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Sagittal
A vertical plane passing through the body which divides it into left and right sides. * * * Resembling an arrow; in the line of an arrow shot from a bow, i.e., in an ...
Sagittal (anatomic orientation)
A vertical plane passing through the standing body from front to back. The mid-saggital, or median plane, splits the body into left and right halves. For a more complete listing ...
Sagittal sinus
A crucial large vein that goes over the top of the skull from front to back and then splits to take blood from the brain back toward the heart.
sagittalis
SYN: sagittal. [L.]
Saint
Charles F.M., African surgeon, *1886. See S. triad.
Saint Anthony fire
1. SYN: ergotism. 2. Any of several inflammations or gangrenous conditions of the skin ( E.G., erysipelas). [St. Anthony, Egyptian monk, about 250–350 ad]
Sakaguchi reaction
See under reaction.
Saksenaea vasiformis
one of the fungal species that cause mucormycosis. This species is notable for the proportion of cases with subcutaneous infection, rather than pulmonary or paranasal sinus ...
Sakurai
Japanese ophthalmologist. See S.- Lisch nodule.
sal
SYN: salt. [L.] - s. alembroth the product obtained by crystallization from a solution of equal parts of ammonium chloride and mercuric chloride. SYN: salt of wisdom. [an ...
Salah
M., 20th century Egyptian surgeon. See S. sternal puncture needle.
salbutamol
SYN: albuterol.
Saldino
Ronald M., American radiologist.
salicin
A glucoside of o-hydroxybenzylalcohol, obtained from the bark of several species of Salix ( willow) and Populus (poplar); s. is hydrolyzed to glucose and saligenin ( salicyl ...
salicyl
The acyl radical of salicylic acid. - s. aldehyde obtained from Spirea ulmaria (meadow sweet), and made synthetically; used as a diuretic and antiseptic, and in perfumery. SYN: ...
salicylamide
The amide of salicylic acid, o-hydroxybenzamide; an analgesic, antipyretic and antiarthritic, similar in action to aspirin.
salicylanilide
An antifungal agent especially useful in the treatment of tinea capitis caused by Microsporum audouinii.
salicylate
1. A salt or ester of salicylic acid. 2. To treat foodstuffs with salicylic acid as a preservative. SYN: salicylize.
salicylated
Treated by the addition of salicylic acid as a preservative.
salicylazosulfapyridine
SYN: sulfasalazine.
salicylic acid
A component of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), derived from salicin and made synthetically; used externally as a keratolytic agent, antiseptic, and fungicide.
salicylic aldehyde
SYN: salicyl aldehyde.
salicylism
Poisoning by salicylic acid or any of its compounds.
salicylize
SYN: salicylate (2).
salicylsalicylic acid
SYN: salsalate.
salicylsulfonic acid
SYN: sulfosalicylic acid.
salicyluric acid
The conjugation product of glycine with salicylic acid; excreted in urine after the administration of salicylic acid or some of its compounds.
salient
1. SYN: projection. 2. In radiology, an obsolete term for projection. [L. salio, to leap or spring up]
salifiable
Capable of being made into salts; said of a base that combines with acids to make salts.
salify
To convert into a salt.
saligenin, saligenol
Obtained by the hydrolysis of salicin; a local anesthetic.
salimeter
A hydrometer used to determine the specific gravity, or the concentration, of a saline solution.
Saline
Relating to salt. As an adjective, "saline" means "salty, containing salt." As a noun "saline" is a salt solution, often adjusted to the normal salinity of the human body. Salt, ...
salinometer
A hydrometer so calibrated as to give a direct reading of the percentage of a particular salt present in solution.
saliva
A clear, tasteless, odorless, slightly acid (pH 6.8) viscid fluid, consisting of the secretion from the parotid, sublingual, and submandibular salivary glands and the mucous ...
salivant
1. Causing a flow of saliva. 2. An agent that increases the flow of saliva. SYN: salivator.
salivary
Relating to saliva. SYN: sialic, sialine. [L. salivarius]
Salivary gland
One of the glands in the mouth that produce saliva. There are 3 major salivary glands. They are the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands. Each of these glands is ...
salivate
To cause an excessive flow of saliva.
salivation
SYN: sialorrhea.
salivator
SYN: salivant (2).
salivolithiasis
SYN: sialolithiasis.
Salk
Jonas, U.S. immunologist, 1914–1995. See S. vaccine.
Salk Institute
The Salk Institute for Biological Studies , a prominent independent non-profit institution doing basic science research concerned with human health. The Institute in La Jolla, ...
Salk vaccine
Vaccine against poliomyelitis named for Dr. Jonas Salk who developed and introduced it in 1955. It was the first type of polio vaccine to become available. It was made by ...
Salmonella
A genus of aerobic to facultatively anaerobic bacteria (family Enterobacteriaceae) containing Gram-negative rods that are either motile or nonmotile; motile cells are ...
Salmonella genome
The entire genetic complement (the DNA) of Salmonella bacteria. The genomes of two strains of Salmonella bacteria have been sequenced. One strain is responsible for typhoid; ...
salmonellosis
Infection with bacteria of the genus Salmonella. Patients with sickle cell anemia and compromised immune systems are particularly susceptible. [Salmonella + G. -osis, condition]
salol
SYN: phenyl salicylate.
salping-
See salpingo-.
salpingectomy
Removal of the fallopian tube. SYN: tubectomy. [ salping- + G. ektome, excision] - abdominal s. removal of one or both fallopian tubes through an abdominal incision.
salpinges
Plural of salpinx.
salpingian
Relating to the fallopian tube or to the auditory tube.
salpingioma
Any tumor arising in the tissues of a uterine tube. [ salping- + G. -oma, tumor]
salpingitic
Relating to salpingitis.
salpingitis
Inflammation of the uterine or the eustachian tube. [ salping- + G. -itis, inflammation] - chronic interstitial s. s. in which fibrosis or mononuclear cell infiltration ...
salpingo-, salping-
A tube (usually the uterine or auditory tube). SEE ALSO: tubo-. [G. salpinx, trumpet (tube)]
salpingo-oophor-, salpingo-oophoro-
The uterine tube and ovary. [salpingo- + Mod. L. oophoron, ovary, fr. G. oophoros, egg-bearing]
Salpingo-oophorectomy
: Removal of the fallopian tubes and ovaries. * * * Removal of the ovary and its fallopian tube. SYN: salpingo- ovariectomy, tubo- ovariectomy.
salpingo-oophoritis
Inflammation of both fallopian tube and ovary. SYN: tubo- ovaritis.
salpingo-oophorocele
Hernia of both ovary and fallopian tube.
salpingo-ovariectomy
SYN: salpingo- oophorectomy.
salpingocele
Hernia of a fallopian tube. [salpingo- + G. kele, hernia]
salpingocyesis
SYN: tubal pregnancy. [salpingo- + G. kyesis, pregnancy]
salpingography
Radiography of the fallopian tubes after the injection of radiopaque contrast medium. [salpingo- + G. grapho, to write]
salpingolysis
Freeing the fallopian tube from adhesions. [salpingo- + G. lysis, loosening]
salpingoneostomy
Surgical reopening of a uterine tube clubbed because of fimbrial adhesions. [salpingo- + neostomy]
salpingoperitonitis
Inflammation of the fallopian tube, perisalpinx, and peritoneum. [salpingo- + peritonitis]
salpingopexy
Operative fixation of an oviduct. [salpingo- + G. pexis, fixation]
salpingopharyngeal
Relating to the auditory tube and pharynx.
salpingopharyngeus
See s. (muscle).
salpingoplasty
Plastic surgery of the fallopian tubes. SYN: tuboplasty. [salpingo- + G. plastos, formed]
salpingorrhagia
Hemorrhage from a fallopian tube. [salpingo- + G. rhegnymi, to burst forth]
salpingorrhaphy
Suture of the fallopian tube. [salpingo- + G. rhaphe, stitching]
salpingoscopy
Visualization of the intraluminal portion of the fallopian tubes, usually by x-ray or by means of an endoscope. [salpingo- + G. skopeo, to view]
salpingostomy
Establishment of an artificial opening in a fallopian tube primarily as surgical treatment for an ectopic pregnancy. [salpingo- + G. stoma, mouth]
salpingotomy
Incision into a fallopian tube. [salpingo- + G. tome, incision] - abdominal s. incision into the fallopian tube through an opening in the abdominal wall.
salpinx
uterine tube. [G. a trumpet (tube)] - s. uterina SYN: uterine tube.
salsalate
A combination of 2 molecules of salicylic acid in ester linkage. The compound is hydrolyzed during and after absorption to salicylic acid which, like other salicylates, exerts ...
Salt
In medicine, salt usually refers to sodium chloride, table salt, used for seasoning food, for the preservation of meat, etc. Salt is found in the earth and in sea water and is ...
saltation
A dancing or leaping, as in a disease ( e.g., chorea) or physiologic function ( e.g., saltatory conduction). [L. saltatio, fr. salto, pp. -atus, to dance, fr. salio, to leap]
saltatory
Pertaining to, or characterized by, saltation.
Salter
Robert B., 20th century Canadian orthopedist. See S.-Harris classification of epiphysial plate injuries. Sir Samuel J.A., English dentist, 1825–1897. See S. incremental lines, ...
salting in
The increase in solubility (as observed for some proteins) by dilute salt solutions (as compared to pure water).
salting out
The precipitation of a protein from its solution by saturation or partial saturation with such neutral salts as sodium chloride, magnesium sulfate, or ammonium sulfate.
saltpeter
SYN: potassium nitrate. - Chilean s. SYN: sodium nitrate.
salubrious
Healthful, usually in reference to climate. [L. salubris, healthy, fr. salus, health]
saluresis
Excretion of sodium in the urine. [L. sal, salt, + G. ouresis, uresis (urination)]
saluretic
Facilitating the renal excretion of sodium.
Salus
Robert, Bohemian ophthalmologist, *1877. See Koerber-S.- Elschnig syndrome.
salutarium
SYN: sanitarium. [L. salutaris, healthful, fr. salus (salut-), health]
salutary
Healthful; wholesome. [L. salutaris]
Salvarsan
Historic proprietary name for arsphenamine. [L. salvare, to preserve, + sanitas, health]
salve
SYN: ointment. [A.S. sealf]
salvia
The dried leaves of S. officinalis (family Labiatae), garden or meadow sage; it inhibits secretory activity, especially of the sweat glands, and was also used in bronchitis and ...
Salzmann
Maximilian, German ophthalmologist, 1862–1954. See S. nodular corneal degeneration.
SAM
Abbreviation for S-adenosyl-l- methionine.
samandarine
A toxic alkaloid from salamanders; causes hemolysis.
samarium
A metallic element of the lanthanide group, atomic no. 62, atomic wt. 150.36. [bands indicating its presence first found in the spectrum of samarskite, a mineral named after Col. ...
sambucus
The dried flowers of S. canadensis or S. nigra (family Caprifoliaceae), the common elder or black elder; slightly laxative. SYN: elder, elder flowers. [L. an elder-tree]
SAMHSA
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, a part of the U.S. Public Health Service, that works to improve the quality and availability of substance abuse ...
sAMP
Abbreviation for adenylosuccinic acid.
sample
1. A specimen of a whole entity small enough to involve no threat or damage to the whole; an aliquot. 2. A selected subset of a population; a s. may be random or nonrandom ...
sampling
The policy of inferring the behavior of a whole batch by studying a fraction of it. [MF essample, fr. L. exemplum, taking out] - biological s. denotes s. that can be taken without ...
San Joaquin Valley disease
A disease also called coccidioidomycosis (CM) due to a fungus called Coccidioides immitis. About 40% of people infected with this fungus develop symptoms. Most often they have ...
San Jose
Hermenia, 20th century Chilean pathologist. See Maldonado-S. stain.
Sanarelli
Giuseppe, Italian bacteriologist, 1865–1940. See S. phenomenon, S.- Shwartzman phenomenon.
sanative
Having a tendency to heal. [L. sano, to cure, heal]
sanatorium
An institution for the treatment of chronic disorders and a place for recuperation under medical supervision. Cf.:sanitarium. [Mod. L. neuter of sanatorius, curative, fr. sano, ...
sanatory
Health-giving; conducive to health. [Mod. L. sanatorius]
Sanchez Salorio
Manuel, Spanish ophthalmologist, *1930. See S. syndrome.
sand
The fine granular particles of quartz and other crystalline rocks, or a gritty material resembling s.. [A.S.] - brain s. SYN: corpora arenacea, under corpus. - hydatid s. the ...
Sand, biliary
Biliary sand is a term mostly used by surgeons when they remove the gallbladder to describe uncountable, small particles in bile that are visible to the naked eye. Biliary sand ...
sandalwood oil
SYN: santal oil.
sandfly
A small, biting, dipterous midge of the genus Phlebotomus or Lutzomyia; a vector of leishmaniasis.
Sandhoff
K., contemporary German biochemist. See S. disease.
Sandison
J. Calvin, U.S. surgeon, *1899. See S.-Clark chamber.
Sandström
I., Swedish anatomist, 1852–1889. See S. bodies, under body.
sandworm
Any of the various dog and cat hookworms whose larvae cause cutaneous larva migrans.
sane
Denoting sanity. [L. sanus]
Sanfilippo
Sylvester J., 20th century U.S. pediatrician. See S. syndrome.
Sanfilippo syndrome
A hereditary lysosomal storage disorder with onset between the ages of two and six. Sanfilippo syndrome is characterized by accumulation of heparin sulfate in the central ...
Sanger
Frederick, English biochemist and twice Nobel laureate, *1918. See S. reagent, S. method.
Sanger Centre
A celebrated genetics research center in the UK where much of the human genome sequencing took place. The Sanger Centre was established jointly by the Wellcome Trust and the ...
sangui-, sanguin-, sanguino-
Blood, bloody. [G. sanguis]
sanguifacient
SYN: hemopoietic. [sangui- + L. facio, to make]
sanguiferous
Conveying blood. SYN: circulatory (2). [sangui- + L. fero, to carry]
sanguification
SYN: hemopoiesis. [sangui- + L. facio, to make]
sanguinarine
An alkaloid obtained from the bloodroot plant, Sanguinaria canadensis, used to treat and remove dental plaque.
Sanguine
1) Having a ruddy (reddish) complexion. 2) Cheerful, hopeful, confident, and optimistic; impulsive. The word "sanguine" from the Latin "sanguineus" for "blood" has long been ...
sanguineous
1. Relating to blood; bloody. 2. SYN: plethoric. 3. SYN: sanguine (2). [L. sanguineus]
sanguinolent
Bloody; tinged with blood. [L. sanguinolentus]
sanguinopurulent
Denoting exudate or matter containing blood and pus. [sanguino- + L. purulentus, festering (suppurative), fr. pus, pus]
Sanguisuga
Former name for Hirudo. [L. a leech, fr. sanguis, blood, + sugo, pp. suctus, to suck]
sanguivorous
Bloodsucking, as applied to certain bats, leeches, insects, etc. [sangui- + L. voro, to devour]
sanies
A thin, blood-stained, purulent discharge. [L.]
saniopurulent
Characterized by bloody pus. [L. sanies, thin, bloody matter, + purulentus, festering (suppurative), fr. pus, pus]
sanioserous
Characterized by blood-tinged serum.
sanious
Relating to sanies; ichorous and blood-stained.
sanitarian
One who is skilled in sanitation and public health. [L. sanitas, health, fr. sanus, sound]
sanitarium
A health resort. Cf.:sanatorium. SYN: salutarium. [L. sanitas, health]
sanitary
Healthful; conducive to health; usually in reference to a clean environment. [L. sanitas, health]
sanitation
Use of measures designed to promote health and prevent disease; development and establishment of conditions in the environment favorable to health. [L. sanitas, health]
sanitization
The process of making something sanitary.
sanity
Soundness of mind, emotions, and behavior; of a sound degree of mental health. [L. sanitas, health]
Sansom
Arthur E., English physician, 1839–1907. See S. sign.
Sanson
Louis J., French physician, 1790–1841. See S. images, under image, Purkinje-S. images, under image.
santal oil
A volatile oil distilled from the wood of Santalum album (family Santalaceae), a tree of India; formerly used in subacute bronchitis and in gonorrhea. SYN: sandalwood oil.
santonin
The inner anhydride or lactone of santoninic acid, obtained from santonica, the unexpanded flower heads of Artemisia cina and other species of Artemisia (family Compositae); ...
Santorini
Giandomenico (Giovanni Domenico), Italian anatomist, 1681–1737. See S. canal, S. cartilage, S. major caruncle, S. minor caruncle, S. concha, S. duct, S. fissures, under ...
sap
The juice or tissue fluid of a living organism. - cell s. contents of vacuoles. - nuclear s. SYN: karyolymph.
saphena
See vein. [Med. L. attributed by some as derived fr. Ar. safin, standing; by others, fr. G. saphenes, manifest, clearly visible]
saphenectomy
Excision of a saphenous vein. [ saphena + G. ektome, excision]
saphenous
Relating to or associated with a s. vein; denoting a number of structures in the leg. [see saphena]
Saphenous vein
The saphenous veins — there are two, the great and the small saphenous veins – serve as the principal veins running superficially (near the surface) up the leg. The great ...
Saphenous vein, great
The larger of the two saphenous veins, the principal veins that run up the leg superficially (near the surface). The great saphenous vein goes from the foot all the way up to ...
Saphenous vein, large
The larger of the two saphenous veins, the principal veins that run up the leg superficially (near the surface). The large saphenous vein goes from the foot all the way up to ...
Saphenous vein, small
The smaller of the two saphenous veins, the principal veins that run up the leg superficially (near the surface). The small saphenous vein, runs behind the outer malleolus ...
SAPHO syndrome
SAPHO syndrome is an eponym for a condition which is characterized by a combination of: Synovitis — inflammation of the joint lining (synovium), typically manifest as warmth, ...
sapo-, sapon-
Soap. [L. sapo]
sapogenin
The aglycon of a saponin; one of a family of steroids of the spirostan type (a 16,22:22,26-diepoxycholestane).
saponaceous
Soapy; relating to or resembling soap.
saponatus
Mixed with soap. [L.]
saponification
Conversion into soap, denoting the hydrolytic action of an alkali on fat, especially on triacylglycerols; in histochemistry, s. is used to demethylate or reverse blockage of ...
saponify
To perform or undergo saponification.
saponins
Glycosides of plant origin characterized by properties of foaming in water and of lysing cells (as in hemolysis of erythrocytes when s. are injected into the bloodstream); ...
Sappey
Marie P.C., French anatomist, 1810–1896. See S. fibers, under fiber, S. plexus, S. veins, under vein.
Sapphism
Female homosexuality. Named after the poet Sappho who lived on the Greek island of Lesbos (circa 600 BC). She was a lesbian by geography and sexual orientation. Also called ...
sapr-
See sapro-.
sapremia
Obsolete term for septicemia. [ sapr- + G. haima, blood]
sapro-, sapr-
Rotten, putrid, decayed. [G. sapros]
saprobe
An organism that lives upon dead organic material. This term is preferable to saprophyte, since bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants. [sapro- + G. bios, life]
saprobic
Pertaining to a saprobe.
saprodontia
SYN: dental caries. [sapro- + G. odous, tooth]
saprogen
An organism living on dead organic matter and causing the decay thereof. [sapro- + G. -gen, producing]
saprogenic, saprogenous
Causing or resulting from decay.
saprophilous
Thriving on decaying organic matter. [sapro- + G. philos, fond]
saprophyte
An organism that grows on dead organic matter, plant or animal. See saprobe. SYN: necroparasite. [sapro- + G. phyton, plant] - facultative s. an organism, usually parasitic, ...
saprophytic
Relating to a saprophyte.
saprozoic
Living in decaying organic matter; especially denoting certain protozoa. [sapro- + G. zoikos, relating to animals]
saprozoonosis
A zoonosis, the agent of which requires both a vertebrate host and a nonanimal (food, soil, plant) reservoir or developmental site for completion of its life cycle. Combination ...
SAR
Abbreviation for scaffold-associated regions, under region.
Sar
Abbreviation for sarcosine.
saralasin acetate
An angiotensin II antagonist used in the treatment of essential hypertension.
Sarcina
A genus of nonmotile, strictly anaerobic bacteria (family Peptococcaceae) containing Gram-positive cocci, 1.8–3.0 μm in diameter, which divide in three perpendicular planes, ...
sarcine
Obsolete term for hypoxanthine.
sarco-
Combining form denoting muscular substance or a resemblance to flesh. [G. sarx (sark-), flesh]
sarcoblast
SYN: myoblast. [ sarco- + G. blastos, germ]
Sarcocystis
A genus of protozoan parasites, related to the sporozoan genera Eimeria, Isospora, and Toxoplasma, and placed in a distinct family, Sarcocystidae, but with the above genera in ...
sarcocystosis
Infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Sarcocystis.
sarcode
A term of historical interest (1835), applied to the protoplasm of protozoa before the term protoplasm was coined. [ sarco- + G. eidos, resemblance]
Sarcodina
The amebae; a subphylum of protozoa in the phylum Sarcomastigophora, possessing pseudopodia or locomotive protoplasmic flow for movement. Includes forms that possess flagella ...
sarcoglia
The accumulation of neurolemma cells at the motor endplate. [ sarco- + G. glia, glue]
sarcoid
SYN: sarcoidosis. [ sarco- + G. eidos, resemblance] - Boeck s. SYN: sarcoidosis. - Spiegler- Fendt s. SYN: benign lymphocytoma cutis.
sarcoidosis
A systemic granulomatous disease of unknown cause, especially involving the lungs with resulting interstitial fibrosis, but also involving lymph node s, skin, liver, spleen, ...
sarcolemma
The plasma membrane of a muscle fiber; formerly, the delicate connective tissue of the endomysium was included under this term by some. SYN: myolemma. [ sarco- + G. lemma, ...
sarcolemmal, sarcolemmic, sarcolemmous
Relating to the sarcolemma.
sarcology
1. SYN: myology. 2. The anatomy of the soft parts, as distinguished from osteology. [ sarco- + G. logos, study]
sarcolysine
SYN: merphalan.
sarcoma
A connective tissue neoplasm, usually highly malignant, formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells. [G. sarkoma, a fleshy excrescence, fr. sarx, flesh, + -oma, tumor] - ...
Sarcoma botryoides
A muscle-cell sarcoma that affects the vagina, bladder, or nearby areas. Unlike other sarcomas, this form usually does cause pain. It is fast- growing, and affects primarily ...
Sarcoma, botryoides
A muscle-cell sarcoma that affects the vagina, bladder, or nearby areas. Unlike other sarcomas, this form usually does cause pain. It is fast- growing, and affects primarily ...
Sarcoma, Ewing
A type of bone tumor that occurs in children and adolescents, most often in the large bones of the arms and legs and the flat bones of the pelvis, spine and ribs. The tumor is ...
Sarcoma, Kaposi
A relatively rare type of skin malignancy that tends to afflict elderly people or, especially, those with an abnormal immune system as in AIDS. Kaposi sarcoma is a highly ...
Sarcoma, metastatic
A sarcoma that is spreading into other body tissues through the lymphatic system. The most common site for metastatic sarcoma is the lungs, and there are usually multiple ...
Sarcoma, soft-tissue
A sarcoma that begins in the muscle, fat, fibrous tissue, blood vessels, or other supporting tissue of the body. See also sarcoma.
Sarcoma, synovial
A soft-tissue sarcoma that usually emerges in adolescence or young adulthood. Synovial sarcomas usually arise near a joint (particularly the knee joint), and are made up of ...
Sarcomastigophora
A phylum of the subkingdom Protozoa characterized by flagellae, pseudopodia, or both types of locomotory organelles; includes both the flagellates ( subphylum Mastigophora) and ...
sarcomatoid
Resembling a sarcoma. [ sarcoma + G. eidos, resemblance]
sarcomatosis
Occurrence of several sarcomatous growths on different parts of the body. [ sarcoma + G. -osis, condition]
sarcomatous
Relating to or of the nature of sarcoma.
sarcomere
The segment of a myofibril between two adjacent Z lines, representing the functional unit of striated muscle. [ sarco- + G. meros, part]
sarconeme
SYN: microneme. [ sarco- + G. nema, thread]
sarcoplasm
The nonfibrillar cytoplasm of a muscle fiber. [ sarco- + G. plasma, a thing formed]
sarcoplasmic
Relating to sarcoplasm.
sarcoplast
SYN: satellite cell of skeletal muscle. [ sarco- + G. plastos, formed]
sarcopoietic
Forming muscle. [ sarco- + G. poiesis, a making]
Sarcopsylla penetrans
SYN: Tunga penetrans.
Sarcopsyllidae
Older name for Tungidae. [ sarco- + G. psylla, flea]
Sarcoptes scabiei
Formerly Acarus scabiei, the itch mite, varieties of which are distributed worldwide and affect humans, horses, cattle, swine, sheep, dogs, cats, and many wild animals; serious ...
sarcoptic
Of, relating to, or caused by mites of the genus Sarcoptes or other members of the family Sarcoptidae.
sarcoptid
Common name for members of the Sarcoptidae, a family of mites that includes the genera Sarcoptes, Knemidokoptes, and Notoedres.
sarcosine
N-Methylglycine; an intermediate in the metabolism of choline; it can donate a methyl group to tetrahydrofolate, yielding N5,N10-methylenetetrahydrofolate; demethylation by s. ...
sarcosinemia
A disorder of amino acid metabolism due to deficiency of sarcosine dehydrogenase, causing the sarcosine level to rise in blood plasma and be excreted in the urine; some affected ...
sarcosis
1. An abnormal increase of flesh. 2. A multiple growth of fleshy tumors. 3. A diffuse sarcoma involving the whole of an organ. [G. sarkosis, the growth of flesh, fr. sarx, ...
sarcosome
1. Formerly, any granule in a muscle fiber. 2. Now, sometimes used synonymously with myomitochondrion. [ sarco- + G. soma, body]
sarcostosis
Ossification of muscular tissue. [ sarco- + G. osteon, bone, + -osis, condition]
sarcotic
1. Relating to sarcosis. 2. Causing an increase of flesh.
sarcotripsy
Rarely used term for use of a crushing forceps to stop hemorrhage. [ sarco- + G. tripsis, a rubbing]
sarcotubules
The continuous system of membranous tubules in striated muscle that corresponds to the smooth endoplasmic reticulum of other cells.
sarcous
Relating to muscular tissue; fleshy. [G. sarx, flesh]
sardonic grin
SYN: risus caninus.
sargramostim
A recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); used to protect against infection in the presence of acute myelogenous leukemia and in bone marrow ...
sarin
A nerve poison similar to diisopropyl fluorophosphate and tetraethyl pyrophosphate; a very potent irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor and a more toxic nerve gas than tabun ...
sarmassation
Erotic squeezing, kneading, or caressing of female tissues and organs. [G. sarx, flesh, + masso, to knead]
sarsaparilla
The dried root of Smilax aristolochiaefolia (Mexican s.), S. regelii (Honduras s.), S. febrifuga (Ecuadorian s.), or of undetermined species of Smilax (family Liliaceae), a thorny ...
SART
Abbreviation for sinoatrial recovery time.
sartorius
See s. (muscle). [L. sartor, a tailor, the muscle being used in crossing the legs in the tailor's position, fr. sarcio pp. sartus, to patch, mend]
Sartorius muscle
The long band of muscle that stretches from the calf to the pelvis. It moves the thigh and, by extension, the leg.
Sartwell
Philip, U.S. epidemiologist, *1908. See S. incubation model.
sassafras
The dried bark of the root of S. albidum (family Lauraceae), a tree of the eastern U.S.; a flavoring agent, diuretic, and diaphoretic; s. oil, a volatile oil obtained by ...
sat.
Abbreviation for saturated or saturation, as in O2 sat.
sat. sol., sat. soln.
Abbreviation for saturated solution.
satellite
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one; e.g., a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one. 2. The posterior ...
Satellite DNA
DNA that contains many tandem (not inverted) repeats of a short basic repeating unit. Satellite DNA is located at very specific spots in the genome (on chromosomes 1, 9, 16 and ...
satellitosis
1. A condition marked by an accumulation of neuroglia cells around the neurons of the central nervous system. 2. The presence of satellite, smaller structures, or lesions, ...
satiation
The state produced by fulfillment of a specific need, such as hunger or thirst. [L. satio, pp. -atus, to fill, satisfy]
Sattler
Hubert, Austrian ophthalmologist, 1844–1928. See S. elastic layer, S. veil.
saturate
1. To impregnate to the greatest possible extent. 2. To neutralize; to satisfy all the chemical affinities of a substance (as by converting all double bonds to single bonds). ...
saturation
1. Impregnation of one substance by another to the greatest possible extent. 2. Neutralization, as of an acid by an alkali. 3. That concentration of a dissolved substance that ...
saturnine
1. Relating to lead. 2. Due to or symptomatic of lead poisoning. [Mediev. L. saturninus, fr. saturnus, lead, fr. L. saturnus, the god and planet Saturn]
saturnism
SYN: lead poisoning. [Mediev. L. saturnus, alchemical term for lead]
satyriasis
Satyromania; excessive sexual excitement and behavior in the male; the counterpart of nymphomania in the female. SYN: satyrism. [G. satyros, a satyr]
satyrism
SYN: satyriasis.
saucerization
Excavation of tissue to form a shallow depression, performed in wound treatment to facilitate drainage from infected areas. SYN: craterization.
Saundby
Robert, English physician, 1849–1918. See S. test.
sauriasis
SYN: ichthyosis. [G. sauros, lizard, + -iasis, condition]
Savage
Henry, English anatomist and gynecologist, 1810–1900. See S. perineal body.
saw
A metal operating instrument having an edge of sharp, toothlike projections, for dividing bone, cartilage, or plaster; edges may be attached to a rigid band, a flexible wire or ...
Sawbones
Slang name for a surgeon and, in particular, an orthopaedic surgeon (who may have "sawed bones" on the battlefield in days gone by). The term "sawbones" has been in use for many ...
saxitoxin
A potent neurotoxin found in shellfish, such as the mussel or the clam, produced by the dinoflagellate Gonyaulax catenella, which is ingested by the shellfish; the cause of ...
Sayre
George P., U.S. ophthalmologist, *1911. See Kearns-S. syndrome.
Sb
Symbol for antimony.
SBE
Abbreviation for subacute bacterial endocarditis.
SBS
Abbreviation for shaken baby syndrome.

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