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Fear of bacilli (bacteria)
An abnormal and persistent fear of bacilli (bacteria). A phobia is an unreasonable sort of fear that can cause avoidance and panic. Phobias are a relatively common type of ...
Fear of bearing a malformed child
An abnormal and persistent fear of bearing a malformed child is termed teratophobia. A phobia is an unreasonable sort of fear that can cause avoidance and panic. Phobias are a ...
Fear of bees
An abnormal and persistent fear of bees. A phobia can cause avoidance and panic. Phobias are a relatively common type of anxiety disorder. Phobias can be treated with cognitive ...
Fear of being buried alive
An abnormal and persistent fear of being buried alive is called taphephobia. A phobia is an unreasonable sort of fear that can cause avoidance and panic. Phobias are a relatively ...
Fear of birds
An abnormal and persistent fear of birds. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety about encountering and even being attacked by birds although they may realize their fears ...
Fear of blood
An abnormal and persistent fear of blood. Sufferers of this very common phobia dread the sight of their own blood, the sight of the blood of another person or an animal, and ...
Fear of blushing
: An abnormal and persistent fear of blushing. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. Their anxiety results from worry ...
Fear of bridges
An abnormal and persistent fear of bridges, especially crossing bridges. Sufferers of this phobia experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. ...
Fear of cats
An abnormal and persistent fear of cats which produces an undue anxiety reaction even though sufferers realize their fear is irrational. Sufferers of this phobia may fear not ...
Fear of children
An abnormal and persistent fear of babies and children. Sufferers experience anxiety even though they realize their fear is groundless. Rearing a child or being around active ...
Fear of closed spaces
Fear of closed spaces, of being closed in or being shut in as in elevators, tunnels, or any other small confined space is termed claustrophobia. The word " claustrophobia" is ...
Fear of cold
An abnormal and persistent fear of cold, including cold weather and cold objects. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is ...
Fear of crossing bridges
An abnormal and persistent fear of crossing bridges. Sufferers of this phobia experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. Their fear may result ...
Fear of crossing streets
Abnormal and persistent fear of crossing streets, highways and other thoroughfares; fear of thoroughfares themselves. Sufferers experience anxiety even though they realize that ...
Fear of depths
An abnormal and persistent fear of depths. Sufferers of this fear experience anxiety even though they realize they are safe from falling into or being consumed by depths. The ...
Fear of dogs
An abnormal and persistent fear of dogs. Sufferers of this fear experience anxiety even though they realize that most dogs pose no threat. To avoid dogs, they may barricade yards ...
Fear of drinking alcohol
An abnormal and persistent fear of drinking alcohol. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety about addiction to alcohol and the effect this addiction can have on their ...
Fear of dust
An abnormal and persistent fear of dust. Sufferers of this fear experience anxiety even though they realize dust poses no threat. Fear of dust is termed " amathophobia," a word ...
Fear of evil spirits (demons)
An abnormal and persistent fear of evil supernatural beings in persons who believe such beings exist and roam freely to cause harm. Those who suffer from this phobia realize their ...
Fear of feces (bowel waste)
An abnormal and persistent fear of feces (bowel waste). Sufferers of this fear experience anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. They go out of their way to ...
Fear of flowers
An abnormal and persistent fear of flowers. Sufferers experience undue anxiety even though they realize they face no threat from flowers. Any genus or species of flowers can ...
Fear of flying
An irrational fear of flying is called aerophobia. Aerophobia also refers to irrational fear of fresh air or drafts of air. From the Greek " aero-", air or gas + "phobos", ...
Fear of fur
An abnormal and persistent fear of fur is called doraphobia. Sufferers of this fear avoid fur-bearing animals such as dogs, cats, foxes, beavers and rabbits because fur is ...
Fear of ghosts
An abnormal and persistent fear of ghosts. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. They may fear going into woods, ...
Fear of going to bed
An abnormal and persistent fear of going to bed. Sufferers of this fear experience anxiety even though they realize that going to bed normally should not threaten their ...
Fear of heat
An abnormal, excessive and persistent fear of heat, including hot weather and hot objects. Sufferers from this fear experience anxiety even though they realize their fear is ...
Fear of heights
An abnormal and persistent fear of heights. Sufferers experience severe anxiety even though they realize as a rule that heights pose no real threat to them. Fear of heights is ...
Fear of horses
An abnormal and persistent fear of horses. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even when a horse is known to be gentle and well trained. They usually avoid horses ...
Fear of insects
An abnormal and persistent fear of insects. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize that most insects pose no threat. To avoid insects, they may ...
Fear of intercourse
An abnormal and persistent fear of male-female sexual intercourse. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety because they are preoccupied with failing in some way while ...
Fear of joy
An abnormal, excessive, and persistent fear of experiencing joy or pleasure. Sufferers with this most puritanical of phobias typically feel guilty about experiencing pleasure ...
Fear of loneliness
An abnormal and persistent fear of loneliness, of being alone. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize that being alone does not threaten their ...
Fear of marriage
An abnormal and persistent fear of being married. Sufferers of this phobia experience undue anxiety even though they may rationally realize that the married state itself poses no ...
Fear of men
An abnormal and persistent fear of men. Sufferers experience anxiety even though they realize they may face no real threat. Fear of men is termed " androphobia," a word derived ...
Fear of mirrors
An abnormal and persistent fear of mirrors. Sufferers experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. Because their fear often is grounded in ...
Fear of money
An abnormal and persistent fear of money. Sufferers experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. They worry that they might mismanage money or that ...
Fear of new things
An irrational fear of anything new, of innovation, of new situations, places, or things. Also called neophobia. In animal behavior, neophobia refers to the tendency of an ...
Fear of nudity
An abnormal and persistent fear of nudity is called gymnophobia. Sufferers of this phobia experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. They may ...
Fear of pain
An abnormal and persistent fear of pain. The fear is excessive, beyond that which is expected under the circumstances, producing an anxiety reaction. Fear of pain is termed " ...
Fear of pleasure
An abnormal, excessive, and persistent fear of pleasure. Sufferers with this most puritanical of phobias typically feel guilty about experiencing pleasure even though they ...
Fear of public places
This irrational fear is called agoraphobia. It applies to open areas, especially those from which escape could be difficult or help not immediately accessible. Persons with ...
Fear of sexual intercourse
An abnormal and persistent fear of male-female sexual intercourse. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety because they are preoccupied with failing in some way while ...
Fear of sharks
Excessive and persistent fear of sharks is termed galeophobia. Sufferers from this phobia experience anxiety even though they may be safe on a boat or in an aquarium or on a ...
Fear of socializing (social phobia)
Excessive fear of embarrassment in social situations that is extremely intrusive and can have debilitating effects on personal and professional relationships. Phobias are ...
Fear of solitude
An abnormal and persistent fear of solitude, of being alone. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize that being alone does not threaten their ...
Fear of spiders
An abnormal and persistent fear of spiders. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize the risk of encountering a spider and being harmed by it is ...
Fear of the dark
Pathological fear of the dark, an abnormal and persistent dread of the dark. Sufferers experience undue anxiety even though they may rationally realize that the dark does not pose ...
Fear of the number 13
A morbid fear of the number 13. Also known as triskaidekaphobia. Written reference to the superstitious fear of the number thirteen dates to the late 1800s. Its origin is ...
Fear of thunder
An abnormal and persistent fear of thunder that causes undue anxiety even though sufferers realize that thunder itself poses no threat to them. When outdoors during a ...
Fear of thunderstorms
An abnormal and persistent fear of thunderstorms. Sufferers experience anxiety even when they realize the risk of harm is very small. Consequently, when indoors they might seek ...
Fear of travel
An irrational and unreasonable fear of travel is called agoraphobia. Agoraphobia is a very complex phobia. It usually manifests as a collection of inter-linked phobias. For ...
Fear of vomiting
An abnormal and persistent fear of vomiting. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety even though they realize their fear is irrational. They usually are especially ...
Fear of water
An abnormal and persistent fear of water. Sufferers of aquaphobia experience anxiety even though they realize the water in an ocean, a river, a lake, a creek or even a bathtub ...
Fear of women
An abnormal, irrational and persistent fear of women. Sufferers experience undue anxiety even though they realize they face no threat. Fear of women is termed "gynephobia," a ...
Fear of work
An abnormal and persistent fear of work. Sufferers of this fear experience undue anxiety about the workplace environment even though they realize their fear is irrational. Their ...
Fear of worms (parasitic)
: An abnormal and persistent fear of being infested with parasitic worms called helminths. The technical term for this fear is helminthphobia. The eggs of parasitic worms can ...
features
The various parts of the face, forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, chin, cheeks, and ears, that give to it its individuality and character. [through O. Fr., fr. L. factura, a making, fr. ...
febricant
SYN: febrifacient.
febricula
A simple continued fever; a mild fever of short duration, of indefinite origin, and without any distinctive pathology. [L. dim. of febris, fever]
febrifacient
1. Causing or favoring the development of fever. SYN: febriferous, febrific. 2. Anything that produces fever. SEE ALSO: pyrogenic. SYN: febricant. [L. febris, fever, + ...
febriferous
SYN: febrifacient (1). [L. febris, fever, + fero, to bear, + -ous]
febrific
SYN: febrifacient (1).
febrifugal
SYN: antipyretic (1).
febrifuge
SYN: antipyretic (2). [L. febris, fever, + fugo, to put to flight]
febrile
Denoting or relating to fever. SYN: feverish (1), pyrectic, pyretic.
Febrile herpes
A small sore situated on the face or in the mouth that causes pain, burning, or itching before bursting and crusting over. The favorite locations are on the lips (the labia), chin ...
Febrile seizure
A convulsion that occurs in association with a rapid increase in body temperature. Febrile seizures are common in infants and young children and, fortunately, are usually of no ...
febris
SYN: fever. [L.] - f. melitensis (fe′bris mel-i-ten′sis) infection with Brucella melitensis; SEE ALSO: Brucella melitensis. - f. undulans (fe′bris un-doo-lanz′) SYN: ...
Fecal
Relating to the feces, the stool. the excrement discharged from the intestines. From the Latin "faex" and "faecis" meaning the dregs or sediment. * * * Relating to feces.
Fecal incontinence
Inability to hold feces in the rectum. This is due to failure of voluntary control over the anal sphincters permitting untimely passage of feces and gas. Also called rectal ...
fecalith
A hard mass consisting of inspissated feces. SYN: coprolith, stercolith. [L. faeces, feces, + G. lithos, stone]
fecaloid
Resembling feces. [L. faeces, feces, + G. eidos, resemblance]
fecaloma
An accumulation of inspissated feces in the colon or rectum giving the appearance of an abdominal tumor. SYN: coproma, fecal tumor, scatoma, stercoroma.
fecaluria
The commingling of feces with urine passed from the urethra in persons with a fistula connecting the intestinal tract and lower urinary tract, often noticed most dramatically by ...
Feces
The medical and scientific term for the "excrement discharged from the intestines." The word "feces" (or its English version "faeces") in Shakespeare ...
Fechner
Gustav T., German physicist, 1801–1887. See Weber-F. law, F.- Weber law.
feculent
Foul. [L. faeculentus, full of excrement, fr. faeces, dregs, feces]
Fecund
Fruitful, abundantly fertile. Just as a writer is prolific, a woman may be fecund, able to reproduce plentifully. Etymology:"Fecund" comes (minus the final "us") from the Latin ...
fecundate
To impregnate; to make fertile. [L. fecundo, pp. -atus, to make fruitful, fertilize]
fecundation
The act of rendering fertile. SEE ALSO: fertilization, impregnation.
Fecundity
The ability to have children, usually lots of them with ease. Etymology:"Fecundity" comes from the Latin "fecundus" meaning fruitful. "Fecundity" emphasizes abundance or rapidity ...
Fede
Francesco, Italian physician, 1832–1913. See Riga-F. disease.
Fee for service (FFS)
In health care, a payment mechanism in which a provider is paid for each individual service rendered to a patient.
Feedback
Many biologic processes are controlled by feedback, just as the temperature in a home from a furnace is regulated by a thermostat. * * * 1. In a given system, the return, as ...
feeding
Giving food or nourishment. - fictitious f. SYN: sham f.. - forced f., forcible f. 1. giving liquid food through a nasal tube passed into the stomach; 2. forcing a person to eat ...
Feeding, breast
The ability of the breast to produce milk diminishes soon after childbirth without the stimulation of breastfeeding. Immunity factors in breast milk can help the baby to fight ...
feeling
1. Any kind of conscious experience of sensation. 2. The mental perception of a sensory stimulus. 3. A quality of any mental state or mood, whereby it is recognized as ...
Feer
Emil, Swiss pediatrician, 1864–1955. See F. disease.
Feet
The plural of foot, both an anatomic structure and a unit of measure. As an anatomic structure, the foot is the end of the leg on which a person normally stands and walks. The ...
FEF
Abbreviation for forced expiratory flow.
Fehling
Hermann von, German chemist, 1812–1885. See F. reagent, F. solution.
Feil
André, French physician, *1884. See Klippel-F. syndrome.
Feiss
Henry O., 20th century American orthopedic surgeon. See F. line.
FEL
Abbreviation for familial erythrophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.
felbamate
An anticonvulsant/antiepileptic agent chemically related to meprobamate; useful in complex partial seizures.
Feldberg
Wilhelm, British physiologist, 1900–1993. See Dale-F. law.
Feldman
Harry Alfred, U.S. epidemiologist, 1914–1986. See Sabin-F. dye test.
Felidae
A family of Carnivora embracing domestic and wild cats such as lions and tigers. [L. felis, cat]
feline
Pertaining or relating to cats. [L. felis, cat]
Felix
Arthur, Polish bacteriologist, 1887–1956. See Weil-F. reaction, Weil-F. test.
fellatio
Oral stimulation of the penis; a type of oral-genital sexual activity; contrasted with cunnilingus, which is the oral stimulation of the vulva or clitoris. SYN: irrumation. ...
felodipine
A calcium blocking agent of the dihydropyridine class resembling nifedipine.
felon
SYN: whitlow. [M.E. feloun, malignant]
Felson
Benjamin, U.S. radiologist, 1913–1988. See silhouette sign of F..
feltwork
1. A fibrous network. 2. A close plexus of nerve fibrils. See neuropil.
Felty
Augustus R., U.S. physician, 1895–1963. See F. syndrome.
felypressin
[Phe2,Lys8]Vasopressin; lysine vasopressin with l-phenylalanine at position 2. SYN: octapressin.
Female
The traditional definition of female was "an individual of the sex that bears young" or "that produces ova or eggs". However, things are not so simple today. ...
Female condom
Although the word " condom" usually conjures up the male condom, there is a female condom. The Reality Female Condom was approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) ...
Female gonad
The female gonad, the ovary or " egg sac", is one of a pair of reproductive glands in women. They are located in the pelvis, one on each side of the uterus. Each ovary is about ...
Female internal genitalia
The internal genital structures of the female, comprising the ovaries, the Fallopian tubes, the uterus (womb), the cervix, and the vagina. These are, collectively, the female ...
Female organs of reproduction
The internal genital structures of the female include the ovaries, the Fallopian tubes, the uterus (womb) and the vagina. The ovaries or "egg sacs" are a pair of female ...
Female orgasmic dysfunction
Failure of a female to achieve an orgasm (climax) during sexual intercourse. This disorder can originate in psychological or emotional problems such as stress, anxiety, ...
Female pelvis
There are significant differences in the anatomy of the pelvis in the female and male. The female pelvis is more delicate, wider and not as high as the male pelvis. The angle ...
Female urethral meatus
The urethra is the transport tube leading from the bladder to discharge urine outside the body. In females the urethra is shorter than in the male. The meatus (opening) of the ...
Female urethral opening
The urethra is the transport tube leading from the bladder to discharge urine outside the body. In females the urethra is shorter than in the male and opens above the vaginal ...
feminization
Development of what are superficially external female characteristics by a male. - testicular f. SYN: complete androgen insensitivity syndrome. testicular f. syndrome.
femoral
Relating to the femur or thigh.
femorocele
SYN: femoral hernia. [L. femur, thigh, + G. kele, hernia]
femorotibial
Relating to the femur and the tibia.
femto-
Prefix used in SI and metric system to signify a submultiple of one-quadrillionth (10–15). [Danish and Norwegian femten, fifteen]
Femur
The femur is the bone in the leg that extends from the hip to the knee. The femur constitutes the upper leg, that part of the leg above the knee. As compared to the lower leg ...
fenbufen
A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent resembling ibuprofen.
fencamine
A central nervous system stimulant.
fenclofenac
A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug used in the treatment of joint disorders; similar to diclofenac.
fenclonine
A serotonin inhibitor.
Fendt
H., 19th century Austrian dermatologist. See cutaneous pseudolymphoma, Spiegler-F. sarcoid.
fenestra
1. [TA] An anatomic aperture, often closed by a membrane. 2. An opening left in a plaster of Paris cast or other form of fixed dressing in order to permit access to a wound ...
fenestrated
Having fenestrae or windowlike openings.
Fenestration
Literally, the making of a window — fenestra in Latin (and fenetre in French) is a window — fenestration refers to the creation of a new opening. * * * 1. The presence of ...
fenfluramine hydrochloride
An anorexigenic agent.
Fenn
Wallace Osgood, U.S. physiologist, 1893–1971. See F. effect.
fennel
F. seed, the dried ripe fruit of cultivated varieties of Foeniculum vulgare (family Umbelliferae), an herb native to southern Europe and Asia, a diaphoretic and carminative; a ...
fenoprofen calcium
An anti-inflammatory analgesic used for treatment of mild to moderate pain and for osteoarthritis; similar to ibuprofen.
fenoterol
A β2 agonist inhalation bronchodilator.
fenpipramide
An antispasmodic.
fentanyl citrate
A short-acting narcotic analgesic about 100 times more potent than morphine used as a supplementary analgesic in general anesthesia.
fenticlor
A topical anti-infective agent.
fenugreek
An annual plant indigenous to western Asia and cultivated in Africa and parts of Europe; the mucilaginous seeds are used as food and in the preparation of culinary spices ...
Fenwick
Edwin Hurry, British urologist, 1856–1944. See F.- Hunner ulcer.
feral
Denoting an animal that is wild and untamed.
Féréol
Louis Felix Henri, French physician, 1825–1891.
Ferguson
J.K.W., 20th century obstetrician. See F. reflex.
Fergusson
Sir William, Scottish surgeon, 1808–1877. See F. incision.
ferment
1. To cause or to undergo fermentation. 2. An agent that causes fermentation. [L. fermentum, leaven]
fermentable
Capable of undergoing fermentation.
fermentation
1. A chemical change induced in a complex organic compound by the action of an enzyme, whereby the substance is split into simpler compounds. 2. In bacteriology, the anaerobic ...
fermentative
Causing or having the ability to cause fermentation.
fermenter
A large container used in cultures of microorganisms.
fermium
Radioactive element, artificially prepared in 1955, atomic no. 100, atomic wt. 257.095; 257Fm has the longest known half-life (100.5 days) of this transuranium element. [E. Fermi, ...
Fernandez reaction
See under reaction.
Fernbach
Auguste, French microbiologist, 1860–1939. See F. flask.
ferning
A term used to describe the pattern of arborization produced by cervical mucus, secreted at midcycle, upon crystallization, which resembles somewhat a fern or a palm leaf.
ferratin
A hematinic.
ferredoxins
Proteins containing iron-sulfur complexes, displaying electron-carrier activity but no classical enzyme function. F. are found in green plants, algae, anaerobic bacteria, and in ...
Ferrein
Antoine, French anatomist, 1693–1769. See F. canal, F. cords, under cord, F. foramen, F. ligament, F. pyramid, F. tube, F. vasa aberrantia, under vas, processus ferreini.
ferri-
Prefix designating the presence of a ferric ion in a compound. [L. ferrum, iron]
ferric
Relating to iron, especially denoting a salt containing iron in its higher ( triad) valence, Fe3+.
ferric ammonium citrate
A compound used in hypochromic anemia; it is relatively free of astringent and irritant action.
ferric ammonium citrate, green
A compound used in hypochromic anemia.
ferric ammonium sulfate
An astringent and styptic. SYN: ammonium ferric sulfate, ferric alum, iron alum.
ferric chloride
An astringent and styptic.
ferric fructose
A potassium-iron-fructose; a hematinic drug.
ferric glycerophosphate
A tonic and a source of iron.
ferric hydroxide
A compound previously used, freshly prepared, as an antidote to arsenic poisoning.
ferric oxide
A compound used as a coloring material.
ferric phosphate
A compound used as a feed and as a food supplement. - soluble f. f. with sodium citrate; a hematinic.
ferric sulfate
Iron persulfate, tersulfate, or sesquisulfate; an astringent and styptic.
ferricyanide
The anion Fe(CN)63-.
ferricytochrome
A cytochrome containing oxidized ( ferric) iron.
ferriheme
SYN: hematin. - f. chloride SYN: hemin.
ferrihemoglobin
SYN: methemoglobin.
ferriporphyrin
The compound formed between a ferric ion and a porphyrin; e.g., ferriprotoporphyrin (hemin). - f. chloride SYN: hemin.
Ferritin
The major iron storage protein. The blood level of ferritin serves as an indicator of the amount of iron stored in the body. Ferritin has the shape of a hollow sphere that ...
ferro-
Prefix designating the presence of metallic iron or of the divalent ion Fe2+. [L. ferrum, iron]
Ferrocalcinosis, cerebrovascular
A condition that was first described in 1930 by T. Fahr and is therefore sometimes called Fahr syndrome, this is a genetic (inherited) neurological disorder characterized by ...
ferrochelatase
A lyase that catalyzes the reversible acid hydrolysis of heme, forming protoporphyrin IX and free ferrous iron; inhibited by lead; a deficiency of f. results in erythropoietic ...
ferrocholinate
Iron choline citrate chelate, used for oral administration in the treatment and prevention of iron deficiency anemias.
ferrocyanide
A compound containing the anion Fe(CN)64− .
ferrocytochrome
A cytochrome containing reduced ( ferrous) iron.
ferroheme
SYN: heme.
ferrokinetics
The study of iron metabolism using radioactive iron. [L. ferrum, iron, + G. kinesis, movement]
ferroporphyrin
The compound formed between a ferrous ion and a porphyrin; e.g., ferroprotoporphyrin (heme).
ferroproteins
Proteins containing iron in a prosthetic group; e.g., heme, cytochromes.
ferrosoferric
Denoting a combination of a ferrous compound with a ferric compound, as in Fe3O4.
ferrotherapy
Therapeutic use of iron. [L. ferrum, iron]
ferrous
Relating to iron, especially denoting a salt containing iron in its lowest valence state, Fe2+. [L. ferreus, made of iron]
ferrous citrate
A compound that occurs in several forms, two of which are monoferrous acid citrate monohydrate and triferrous dicitrate decahydrate; a hematinic.
ferrous fumarate
Iron fumarate, a hematinic.
ferrous gluconate
Iron gluconate; a hematinic.
ferrous lactate
Iron lactate; a hematinic.
ferrous succinate
Iron succinate; a hematinic.
ferrous sulfate
SYN: iron sulfate. - dried f. exsiccated iron sulfate; a hematinic.
ferrugination
Deposition of mineral deposits including iron in the walls of small blood vessel s and at the site of a dead neuron. [L. ferrugo, iron-rust]
ferruginous
1. Iron-bearing; associated with or containing iron. 2. Of the color of iron rust. [L. ferrugineus, iron rust, rust-colored]
ferrule
A metal band or ring used around the crown or root of a tooth. [corrupted through O. Fr. and Medieval L., fr. L. viriola, a small bracelet]
Ferry
Erwin S., U.S. physicist, 1868–1956. See F.- Porter law.
fertile
1. Fruitful; capable of conceiving and bearing young. SYN: fecund. 2. Impregnated; fertilized. [L. fertilis, fr. fero, to bear]
Fertility
The ability to conceive and have children, the ability to become pregnant through normal sexual activity. Infertility is defined as the failure to conceive after a year of ...
Fertility awareness
Also known as natural family planning, periodic abstinence and the rhythm method, this approach entails not having sexual intercourse on the days of a woman's menstrual ...
Fertilization
Fertilization is the process of combining the male gamete, or "sperm," with the female gamete, or "ovum." The product of this combination is a cell called a ...
Fertilization, in vitro
IVF, a laboratory procedure in which sperm are placed with an unfertilized egg in a Petri dish to achieve fertilization. The embryo is then transferred into the uterus to begin ...
fertilizin
An acid polysaccharide-amino acid complex associated with the female gamete membrane of several organisms; provides receptor groups that agglutinate sperm and bind them to ova.
Ferula
A genus of plants of the family Umbelliferae. F. assa-foetida, F. rubricaulis and F. foetida furnish asafetida; F. galbaniflua and F. rubricaulis, galbanium; and F. sumbul, ...
fervescence
An increase of fever. [L. fervesco, to begin to boil, fr. ferveo, to boil]
FESS
Abbreviation for functional endoscopic sinus surgery.
fester
1. To form pus or putrefy. 2. To make inflamed. [L. fistula]
festinant
Rapid; hastening; accelerating. [L. festino, to hasten]
festination
SYN: festinating gait. [L. festino, to hasten]
festoon
1. A carving in the base material of a denture that simulates the contours of the natural tissue that is being replaced by the denture. 2. A distinguishing characteristic of ...
festooning
Undulating, like the pattern of dermal papillae beneath a subepidermal blister.
FET
Abbreviation for forced expiratory time.
fetal
1. Relating to a fetus; 2. In utero development after the eighth week.
Fetal alcohol effects (FAE)
A softer diagnosis than fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS). The diagnosis of possible FAE is considered when: 1. The person has some signs of FAS; 2. The person does not meet all of ...
Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS)
The sum total of the damage done to the child before birth as a result of the mother drinking alcohol during pregnancy. FAS always involves brain damage, impaired growth, and head ...
Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) diagnosis
To establish the diagnosis of FAS, the following signs must be present: 1. Small size and weight before and after birth (pre- and postnatal growth retardation); 2. Brain ...
Fetal circulation
The blood circulation in the fetus before birth. Before birth, the blood from the heart headed for the lungs in the aptly named pulmonary artery is shunted away from the lungs and ...
Fetal distress
Compromise of the fetus during the antepartum period (before labor) or intrapartum period (birth process). The term "fetal distress" is commonly used to describe fetal hypoxia ...
Fetal dystocia
Difficult labor and delivery caused by the fetus’ size (too big), shape or position. Dystocia comes from the Greek "dys" meaning "difficult, painful, ...
Fetal mortality rate
The ratio of fetal deaths divided by the sum of the births (the live births + the fetal deaths) in that year. In the United States, the fetal mortality rate plummeted from 19.2 ...
fetal reticularis
1. SYN: fetal adrenal cortex. 2. SYN: androgenic zone (2). 3. SYN: X zone (2).
Fetal rubella effects
The constellation of abnormalities, also called the rubella syndrome, caused by infection with the rubella (German measles) A virus before birth. The syndrome is characterized ...
fetalism
Presence of certain fetal structures or characteristics in the body after birth.
fetation
SYN: pregnancy.
feticide
Destruction of the embryo or fetus in the uterus. [L. fetus + caedo, to kill]
fetid
Foul-smelling. [L. foetidus]
fetish
An inanimate object or nonsexual body part that is regarded as endowed with magic or erotic qualities. [Fr. fétiche, fr. L. factitius, made by art, artificial]
fetishism
The act of worshipping or using for sexual arousal and gratification that which is regarded as a fetish.
fetoglobulins
One of a number of proteins of unknown function found in fetal blood. α-F. occurs in small amounts in normal adults and in larger amounts in the fetus and pregnant mother, ...
fetography
Radiography of the fetus in utero, using contrast medium; an obsolete technique. Cf.:amniography. [L. fetus + G. grapho, to write]
fetology
SYN: maternal-fetal medicine. [L. fetus + G. logos, study]
fetometry
Estimation of the size of the fetus, especially of its head, prior to delivery. [L. fetus + G. metron, measure]
fetopathy
SYN: embryopathy. [L. fetus + G. pathos, suffering, disease] - diabetic f. f. resulting from maternal diabetes, which may cause macrosomia and fetal death.
fetoplacental
Relating to the fetus and its placenta.
Fetoprotein, alpha- (AFP)
AFP is a plasma protein that is normally produced by the fetus. It serves as the basis for some valuable tests. AFP is manufactured principally in the fetus's liver and, also, ...
fetoproteins
Fetal proteins found in small amounts in adults in the following forms: α-f. (AFP) increases in maternal blood during pregnancy and, when detected by amniocentesis, is an ...
fetor
A very offensive odor. [L. an offensive smell, fr. feteo, to stink] - f. hepaticus a peculiar odor to the breath in persons with severe liver disease; caused by volatile ...
Fetoscope
(1) A flexible fiberoptic device used to view or operate upon a fetus within the womb (to do fetal surgery). (2) A stethoscope designed for listening to the fetal heart ...
Fetoscopy
A technique for looking directly at the fetus within the uterus (using a fetoscope). * * * Use of a fiberoptic endoscope to view the fetus and the fetal surface of the placenta ...
fetuin
A low molecular-weight globulin that constitutes nearly the total globulin in fetal blood. [fetus + -in]
Fetus
The unborn offspring from the end of the 8th week after conception (when the major structures have formed) until birth. Up until the eighth week, the developing offspring is ...
Feulgen
Robert, German nucleic acid biochemist and cytochemist, 1884–1955. First to detect DNA in cells by a specific cytochemical test. See F. cytometry.
FEV
Abbreviation for forced expiratory volume, with subscript indicating time interval in seconds.
Fever
Although a fever technically is any body temperature above the normal of 98.6 degrees F. (37 degrees C.), in practice a person is usually not considered to have a significant ...
Fever blister
A small sore situated on the face or in the mouth that causes pain, burning, or itching before bursting and crusting over. The favorite locations are on the lips, chin or cheeks ...
Fever therapy
Using abnormal elevations in body temperature as a tool to treat disease. This was done in the past by deliberately raising the patient's temperature to cause fever. Fever therapy ...
Fever with renal syndrome, hemorrhagic
A set of diseases, also known as hemorrhagic fever, characterized by the abrupt onset of high fever and chills, headache, cold and cough, and pain in the muscles, joints and ...
Fever, breakbone
An acute mosquito-borne viral illness of sudden onset that usually follows a benign course with headache, fever, prostration, severe joint and muscle pain, swollen glands ...
Fever, cat scratch
A bacterial infection due to a cat scratch seen most often today in people with HIV. The disease characteristically presents with swollen lymph nodes (lymphadenitis), sore throat, ...
Fever, dandy
An acute mosquito- borne viral illness of sudden onset that usually follows a benign course with headache, fever, prostration, severe joint and muscle pain, swollen glands ...
Fever, dengue
An acute mosquito-borne viral illness of sudden onset that usually follows a benign course with headache, fever, prostration, severe joint and muscle pain, swollen glands ...
Fever, dengue hemorrhagic (DHF)
A syndrome due to the dengue virus that tends to affect children under 10, causing abdominal pain, hemorrhage (bleeding) and circulatory collapse (shock). DHF starts abruptly ...
Fever, desert
A disease also called coccidioidomycosis (CM) due to a fungus called Coccidioides immitis. About 40% of people infected with this fungus develop symptoms. Most often they have ...
Fever, dumdum
Also called kala-azar, a chronic, potentially fatal parasitic disease of the viscera (the internal organs) due to infection by an agent called Leishmania donovani. Leishmania ...
Fever, epidemic hemorrhagic
A number of diseases characterized by an abrupt onset of high fever and chills, headache, cold and cough, and pain in the muscles, joints and abdomen with nausea and vomiting ...
Fever, five-day
Also called trench fever, this is a disease borne by body lice that was first recognized in the trenches of World War I, when it is estimated to have affected more than a million ...
Fever, hemorrhagic
A number of diseases characterized by an abrupt onset of high fever and chills, headache, cold and cough, and pain in the muscles, joints and abdomen with nausea and vomiting ...
Fever, Lassa
An acute viral infection found in the tropics, especially in West Africa. Epidemics of Lassa fever have occurred in countries such as Sierra Leone, Congo (formerly Zaire), ...
Fever, Mediterranean
A inherited disorder of unknown cause featuring short recurring bouts of fever together with pain in the joints, chest or abdomen. Also called Familial Mediterranean Fever (FMF). ...
Fever, Meuse
Named for the Meuse River area, one of the great battlegrounds of World War I. Also known as trench fever. Meuse or trench fever is a disease borne by body lice that was first ...
Fever, Philippine hemorrhagic
A syndrome due to the dengue virus that tends to affect children under 10, causing abdominal pain, hemorrhage (bleeding) and circulatory collapse (shock). Known also as dengue ...
Fever, puerperal
Fever that lasts for more than 24 hours within the first 10 days after a woman has had a baby. Puerperal fever is due to an infection, most often of the placental site within the ...

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