper left part of the abdomen, is a potential catastrophe that requires immediate medical and surgical attention. Splenic ...
RUQ
Abbreviation for the right upper quadrant (quarter). The RUQ of the abdomen contains the liver and the gallbladder. (By contrast, LUQ stands for the left upper quadrant, LLQ ...
Rushton
Martin A., British pathologist, 1903–1970. See R. bodies.
Russell
Albert L., U.S. dentist, 1905–1985. See R. Periodontal Index. Alexander, 20th century British pediatrician. See R. syndrome, Silver-R. dwarfism, Silver-R. syndrome. Gerald ...
Russell Periodontal Index
An index that estimates the degree of periodontal disease present in the mouth by measuring both bone loss around the teeth and gingival inflammation; used frequently in the ...
Rust
Johann N., German surgeon, 1775–1840. See R. phenomenon.
rusts
Species of Puccinia and other microbes constituting important pathogens of plants, especially cereal grains; they are important allergens for humans when inhaled in large numbers, ...
ruthenium
A metallic element of the platinum group; atomic no. 44, atomic wt. 101.07; 106Ru, with a half-life of 1.020 years, has been used in the treatment of certain eye problems. ...
ruthenium red
Ammoniated r. oxychloride, used in histology and electron microscopy as a stain for certain complex polysaccharides.
rutherford
Obsolete term for a unit of radioactivity, representing that quantity of radioactive material in which a million disintegrations are taking place per second; 37 r. = 1 mCi. See ...
rutidosis
SYN: rhytidosis.
rutin
A flavonoid obtained from buckwheat, which causes decreased capillary fragility. SYN: rutoside.
rutinose
A disaccharide of d-glucose and l-rhamnose, and a component of rutin.
rutoside
SYN: rutin.
Ruysch
Frederik, Dutch anatomist, 1638–1731. See R. membrane, R. muscle, R. tube, R. veins, under vein.
RV
Abbreviation for residual volume.
RV (rotavirus)
Aside from recreational vehicle, RV is an abbreviation for rotavirus, a leading cause of severe winter diarrhea in young children. Each year RV causes an estimated 500,000 ...
Rx
On a prescription the symbol Rx (or R) stands for the word Recipe, meaning (in Latin) "to take." It is usually a part of the superscription (or heading) of the prescription. The ...
Ryan
Norbert J., 20th century Australian pathologist. See R. stain.
ryanodine
An alkaloid obtained from Ryania speciosa (family Flacourtiaceae); has a disruptive effect on calcium storage in cardiac and skeletal muscle, where it produces sustained ...
rye smut
SYN: ergot.
Ryle
John A., English physician, 1889–1950. See R. tube.
Røonne
Henning K.T., Danish ophthalmologist, 1878–1947. See R. nasal step.
S
1. Abbreviation for sacral vertebra (S1–S5); spherical, spherical lens; Svedberg unit. 2. Symbol for siemens; sulfur; entropy in thermodynamics; substrate in the ...
s
Abbreviation of L. sinister, left; L. semis, half; second; as a subscript, denotes steady state. Abbreviation for L. sine, without. Symbol for selection coefficient; ...
S romanum
Archaic term for sigmoid colon.
S-A
Abbreviation for sinuatrial.
S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine
The compound formed by the demethylation of S-adenosyl-l-methionine.
S-adenosyl-l-methionine
Condensation product of adenosine and l-methionine involving replacement of the —OPO3H2 of adenylic acid by —S+(CH3)CH2CH2CH(NH3+)CO2 of methionine; a sulfonium compound ...
s-cone
Short wavelength sensitive c. (blue c.).
S-nitrosohemoglobin
A compound formed by the binding of nitric oxide with hemoglobin; release and uptake of the nitric oxide group produce changes in vascular resistance and blood flow, which ...
S-sulfocysteine
A sulfated derivative of cysteine that is elevated in individuals with a molybdenum cofactor deficiency.
s.c.
Abbreviation for subcutaneous; subcutaneously.
S.G.O.
Abbreviation for Surgeon General's Office.
s.o.s.
Abbreviation for L. si opus sit, if needed.
S1
Symbol for first heart sound.
S1-S5 (sacral vertebrae)
The first sacral vertebra through the fifth sacral vertebra. There are 5 sacral vertebral bones. They are represented by the symbols S1 through S5. The sacral vertebrae are ...
S100
An acidic, calcium-binding protein characterized by its partial solubility in saturated ammonium sulfate; stains for S. are used in the differential diagnosis of melanomas, ...
S2
Symbol for second heart sound.
S3
Symbol for third heart sound.
S4
Symbol for fourth heart sound.
S7
SYN: summation gallop.
SA
Abbreviation for sacroanterior position.
SA node
The SA node (SA stands for sinoatrial) is one of the major elements in the cardiac conduction system, the system that controls the heart rate. This stunningly designed system ...
sabadilla
The seed of Schoenocaulon officinale (family Liliaceae), a plant of the shores of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea; it yields cevadine, veratridine, and several other ...
Sabin
Albert B., Polish-U.S. virologist, 1906–1993. See S. vaccine, S.- Feldman dye test.
Sabin vaccine
The oral polio vaccine developed by Dr. Albert S. Sabin. The first vaccine against poliomyelitis was introduced by Dr. Jonas Salk in 1955 and was administered by injection ...
Sabouraud
Raymond J.A., French dermatologist, 1864–1938. See S. agar, S. pastils, under pastil, S.-Noiré instrument.
sabulous
Sandy; gritty. [L. sabulosus, fr. sabulum, coarse sand]
saburra
Foulness of the stomach or mouth resulting from decomposed food. [L. sand]
saburral
Relating to saburra.
sac
1. A pouch or bursa. SYN: saccus [TA]. SEE ALSO: sacculus. 2. An encysted abscess at the root of a tooth. 3. The capsule of a tumor, or envelope of a cyst. [L. saccus, a ...
Sac, pericardial
The pericardial sac is a conical sac of fibrous tissue which surrounds the heart and the roots of the great blood vessels. The pericardium has outer and inner coats. The outer ...
saccade
Rapid eye movement to redirect the line of sight. [Fr. s., sudden check of a horse]
saccadic
Jerky. See s. movement.
saccate
Relating to a sac. [L. saccus, sac]
sacchar-
See saccharo-.
saccharase
SYN: β-fructofuranosidase.
saccharate
A salt or ester of saccharic acid.
saccharephidrosis
The presence of sugar in the sweat. [ sacchar- + G. ephidrosis, a slight perspiration]
sacchari-
See saccharo-.
saccharic
Relating to sugar.
saccharic acid
Term used to denote the class of dicarboxy sugar acids.
saccharides
S. are classified as mono-, di-, tri-, and polysaccharides according to the number of monosaccharide groups composing them. See carbohydrates.
sacchariferous
Producing sugar.
saccharification
The process of saccharifying.
saccharify
To convert starch or cellulose or other polysaccharides into sugar. [ sacchari- + L. facio, to make]
saccharimeter
An instrument for determining the amount of sugar in a solution; it may be a polarimeter, a hygrometer, or a container in which the solution is fermented and the amount ...
Saccharin
: An artificial sweetener which diluted in water is 300-500 times sweeter than the sugar sucrose. (Saccharin is o-sulfobenzimide; 2,3-dihydro-3-oxobenzisosulfonazole.) The US ...
saccharine
Relating to sugar; sweet.
saccharo-, sacchar-, sacchari-
Combining forms denoting sugar (saccharide). [G. sakcharon, sugar]
saccharogen amylase
SYN: β-amylase.
saccharolytic
Capable of hydrolyzing or otherwise breaking down a sugar molecule. [saccharo- + G. lysis, loosening]
saccharometabolic
Relating to saccharometabolism.
saccharometabolism
Metabolism of sugar; the process of utilization of sugar in cells.
saccharometer
SYN: saccharimeter.
Saccharomyces
A genus of budding yeasts (family Saccharomycetaceae); an ascomycete. S. cerevisiae is used to produce brewer's yeast and ethanol. S. cerevisiae is a very rare pathogen in ...
Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) genome
All of the genetic information contained in yeast. The genomes of particular nonhuman organisms such as yeast have been studied for a number of reasons including the need to ...
Saccharomycetaceae
The family of yeasts; that group of fungi comprising the ascomycetes which possess a predominantly unicellular thallus, reproduce asexually by budding, transverse division, or ...
Saccharomycetales
SYN: Endomycetales.
saccharopine
A derivative of α-ketoglutarate and l-lysine that is an intermediate in l-lysine catabolism; elevated in cases of saccharopinuria. - s. dehydrogenase two enzymes that are ...
saccharopinuria
Elevated levels of saccharopine in the urine; associated with a variant of familial hyperlysinuria.
saccharose
SYN: sucrose.
saccharum
SYN: sucrose. [Mod. L. fr. G. sakcharon] - s. canadense SYN: maple sugar. - s. lactis SYN: lactose.
sacciform
Pouched; sac-shaped. SYN: saccular, sacculated. [L. saccus, sack, + forma, form]
Saccular
From the Latin “sacculus” meaning a small pouch. As for example the alveolar saccules (little air pouches) within the lungs . * * * SYN: sacciform.
Saccular aneurysm
An aneurysm that resembles a small sack. A berry aneurysm is typically saccular. An aneurysm is a localized widening (dilatation) of an artery, vein, or the heart. At the area ...
sacculated
SYN: sacciform.
sacculation
1. A structure formed by a group of sacs. 2. The formation of a sac or pouch. - s. of colon SYN: haustra of colon, under haustrum.
saccule
1. [TA] The smaller of the two membranous sacs in the vestibule of the labyrinth, lying in the spherical recess; it is connected with the cochlear duct by a very short tube, ...
sacculocochlear
Relating to the sacculus and the membranous cochlea.
sacculus
SYN: saccule. [L. dim. of saccus, sac] - s. alveolaris, pl.sacculi alveolares [TA] SYN: alveolar sac (1). - s. communis SYN: utricle. - s. endolymphaticus SYN: endolymphatic ...
saccus
SYN: sac (1). [L. a bag, sack] - s. conjunctivalis [TA] SYN: conjunctival sac. - s. endolymphaticus [TA] SYN: endolymphatic sac. - s. lacrimalis [TA] SYN: lacrimal sac. - s. ...
Sachs
Bernard, U.S. neurologist, 1858–1944. See Tay-S. disease. Hans, German bacteriologist, 1877–1945. See S.- Georgi test. Maurice D., U.S. radiologist, *1909. See Hill-S. ...
sacr-
See sacro-.
sacrad
In the direction of the sacrum. [ sacr- + L. ad, to]
sacral
Relating to or in the neighborhood of the sacrum.
Sacral agenesis
Failure of formation of all or part of the sacrum (the lowest section of the spine). Currarino syndrome is a condition characterized by the combination of: {{}}Partial absence ...
sacralgia
Pain in the sacral region. SYN: sacrodynia. [ sacr- + G. algos, pain]
sacralization
Lumbar development and appearance of the first sacral vertebra.
sacrectomy
Resection of a portion of the sacrum to facilitate an operation. SYN: sacrotomy. [ sacr- + G. ektome, excision]
sacro-, sacr-
The sacrum. [L. os sacrum, sacred bone]
sacrococcygeal
Relating to both sacrum and coccyx.
sacrococcygeus
See muscle.
sacrodynia
SYN: sacralgia. [sacro- + G. odyne, pain]
sacroiliac
Relating to the sacrum and the ilium.
sacroiliitis
Inflammation of the sacroiliac joint.
sacrolumbalis
The iliocostalis lumborum muscle.
sacrolumbar
SYN: lumbosacral.
sacrosciatic
Relating to both sacrum and ischium.
sacrospinal
Relating to the sacrum and the vertebral column above.
sacrotomy
SYN: sacrectomy. [sacro- + G. tome, incision]
sacrovertebral
Relating to the sacrum and the vertebrae above.
Sacrum
The large, heavy bone at the base of the spine, which is made up of fused sacral vertebrae. The sacrum is located in the vertebral column, between the lumbar vertebrae and the ...
SACT
Abbreviation for sinoatrial conduction time.
SAD
Abbreviation for seasonal affective disorder.
SAD (seasonal affective disorder)
Depression that tends to occur (and recur) as the days grow shorter in the fall and winter. It is believed that affected persons react adversely to the decreasing amounts of light ...
saddle
1. A structure shaped like, or suggestive of, a seat or s. used in horseback riding. SYN: sella. 2. SYN: denture base. - Turkish s. SYN: sella turcica.
sadism
A form of perversion, often sexual in nature, in which a person finds pleasure in inflicting abuse and maltreatment. Cf.:masochism. [Marquis de Sade, 1740–1814, confessedly ...
sadist
One who practices sadism.
sadistic
Pertaining to or characterized by sadism.
sadomasochism
A form of perversion marked by enjoyment of cruelty and/or humiliation in its received or active and/or dispensed and passive form. [ sadism + masochism]
Saemisch
Edwin T., German ophthalmologist, 1833-1909. See S. section, S. ulcer.
Saenger
M., Prague obstetrician, 1853–1903. See S. operation.
Safe sex
Sexual practices that do not involve the exchange of bodily fluids, including blood, sperm, vaginal secretions, and saliva, to avoid AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. ...
safflower
SYN: carthamus. [Ar. safra, yellow]
safflower oil
An oil extracted from the seeds of Carthamus tinctorius, containing 74.5% linoleic acid and 6.6% saturated fatty acid s; recommended for use in hypercholesteremia, myocardial ...
saffron
SYN: crocus. [Ar. zafaran, fr. safra, yellow]
safranin O
A mixture of dimethyl- and trimethylphenosafranin chloride, a basic red dye that exhibits orange metachromasia; used in histology as a nuclear stain, in microbiology as a ...
safranophil, safranophile
Staining readily with safranin; denoting certain cells and tissues.
safrole
The methylene ether of allyl pyrocatechol; contained in oil of sassafras, oil of camphor, and various other volatile oils; it is obtained chiefly from oil of camphor by ...
sage
SYN: salvia. [L. salvia, the s. plant, fr. salvus, safe]
sagitta
SYN: otoliths.

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