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friable
1. Easily reduced to powder. 2. In bacteriology, denoting a dry and brittle culture falling into powder when touched or shaken. [L. friabilis, fr. frio, to crumble]
fricative
Speech sound made by forcing the air stream through a narrow orifice, created by apposition of the teeth, tongue, and lips in producing consonant phonemes such as f, v, s, and z.
friction
1. The act of rubbing the surface of an object against that of another; especially rubbing the limbs of the body to aid the circulation. 2. The force required for relative motion ...
Friderichsen
Carl, Danish physician, *1886. See Waterhouse-F. syndrome, F.- Waterhouse syndrome.
Friedländer
Carl, German pathologist, 1847–1887. See F. bacillus, F. pneumonia, F. stain for capsules.
Friedman
Emanuel A., U.S. obstetrician, *1926. See F. curve.
Friedreich
Nikolaus, German neurologist, 1825–1882. See F. ataxia, F. phenomenon, F. sign.
Friend
Charlotte, U.S. microbiologist, 1921–1987. See F. disease, F. virus, F. leukemia virus.
frigid
1. SYN: cold. 2. Temperamentally, especially sexually, cold or irresponsive. [L. frigidus, cold]
Frigidity
Failure of a female to respond to sexual stimulus; aversion on the part of a woman to sexual intercourse; failure of a female to achieve an orgasm (anorgasmia) during sexual ...
frigorific
Producing cold. [L. frigus, cold, + facio, to make]
frigorism
SYN: cryopathy. [L. frigus, cold]
fringe
SYN: fimbria (1). - costal f. an irregularly disposed collection of visible veins seen in the skin of people usually of or past middle age; it has no specific connection with any ...
frit
1. The material from which the glaze for artificial teeth is made. 2. A powdered pigment material used in coloring the porcelain of artificial teeth. [Fr. f., fried]
Fritsch
Heinrich, German gynecologist, 1844–1915. See Bozeman-F. catheter.
Froehde
A., 19th century German chemist. See F. reagent.
frog
An amphibian in the order Anura, which includes the toads; the commonest f. genera are Rana (grass frogs) and Hyla (tree frogs). [A.S. frogge]
Fröhlich
Alfred, Austrian neurologist and pharmacologist, 1871–1953. See F. dwarfism, F. syndrome.
Frohn
Damianus, German physician, *1843. See F. reagent.
Froin
Georges, French physician, 1874–1932. See F. syndrome.
frôlement
1. Light friction or massage with the palm of the hand. 2. A rustling sound heard in auscultation. [Fr.]
Froment
Jules, Lyon physician, 1878–1946. See F. sign.
Frommel
Richard, German gynecologist, 1854–1912. See Chiari-F. syndrome.
frons
SYN: forehead. [L.]
front
The position of the leading edge of the solvent in chromatography.
frontad
Toward the front.
frontal
1. In front; relating to the anterior part of a body. 2. Referring to the f. ( coronal) plane or to the f. bone or forehead. SYN: frontalis [TA].
Frontal bone
The large bone that makes up the forehead and supplies the upper edge and roof of the orbit (eye socket). The frontal bone articulates (comes together) with a number of other ...
frontalis
SYN: frontal. [L.]
fronto-occipital
Relating to the frontal and the occipital bones, or to the forehead and the occiput.
frontomalar
SYN: frontozygomatic.
frontomaxillary
Relating to the frontal and the maxillary bones.
frontonasal
Relating to the frontal and the nasal bones.
frontoparietal
Relating to the frontal and the parietal bones.
frontotemporal
Relating to the frontal and the temporal bones.
frontotemporale
A craniometric point located at the most anterior point of the temporal line on the frontal bone.
frontozygomatic
Relating to the frontal and zygomatic bones. SYN: frontomalar.
Froriep
August von, German anatomist, 1849–1917. See F. ganglion.
frost
A deposit resembling that of frozen vapor or dew. - urea f., uremic f. powdery deposits on the skin, especially the face, including urea and uric acid salts, due to excretion of ...
Frost
Albert D., U.S. ophthalmologist, 1889–1945. See F. suture. Wade H., U.S. epidemiologist, 1880–1938. See Reed-F. model. William A., English ophthalmologist, 1853–1935.
Frostbite
Damage to tissues from freezing due to the formation of ice crystals within cells, rupturing the cells and leading to cell death. Frostbite goes through several stages: {{}}First ...
frottage
1. The rubbing movement in massage. 2. Production of sexual excitement by rubbing against someone. [F. a rubbing]
frotteur
One who gets sexual excitement through frottage.
Frozen shoulder
Constant severe limitation of the range of motion of the shoulder due to scarring around the shoulder joint (adhesive capsulitis). Frozen shoulder is an unwanted consequence of ...
FRS
Abbreviation for first rank symptoms, under symptom.
Fru
Symbol for fructose.
fructan
SYN: fructosan (1).
fructo-
Chemical prefix denoting the fructose configuration. [L. fructus, fruit]
fructofuranose
Fructose in furanose form.
fructokinase
A liver enzyme that catalyzes the reaction of ATP and d-fructose to form fructose 6-phosphate and ADP; deficient in individuals with essential fructosuria (hepatic f. ...
fructolysis
The conversion of fructose to lactate; analogous to glycolysis.
fructosan
1. A polysaccharide of fructose ( e.g., inulin) containing small amounts of other sugars; present in certain tubers. SYN: fructan, levan, levulan, levulin, levulosan, ...
fructose
The d-isomer (also referred to as fruit sugar, levoglucose, levulose, and d-arabino-2-hexulose) is a 2-ketohexose that is physiologically the most important of the ketohexoses ...
fructose 1,6-bisphosphate
A key intermediate in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. SYN: hexosebisphosphatase, hexosediphosphatase.
fructose 1-phosphate
A fructose derivative that accumulates in individuals with hereditary fructose intolerance.
fructose 2,6-bisphosphate
An analog of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate that plays a key role in the regulation of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; activates phosphofructokinase and inhibits fructose ...
fructose 6-phosphate
An intermediate in glycolysis and in transketolation of erythrose 4-phosphate. SYN: Neuberg ester.
fructose-bisphosphatase
A hydrolase that catalyzes conversion of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to d-fructose 6-phosphate and orthophosphate in gluconeogenesis; AMP is an allosteric inhibitor; f. ...
fructose-bisphosphate aldolase
Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate triophosphate-lyase; an enzyme reversibly cleaving fructose 1,6-bisphosphate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate; also acts on ...
fructose-diphosphate aldolase
SYN: fructose-bisphosphate aldolase.
fructosemia
Presence of fructose in the circulating blood. SEE ALSO: hereditary fructose intolerance. SYN: levulosemia.
fructoside
Fructose in —C—O— linkage where the —C—O— group is the original 2-group of the fructose.
fructosuria
Excretion of fructose in the urine. SYN: levulosuria. [ fructose + G. ouron, urine] - benign f. SYN: essential f.. - essential f. [MIM*229800] a benign, asymptomatic inborn ...
fructosyl-
Chemical prefix indicating fructose in —C—R— (not —C—O—R—) linkage through its carbon-2 (R is usually C).
Fruitfly genome
All of the genetic information contained in Drosophila, the fruitfly. The genomes of particular nonhuman organisms such as Drosophila have been studied for a number of reasons ...
frusemide
SYN: furosemide.
frustration
A psychologic or psychiatric term indicating the thwarting of or inability to gratify a desire or to satisfy an urge or need. [L. frustro, pp. -atus, to deceive, disappoint, fr. ...
FSH
Abbreviation for follicle-stimulating hormone.
ft.
Abbreviation for foot, a measure of length. For example, 6 ft. is 1.83 meters. * * * Abbreviation for L. fiat, let it be done (made); abbreviation for foot or feet.
FTA-ABS
Abbreviation for fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption. See fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption test.
FTI
Abbreviation for free thyroxine index.
FTT
Failure to thrive. Refers to a child whose physical growth is significantly less than that of peers. There is no official consensus on what constitutes FTT. It usually refers to ...
Fuc
Abbreviation for fucose.
Fuchs
Ernst, Austrian ophthalmologist, 1851–1930. See F. adenoma, angle of F., F. heterochromic cyclitis, F. coloboma, F. endothelial dystrophy, F. black spot, F. spur, F. stomas, ...
fuchsin
A nonspecific term referring to any of several red rosanilin dyes used as stains in histology and bacteriology. [Leonhard Fuchs, German botantist, 1501–1506] - acid f. [C.I. ...
fuchsinophil
1. Staining readily with fuchsin dyes. SYN: fuchsinophilic. 2. A cell or histologic element that stains readily with fuchsin. [ fuchsin + G. philos, fond]
fuchsinophilia
The property of staining readily with fuchsin.
fuchsinophilic
SYN: fuchsinophil (1).
fucose
6-Deoxygalactose; a methylpentose, the l-configuration of which occurs in the mucopolysaccharides of the blood group substances, in human milk (as a polysaccharide), and ...
fucosidosis
A metabolic storage disease characterized by accumulation of fucose-containing glycolipids and deficiency of the enzyme α-fucosidase; progressive neurologic deterioration ...
FUDR
Abbreviation for fluorodeoxyuridine. See floxuridine.
fugacity
The tendency of the molecules in a fluid, as a result of all forces acting on them, to leave a given site in the body; the escaping tendency of a fluid, as in diffusion, ...
fugitive
1. Temporary; transient. 2. Fleeting; denoting certain inconstant symptoms. [L. fugitivus, fleeing, fr. fugio, pp. fugitus, to flee]
fugue
A condition in which an individual suddenly abandons a present activity or lifestyle and starts a new and different one for a period of time, often in a different city; afterward, ...
fugutoxin
The potent poison derived from the ovaries and skin of the Pacific pufferfish. SEE ALSO: tetrodotoxin.
Fukase
Masaichi. See Crow-F. syndrome.
fulcrum
A support or the point thereon on which a lever turns. [L. a bedpost, fr. fulcio, to prop up]
fulgurant
Sharp and piercing. Cf.:fulminant. SYN: fulgurating (1). [L. fulgur, flashing lightning]
fulgurating
1. SYN: fulgurant. 2. Relating to fulguration.
fulguration
Destruction of tissue by means of a high-frequency electric current : direct f. utilizes an insulated electrode with a metal point, which is connected to the uniterminal of the ...
fulminant
Occurring suddenly, with lightning-like rapidity, and with great intensity or severity; applied to certain pains, e.g., those of tabes dorsalis. Cf.:fulgurant. [L. fulmino, pp. ...
fulminating
Running a rapid course, worsening quickly.
fumarase
SYN: fumarate hydratase.
fumarate hydratase
An enzyme catalyzing the reversible interconversion of fumarate and water to malate, a reaction of importance in the tricarboxylic acid cycle. A deficiency will lead to mental ...
fumarate reductase
SYN: succinate dehydrogenase.
fumaric acid
trans-Butanedioic acid; an unsaturated dicarboxylic acid occurring as an intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle.
fumaric acidemia
Elevated levels of fumarate in blood plasma; due to a decrease in activity of fumarate hydratase.
fumaric aminase
SYN: aspartate ammonia- lyase.
fumaric hydrogenase
SYN: succinate dehydrogenase.
fumarylacetoacetate
An intermediate in phenylalanine and tyrosine catabolism; elevated in tyrosinemia IA. - f. hydrolase an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of f. to fumarate and ...
fumigant
A substance utilized in fumigation.
fumigate
To expose to the action of smoke or of fumes of any kind as a means of disinfection or eradication. [L. fumigo pp. -atus, to f., fr. fumus, smoke, + ago, to drive]
fumigation
The act of fumigating; the use of a fumigant.
fuming
Giving forth a visible vapor, a property of concentrated nitric, sulfuric, and hydrochloric acid s, and certain other substances. [L. fumus, smoke]
functio laesa
Impaired function; a fifth sign of inflammation added by Galen to those enunciated by Celsus ( rubor, tumor, calor, and dolor). [L.]
function
1. The special action or physiologic property of an organ or other part of the body. 2. To perform its special work or office, said of an organ or other part of the body. 3. The ...
function corrector
A removable orthodontic appliance utilizing oral and facial muscle forces to move teeth and possibly change the relationship of the dental arches.
functional
1. Relating to a function. 2. Not organic in origin; denoting a disorder with no known or detectable organic basis to explain the symptoms. See neurosis.
Functional food
Functional foods are "those foods that encompass potentially healthful products including any modified food or ingredient that may provide a health benefit beyond the traditional ...
Functional gene test
Test for a specific protein which indicates that the corresponding gene is not only present but active.
Functional scoliosis
A structurally normal spine that appears to have a lateral curve (scoliosis). Nonstructural scoliosis involves a temporary change of spinal curvature. This is caused by an ...
functionalism
A branch of psychology concerned with the function of mental processes in humans and animals, especially the role of the mind, intellect, emotions, and behavior in an individual's ...
fundament
1. A foundation. 2. The anus. [L. fundamentum, foundation, fr. fundus, bottom]
fundectomy
SYN: fundusectomy. [ fundus + G. ektome, excision]
fundic
Relating to a fundus.
fundiform
Looped; sling-shaped. [L. funda, a sling, + forma, shape]
fundoplication
Suture of the fundus of the stomach completely or partially around the gastroesophageal junction to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease; can be performed by open abdominal ...
Fundus
Latin word for the bottom. In medicine, fundus refers to the bottom or base of an organ. For example, the fundus of the eye (the retina), the fundus of the uterus, and so on. The ...
Fundus, retinal
The interior lining of the eyeball, including the retina (the light-sensitive screen), optic disc (the head of the nerve to the eye), and the macula (the small spot in the retina ...
funduscope
SYN: ophthalmoscope. [L. fundus, bottom, + G. skopeo, to view]
funduscopy
SYN: ophthalmoscopy.
fundusectomy
Excision of the fundus of an organ. SYN: fundectomy. [L. fundus, + G. ektome, excision]
fungal
SYN: fungous.
Fungal nail infection
The most common fungus infection of the nails is onychomycosis. Onychomycosis makes the nails look white and opaque, thickened, and brittle. Those at increased risk for ...
fungate
To grow exuberantly like a fungus or spongy growth.
fungemia
Fungal infection disseminated by way of the bloodstream.
Fungi
A division of eukaryotic organisms that grow in irregular masses, without roots, stems, or leaves, and are devoid of chlorophyll or other pigments capable of photosynthesis. ...
fungi
Plural of fungus.
Fungi Imperfecti
A phylum of fungi in which sexual reproduction is not known or in which one of the mating types has not yet been discovered. Formerly, most fungi causing disease in humans were ...
fungicidal
Having a killing action on fungi. [fungus + L. caedo, to kill]
fungicide
Any substance that has a destructive killing action upon fungi. SYN: mycocide.
fungicidin
SYN: nystatin.
Fungiform
Mushroom-shaped. From fungi-, fungus + forma, shape. The fungiform papillae are broad flat structures that house taste buds in the central portion of the dorsum (back) of the ...
Fungiform papilla
The fungiform papillae are broad flat structures that house taste buds in the central portion of the dorsum (back) of the tongue. These papillae were thought to resemble a ...
fungilliform
SYN: fungiform. [Mod L. fungillus, dim. of L. fungus]
fungistat
An agent having fungistatic action.
fungistatic
Having an inhibiting action upon the growth of fungi. SYN: mycostatic. [fungus + G. statos, standing]
fungitoxic
Poisonous or in any way deleterious to the growth of fungi.
fungitoxicity
The property of being fungitoxic.
fungoid
Resembling a fungus; denoting an exuberant morbid growth on the surface of the body.
fungous
Relating to a fungus. SYN: fungal.
Fungus
A single-celled or multicellular organism. Fungi can be true pathogens (such as histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis) that cause infections in healthy persons or they can be ...
Fungus, foot
Athlete’s foot causes foot itching, burning, pain, and scaling. It is caused by a fungus and is treated with antifungal medications, many of which are available ...
funic
Relating to the funis, or umbilical cord. SYN: funicular (2).
funicle
SYN: cord.
funicular
1. Relating to a funiculus. 2. SYN: funic.
funiculitis
1. Inflammation of a funiculus, especially of the spermatic cord. 2. Inflammation of the umbilical cord usually associated with chorioamnionitis. [ funiculus + G. -itis, ...
funiculus
SYN: cord. [L. dim. of funis, cord] - anterior f. [TA] anterior white column of spinal cord, a column or bundle of white matter on either side of the anterior median fissure, ...
funiform
Ropelike. [L. funis, cord, + forma, shape]
funipuncture
SYN: cordocentesis. [L. funis, cord, + puncture]
funis
1. SYN: umbilical cord. 2. A cordlike structure. [L. a rope, cord]
funisitis
Inflammation of the umbilical cord. [ funis + -itis]
funnel
1. A hollow conical vessel with a tube of variable length proceeding from its apex, used in pouring fluids from one container to another, in filtering, etc. 2. In anatomy, an ...
Funnel chest (pectus excavatum)
"Caved-in" chest. Usually an unimportant isolated finding evident at birth. (Funnel chest can occasionally be part of a connective tissue disorder such as Marfan ...
Funny bone
As in "it tickled my funny bone." When the elbow is bumped, the ulnar nerve running past the elbow is stimulated and produces a strange (funny) electric sensation.
FUO
Abbreviation for fever of unknown origin.
fur
1. The coat of soft, fine hair of some mammals. 2. A layer of epithelial debris and fungal elements on the dorsum of the tongue. It is related more to neglected oral hygiene ...
fura-2
A fluorescent indicator which binds calcium; it is excited at longer wavelengths when free of calcium than when calcium is bound; the ratio of fluorescence intensity at two ...
furaltadone
An antibacterial agent.
furan
1. A cyclic compound found, usually in saturated form, in those sugars with an oxygen bridge between carbon atoms 1 and 4, or 2 and 5, or 3 and 7, for which reason they are ...
furanose
A saccharide unit or molecule containing the furan cyclic structure; specific examples are preceded by prefixes indicating the configuration, e.g., fructofuranose, ...
furazolidone
Has antibacterial and antiprotozoal activity against enteric organisms; used in the treatment of bacterial enteritis and diarrhea.
furcal
Forked.
furcation
1. A forking, or a forklike part or branch. 2. In dental histology, the region of a multirooted tooth at which the roots divide. [L. furca, fork]
furcula
1. The fused clavicles, which form the V-shaped bone (wishbone) of the bird's skeleton. 2. In the embryo, an inverted U-shaped elevation that appears on the ventral wall of the ...
furfur
An epidermal scale; e.g., dandruff. [L. bran]
furfuraceous
Branny, or composed of small scales; denoting a form of desquamation. SYN: pityroid. [L. furfuraceus, fr. furfur, bran]
furfural
C4H3O—CHO; a colorless, aromatic, irritating fluid obtained in the distillation of bran with dilute sulfuric acid; used in the manufacture of medicinal agents.
furfurol
Misnomer for furfural and furfuryl alcohol.
furfuryl
The monovalent radical derived from f. alcohol by loss of the OH group. - f. alcohol 2-furanmethanol; 2-hydroxymethylfuran; a solvent and wetting agent.
furnace
A stovelike apparatus containing a chamber for heating, melting, or fusing. - dental f. 1. a f. used to eliminate the wax pattern from the investment mold prior to casting in ...
furosemide
A diuretic used in edematous states and hypertension. SYN: frusemide.
furrow
A groove or sulcus. [A.S. furh] - digital f. SYN: digital crease. - genital f. a groove on the genital tubercle in the embryo, appearing toward the end of the second month. - ...
Furuncle
Nothing more nor less than a "boil" with a fancy name. A boil is a collection of pus. Antibiotics are often not very helpful in treating abscesses. The main treatments ...
furunculosis
A condition marked by the presence of furuncles, often chronic and recurrent.
furunculus
SYN: furuncle. [L. a petty thief, a boil, dim. of fur, a thief]
Fusarium
A genus of rapidly growing fungi producing characteristic sickle-shaped, multiseptate macroconidia which can be mistaken for those produced by some dermatophytes. Usually ...
fuseau
A fusiform or spindle-shaped, multiseptate macroconidium. [Fr. spindle fr. L. fusus]
fusidate sodium
The sodium salt of fusidic acid; has antibacterial properties. SYN: sodium fusidate.
fusidic acid
A fermentation product of Fusidium coccineum, a parasitic fungus on the plant Veronica; inhibits protein synthesis and the accumulation of ppGpp. See fusidate sodium. SYN: ...
Fusiform
Formed like a spindle, wider in the middle and tapering toward the ends. An aneurysm may be fusiform. The word “fusiform” comes from the Latin “fusus” meaning ...
Fusiform aneurysm
A vascular outpouching shaped like a spindle. A fusiform widening of an artery or vein. An aneurysm is a localized widening (dilatation) of an artery, vein, or the heart. At the ...
Fusiformis
An obsolete generic name sometimes used for the anaerobic fusiform bacteria found in the human mouth; these organisms are closely related to the anaerobic organisms found in the ...
fusimotor
Pertaining to the efferent innervation of intrafusal muscle fibers by gamma motor neurons. SEE ALSO: neuromuscular spindle. [L. fusus, spindle, + moveo, to move]
fusin
A G protein–linked receptor present on certain human cells that is thought to be required for HIV fusion with a target cell. [fuse, fr. L. fundo, pp. fusum, to melt, + -in]
fusion
1. Liquefaction, as by melting by heat. 2. Union, as by joining together; e.g., bone f.. 3. The blending of slightly different images from each eye into a single perception. 4. ...
Fusobacterium
A genus of bacteria (family Bacteroidaceae) containing Gram-negative, nonsporeforming, nonmotile, obligately anaerobic rods that produce butyric acid as a major metabolic ...
fusocellular
Spindle-celled.
Fusospirillary gingivitis
This is trench mouth, a progressive painful infection with ulceration, swelling and sloughing off of dead tissue from the mouth and throat due to the spread of infection from the ...
Fusospirillosis
This is trench mouth, a progressive painful infection with ulceration, swelling and sloughing off of dead tissue from the mouth and throat due to the spread of infection from the ...
fusospirochetal
Referring to the associated fusiform and spirochetal organisms such as those found in the lesions of Vincent angina.
Fusospirochetal gingivitis
This is trench mouth, a progressive painful infection with ulceration, swelling and sloughing off of dead tissue from the mouth and throat due to the spread of infection from the ...
fustic
A complex of natural dyes derived from certain West Indian, Central, and South American trees, Rhus cotinus and Chlorophora tinctoria; used as mordant dyes for textiles. An ...
fustigation
A form of massage consisting of beating the surface with light rods. [L. fustigo, pp. -atus, to beat with a cudgel]
Futcher
Palmer Howard, U.S.-Canadian physician, *1910.
FVC
Abbreviation for forced vital capacity.
Fy blood group
See Duffy blood group, Blood Groups Appendix.
G
G stands for guanine, one member of the base pair G-C (guanine-cytosine) in the DNA. The other base pair in the DNA is A-T (adenine-thymine). Each base pair forms a "rung of ...
G (drug caution code)
Abbreviation on a medication that stands for "glaucoma" and indicates the medication can cause problems for a person with this eye disorder. Further, a person with glaucoma might ...
g (gram)
Symbol for gram, a unit of measurement of weight and mass in the metric system. In weight, a gram is equal to a thousandth of a kilogram. In mass, a gram is equal to a thousandth ...
G acid
2-Naphthol-6,8-disulfonic acid.
G protein
These molecules have been described as "biological traffic lights." Located inside the cell, G proteins are able respond to signals outside the cell — light, smell, hormones — ...
G-actin
See under actin.
G-banding
See G- banding stain.
G-CSF
Abbreviation for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor.
G-strophanthin
See ouabain.
g-tolerance
The tolerance of a person or a piece of equipment to forces that develop as a result of acceleration or deceleration.
G1
Symbol for gap1 period.
G2
Symbol for gap 2.
Ga
Symbol for gallium.
GABA
Abbreviation for γ-aminobutyric acid.
GAD
Abbreviation for glutamate decarboxylase.
Gaddum
John H., English pharmacologist, 1900–1965. See G. and Schild test.
gadfly
See Tabanus.
gadodiamide
A nonionic structural analog of gadolinium DPTA; used as a paramagnetic contrast medium in magnetic resonance imaging.
gadoleic acid
A cis-unsaturated fatty acid from cod liver oil and other sources. SYN: 9-eicosenoic acid.
gadolinium
An element of the lanthanide group, atomic no. 64, atomic wt. 157.25. The paramagnetic properties of this element are used in contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging. ...
gadopentetate
(NMG)2[GdDTPA], dimeglumine diethylenetriaminepentaacetatogadolinate (III); the methylglucamine salt of dianionic gadolinium DPTA, an acyclic chelate; used as a paramagnetic ...
gadoteridol
GdHP-DO3A; a gadolinium (III) chelate of 10-(2-hydroxypropyl)-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid; a nonionic macrocyclic analog of gadolinium DOTA; used as a ...
Gaenslen
Frederick J., U.S. surgeon, 1877–1937. See G. sign.
Gaffky
Georg T.A., German hygienist, 1850–1918. See G. scale, G. table.
GAG
Abbreviation for glycosaminoglycan.
gag
1. To retch; to cause to retch or heave. 2. To prevent from talking. 3. An instrument adjusted between the teeth to keep the mouth from closing during operations in the mouth or ...
gage
SYN: gauge.
Gage, Phineas
: The most famous patient to have survived severe damage to the brain and the first from whom something was learned about the relation between personality and the function of the ...
gain
1. Profit; advantage. 2. The ratio of output to input of an amplifying system, generally expressed in decibels in ultrasound. [M.E. gayne, booty, fr. O.Fr., fr. Germanic] - ...
Gairdner
Sir William T., Scottish physician, 1824–1907. See G. disease.
Gaisböck
Felix, German physician, 1868–1955. See G. syndrome.
gait
Manner of walking. - antalgic g. a characteristic g. resulting from pain on weightbearing in which the stance phase of g. is shortened on the affected side. - ataxic g. SYN: ...
Gal
Symbol for galactose.
galact-
See galacto-.
galactacrasia
Abnormal composition of mother's milk. [ galact- + G. akrasia, bad mixture, fr. a- priv. + krasis, a mixing]
galactagogue
An agent that promotes the secretion and flow of milk. [ galact- + G. agogos, leading]
galactans
Polymers of galactose occurring naturally, along with galacturonans and arabans, in pectins; e.g., agar. SYN: galactosans.
galactic
Pertaining to milk; promoting the flow of milk.
galactidrosis
Sweating of a milky fluid. [ galact- + G. hidros, sweat, + -osis, condition]
galactitol
A sugar alcohol derived from galactose; g. accumulates in transferase deficiency galactosemia.
galacto-, galact-
Milk. Cf.:lact-. [G. gala]
galactoblast
SYN: colostrum corpuscle. [galacto- + blastos, germ]
galactocele
Retention cyst caused by occlusion of a lactiferous duct. SYN: lactocele. [galacto- + G. kele, tumor]
galactogen
A polysaccharide containing galactose in various forms. [galacto- + G. -gen, producing]
galactokinase
An enzyme (phosphotransferase) that, in the presence of ATP, catalyzes the phosphorylation of d-galactose to d-galactose l-phosphate, the first step in the metabolism of ...
galactometer
A form of hydrometer for determining the specific gravity of milk as an indication of its fat content. SYN: lactometer. [galacto- + G. metron, measure]
galactophagous
Subsisting on milk. [galacto- + G. phago, to eat]
galactophore
SYN: lactiferous ducts, under duct. [galacto- + G. phoros, bearing]
galactophoritis
Inflammation of the milk ducts. [galacto- + G. phoros, carrying, + -itis, inflammation]
galactophorous
Conveying milk.
galactopoiesis
Milk production. [galacto- + G. poiesis, forming]
galactopoietic
Pertaining to galactopoiesis.
galactopyranose
Galactose in pyranose form.
Galactorrhea
Galactorrhea is the spontaneous flow of milk from the nipple at a time other than during nursing. Galactorrhea can be due to "normal" factors such as an unrecognized pregnancy, ...
galactosamine
The 2-amino-2-deoxy derivative of galactose, in which the NH2 replaces the 2-OH group; the d-isomer occurs in various mucopolysaccharides, notably of chondroitin sulfuric acid ...
galactosaminoglycan
See mucopolysaccharide.
galactosans
SYN: galactans.
galactoscope
An instrument for judging of the richness and purity of milk by the translucency of a thin layer. SYN: lactoscope. [galacto- + G. skopeo, to examine]
Galactose
A sugar contained in milk. Galactose makes up half of the sugar called lactose that is found in milk. Lactose is called a disaccharide, di meaning 2, since lactose is made up of ...
galactose-1-phosphate
A phosphorylated derivative of galactose that is key in galactose metabolism; accumulates in certain types of galactosemia. - galactose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase an ...
galactose-6-sulfatase
An enzyme that eliminates sulfur from the galactose 6-sulfate residues of certain mucopolysaccharides, producing 3,6-anhydrogalactose residues; it is absent in Morquio syndrome ...
galactose-6-sulfurase
SYN: galactose-6- sulfatase.
Galactosemia
A genetic metabolic disease in which there is a defect in the body's ability to use the sugar galactose. In classic galactosemia, the basic defect is a deficiency of the enzyme ...
galactoside
A compound in which the H of the OH group on carbon-1 of galactose is replaced by an organic moiety.
galactosis
Formation of milk by the lacteal glands. [galacto- + G. -osis, condition]
galactosuria
The excretion of galactose in the urine. [ galactose + G. ouron, urine]
galactosyl
The galactose portion of a galactoside.
galactosylceramide
A sphingolipid that accumulates in individuals with Krabbe disease.

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