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Слова на букву chem-culi (2629)

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Contusion
Another name for a bruise. What is a bruise ? A bruise, or contusion, is caused when blood vessels are damaged or broken as the result of a blow to the skin (be it bumping ...
conular
Cone-shaped.
Conus
A genus of shellfish that inhabits the shores of some South Pacific islands. Several species, C. geographus, C. textilis, C. aulicus, C. tulipa, and C. marmoreus are poisonous, ...
conus
1. [TA] SYN: cone. 2. Posterior staphyloma in myopic choroidopathy. [L. fr. G. konos, cone] - c. arteriosus [TA] the left or anterosuperior, smooth-walled portion of the ...
convalescence
A period between the end of a disease and the patient's restoration to complete health. [L. con-valesco, to grow strong, fr. valeo, to be strong]
convalescent
1. Getting well or one who is getting well. 2. Denoting the period of convalescence.
convallaria
The flower, rhizome, and roots of C. majalis (family Liliaceae), lily of the valley; they contain glycosides with digitalis-like action ( e.g., convallatoxin). [L. convallis, ...
convection
Conveyance of heat in liquids or gases by movement of the heated particles, as when the layer of water at the bottom of a heated pot rises or the warm air of a room ascends to the ...
convergence
1. The tending of two or more objects toward a common point. 2. The direction of the visual lines to a near point. [L. con-vergere, to incline together] - accommodative c. the ...
convergent
Tending toward a common point.
conversion
1. SYN: transmutation. 2. An unconscious defense mechanism by which the anxiety which stems from an unconscious conflict is converted and expressed symbolically as a ...
convertase
Proteases of complement that convert one component into another. See component of complement.
convertin
Active form of factor VII designated VIIa.
convex
Applied to a surface that is evenly curved outward, the segment of a sphere. [L. convexus, vaulted, arched, c., fr. con-veho, to bring together] - high c. the segment of a sphere ...
convexity
1. The state of being convex. 2. A convex structure. - cortical c. SYN: superolateral surface of cerebrum.
convexobasia
Forward bending of the occipital bone. [L. convexus, outwardly curved, + basis, foundation]
convexoconcave
Convex on one surface and concave on the opposite surface.
convexoconvex
SYN: biconvex.
convolute
Rolled together with one part over the other; in the shape of a roll or scroll. SYN: convoluted. [L. con-volvo, pp. -volutus, to roll together]
convoluted
SYN: convolute.
convolution
1. A coiling or rolling of an organ. 2. Specifically, a gyrus of the cerebral or cerebellar cortex. [L. convolutio] - angular c. SYN: angular gyrus. - anterior central c. SYN: ...
convulsant
A substance that produces convulsions. SEE ALSO: eclamptogenic, epileptogenic.
convulsion
1. A violent spasm or series of jerkings of the face, trunk, or extremities. 2. SYN: seizure (2). [L. convulsio, fr. convello, pp. -vulsus, to tear up] - benign neonatal ...
convulsive
Relating to convulsions; marked by or producing convulsions.
Cooke
A. Bennett, U.S. physician, *1869. See C. speculum.
Cooley
Thomas B., U.S. pediatrician, 1871–1945. See C. anemia. Denton, U.S. cardiothoracic surgeon, *1920, noted for inventing many surgical instruments.
Coolidge
William D., U.S. physicist, 1873–1975. See C. tube.
Coomassie brilliant blue R-250
A general protein stain used in electrophoresis because of its unusual sensitivity. [originally, a proprietary name of Imperial Chemical; Coomassie (Kumasi), Ghana]
Coombs
Robin R.A., English veterinarian and immunologist, *1921. See Gell and C. reactions, under reaction, C. serum, C. test, direct C. test, indirect C. test. Carey F., English ...
Cooper
Sir Astley Paston, English anatomist and surgeon, 1768–1841. See C. fascia, C. hernia, C. herniotome, C. ligaments, under ligament, suspensory ligaments of C., under ligament. ...
cooperativity
A property of certain proteins (often enzymes) in which the binding curves or saturation curves or, in the case of enzymes, a plot of initial rates as a function of initial ...
Cooperia
A genus of small, slender nematodes (family Trichostrongylidae) inhabiting the small intestine, rarely the abomasum, of ruminants; when fresh they are a bright pink color; they ...
coordinate
1. (ko-or′di-nit)Any of the scales or magnitudes that serve to define the position of a point. 2. (ko-or′di-nat)To perform the act of coordination. [see coordination]
coordination
The harmonious working together, especially of several muscles or muscle groups in the execution of complicated movements. [L. co-, together, + ordino, pp. -atus, to arrange, fr. ...
copaiba
The oleoresin of Copaifera officinalis and other species of Copaifera (family Leguminosae), a South American plant; c. oil is used as an expectorant, diuretic, and stimulant. ...
COPD
Abbreviation for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Cope
Sir Vincent Z., English surgeon, 1881–1974. See C. clamp.
cope
1. The upper half of a flask in the casting art; hence applicable to the upper or cavity side of a denture flask. 2. An act that enables one to adjust to the environmental ...
copepod
Any member of the order Copepoda.
Copepoda
An order of abundant, free-living, freshwater and marine crustaceans of basic importance in the aquatic food chain in both the marine and freshwater environments; some species ...
coping
1. A thin metal covering or cap. 2. An adaptive or otherwise successful method of dealing with individual or environmental situations that involve psychologic or physiologic ...
copolymer
A polymer in which two or more monomers or base units are combined. - c.-1 acetate salt of a mixture of synthetic polypeptides composed of four amino acid s; used to reduce the ...
copper
A metallic element, atomic no. 29, atomic wt. 63.546; several of its salts are used in medicine. A bioelement found in a number of proteins. [L. cuprum, orig. Cyprium, fr. ...
copper pennies
SYN: sclerotic bodies, under body.
copper-64
Beta and positron emitter with a half-life of 12.82 hr. Used in the study of Wilson disease and in brain scans for tumors.
copper-67
Beta and gamma emitter with a half-life of 2.580 days.
copperas
The impure commercial variety of ferrous sulfate.
copperhead
A poisonous snake of the genus Agkistrodon in the U.S.
Coppet
Louis de, French physicist, 1841–1911. See C. law.
coprecipitation
Precipitation of unbound antigen along with an antigen-antibody complex; may occur particularly when a soluble complex is precipitated by a second antibody specific for the Fc ...
copremesis
SYN: fecal vomiting. [G. kopros, dung, + emesis]
copro-
Filth, dung, usually used in referring to feces. SEE ALSO: scato-, sterco-. [G. kopros, dung]
coproantibodies
Antibodies found in the intestine and in feces; they probably are formed by plasma cells in the intestinal mucosa and consist chiefly of the IgA class.
Coprolalia
The excessive and uncontrollable use of foul or obscene language, including words related to feces (bowel waste). Coprolalia is a typical symptom of Tourette syndrome, a ...
coprolith
SYN: fecalith. [ copro- + G. lithos, stone]
coprology
SYN: scatology (1). [ copro- + G. logos, study]
coproma
SYN: fecaloma. [ copro- + G. -oma, tumor]
coprophagia
The eating of excrement. SYN: coprophagy, scatophagy.
coprophagous
Feeding on excrement.
coprophagy
SYN: coprophagia. [ copro- + G. phago, to eat]
coprophil, coprophilic
1. Denoting microorganisms occurring in fecal matter. 2. Relating to coprophilia. [see coprophilia]
coprophile
An organism that ingests fecal material from other organisms.
coprophilia
1. Attraction of microorganisms to fecal matter. 2. In psychiatry, a morbid attraction to, and interest in (with a sexual element), fecal matter. SYN: mysophilia. [ copro- ...
Coprophobia
An abnormal and persistent fear of feces (bowel waste). Sufferers of coprophobia experience anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. They go out of their way to ...
coprophrasia
SYN: coprolalia.
coproplanesia
Rarely used term for passage of feces through a fistula or artificial anus. [ copro- + G. planesis, a wandering]
coproporphyria
Presence of coproporphyrins in the urine, as in variegate porphyria. - hereditary c. an inherited (autosomal dominant) disorder of a deficiency of coproporphyrinogen oxidase, ...
coproporphyrin
One of two porphyrin compounds found normally in feces as a decomposition product of bilirubin (hence, from hemoglobin); certain corproporphyrins are elevated in certain ...
coproporphyrinogen
See porphyrinogens. - c. oxidase an enzyme that catalyzes a step in porphyrin biosynthesis, reacting c. III and O2 to form protoporphyrinogen IX and 2CO2. A deficiency of this ...
coprostane
The parent hydrocarbon of coprosterol.
coprostanone
5β-Cholestan-3-one, an oxidation product of coprosterol.
coprostasis
Rarely used term for fecal impaction. [ copro- + G. stasis, a standing]
coprostenol
SYN: allocholesterol.
coprosterol
5β-Cholastan-3β-ol; the main sterol of the feces produced by the reduction of cholesterol by intestinal bacteria. For structure of coprostane and cholestane, see steroids. ...
coprostigmastane
The 5β isomer of stigmastane.
coprozoa
Protozoa that can be cultivated in fecal matter, although not necessarily living in feces within the intestine. [ copro- + G. zoon, animal]
coprozoic
Relating to coprozoa.
coptosis
A state of perpetual fatigue. [G. kopto, to tire, + osis, condition]
copula
1. In anatomy, a narrow part connecting two structures, e.g., the body of the hyoid bone. 2. A swelling that is formed during the early development of the tongue by the medial ...
copulation
1. SYN: coitus. 2. In protozoology, conjugation between two cells that do not fuse but separate after mutual fertilization; observed in the ciliophora, as in Paramecium. ...
copulines
Substances that occur in vaginal secretions; men who were exposed to c. rated women as more attractive, especially those women considered less attractive by controls tested with ...
CoQ
Abbreviation for coenzyme Q.
coquille
A spherical curved lens of uniform thickness. [Fr.]
Cor
The Latin word for the heart. For example, cor pulmonale is heart disease that results from abnormally high resistance to the passage of blood through the lungs. Cor biloculare ...
Cor biloculare
A two-chambered heart. Cor biloculare is due to failure of development of the walls that normally separate the two atria (interatrial septum) and the two ventricles ...
Cor pulmonale
Heart disease that results from abnormally high resistance to the passage of blood through the lungs; it often leads to right heart failure. Cor is the Latin word for the heart.
coracidium
The ciliated first-stage aquatic embryo of pseudophyllid and other cestodes with aquatic cycles; within the ciliated embryophore is a hooked larva, the hexacanth, that ...
coracoacromial
Relating to the coracoid and acromial processes. SYN: acromiocoracoid.
coracobrachialis
Relating to the coracoid process of the scapula and the arm. SEE ALSO: c. muscle, coracobrachial bursa.
coracoclavicular
Relating to the coracoid process and the clavicle. SYN: scapuloclavicular (2).
coracohumeral
Relating to the coracoid process and the humerus.
coracoid
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting a process of the scapula. [G. korakodes, like a crow's beak, fr. korax, raven, + eidos, appearance]
corallin
SYN: aurin. - yellow c. a sodium salt of aurin.
Cord
Short and informal reference to the spinal cord, the major column of nerve tissue that is connected to the brain, lies within the vertebral canal, and from which the spinal nerves ...
Cord, spinal
The major column of nerve tissue that is connected to the brain, lies within the vertebral canal, and from which the spinal nerves emerge. The spinal cord and the brain constitute ...
Cord, umbilical
The cord that connects the developing fetus with the placenta. Within this cord run the two umbilical arteries and the umbilical vein. At birth, the umbilical cord is clamped and ...
Cord, vocal
: One of two small bands of muscle within the larynx. These muscles vibrate to produce the voice. The vocal cords form a "V" inside the larynx, a 2-inch-long tube-shaped organ in ...
cord-
See chord-.
cordate
Heart-shaped.
cordectomy
Excision of a part or whole of a vocal cord. [G. chorde, cord, + ektome, excision]
cordial
A sweet aromatic liquor. [Mediev. L. cordialis, fr. cor ( cord-), heart]
cordianine
SYN: allantoin.
cordiform
Heart-shaped. [L. cor (cord-), heart, + forma, shape]
cordis
Of the heart. [gen. of L. cor, heart] - diastasis c. (di-as′ta-sis) any period of mechanical inactivity of the heart and particularly of the ventricles, usually appearing ...
cordocentesis
Transabdominal blood sampling of the fetal umbilical cord, performed under ultrasound guidance. SYN: funipuncture. [cord + G. kentesis, puncture]
cordon sanitaire
The barrier erected around a focus of infection. [Fr., sanitary barrier]
cordopexy
1. Operative fixation of any displaced anatomic cord. 2. Lateral fixation of one or both vocal cords to correct glottic stenosis. [G. chorde, cord, + pexis, fixation]
cordotomy
1. Any operation on the spinal cord. 2. Division of tracts of the spinal cord, which may be performed percutaneously ( stereotactic c.) or after laminectomy (open c.) by various ...
Cordylobia
A genus of calliphorid fleshflies. [G. kordyle, a cudgel, swelling, or tumor] - C. anthropophaga tumbu fly of Africa south of the Sahara; a species that causes a boil-like ...
cordylobiasis
Infection of humans and animals with larvae of flies of the genus Cordylobia. SYN: African furuncular myiasis, tumbu dermal myiasis.
core
1. The central mass of necrotic tissue in a boil. 2. A metal casting, usually with a post in the canal of a tooth root, designed to retain an artificial crown. 3. A sectional ...
core-, coreo-, coro-
The pupil (of the eye). [G. kore, pupil]
corectopia
Eccentric location of the pupil so that it is not in the center of the iris. [G. kore, pupil, + ektopos, out of place]
corelysis
A rarely used term for freeing of adhesions between lens capsule and the iris. [G. kore, pupil, + lysis, a loosening]
coremium
A sheaflike tuft of conidiophores. [G. korema, filth, refuse]
coreo-
See core-.
coreoplasty
The procedure to correct a misshapen, miotic, or occluded pupil. [G. kore, pupil, + plasso, to form]
corepexy
A suturing of the iris to modify the shape or size of the pupil. - purse-string c. a suture threaded along the pupillary margin and tied down to make a large pupil small.
corepraxy
A procedure designed to widen a small pupil. [G. kore, pupil, + praxis, action] - laser c. the iris stroma is heated with a laser and the resultant contracture of iris tissue ...
corepressor
A molecule, usually a product of a specific metabolic pathway, that combines with and activates a repressor produced by a regulator gene. The activated repressor then attaches to ...
Corey
R.B., U.S. chemist, 1897–1971. See Pauling-C. helix.
Cori
Gerty Theresa, Czech-U.S. biochemist and Nobel laureate, 1896–1957. See C. disease. Carl F., Czech-U.S. biochemist and Nobel laureate, 1896–1984. See C. cycle, C. ester.
coria
Plural of corium.
coriander
The dried ripe fruit of Coriandrum sativum (family Umbelliferae); a mild stimulant aromatic and a flavoring agent.
corium
dermis. [L. skin, hide, leather]
corn
SYN: clavus (1). [L. cornu, horn, hoof] - asbestos c. a granulomatous or hyperkeratotic lesion of the skin at the site of deposit of asbestos particles. SYN: asbestos wart. - ...
corn oil
The refined fixed oil expressed from the embryo of Zea mays (family Gramineae); a solvent. SYN: maise oil.
corn smut
SYN: Ustilago maydis.
Cornea
The clear front window of the eye. The cornea transmits and focuses light into the eye. The eye has a number of other components. These include the iris, pupil, lens, retina, ...
Corneal
Pertaining to the cornea, the clear front window of the eye. The cornea transmits and focuses light into the eye. The eye has a number of other components. These include the ...
Corneal dystrophy, Cogan
A disorder in which the cornea (the normally clear front window of the eye) shows grayish fingerprint lines, geographic map-like lines, and dots (or microcysts) on examination ...
Corneal dystrophy, epithelial basement
A disorder in which the cornea (the normally clear front window of the eye) shows grayish fingerprint lines, geographic map-like lines, and dots (or microcysts) on examination ...
Corneal dystrophy, map-dot-fingerprint type
A disorder in which the cornea (the normally clear front window of the eye) shows geographic map-like lines, dots (or microcysts), and grayish fingerprint lines on examination ...
Corneal dystrophy, microcystic
A disorder in which the cornea (the normally clear front window of the eye) shows dots (or microcysts), geographic map-like lines, and grayish fingerprint lines on examination ...
Corneal ring, intrastromal
A plastic ring designed to be implanted in the cornea, the transparent structure in the front of the eye. The aim of the corneal ring implant is to flatten the cornea and in so ...
Cornelia de Lange syndrome
A relatively common birth defect syndrome with multiple malformations and mental retardation of unknown origin that is recognized by the presence of: Prenatal and postnatal ...
corneoblepharon
Adhesion of the eyelid margin to the cornea. [cornea + G. blepharon, eyelid]
corneocyte
The dead keratin-filled squamous cell of the stratum corneum. SYN: horny cell, keratinized cell. [cornea, L. fem. of corneus, horny, + G. kytos, cell]
corneosclera
The combined cornea and sclera when considered as forming the external coat of the eyeball.
corneoscleral
Pertaining to the cornea and sclera.
Corner
George W., U.S. anatomist, 1889–1981. See C.- Allen test, C.- Allen unit. Edred M., English surgeon, 1873–1950. See C. tampon.
corneum
See stratum c. epidermidis, stratum c. unguis. [L., ntr. of corneus, horny, fr. cornu, horn]
corniculate
1. Resembling a horn. 2. Having horns or horn-shaped appendages. [L. corniculatus, horned]
corniculum
A small cornu. [L. dim. of cornu, horn] - c. laryngis SYN: corniculate cartilage.
cornification
SYN: keratinization. [L. cornu, horn, + facio, to make]
cornified
SYN: keratinized.
cornsilk
SYN: zea.
cornu
1. [TA] SYN: horn. 2. Any structure composed of horny substance. 3. One of the coronal extensions of the dental pulp underlying a cusp or lobe. 4. The major subdivisions of ...
cornua
Plural of cornu.
cornual
Relating to a cornu.
coro-
See core-.
corona
SYN: crown. [L. garland, crown, fr. G. korone] - c. capitis the topmost part of the head. SYN: crown of head. - c. ciliaris [TA] the circular figure on the inner surface of the ...
coronad
In a direction toward any corona.
Coronal
A coronal plane through the body is a vertical plane from head to foot and parallel to the shoulders. * * * Relating to a corona or the c. plane. SYN: coronalis [TA].
coronale
1. SYN: frontal bone. 2. One of the two most widely separated points on the coronal suture at the poles of the greatest frontal diameter. [L. neuter of coronalis, pertaining ...
coronalis
SYN: coronal.
coronaria
A coronary artery, of the heart.
coronarism
1. SYN: coronary insufficiency. 2. SYN: angina pectoris. [coronary (artery) + -ism]
coronaritis
Inflammation of coronary artery or arteries.
coronary
1. Relating to or resembling a crown. 2. Encircling; denoting various anatomical structures, e.g., nerves, blood vessel s, ligaments. 3. Specifically, denoting the c. blood ...
Coronary angiography
The most accurate method (the "gold standard") for evaluating and defining coronary artery disease (CAD). Coronary angiography is used to identify the exact location and severity ...
Coronary arteries
The vessels that supply the heart muscle with blood rich in oxygen. They are called the coronary arteries because they encircle the heart in the manner of a crown. The word ...
Coronary artery bypass graft (CABG)
Coronary artery disease develops because of hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) that supply blood to the heart muscle. Diagnostic tests include EKG, stress test, ...
Coronary artery spasm
A spasm (a sudden constriction) of one of the coronary arteries depriving the (myocardium (the heart muscle) of blood and oxygen. This can cause chest pain referred to as ...
Coronaviridae
A family of single-stranded RNA-containing viruses with 3 or 4 major antigens corresponding to each of the major viral proteins; some of which cause upper respiratory tract ...
Coronavirus
A genus in the family Coronaviridae that is associated with upper respiratory tract infections and possibly gastroenteritis in man.
coronavirus
Any virus of the family Coronaviridae.
coroner
An official whose duty it is to investigate sudden, suspicious, or violent death to determine the cause; in some communities, the office has been replaced by that of medical ...
coronion
The tip of the coronoid process of the mandible; a craniometric point. SYN: koronion. [G. korone, crow]
coronoid
Shaped like a crow's beak; denoting certain processes and other parts of bones. [G. korone, a crow, + eidos, resembling]
coronoidectomy
Surgical removal of the coronoid process of the mandible. [ coronoid + G. ektome, excision]
corpora
Plural of corpus.
Corpora cavernosa
Two chambers in the penis which run the length of the organ and are filled with spongy tissue. Blood flows in and fills the open spaces in the spongy tissue to create an ...
corporeal
Pertaining to the body, or to a corpus.
corporin
Obsolete term for corpus luteum hormone.
corps ronds
Dyskeratotic round cells occurring in the epidermis, with a central round basophilic mass surrounded by a clear halo; characteristically found in keratosis follicularis. [Fr. ...
corpse
SYN: cadaver. [L. corpus, body]
corpulence, corpulency
SYN: obesity. [L. corpulentia, magnification of corpus, body]
corpulent
SYN: obese.
corpus
1. SYN: body. 2. Any body or mass. 3. The main part of an organ or other anatomic structure, as distinguished from the head or tail. SEE ALSO: body, diaphysis, soma. [L. ...
Corpus callosum, agenesis of the
A congenital abnormality (a birth defect) in which there is partial or complete absence (agenesis) of the corpus callosum, the area of the brain which connects the two cerebral ...
corpuscle
1. A small mass or body. 2. A blood cell. SYN: corpusculum. [L. corpusculum, dim. of corpus, body] - amnionic c. SYN: corpus amylaceum. - amylaceous c., amyloid c. SYN: ...
corpuscula
Plural of corpusculum.
corpuscular
Relating to a corpuscle.
corpusculum
SYN: corpuscle. - corpuscula articularia SYN: articular corpuscles, under corpuscle. - corpuscula bulboidea SYN: Krause end bulbs, under bulb. - corpuscula genitalia SYN: ...
correction
The act of reducing a fault; the elimination of an unfavorable quality. - occlusal c. 1. the c. of malocclusion, by whatever means is employed; 2. elimination of disharmony ...
corrective
1. Counteracting, modifying, or changing what is injurious. 2. A drug that modifies or corrects an undesirable or injurious effect of another drug. SYN: corrigent. [L. cor-rigo ...
correlation
1. The mutual or reciprocal relation of two or more items or parts. 2. The act of bringing into such a relation. 3. The degree to which variables change together. - product- ...
Correra line
See under line.
correspondence
In optics, those points on each retina that have the same visual direction. - abnormal c. SYN: anomalous retinal c.. - anomalous retinal c. abnormal c., a condition, frequent in ...
Corrigan
Sir Dominic J., Irish pathologist and clinician, 1802–1880. See C. disease, C. pulse, C. sign.
Corrigan pulse
A pulse that is full and then suddenly collapses. This pulse is named for the Irish physician Dominic John Corrigan (1802-80) who described it in patients with aortic ...
corrigent
SYN: corrective.
corrin
The cyclic system of four pyrrole rings forming corrinoids, which are the central structure of the vitamins B12 and related compounds, differing from porphin ( porphyrin) in that ...
corrinoid
A compound containing a corrin ring.
corrode
To cause, or to be affected by, corrosion.
corrosion
1. Gradual deterioration or consummation of a substance by another, especially by biochemical or chemical reaction. Cf.:erosion. 2. The product of corroding, such as rust. [L. ...
corrosive
1. Causing corrosion. 2. An agent that produces corrosion; e.g., a strong acid or alkali.
corrugator
A muscle that draws together the skin, causing it to wrinkle. [L. cor-rugo (conr-), pp. -atus, to wrinkle, fr. ruga, a wrinkle]
Cortex
The outer portion of an organ. The outer portion of the adrenal gland is called the adrenal cortex; the outer portion of the cerebrum is the cerebral cortex (a key part of the ...
cortexolone
A mineralocorticoid hormone from the adrenal cortex.
cortexone
SYN: deoxycorticosterone.
Corti
Marquis Alfonso, Italian anatomist, 1822–1876. See C. arch, C. canal, C. cells, under cell, C. ganglion, C. membrane, C. organ, C. pillars, under pillar, C. rods, under rod, C. ...
Cortical
Having to do with the cortex, the outer portion of an organ. The outer portion of the adrenal gland is called the adrenal cortical part; the outer portion of the cerebrum is the ...
corticalization
In phylogenesis, the migration of function from subcortical centers to the cortex. SYN: encephalization, telencephalization.
corticalosteotomy
An osteotomy through the cortex at the base of the dentoalveolar segment, which serves to weaken the resistance of the bone to the application of orthodontic forces.
corticectomy
Removal of a specific portion of the cerebral cortex. [cortic- + G. ektome, excision]
cortices
Plural of cortex.
corticifugal
SYN: corticofugal.
corticipetal
Passing in a direction toward the outer surface; denoting nerve fibers conveying impulses toward the cerebral cortex. SYN: corticoafferent. [L. cortex, rind, bark, + peto, to ...
corticoafferent
SYN: corticipetal.
corticobulbar
See c. fibers, under fiber, corticonuclear fibers, under fiber.
corticocerebellum
SYN: neocerebellum.
corticoefferent
SYN: corticofugal.
corticofugal
Passing in a direction away from the outer surface; denoting especially nerve fibers conveying impulses away from the cerebral cortex. SYN: corticifugal, corticoefferent. [L. ...
corticoid
1. Having an action similar to that of a hormone of the adrenal cortex. 2. Any substance exhibiting this action. 3. SYN: corticosteroid.
corticomedial
Cortical and medial; specifically used to refer to one of the two major cytological divisions of the amygdaloid complex. See corpus amygdaloideum.
Corticosteroid
Any of the steroid hormones made by the cortex (outer layer) of the adrenal gland. Cortisol is a corticosteroid. * * * A steroid produced by the adrenal cortex ( i.e., adrenal ...
corticosterone
A corticosteroid that induces some deposition of glycogen in the liver, sodium conservation, and potassium excretion; the principal glucocortoid in the rat.
corticothalamic
Pertaining to cortex and thalamus; the term is applied to fibers projecting from the cerebral cortex to the thalamus, the c. fibers [TA].
corticotroph
A cell of the adenohypophysis that produces adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH).
corticotropin
1. SYN: adrenocorticotropic hormone. 2. SYN: β-c.. [G. trope, a turning] - c.-zinc hydroxide purified c. absorbed on zinc hydroxide; same uses as c. but with a prolonged ...
Corticotropin-releasing hormone
A hormone made by the hypothalamus that stimulates the release of corticotropin by the anterior pituitary gland. Corticotropin-releasing hormone is abbreviated and often ...
Corticoviridae
Name for a family of nonenveloped, ether-sensitive bacterial viruses of medium size, with a lipid-containing capsid and genome of circular, double-stranded DNA (MW 5 × 106), ...
corticovirus
Only genus in family of Corticoviridae.
cortilymph
The fluid in Corti tunnel.
cortin
SYN: corticosteroid.
Cortisol
The primary stress hormone. Cortisol is the major natural GLUCOCORTICOID (GC) in humans. * * * SYN: hydrocortisone. - c. acetate SYN: hydrocortisone acetate.
cortisone
A glucocorticoid not normally secreted in significant quantities by the human adrenal cortex. Endogenously, it is probably a metabolite of hydrocortisone but exhibits no ...
corundum
Native crystalline aluminum oxide. [Hind. kurand]
Corvisart des Marets
Baron Jean N., French clinician, 1755–1821. See Corvisart facies.
corymbiform
Denoting the flowerlike clustering configuration of skin lesions in granulomatous diseases ( e.g., syphilis, tuberculosis). [L. corymbus, cluster, garland]
corynebacteria
Plural of corynebacterium.
corynebacteriophage
Any one of the bacteriophages specific for corynebacteria. - β c. a DNA-containing bacteriophage that induces toxigenicity in strains of Corynebacterium diphtheriae that are ...
Corynebacterium
A genus of nonmotile (except for some plant pathogens), aerobic to anaerobic bacteria (family Corynebacteriaceae) containing irregularly staining, Gram-positive, straight to ...
corynebacterium
A vernacular term used to refer to any member of the genus C..
Coryza
A cold in the head. The word “coryza” came from the Greek “koryza” which is thought to have been compounded from “kara”, head + “zeein”, to boil. The “boiling ...
Coryzavirus
Obsolete name for Rhinovirus.
cosmesis
A concern in therapeutics for the appearance of the patient; i.e., an operation that improves appearance. [G. kosmesis, an adorning, fr. kosmeo, to order, arrange, adorn, fr. ...
cosmetic
1. Relating to cosmesis. 2. Relating to the use of cosmetics.
cosmetics
Composite term for a variety of camouflages applied to the skin, lips, hair, and nails for purposes of beautifying in accordance with cultural dictates.
Cosmid
DNA from a bacterial virus into which is spliced a small fragment of a genome to be amplified and sequenced. A cosmid is an artificially constructed structure. It is used in ...
cosmopolitan
In the biologic sciences, a term denoting worldwide distribution. [G. kosmos, universe, + polis, city-state]
costa
1. [TA] [I–XII]. SYN: rib [I–XII]. 2. A rodlike internal supporting organelle that runs along the base of the undulating membrane of certain flagellate parasites such as ...
costal
Relating to a rib.
Costal margin
The lower edge of the chest (thorax) formed by the bottom edge of the rib cage.
costalgia
SYN: pleurodynia. [L. costa, rib, + G. algos, pain]
costectomy
Excision of a rib. [L. costa, rib, + G. ektome, excision]
Costen
James B., U.S. otolaryngologist, 1895–1962. See C. syndrome.
costicartilage
SYN: costal cartilage.
costiform
Rib-shaped. [L. costa, rib, + forma, form]
costive
Pertaining to or causing constipation. [contraction from L. constipo, to press together]
costiveness
SYN: constipation.
costo-
The ribs. [L. costa, rib]
costocentral
SYN: costovertebral.
costochondral
Relating to the costal cartilages. SYN: chondrocostal.
Costochondritis
Costochondritis is the result of inflammation of the cartilage of the chest wall, usually involving that which surrounds the breast bone (sternum). It causes local pain and ...
costoclavicular
Relating to the ribs and the clavicle.
costocoracoid
Relating to the ribs and the coracoid process of the scapula.
costogenic
Arising from a rib.
costoinferior
Relating to the lower ribs.
costoscapular
Relating to the ribs and the scapula.
costoscapularis
SYN: serratus anterior (muscle).
costosternal
Pertaining to the ribs and the sternum.

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