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stercobilin
A brown degradation product of hemoglobin, present in the feces. SEE ALSO: bilirubinoids.
stercolith
SYN: fecalith. [ sterco- + G. lithos, stone]
stercoraceous
Relating to or containing feces. SYN: stercoral, stercorous.
stercoral
SYN: stercoraceous.
stercorin
SYN: coprosterol.
stercoroma
SYN: fecaloma. [ sterco- + G. -oma, tumor]
stercorous
SYN: stercoraceous.
stercus
SYN: feces. [L. feces, excrement]
stere
A measure of capacity; equivalent to a cubic meter or a kiloliter; equal to 1.307951 cubic yards. [Fr. fr. G. stereos, solid]
stereo-
1. A solid; a solid condition or state. 2. Spatial qualities, three-dimensionality. [G. stereos, solid]
stereo-orthopter
A type of stereoscope used in visual training. [ stereo- + G. orthos, straight, + optikos, optical]
stereoagnosis
SYN: tactile agnosia.
stereoanesthesia
SYN: tactile agnosia. [ stereo- + G. an- priv. + aisthesis, sensation]
stereoarthrolysis
Production of a new joint with mobility in cases of bony ankylosis. [ stereo- + G. arthron, joint, + lysis, loosening]
stereocampimeter
An apparatus for studying the central visual fields while the fellow eye holds fixation. [ stereo- + L. campus, field, + G. metron, measure]
stereochemical
Relating to stereochemistry.
stereochemistry
The branch of chemistry concerned with the spatial three-dimensional relations of atoms in molecules, i.e., the positions the atoms in a compound bear in relation to one another ...
stereocilium
A nonmotile long microvillus. [ stereo- + L. cilium, eyelid]
stereocinefluorography
Obsolete practice of recording on motion picture film the images obtained by stereoscopic fluoroscopy; three-dimensional views are obtained.
stereocolpogram
Picture taken with the stereocolposcope.
stereocolposcope
Instrument that provides the observer with a magnified three-dimensional gross inspection of the vagina and cervix. [ stereo- + G. kolpos, a hollow (vagina), skopeo, to view]
stereoelectroencephalography
Recording of electrical activity in three planes of the brain, i.e., with surface and depth electrodes.
stereoencephalometry
The localization of brain structures by use of three-dimensional coordinates.
stereognosis
The appreciation of the form of an object by means of touch. [ stereo- + G. gnosis, knowledge]
stereognostic
Relating to stereognosis.
stereogram
A stereoscopic radiographic image of a pair.
stereograph
A stereoscopic x-ray apparatus.
stereography
SYN: stereoradiography.
stereoisomer
A molecule containing the same number and kind of atom groupings as another but in a different arrangement in space; the stereoisomers are not interconvertible unless bonds are ...
stereoisomeric
Relating to stereoisomerism.
stereoisomerism
Molecular asymmetry, isomerism involving different spatial arrangements of the same groups ( e.g., androsterone and isoandrosterone, differing only in that one has a 3α-OH, ...
stereology
A study of the three-dimensional aspects of a cell or microscopic structure. [ stereo- + G. logos, study]
stereometer
An instrument used in stereometry. [ stereo- + G. metron, measure]
stereometry
1. Measurement of a solid object or the cubic capacity of a vessel. 2. Determination of the specific gravity of a liquid.
stereopathy
Persistent stereotyped thinking.
stereophorometer
A phorometer with a stereoscopic attachment.
stereophotomicrograph
A stereoscopic photomicrograph that, when viewed with a stereoscope, appears three dimensional.
stereopsis
SYN: stereoscopic vision. [ stereo- + G. opsis, vision]
stereoradiography
Preparation of a pair of radiographs with appropriate shift of the x-ray tube or film so that the images can be viewed stereoscopically to give a three-dimensional appearance. ...
stereoroentgenography
SYN: stereoradiography.
stereoscope
An instrument producing two horizontally separated images of the same object, providing a single image with an appearance of depth. [ stereo- + G. skopeo, to view]
stereoscopic
Relating to a stereoscope, or giving the appearance of three dimensions.
stereoscopy
1. An optic technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image. 2. See radiostereoscopy.
stereoselective
As applied to a reaction, denoting a process in which of two or more possible stereoisomeric products only one predominates; a s. process is not necessarily stereospecific.
stereospecific
As applied to a reaction, denoting a process in which stereoisomerically different starting materials give rise to stereoisomerically different products; a s. process is thus ...
Stereotactic
Stereotactic refers to precise positioning in three-dimensional space. For example, biopsies, surgery or radiation therapy can be done stereotactically. In a stereotactic needle ...
Stereotactic needle biopsy
A biopsy in which the spot to be biopsied is located three-dimensionally, the information is entered into a computer, and the computer calculates the information and positions a ...
Stereotactic radiotherapy
Radiation therapy in which a number of precisely aimed beams of ionizing radiation coming from different directions meet at a specific point, delivering the radiation treatment to ...
Stereotactic surgery
Surgery in which a system of three- dimensional coordinates is used to locate the site to be operated on. Stereotactic surgery is used in neurosurgery (and neurological ...
stereotactic, stereotaxic
Relating to stereotaxis or stereotaxy.
Stereotaxis
: Use of a computer and scanning devices to create three-dimensional pictures. This method can be used to direct a biopsy, external radiation, or the insertion of radiation ...
stereotaxy
A precise method of identifying nonvisualized anatomic structures by use of three-dimensional coordinates; more frequently used for brain and spinal surgery. SYN: stereotactic ...
stereotropic
Relating to or exhibiting stereotropism.
stereotropism
Growth or movement of a plant or animal toward (positive s.) or away from (negative s.) a solid body, usually applied where a part of the organism rather than the whole reacts. [ ...
stereotypy
1. Maintenance of one attitude for a long period. 2. Constant repetition of certain meaningless gestures or movements, as in certain forms of schizophrenia. [ stereo- + G. ...
steric
Pertaining to stereochemistry. - s. hindrance interference with or inhibition of a seemingly feasible reaction (usually synthetic) because the size of one or another reactant ...
sterid
SYN: steroid (2).
sterigma
A slender, pointed structure arising from a basidium upon which a basidiospore will develop. [G. s., a support]
sterile
Relating to or characterized by sterility. [L. sterilis, barren]
sterility
1. In general, the incapability of fertilization or reproduction. See female s., male s.. 2. Condition of being aseptic, or free from all living microorganisms. [L. ...
sterilization
1. The act or process by which an individual is rendered incapable of fertilization or reproduction, as by vasectomy, partial salpingectomy, or castration. 2. The destruction ...
Sterilization, female surgical
Female surgical sterilization blocks (or removes part or all of) the fallopian tubes so the egg cannot travel to the uterus. The procedure is done by various surgical techniques, ...
Sterilization, male surgical
Male surgical sterilization is done by vasectomy which involves sealing, tying or cutting a man's vas deferens, the tube which otherwise would carry the sperm from the testicle ...
Sterilization, surgical
Surgical sterilization is a contraceptive option for people who do not want children in the future. It is considered permanent because reversal requires major surgery that is ...
sterilize
To produce sterility.
sterilizer
An apparatus for rendering objects sterile. - glass bead s. a s. for endodontic equipment; the heat is transmitted to the instruments, absorbent points, or cotton pellets by ...
Stern
Heinrich, U.S. physician, 1868–1918. See S. posture.
stern-
See sterno-.
sterna
Plural of sternum.
sternad
In a direction toward the sternum.
sternal
Relating to the sternum.
Sternal rib
One of the first 7 pairs of ribs. A rib is said to be a "sternal" rib or a "true" rib if it attaches to the sternum (the breast bone). All 12 pairs of ribs attach to the building ...
sternalgia
Pain in the sternum or the sternal region. SYN: sternodynia. [ stern- + G. algos, pain]
sternalis
See s. (muscle).
Sternberg
George M., U.S. bacteriologist, 1838–1915. See S. cell, S.-Reed cell, Reed-S. cell.
sternebra
One of the four segments of the primordial sternum of the embryo by the fusion of which the body of the adult sternum is formed. [Mod. L. fr. stern(um) + (vert)ebra]
sternen
Relating to the sternum independent of any other structures. [ stern- + G. en, in]
sterno-, stern-
The sternum, sternal. [G. sternon, chest]
sternochondroscapularis
See sternochondroscapular muscle. [Mod. L.]
sternoclavicular
Relating to the sternum and the clavicle.
sternoclavicularis
See sternoclavicular muscle.
sternocleidal
Relating to the sternum and the clavicle. [sterno- + G. kleis, key (clavicle)]
sternocleidomastoid
Relating to sternum, clavicle, and mastoid process.
sternocleidomastoideus
See sternocleidomastoid (muscle). [Mod. L.]
sternocostal
Relating to the sternum and the ribs. [L. costa, rib]
sternodynia
SYN: sternalgia. [sterno- + G. odyne, pain]
sternofascialis
See musculus s..
sternoglossal
Denoting muscular fibers that occasionally pass from the sternohyoid muscle to join the hyoglossal muscle.
sternohyoideus
See sternohyoid (muscle). [Mod. L.]
sternoid
Resembling the sternum. [sterno- + G. eidos, resemblance]
sternomastoid
Relating to the sternum and the mastoid process of the temporal bone; applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle.
sternopagia
Condition shown by conjoined twins united at the sterna or more extensively at the ventral walls of the chest. See conjoined twins, under twin. [sterno- + G. pagos, something ...
sternopericardial
Relating to the sternum and the pericardium.
sternoschisis
Congenital cleft of the sternum. [sterno- + G. schisis, a cleaving]
sternothyroideus
See sternothyroid (muscle). [Mod. L.]
sternotomy
Incision into or through the sternum. [sterno- + G. tome, incision] - median s. incision through the midline of the sternum usually used to gain access to the heart, mediastinal ...
sternotracheal
Relating to the sternum and the trachea.
sternotrypesis
Trephining of the sternum. [sterno- + G. trypesis, a boring]
sternovertebral
Relating to the sternum and the vertebrae; denoting the true ribs, or the seven upper ribs on either side, which articulate with the vertebrae and with the sternum. SYN: ...
Sternum
Anatomic name for the breast bone, the long flat bone in the upper middle of the front of the chest. The sternum articulates (comes together) with the cartilages of the first ...
Sternutation
Sneezing. When we sneeze, air is expelled with force from the nose (and from the mouth, if it is open) due to a spasmodic contraction of the chest muscles and diaphragm. A ...
sternutator
A substance, such as a gas, that induces sneezing. SYN: sneezing gas.
sternutatory
1. Causing sneezing. 2. An agent that provokes sneezing. SYN: ptarmic.
Steroid
: A large group of chemical substances related in structure to one another and each containing the same chemical skeleton (a tetracyclic cyclopenta[a]phenanthrene skeleton). Many ...
Steroid abuse
Use of substances containing anabolic steroids to increase muscle mass. Such steroids can have many side effects when misused, including psychiatric problems, liver tumors, ...
steroidal
SYN: steroid (1).
steroidogenesis
The formation of steroids; commonly referring to the biological synthesis of steroid hormones, but not to the production of such compounds in a chemical laboratory. [steroid + G. ...
steroids
A large family of chemical substances, comprising many hormones, body constituents, and drugs, each containing the tetracyclic cyclopenta[a]phenanthrene skeleton. Stereoisomerism ...
sterol
A steroid with one OH (alcohol) group; the systematic name s contain either the prefix hydroxy- or the suffix -ol, e.g., cholesterol, ergosterol.
stertor
A noisy inspiration occurring in coma or deep sleep, sometimes due to obstruction of the larynx or upper airways. [L. sterto, to snore] - hen-cluck s. a breath sound like the ...
stertorous
Relating to or characterized by stertor or snoring.
steth-
See stetho-.
stethalgia
Pain in the chest. [ steth- + G. algos, pain]
stetharteritis
Inflammation of the aorta or other arteries in the chest. [ steth- + L. arteria, artery, + G. -itis, inflammation]
stetho-, steth-
Combining forms denoting the chest. [G. stethos]
stethograph
An apparatus for recording the respiratory movements of the chest. [stetho- + G. grapho, to write]
stethomyitis
Inflammation of the muscles of the chest wall. SYN: stethomyositis. [stetho- + G. mys, muscle, + -itis, inflammation]
stethomyositis
SYN: stethomyitis.
stethoparalysis
Paralysis of the respiratory muscles.
stethoscope
An instrument originally devised by Laennec for aid in hearing the respiratory and cardiac sounds in the chest, but now modified in various ways and used in auscultation of any ...
stethoscopic
1. Relating to or effected by means of a stethoscope. 2. Relating to an examination of the chest.
stethoscopy
1. Examination of the chest by means of auscultation, either mediate or immediate, and percussion. 2. Mediate auscultation with the stethoscope.
Stevens
Albert M., U.S. pediatrician, 1884–1945. See S.- Johnson syndrome.
Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS)
A systemic (bodywide) disease with a characteristic rash involving the skin and mucous membranes, including the buccal mucosa (inside of the mouth). The disease is due to a ...
Stewart
Fred Waldorf, U.S. physician, 1894–1991. See S.- Treves syndrome. George N., Canadian-U.S. scientist, 1860–1930. See S. test, S.-Hamilton method. R.M., 20th century English ...
STH
Abbreviation for somatotropic hormone.
sthenia
A condition of activity and apparent force, as in an acute sthenic fever. [G. sthenos, strength, + -ia, condition]
sthenic
Active; marked by sthenia; said of a fever with strong bounding pulse, high temperature, and active delirium.
stheno-
Strength, force, power. [G. sthenos]
sthenometer
An instrument for measuring muscular strength. [ stheno- + G. metron, measure]
sthenometry
The measurement of muscular strength. [ stheno- + G. metrin, to measure]
stibamine glucoside
A nitrogen glycoside of sodium p-aminobenzenestibonate; a pentavalent antimony compound; has been used in leishmaniasis (kala azar) and certain other tropical diseases, but is ...
stibenyl
The first pentavalent antimonial used in the treatment of leishmaniasis (kala azar).
stibialism
Chronic antimonial poisoning. [L. stibium, antimony]
stibiated
Impregnated with or containing antimony.
stibiation
Impregnation with antimony.
stibium
SYN: antimony. [L. fr. G. stibi]
stibocaptate
SYN: antimony dimercaptosuccinate.
stibogluconate sodium
1. Pentavalent sodium stibogluconate, used in the treatment of all types of leishmaniasis; toxic effects are frequent. SYN: antimony sodium gluconate. 2. Trivalent antimony ...
stibonium
The hypothetical radical, SbH4+, analogous to ammonium.
stibophen
An organic trivalent antimony compound, used in the treatment of schistosomiasis, filariasis, leishmaniasis, and lymphogranuloma inguinale.
stichochrome
Denoting a nerve cell in which the chromophil substance, or stainable material, is arranged in roughly parallel rows or lines. [G. stichos, a row, + chroma, color]
Stick, heel
A procedure in which a newborn baby's heel is pricked and then a small amount of the blood is collected, usually with a narrow-gauge ("capillary") glass tube or a filter paper. ...
Stickler
Gunnar B., U.S. physician, *1925. See S. syndrome.
Stieda
Ludwig, German anatomist, 1837–1918. See S. process. Alfred, German surgeon, 1869–1945. See Pellegrini-S. disease.
Stierlin
Eduard, German surgeon, 1878–1919. See S. sign.
Stiff baby syndrome
A genetic disorder also known as hyperexplexia in which babies have an exaggerated startle reflex (reaction). This disorder was not recognized until 1962 when it was described ...
stigma
1. Visible evidence of a disease. 2. SYN: follicular s.. 3. Any spot or blemish on the skin. 4. A bleeding spot on the skin, which is considered a manifestation of conversion ...
stigmastane
The parent substance of sitosterol. SYN: sitostane.
stigmata
Alternative plural of stigma.
stigmatic
Relating to or marked by a stigma.
stigmatism
The condition of having a stigma. SYN: stigmatization (1).
stigmatization
1. SYN: stigmatism. 2. Production of stigmas, especially of a hysterical nature. 3. Debasement of a person by attributing a negatively toned characteristic or other stigma to ...
stilbamidine
A compound used in the treatment of leishmaniasis (kala azar), in infections due to Blastomyces dermatitidis, and in actinomycosis; also used in multiple myeloma for the ...
stilbazium iodide
An anthelmintic.
stilbene
1. C6H5CH=CHC6H5; α,β-diphenylethylene; an unsaturated hydrocarbon, the nucleus of stilbestrol and other synthetic estrogenic compounds. 2. A class of compounds based on ...
stilbestrol
SYN: diethylstilbestrol.
Stiles
Walter S., English physicist, 1901–1985. See S.- Crawford effect.
stilet, stilette
See stylet.
Still
Sir George F., English physician, 1868–1941. See S. disease, S. murmur, S.- Chauffard syndrome.
Stillbirth
The tragic birth of a dead baby, the delivery of a fetus that has died before birth. There is no possibility of resuscitation. The word "stillbirth" is a fusion of "still" in the ...
stillborn
Born dead; denoting an infant dead at birth.
Stilling
Benedict, German anatomist, 1810–1879. See S. canal, S. column, S. nucleus, S. raphe, S. gelatinous substance.
stilus
See stylus.
stimulant
1. Stimulating; exciting to action. 2. An agent that arouses organic activity, strengthens the action of the heart, increases vitality, and promotes a sense of well-being; ...
stimulation
1. Arousal of the body or any of its parts or organs to increased functional activity. 2. The condition of being stimulated. 3. In neurophysiology, the application of a stimulus ...
stimulator
SYN: stimulant (2). - long-acting thyroid s. ( LATS) a substance, found in the blood of some hyperthyroid patients, that exerts a prolonged stimulatory effect on the thyroid ...
stimulus
1. A stimulant. 2. That which can elicit or evoke action (response) in a muscle, nerve, gland or other excitable tissue, or cause an augmenting action upon any function or ...
stimulus word
The word used in association tests to evoke a response.
sting
1. Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by the puncture of the skin by many species of arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by ...
Sting, Africanized bee
All stings from bees (and other large stinging insects such as yellow jackets, hornets and wasps) can trigger allergic reactions varying greatly in severity. Avoidance and prompt ...
Sting, yellow jacket
A sting from a yellow jacket (or other large stinging insects such as bees, hornets and wasps) can trigger allergic reactions ranging from local responses of limited duration to ...
stingers
SYN: burners.
stink weed
SYN: Datura stramonium.
stippling
1. A speckling of a blood cell or other structure with fine dots when exposed to the action of a basic stain, due to the presence of free basophil granules in the cell ...
STIR
Acronym for short TI inversion recovery.
Stirling
William, British histologist and physiologist, 1851–1932. See S. modification of Gram stain.
stirrup
SYN: stapes. [A.S. stirap]
stitch
1. A sharp sticking pain of momentary duration. 2. A single suture. 3. SYN: suture (2). [A.S. stice, a pricking] - lock s. SYN: locking suture.
STM
Abbreviation for short-term memory.
Stock
Wolfgang, German ophthalmologist, 1874–1956. See Spielmeyer-S. disease.
stock
All the populations of organisms derived from an isolate without any implication of homogeneity or characterization. [A.S. stoc]
Stocker
Frederick William, U.S. ophthalmologist, 1893–1974. See S. line.
Stoffel
Adolf, German orthopedic surgeon, 1880–1937. See S. operation.
stoichiology
The science concerned with the elements or principles in any branch of knowledge, especially in chemistry, cytology, or histology. [G. stoicheion, element (lit. one of a row), ...
stoichiometric
Pertaining to stoichiometry.
stoichiometry
Determination of the relative quantities of the substances concerned in any chemical reaction; e.g., with the laws of definite proportions in chemistry, as in the molar ...
stoke
A unit of kinematic viscosity, that of a fluid with a viscosity of 1 poise and a density of 1 g/ml; equal to 10−4 m2/s. [Sir George Gabriel Stokes]
Stokes
Sir George Gabriel, British physicist and mathematician, 1819–1903. See stoke, S. law (2), S. law (3). William, Irish physician, 1804–1878. See S. law (1), Cheyne-S. ...
Stokes Adams attack
Sudden collapse into unconsciousness due to a disorder of heart rhythm in which there is a slow or absent pulse resulting in syncope (fainting) with or without convulsions. In ...
stolon
A runner or connective aerial hypha that forms a cluster of rhizoids when it touches the substrate, and then sends out other runners to produce the aerial mycelium and ...
stom-
See stomato-.
stoma
1. A minute opening or pore. 2. An artificial opening between two cavities or canals, or between such and the surface of the body. [G. a mouth] - Fuchs stomas small depression ...
Stomach
: The stomach is part of the digestive system. It is located in the upper abdomen, under the ribs. The upper part of the stomach connects to the esophagus, and the lower part ...
Stomach emptying study
Also called a gastric emptying study, this test evaluates the emptying of food from the stomach. For a gastric emptying study, a patient eats a meal in which the solid food, ...
Stomach flu
So-called "stomach flu" actually has nothing to do with the influenza (flu) virus. This term is sometimes used to describe gastrointestinal illnesses caused by other ...
Stomach paralysis
Formally called gastroparesis, this is a medical condition in which the muscle of the stomach is paralyzed by a disease of either the stomach muscle itself or the nerves ...
Stomach, Pavlov
A pouch fashioned surgically from part of the stomach (but isolated from the rest of the stomach) that opens via a fistula (canal) on to the abdominal wall. At different points ...
stomachal
Relating to the stomach. SYN: stomachic (1).
stomachalgia
Obsolete term for stomach ache. [stomach + G. algos, pain]
stomachic
1. SYN: stomachal. 2. An agent that improves appetite and digestion.
stomachodynia
Obsolete term for stomach ache. [stomach + G. odyne, pain]
stomal
Relating to a stoma.
stomat-
See stomato-.
stomata
Alternate plural of stoma.
stomatal
Relating to a stoma.
stomatalgia
Pain in the mouth. SYN: stomatodynia. [ stomat- + G. algos, pain]
stomatic
Relating to the mouth; oral.
stomatitis
Inflammation of the mucous membrane of the mouth. [ stomat- + G. -itis, inflammation] - angular s. SYN: angular cheilitis. - aphthous s. SYN: aphtha (2). - epidemic s. ...
Stomatitis, Vincent
This is trench mouth, a progressive painful infection with ulceration, swelling and sloughing off of dead tissue from the mouth and throat due to the spread of infection from the ...
stomato-, stom-, stomat-
Mouth. [G. stoma]
stomatocyte
A red blood cell that exhibits a slit or mouth-shaped pallor rather than a central one on air-dried smears; e.g., Rh null cells. [stomato- + G. kytos, cell]
stomatocytosis
A hereditary deformation of red blood cells, which are swollen and cup-shaped, causing congenital hemolytic anemia. SEE ALSO: Rh null syndrome.
stomatodeum
SYN: stomodeum (1).
stomatodynia
SYN: stomatalgia. [stomato- + G. odyne, pain]
stomatodysodia
SYN: halitosis. [stomato- + G. dysodia, bad odor]
stomatognathic
Pertaining to the mouth and jaw. [stomato- + G. gnathos, jaw]
stomatologic
Relating to stomatology.
stomatologist
A specialist in diseases of the oral cavity.
stomatology
The study of the structure, function, and diseases of the mouth. [stomato- + G. logos, study]
stomatomalacia
Pathologic softening of any of the structures of the mouth. [stomato- + G. malakia, softness]
stomatomycosis
Disease of the mouth due to a fungus. [stomato- + G. mykes, fungus, + -osis, condition]
stomatonecrosis
SYN: noma. [stomato- + G. nekrosis, death]
stomatopathy
Any disease of the oral cavity. SYN: stomatosis. [stomato- + G. pathos, suffering]
stomatoplasty
Old term for corrective operation of the mouth. [stomato- + G. plastos, formed]
stomatorrhagia
Bleeding from the gums or other part of the oral cavity. [stomato- + G. rhegnymi, to burst forth]
stomatoscope
An apparatus for illuminating the interior of the mouth to facilitate examination. [stomato- + G. skopeo, to view]
stomatosis
SYN: stomatopathy. [stomato- + G. -osis, condition]
stomion
The median point of the oral slit when the lips are closed.
stomocephalus
Malformed individual with an undeveloped jaw and a snoutlike mouth; likely to be combined with an ethmocephalic type of cyclopia. [G. stoma, mouth, + kephale, head]
stomodeal
Relating to a stomodeum.
stomodeum
1. A midline ectodermal depression ventral to the embryonic brain and surrounded by the mandibular arch; when the buccopharyngeal membrane disappears, it becomes continuous ...
Stomoxys calcitrans
The stable fly, a species of biting fly, resembling in size and general appearance the common housefly, which is an annoying pest of humans and domestic animals worldwide and is ...
stone
1. SYN: calculus. 2. An English unit of weight of the human body, equal to 14 pounds. [A.S. stan] - artificial s. a specially calcined gypsum derivative similar to plaster of ...
Stone, renal
A stone in the kidney (or lower down in the urinary tract). Also called a kidney stone. Renal stones are a common cause of blood in the urine and pain in the abdomen, flank, ...
Stone, tonsil
A tiny stone (calculus) in the tonsils. These stones, called tonsilloliths, are found within little pockets (crypts) in the tonsils that typically form in chronic recurrent ...
Stones, cystine kidney
Cystine kidney stones are due to cystinuria, an inherited (genetic) disorder of the transport of an amino acid (a building block of protein) called cystine. The result is an ...
Stookey
Byron P., U.S. neurosurgeon, 1887–1966. See S.- Scarff operation, Queckenstedt-S. test.
stool
1. A discharging of the bowels. 2. The matter discharged at one movement of the bowels. SYN: evacuation (2). SYN: motion (3), movement (2). [A.S. stol, seat] - butter stools ...
STOP (selective tubal occlusion procedure)
A nonsurgical form of permanent birth control in which a physician inserts a 4-centimeter (1.6 inch) long metal coil into each one of a woman's two fallopian tubes via a scope ...
Stop codon
A set of three adjacent bases in the DNA or their complementary bases in messenger RNA that specifies the end of a polypeptide chain. The three stop codons (in messenger RNA) ...
stops
Bends in, or wires soldered to, an archwire to limit passage through a bracket or tube.
storage
The second stage in the memory process, following encoding and preceding retrieval, involving mental processes associated with retention of stimuli that have been registered and ...
storax
A liquid balsam obtained from the wood and inner bark of Liquidamber orientalis, a tree of Asia Minor, or L. styraciflua (family Hamamelidaceae); has been used in the treatment ...
STORCH
A revision of the TORCH acronym ( q.v.) to include syphilis as a cause of congenital infections.
storiform
Having a cartwheel pattern, as of spindle cells with elongated nuclei radiating from a center. [L. storea, woven mat, + -formis, form]
storm
An exacerbation of symptoms or a crisis in the course of a disease. - thyroid s. SYN: thyrotoxic crisis.
Storm supplies kit
You and your family can cope best by preparing for disaster before it strikes. One way to prepare is by assembling a Disaster Supplies Kit. Once disaster hits, you won't have time ...
Stout wiring
See under wiring.
STPD
Abbreviation indicating that a gas volume has been expressed as if it were at standard temperature (0°C), standard pressure (760 mm Hg absolute), and dry; under these conditions ...
strabismal
Relating to or affected with strabismus. SYN: strabismic.
strabismic
SYN: strabismal.
strabismologist
A physician subspecializing in pediatric ophthalmology with an emphasis on the management of strabismus and amblyopia.
Strabismus
A condition in which the visual axes of the eyes are not parallel and the eyes appear to be looking in different directions. In divergent strabismus, or exotropia, the visual ...
Strabismus surgery
Surgery for strabismus, a condition in which the visual axes of the eyes are not parallel and the eyes appear to be looking in different directions. The concern is that the ...
strain
1. A population of homogeneous organisms possessing a set of defined characteristics; in bacteriology, the set of descendants that retains the characteristics of the ancestor; ...
strait
A narrow passageway. inferior s., apertura pelvis inferior; superior s., apertura pelvis superior. [M.E. streit thr. O. Fr. fr. L. strictus, drawn together, tight]
straitjacket
A garmentlike device with long sleeves that can be secured to restrain a violently disturbed person. SYN: camisole.
stramonium
The dried leaves and flowering or fruiting tops with branches of Datura s. or D. tatula (family Solanaceae), a herb abounding in temperate and subtropical countries; it ...
strand
In microbiology, a filamentous or threadlike structure. - anticoding s. the s. of duplex DNA which is used as a template for the synthesis of mRNA. SYN: antisense s.. - ...
Strandberg
James Victor., Swedish dermatologist, *1883. See Grönblad-S. syndrome.
strangalesthesia
SYN: zonesthesia. [G. strangale, halter, + aisthesis, sensation]
strangle
To suffocate; to choke; to compress the trachea so as to prevent sufficient passage of air. [G. strangaloo, to choke, fr. strangale, a halter]
strangulated
Constricted so as to prevent sufficient passage of air, as through the trachea, or to cut off venous return and/or arterial flow so as to compromise viability, as in the case of ...
strangulation
The act of strangulating or the condition of being strangulated, in any sense : compression, constriction, herniation.

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