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Слова на букву retr-spas (2629)

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Sc
Symbol for scandium.
scab
A crust formed by coagulation of blood, pus, serum, or a combination of these, on the surface of an ulcer, erosion, or other type of wound. [A.S. scaeb]
scabicidal
Destructive to scabies mites.
Scabicide
A medication used to treat scabies. Although they were the most effective treatment, pyrethrin- based medications such as the lindane solution Qwell contain benzene, and are no ...
Scabies
Infestation of the skin by the human itch mite, Sarcaptes scabies. The initial symptom of scabies are red, raised bumps that are intensely itchy. A magnifying glass will reveal ...
Scabies, crusted
A severe form of scabies caused by delayed treatment of the initial infestation, characterized by mite-filled lesions covered with scabs. These lesions often fall victim to ...
scabrities
Roughness of the skin. [L., fr. scaber, scurfy] - s. unguium thickening and distortion of the nails.
scala
One of the cavities of the cochlea winding spirally around the modiolus. [L. a stairway] - Löwenberg s. SYN: cochlear duct. - s. media SYN: cochlear duct. - s. tympani [TA] ...
scald
1. To burn by contact with a hot liquid or steam. 2. The lesion resulting from such contact. [L. excaldo, to wash in hot water]
Scalded skin syndrome
A potentially serious side effect of infection with the Staph (Staphylococcus) bacteria that produces a specific protein which loosens the "cement" holding the various ...
scalding
A burning pain on urinating.
scale
1. A standardized test for measuring psychological, personality, or behavioral characteristics. SEE ALSO: score, test. 2. SYN: squama. 3. A small thin plate of horny ...
Scale, centigrade
Thermometer scale in which the freezing point of water is 0°C and the boiling point of water at sea level is 100°C. The Centigrade scale is used around most of the world to ...
Scale, Fahrenheit
Thermometer scale in which the freezing point of water is 32°F and the boiling point of water 212°F. The Fahrenheit scale is still obstinately in use in the US. This ...
scalene
1. Having sides of unequal length, said of a triangle so formed. 2. One of several muscles so named. See scalenus anterior (muscle), musculus scalenus anticus, scalenus ...
scalenectomy
Resection of the scalene muscles. [ scalene + G. ektome, excision]
scalenotomy
Division or section of the anterior scalene muscle. [ scalene + G. tome, incision]
scalenus
SYN: scalene. [L.]
scaler
1. An instrument for removing tartar from the teeth. 2. A device for counting electrical impulses, as in the assay of radioactive materials. - hoe s. a hoe-shaped s. with a ...
scaling
In dentistry, removal of accretions from the crowns and roots of teeth by use of special instruments.
scalloping
A series of indentations or erosions on a normally smooth margin of a structure.
scalp
The skin and subcutaneous tissue, normally hair-bearing, covering the neurocranium. [M. E. fr. Scand. skalpr, sheath]
Scalp ringworm
A superficial fungus infection of the skin, affecting the scalp. Also known as ringworm. It appears as scalp scaling associated with bald spots (in contrast to seborrhea or ...
scalpel
A knife used in surgical dissection. [L. scalpellum; dim. of scalprum, a knife] - plasma s. a s. that uses a fine high-temperature gas jet, instead of a blade, for cutting. ...
scalpriform
Chisel-shaped. [L. scalprum, chisel, + forma, shape]
scalprum
1. A large, strong scalpel. 2. A raspatory. [L. chisel, penknife, fr. scalpo, pp. scalptus, to carve]
scaly
SYN: squamous.
scammony
The plant, Convolvulus scammonia (family Convolvulaceae), the dried root of which contains a cathartic resin. SEE ALSO: ipomea. [G. skammonia]
scan
1. To survey by traversing with an active or passive sensing device. 2. The image, record, or data obtained by scanning, usually identified by the technology or device ...
Scan, bone
A technique to create images of bones on a computer screen or on film. A small amount of radioactive material is injected and travels through the bloodstream. It collects in the ...
Scan, computerized axial tomography
Pictures of structures within the body created by a computer that takes the data from multiple X-ray images and turns them in pictures. The CAT (computerized axial tomography) ...
Scan, computerized tomography
Pictures of structures within the body created by a computer that takes the data from multiple X-ray images and turns them in pictures. The computerized tomography (CT) scan can ...
Scan, helical CAT
A conventional computerized axial tomography scan (CAT scan or CT scan) is an x-ray procedure which combines many x-ray images with the aid of a computer to generate ...
Scan, radionuclide
An examination that produces pictures (scans) of internal parts of the body. The patient is given an injection or swallows a small amount of radioactive material. A machine called ...
Scan, SPECT
Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography, a nuclear medicine procedure in which a gamma camera rotates around the patient and takes pictures from many angles, which a computer ...
Scan, spiral CAT
A conventional computerized axial tomography scan (CAT scan or CT scan) is an x-ray procedure which combines many x-ray images with the aid of a computer to generate ...
Scan, thyroid
An image taken of the thyroid gland after radioactive iodine is taken by mouth. The thyroid gland is in front of the neck: Thyroid scanning is a nuclear medicine procedure. As ...
scandium
A metallic element, atomic no. 21, atomic wt. 44.955910. [L. Scandia, Scandinavia, where discovered]
scanner
A device or instrument that scans.
scanning
The act of imaging by traversing with an active or passive sensing device, often identified by the technology or device employed. - transvaginal s. ultrasonography of the ...
scanogram
A radiographic technique for showing true dimensions by moving a narrow orthogonal beam of x-rays along the length of the structure being measured, e.g., the lower extremities. ...
Scanzoni
Friedrich W., German obstetrician, 1821–1891. See S. maneuver.
scapha
1. [TA] The longitudinal furrow between the helix and the antihelix of the auricle. SYN: fossa of helix. 2. Obsolete term for scaphoid fossa. [L. fr. G. skaphe, skiff]
scapho-
A scapha, scaphoid. [G. skaphe, skiff, boat]
scaphocephalic
Denoting or relating to scaphocephaly. SYN: scaphocephalous, tectocephalic.
scaphocephalism
SYN: scaphocephaly.
scaphocephalous
SYN: scaphocephalic.
scaphocephaly
A form of craniosynostosis that results in a long, narrow head in which the parietal eminences are absent and frontal and occiptal protrusions are conspicuous; there may be a ...
scaphohydrocephalus, scaphohydrocephaly
Occurrence of hydrocephalus in a scaphocephalic individual.
scaphoid
Boat-shaped; hollowed. See s. (bone). [ scapho- + G. eidos, resemblance]
Scapula
The shoulder blade (or "wingbone"), the familiar flat triangular bone at the back of the shoulder. The word "scapula" (with the accent on the first syllable) is Latin. The ...
scapulalgia
Rarely used term meaning pain in the shoulder blade s. SYN: scapulodynia. [scapula + G. algos, pain]
scapular
Relating to the scapula.
scapulary
A form of brace or suspender for keeping a belt or body bandage in place.
scapulectomy
Excision of the scapula. [scapula + G. ektome, excision]
scapulo-
Scapula, scapular. [L. scapulae, shoulder blade s]
scapuloclavicular
1. SYN: acromioclavicular. 2. SYN: coracoclavicular.
scapulodynia
SYN: scapulalgia. [ scapulo- + G. odyne, pain]
scapulohumeral
Relating to both scapula and humerus. SEE ALSO: glenohumeral.
scapulopexy
Operative fixation of the scapula to the chest wall or to the spinous process of the vertebrae. [ scapulo- + G. pexis, fixation]
scapus
A shaft or stem. [L. shaft, stalk] - s. penis SYN: body of penis. - s. pili SYN: hair shaft.
scar
Fibrous tissue replacing normal tissues destroyed by injury or disease. [G. eschara, scab] - cigarette-paper scars atrophic scars in the skin at sites of minor lacerations over ...
Scardino
Peter T., U.S. urologist, *1915. See S. vertical flap pyeloplasty.
Scarff
John E., U.S. neurosurgeon, 1898–1978. See Stookey-S. operation.
scarification
The making of a number of superficial incisions in the skin. [L. scarifico, to scratch, fr. G. skariphos, a style for sketching]
scarify
To produce scarification.
Scarlatina
Also called scarlet fever, a disease caused by infection with group A streptococcal bacteria that occurs in a small proportion of people with strep throat. The incubation ...
scarlatinal
Relating to scarlatina.
scarlatinella
SYN: Filatov-Dukes disease. [dim. of scarlatina]
scarlatiniform
Resembling scarlatina, denoting a rash. SYN: scarlatinoid (1).
scarlatinoid
1. SYN: scarlatiniform. 2. SYN: Filatov-Dukes disease. [ scarlatina + G. eidos, resemblance]
scarlet
Denoting a bright red color tending toward orange. [Mediev. L. scarlatum, s. cloth]
Scarlet fever
Also called scarlatina, a disease caused by infection with group A streptococcal bacteria that occurs in a small proportion of people with strep throat. The incubation period ...
scarlet red
An azo dye; a dark, brownish red powder, soluble in oils, fats, and chloroform, but insoluble in water; used in medicine as a vulnerary, in histology to stain fat in tissue ...
scarlet red sulfonate
An azo dye that has been used to stimulate healing of chronic superficial wounds and ulcers.
Scarpa
Antonio, Italian anatomist, orthopedist, and ophthalmologist, 1747–1832. See canals of S., under canal, membranous layer of subcutaneous tissue of abdomen, S. fluid, S. ...
Scatchard
George, U.S. chemist and biochemist, 1892–1973. See S. plot.
scatemia
Intestinal autointoxication. [ scato- + G. haima, blood]
scato-
Feces. SEE ALSO: copro-, sterco-. [G. skor (skat-), excrement]
scatologic
Pertaining to scatology.
scatology
1. The scientific study and analysis of feces, for physiologic and diagnostic purposes. SYN: coprology. 2. The study relating to the psychiatric aspects of excrement or ...
scatoma
SYN: fecaloma. [ scato- + G. -oma, tumor]
scatophagy
SYN: coprophagia. [ scato- + G. phago, to eat]
scatoscopy
Examination of the feces for purposes of diagnosis. [ scato- + G. skopeo, to view]
scatter
1. A change in direction of a photon or subatomic particle, as the result of a collision or interaction. 2. The secondary radiation resulting from the interaction of primary ...
scattergram
Graphical display of distribution of two variables in relation to each other. [scatter + G. gramma, something written]
scatula
A square pillbox. [Mediev. L. a rectangular figure whose width is one-tenth of its length]
Scedosporium
An imperfect fungus of the form-class Hyphomycetes; anamorph of Pseudallescheria. - S. apiospermum (sked-os-por′e-um) the imperfect state of the fungus Pseudallescheria ...
scelalgia
Pain in the leg. [G. skelos, leg, + algos, pain]
scene
primal s. in psychoanalysis, the actual or fantasied observation by a child of sexual intercourse, particularly between the parents.
scent
SYN: odor. [M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. L. sentio, to feel]
SCFE
Slipped capital femoral epiphysis.
Schacher
Polycarp G., German physician, 1674–1737. See S. ganglion.
Schaer reagent
See under reagent.
Schäfer
Sir Edward A. Sharpey-, English physiologist and histologist, 1850–1935. See S. method.
Schäffer
Max, German neurologist, 1852–1923. See S. reflex.
Schaffer test
See under test.
Schamberg
Jay F., U.S. dermatologist, 1870–1934. See S. fever.
Schapiro
Heinrich, Russian physician, 1852–1901. See S. sign.
Schardinger
Franz, Austrian scientist, 1853–1920. See S. dextrins, under dextrin, S. enzyme, S. reaction.
scharlach red
SYN: scarlet red.
Schatzki
Richard, U.S. radiologist, 1901–1992. See S. ring.
Schaudinn
Fritz R., German bacteriologist, 1871–1906. See S. fixative.
Schaumann
Jörgen N., Swedish physician, 1879–1953. See S. bodies, under body, S. lymphogranuloma, S. syndrome, Besnier-Boeck-S. disease, Besnier-Boeck-S. syndrome.
Schaumberg
H.H., U.S. neuropathologist, *1912.
Schauta
Friedrich, Austrian gynecologist, 1849–1919. See S. vaginal operation.
Schede
Max, German surgeon, 1844–1902. See S. method.
schedule
A procedural plan for a proposed objective, especially the sequence and time allotted for each item or operation required for its completion. [L. scheda, fr. scida, a strip of ...
Schedules, Gesell Developmental
A measure of child development devised by the American child psychologist and pediatrician Arnold Gesell (1880-1961) whyo founded the Clinic of Child Development at Yale in 1911 ...
Scheele
Karl W., Swedish chemist, 1742–1786. See S. green.
Scheibe
A., U.S. physician, *1875. See S. hearing impairment.
Scheibler reagent
See under reagent.
Scheie
Harold G., U.S. ophthalmologist, *1909. See S. syndrome.
Scheiner
Christoph, German physicist, 1575–1650. See S. experiment.
Schellong
Fritz, German physician, 1891–1953. See S. test, S.- Strisower phenomenon.
schema
1. A plan, outline, or arrangement. SYN: scheme. 2. In sensorimotor theory, the organized unit of cognitive experience. [G. s., shape, form] - body s. SYN: body image.
schematic
Made after a definite type of formula; representing in general, but not with absolute exactness; denoting an anatomical drawing or model. [G. schematikos, in outward show, fr. ...
schematograph
An instrument for making a tracing in reduced size of the outline of the body. [G. schema, form, + grapho, to write]
scheme
SYN: schema (1). - occlusal s. SYN: occlusal system.
schemochromes
SYN: structural color.
Schenck
Benjamin R., U.S. surgeon, 1873–1920. See S. disease.
Scheuermann
Holger W., Danish surgeon, 1877–1960. See S. disease.
Scheuermann’s disease
A skeletal disease that usually begins in adolescence, and results in a hunched back. Treatment with casting and a back brace is successful if undertaken early. Also known as ...
Schick
Bela, Austrian pediatrician in U.S., 1877–1967. See S. method, S. test, S. test toxin.
Schiff
Hugo, German chemist in Florence, 1834–1915. See S. base, S. reagent, Kasten fluorescent S. reagents, under reagent, periodic acid -S. stain, ninhydrin-S. stain for ...
Schilder
Paul Ferdinand, Austrian neurologist, 1886–1940.
Schiller
Walter, Austrian pathologist in U.S., 1887–1960. See S. test.
Schilling
Victor, German hematologist, 1883–1960. See S. blood count, S. band cell, S. index, S. test, S. type of monocytic leukemia.
schindylesis
A form of fibrous joint in which the sharp edge of one bone is received in a cleft in the edge of the other, as in the articulation of the vomer with the rostrum of the ...
Schiötz
Hjalmar, Norwegian physician, 1850–1927. See S. tonometer.
Schirmer
Otto W.A., German ophthalmologist, 1864–1917. See S. test.
schisto-
Cleft, division. SEE ALSO: schizo-. [G. schistos, split]
schistocelia
Congenital fissure of the abdominal wall. [ schisto- + G. koilia, a hollow]
schistocormia
Congenital clefting of the trunk, the lower extremities of the fetus usually being imperfectly developed. SYN: schistosomia. [ schisto- + G. kormos, trunk of a tree]
schistocystis
Fissure of the bladder. [ schisto- + G. kystis, bladder]
schistocyte
A variety of poikilocyte that owes its abnormal shape to fragmentation occurring as the cell flows through damaged small vessels. SYN: schizocyte. [ schisto- + G. kytos, cell] ...
schistocytosis
The occurrence of many schistocytes in the blood. SYN: schizocytosis.
schistoglossia
Congenital fissure or cleft of the tongue. [ schisto- + G. glossa, tongue]
schistomelia
Congenital cleft of a limb.
schistorrhachis
SYN: spina bifida. [ schisto- + G. rhachis, spine]
Schistosoma
A genus of digenetic trematodes, including the important blood flukes of humans and domestic animals, that cause schistosomiasis; characterized by elongate shape, by separate ...
Schistosoma haematobium
A species of trematode worm that parasitizes humans and causes urinary tract disease. See Schistosomiasis.
Schistosoma japonicum
A species of trematode worm that parasitizes humans and that (like S. mansoni) causes liver and gastrointestinal tract disease. See Schistosomiasis.
Schistosoma mansoni
A species of trematode worm that parasitizes humans and that (like S. japonicum) causes liver and gastrointestinal tract disease. See Schistosomiasis.
Schistosome
A parasitic trematode worm contracted from infested water that is capable of causing liver, gastrointestinal tract and bladder disease. There are three main species of these ...
schistosomia
SYN: schistocormia. [ schisto- + G. soma, body]
Schistosomiasis
Diseases of liver, gastrointestinal tract and bladder caused by schistosomes, trematode worms that parasitize people. Infection is from infested water. There are three main ...
schistosomulum
The stage in the life cycle of a blood fluke of the genus Schistosoma immediately after penetration of the skin as a cercaria; marked by loss of the tail and gaining of ...
schistosternia
SYN: schistothorax. [ schisto- + G. sternon, sternum]
schistothorax
Congenital cleft of the chest wall. SYN: schistosternia. [ schisto- + G. thorax, thorax]
schiz-
See schizo-.
schizamnion
An amnion developing, as in the human embryo, by the formation of a cavity over or within the inner cell mass. [ schiz- + amnion]
schizaxon
An axon divided into two branches. [ schiz- + G. axon, axis]
Schizencephaly
A developmental disorder of the brain characterized by abnormal slits, or clefts, in the cerebral hemispheres. Schizencephaly is a form of porencephaly. Individuals with clefts ...
schizo-, schiz-
Split, cleft, division; schizophrenia. SEE ALSO: schisto-. [G. schizo, to split or cleave]
schizo-affective
Having an admixture of symptoms suggestive of both schizophrenia and affective ( mood) disorder.
Schizoaffective disorder
A mood disorder that is coupled with some symptoms resembling those of schizophrenia, particularly loss of personality (flat affect) and/or social withdrawal.
schizocyte
SYN: schistocyte. [schizo- + G. kytos, cell]
schizocytosis
SYN: schistocytosis.
schizogenesis
Reproduction by fission. SYN: fissiparity, scissiparity. [schizo- + G. genesis, origin]
schizogony
Multiple fission in which the nucleus first divides and then the cell divides into as many parts as there are nuclei; called merogony if daughter cells are merozoites, ...
schizogyria
Deformity of the cerebral convolutions marked by occasional interruptions of their continuity. [schizo- + G. gyros, circle (convolution)]
Schizoid
Having symptoms similar to those of schizophrenia. See schizophrenia * * * Socially isolated, withdrawn, having few (if any) friends or social relationships; resembling the ...
schizoidism
A schizoid state; the manifestation of schizoid tendencies.
schizomycete
A member of the class Schizomycetes; a bacterium.
schizomycetic
Relating to or caused by fission fungi (bacteria).
schizont
A sporozoan trophozoite ( vegetative form) that reproduces by schizogony, producing a varied number of daughter trophozoites or merozoites. SEE ALSO: meront, segmenter. SYN: ...
schizonticide
An agent that kills schizonts. [ schizont + L. caedo, to kill]
schizonychia
Splitting of the nails. [schizo- + G. onyx, nail]
schizophasia
A rarely used term for the disordered speech (word salad) of the schizophrenic individual. [schizo- + G. phasis, speech]
Schizophrenia
: One of several brain diseases whose symptoms that may include loss of personality (flat affect), agitation, catatonia, confusion, psychosis, unusual behavior, and ...
Schizophrenia, childhood
The onset of schizophrenia before adulthood. This condition is very rare in young children, but occurs with more frequency in the teenage years. Autism was once known as ...
schizophrenic
Relating to, characteristic of, or suffering from one of the schizophrenias.
schizotonia
Division of the distribution of tone in the muscles. [schizo- + G. tonos, tension, tone]
schizotrichia
A splitting of the hairs at their ends. SYN: scissura pilorum. [schizo- + G. thrix, hair]
Schizotrypanum cruzi
A distinct generic designation used for Trypanosoma cruzi, used frequently by workers in the endemic area of South American trypanosomiasis; also used as a subgeneric ...
Schizotypal personality disorder
A type of personality characterized by unusual patterns of speech and behavior and by social withdrawal. See also Asperger syndrome.
schizozoite
A merozoite prior to schizogony, as in the exoerythrocytic phase of the development of the Plasmodium agent after sporozoite invasion of the hepatocyte and before multiple ...
schlammfieber
Name given to an outbreak of leptospirosis near Breslau in Germany thought to have been due to infection with Leptospira grippotyphosa.
Schlatter
Carl B., Swiss surgeon, 1864–1934. See Osgood-S. disease.
Schlemm
Friedrich, German anatomist, 1795–1858. See S. canal.
Schlesinger
Hermann, Austrian physician, 1868–1934. See S. sign, Pool-S. sign.
schlieren
See s. optics.
Schmid
Rudi, Swiss-U.S. internist and biochemist, *1922. See McArdle-S.- Pearson disease. W. See S.- Fraccaro syndrome.
Schmidel
Kasimir C., German anatomist, 1718–1792. See S. anastomoses, under anastomosis.
Schmidt
Gerhard, U.S. biochemist, *1900. See S.-Thannhauser method. Henry D., U.S. anatomist and pathologist, 1823–1888. See S.- Lanterman clefts, under cleft, S.- Lanterman incisures, ...
Schmorl
Christian G., German pathologist, 1861–1932. See S. nodule, S. ferric- ferricyanide reduction stain, S. picrothionin stain, S. jaundice.
Schneider
C.V., German anatomist, 1614–1680. See schneiderian membrane. Franz C., German chemist, 1813–1897. See S. carmine. Kurt, German psychiatrist, 1887–1967.
Schneidersitz
A typical sitting position with legs crossed in front, exhibited by severely defective patients with phenylketonuria and resembling the position which was commonly attributed to ...
Schnitzler
L., 20th century European physician. See S. syndrome.
Scholander
Per F., Norwegian physiologist, 1905–1980. See S. apparatus, Roughton-S. apparatus, Roughton-S. syringe.
Scholz
Willibald, German neurologist, 1889–1971. See S. disease.
Schönbein
Christian F., German chemist, 1799–1868. See S. test.
Schönlein
Johann L., German physician, 1793–1864. See S. purpura, Henoch-S. purpura.
school
A set of beliefs, teachings, methods, etc. [O. E. scol] - biometrical s. a group of British geneticists, followers of Galton and Karl Pearson, whose approach to genetics was ...
School, first American medical
King's College Medical School founded in New York in 1767. Its mission was fairly lofty — to "enlarge the Mind, improve the Understanding, polish the whole Man, and qualify them ...
Schott
Theodor, 1850–1921, German physician in Bad Nauheim. See S. treatment.
schradan
A potent irreversible organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor used as an insecticide. It was prepared for potential use as a nerve gas. Poisoning produces a cholinergic ...
Schreger
Christian H.T., German anatomist and chemist, 1768–1833. See S. lines, under line, Hunter-S. bands, under band, Hunter-S. lines, under line.
Schridde
Hermann R.A., German pathologist, *1876. See S. cancer hairs, under hair.
Schroeder
Karl L.E., German gynecologist, 1838–1887. See S. operation.
Schuchardt
Karl A., German surgeon, 1856–1902. See S. operation.
Schüffner
Wilhelm, German pathologist in Sumatra, 1867–1949. See S. granules, under granule, S. dots, under dot.
Schüller
Karl H.L.A. Max, German surgeon, 1843–1907. See S. ducts, under duct. Artur, Austrian neurologist, *1874. See S. disease, S. phenomenon, S. syndrome, Hand-S.- Christian disease.
Schultes
Johann. See Scultetus.
Schultz
Werner, German internist, 1878–1947. See S.- Charlton phenomenon, S.- Charlton reaction, S.- Dale reaction. Arthur R.H., German physician, *1890. See S. reaction, S. stain.
Schultze
Max J.S., German histologist and zoologist, 1825–1874. See S. cells, under cell, S. membrane, S. sign, comma bundle of S., comma tract of S.. Bernhard S., German ...
Schütz
Erich, German biochemist, *1902. See S. law, S. rule. Hugo, 19th century German anatomist. See S. bundle.
Schwabach
Dagobert, German otologist, 1846–1920. See S. test.
Schwalbe
Gustav A., German anatomist, 1844–1916. See S. corpuscle, S. nucleus, S. ring, S. spaces, under space.
Schwann
Theodor, German histologist and physiologist, 1810–1882. See S. cells, under cell, S. cell unit, S. white substance, sheath of S..
schwannoma
A benign, encapsulated neoplasm in which the fundamental component is structurally identical to a syncytium of Schwann cells; the neoplastic cells proliferate within the ...
schwannosis
A nonneoplastic proliferation of Schwann cells in the perivascular spaces of the spinal cord; seen particularly in older patients, especially those with diabetes mellitus.
Schwartz
Henry G., U.S. neurosurgeon, *1909. See S. tractotomy. Oscar, U.S. pediatrician, *1919. See S. syndrome.
Schweigger-Seidel
Franz, German physiologist, 1834–1871. See sheath of Schweigger- Seidel.
Schweninger
Ernst, German dermatologist, 1850–1924. See S.- Buzzi anetoderma, S. method.
sciage
A to-and-fro, sawlike movement of the hand in massage. [Fr. scie, saw]
sciatic
1. Relating to or situated in the neighborhood of the ischium or hip. Ischial or s.. SYN: ischiadic, ischial, ischiatic. 2. Relating to sciatica. SYN: ischiadicus. ...
Sciatic nerve
The largest nerve in the body, the sciatic nerve begins from nerve roots in the lumbar part of the spinal cord (in the low back) and extends through the buttock area to send ...
Sciatica
Pain resulting from irritation of the sciatic nerve, typically felt from the low back to behind the thigh and radiating down below the knee. While sciatica can result from a ...
SCID
Abbreviation for severe combined immunodeficiency.
SCID mice
Abbreviation for severe combined immunodeficient mice.
science
1. The branch of knowledge that produces theoretical explanations of natural phenomena based on experiments and observations. 2. An area of such knowledge that is restricted to ...
Science (journal)
A weekly journal concerning science. Science was founded in 1880 by one of the world's most famous scientists, Thomas Alva Edison, inventor of the light bulb. Science is the ...
Science, cognitive
Cognitive science is the study of the mind. It is an interdisciplinary science that draws upon many fields including neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, computer science, ...
scientometrics
The measurement of scientific output, and the impact of scientific findings, e.g., on public policy. [L. scientia, science, knowledge, fr. scio, to know, + G. metron, measure, + ...
scilla
SYN: squill. [G.]
scillaren
A mixture of glycosides, possessing digitalis-like actions, present in squill. - s. A a crystalline steroidal glycoside (Scilla maritima), present in squill that can be ...
scillaricide
A toxic principle from squill used as a rodenticide.
scilliroside
Glycoside from red squill, the red variety of Urginea maritima (family Liliaceae). Used as a rodenticide.
scinticisternography
Cisternography performed with a radiopharmaceutical and recorded with a radionuclide imaging device.
scintigram
SYN: scintiscan. [L. scintilla, spark, + G. gramma, something written]
scintigraphic
Relating to or obtained by scintigraphy.
Scintigraphy
A diagnostic test in which a two-dimensional picture of a body radiation source is obtained by the use of radioisotopes. To take a specific example, cholescintigraphy ...
scintillascope
Obsolete term for scintillation counter. [L. scintilla, spark, + G. skopeo, to observe]
scintillation
1. Flashing or sparkling; a subjective sensation as of sparks or flashes of light. 2. In radiation measurement, the light produced by an ionizing event in a phosphor, as in a ...
scintillator
A substance that emits visible light when hit by a subatomic particle or x- or gamma ray. SEE ALSO: scintillation counter. - liquid s. a liquid with the properties of a s., in ...
scintillometer
SYN: scintillation counter. [L. scintilla, spark, + G. metron, measure]
Scintimammography
Scintimammography is an imaging technique that uses a radioisotope (a radioactive substance) to help visualize the breast and find cancer. Scintimammography using the ...
scintiphotograph
The image obtained by scintiphotography; obsolete. SEE ALSO: scintiscan.
scintiphotography
The process of obtaining a photographic recording of the distribution of an internally administered radiopharmaceutical with the use of a gamma camera; obsolete. SYN: ...
scintiscan
The record obtained by scintigraphy. SEE ALSO: scan. SYN: photoscan, scintigram.
scintiscanner
The apparatus used to make a scintiscan.
scintography
SYN: scintiphotography.
scion
In experimental embryology, an embryonic tissue or part grafted to another embryo of the same or of another species. SEE ALSO: chimera. [O. Fr. sion, shoot, sprig, fr. L. seco, ...
scirrhosity
A scirrhous state or hardness of a tumor.
scirrhous
Hard; relating to a scirrhus.
scirrhus
Obsolete term for any fibrous indurated area, especially an indurated carcinoma. [G. skirrhos, hard, a hard tumor]
scission
1. A separation, division, or splitting, as in fission. 2. SYN: cleavage (2). [L. scissio, fr. scindo, pp. scissus, to cleave]
scissiparity
SYN: schizogenesis. [L. scissio, cleavage, + pario, to bring forth]
scissors
An instrument with two blades, moving on a pivot, that cut against each other. SYN: shears. [L. scindo, pp. scissus, to cut] - de Wecker s. a small s. with sharp points for ...
scissors-shadow
A distorted image seen in mixed astigmatism by retinoscopy.
scissura
1. Cleft or fissure. 2. A splitting. SYN: scissure. [L.] - s. pilorum SYN: schizotrichia.
scissure
SYN: scissura.
scler-
See sclero-.
Sclera
The tough white outer coat over the eyeball that covers approximately the posterior five-sixths of its surface. The sclera is continuous in the front of the eye with the cornea ...
scleradenitis
Inflammatory induration of a gland. [ scler- + G. aden, gland, + -itis, inflammation]
scleral
Relating to the sclera. SYN: sclerotic (2).
scleratogenous
SYN: sclerogenous.
sclerectasia
Localized bulging of the sclera. SYN: scleral ectasia. [ scler- + G. ektasis, an extension] - partial s. partial protrusion of a portion of the sclera, typically seen in severe ...
sclerectomy
1. Excision of a portion of the sclera. 2. Removal of the fibrous adhesions formed in chronic otitis media. [ scler- + G. ektome, excision]
scleredema
Hard nonpitting edema of the skin of the dorsal aspect of the upper body and extremities, giving a waxy appearance and no sharp demarcation; seen in diabetics and in s. ...
sclerema
Induration of subcutaneous fat. [ scler- + edema] - s. neonatorum s. appearing at birth or in early infancy, usually in premature and hypothermic infants, as sharply demarcated ...
Sclerencephaly
A general term for scarring and shrinkage of the substance of the brain. Sclerencephaly occurs because of chronic inflammation of the brain matter.
sclerencephaly, sclerencephalia
Sclerosis and shrinkage of the brain substance. [ scler- + G. enkephalos, brain]

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