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Слова на букву insp-line (2629)

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Intertrigo
A superficial skin disorder involving any area of the body where opposing skin surfaces may touch and rub, such as the creases of the neck, the skin folds of the groin, axilla ...
intertrochanteric
Between the two trochanters of the femur.
intertubular
Between or among tubules.
interureteral
Between the two ureters. SYN: interureteric.
interureteric
SYN: interureteral.
interval
A time or space between two periods or objects; a break in continuity. [L. inter-vallum, space between breastworks in a camp, an i., fr. vallum, a rampart, wall] - a-c i. the i. ...
intervascular
Between blood or lymph vessels.
Intervening sequence
Part of a gene that is initially transcribed from the DNA into the primary RNA transcript but then is excised (removed) from it when the so-called exxon sequences on either side ...
intervention
An action or ministration that produces an effect or that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process. [L. inter-ventio, a coming between, fr inter-venio, to come ...
Interventional radiology
Interventional radiologists employ image guidance methods to gain access to the deep interstices of most organs and organ systems. Through a galaxy of techniques, they can treat ...
interventricular
Between the ventricles.
Interventricular foramen
An opening between the lateral and third ventricles in a system of four communicating cavities within the brain that are continuous with the central canal of the spinal cord. The ...
Interventricular septum
The stout wall separating the lower chambers (the ventricles) of the heart from one another. A hole in the interventricular septum is termed a ventricular septal defect (VSD).
intervertebral
Between two vertebrae.
interview
Zarit burden i. a structured verbal interaction used to evaluate levels of stress in family members or caregivers of Alzheimer patients.
intervillous
Between or among villi.
intestinal
Relating to the intestine. - i. pseudo-obstruction clinical manifestations falsely suggesting obstruction of the small intestine, usually occurring in patients with multiple ...
Intestinal gas
The complaint referred to as "intestinal gas" is a common one and the discomfort can be quite significant. Everyone has gas and eliminates it by burping or passing it ...
Intestinal obstruction
Blockage of the intestine by infolding (intussusception), malformation, tumor, digestive problems, a foreign body, or inflammation. Symptoms can include crampy abdominal pain, ...
Intestinal pseudo-obstruction
Symptoms of intestinal obstruction with no sign of actual physical obstruction. This condition may be due to problems with the nerves that control intestinal muscles or other ...
intestine
The digestive tube passing from the stomach to the anus. It is divided primarily into the intestinum tenue (small i.) and the intestinum crassum (large i.). SYN: bowel, gut (1), ...
Intestine, large
The tubelike organ that completes the process of digestion, receiving material from the small intestine. It has four parts: the cecum (caecum), the appendix (vermiform appendix), ...
Intestine, small
The tubelike organ that receives the products of digestion from the stomach. It has three parts, the duodenum, the jejunum, and the ileum. The duodenum is rich in glands that ...
intestinotoxin
Obsolete term for enterotoxin.
intestinum
1. [TA] SYN: intestine. 2. Inward; inner. [neuter of intestinus] [L. intestinus, internal, ntr. as noun, the entrails, fr. intus, within] - i. cecum SYN: cecum (1). - i. ...
intima
Innermost. See tunica i.. [L. fem. of intimus, inmost]
intimal
Relating to the intima or inner coat of a vessel.
intimitis
Inflammation of an intima, as in endangiitis. [ intima + G. -itis, inflammation] - proliferative i. eruption characterized by dusky erythema and small ulcers due to ...
intoe
SYN: metatarsus adductus.
intolerance
Abnormal metabolism, excretion, or other disposition of a given substance; term often used to indicate impaired utilization or disposal of dietary constituents. - hereditary ...
Intolerance, food
Difficulty in digesting a food. Common offenders include milk products, wheat and other grains that contain gluten, and foods that tend to cause intestinal gas, such as cabbage ...
Intolerance, lactose
The inability to digest lactose, a sugar component of milk and most other dairy products. Lactose is sometimes also used as an ingredient in other foods, so those with a lactase ...
intorsion
Conjugate rotation of the upper poles of each cornea inward. [L. in-torqueo, pp. tortus, to twist]
intortor
SYN: medial rotator.
intoxation
Poisoning, especially by the toxic products of bacteria or poisonous animals, other than alcohol. [see intoxication]
intoxicant
1. Having the power to intoxicate. 2. An intoxicating agent, such as alcohol.
intoxication
1. SYN: poisoning (2). 2. SYN: acute alcoholism. [L. in, in, + G. toxikon, poison] - acid i. poisoning by acid products (β-oxybutyric acid, diacetic acid, or acetone) formed ...
intra vitam
During life. [L. vita, life]
intra-
Inside, within; opposite of extra-. SEE ALSO: endo-, ento-. [L. within]
intra-abdominal
Within the abdomen.
intra-adenoidal
Within the adenoids.
intra-arterial
Within an artery or the arteries.
Intra-arterial pressure
The pressure of the blood within an artery, the arterial pressure. Also called the arterial tension.
intra-articular
Within the cavity of a joint. [ intra- + L. articulus, joint]
intra-atrial
Within one or both of the atria of the heart.
intra-aural
Within the ear. [ intra- + L. auris, ear]
intraacinous
Within an acinus.
intraauricular
Within an auricle ( e.g., of the ear).
intrabronchial
Within the bronchi or bronchial tubes. SYN: endobronchial.
intrabuccal
1. Within the mouth. 2. Within the substance of the cheek. [ intra- + L. bucca, cheek]
intracanalicular
Within a canaliculus or canaliculi.
intracapsular
Within a capsule, especially the capsule of a joint.
intracardiac
Within one of the chambers of the heart. SYN: endocardiac (1), endocardial, intracordal. [ intra- + G. kardia, heart]
intracarpal
Within the carpus; among the carpal bones.
intracartilaginous
Within a cartilage or cartilaginous tissue. SYN: enchondral, endochondral.
intracatheter
A plastic tube, usually attached to the puncturing needle, inserted into a blood vessel for infusion, injection, or pressure monitoring.
intracavitary
Within an organ or body cavity.
intracelial
Within any of the body cavities, especially within one of the ventricles of the brain. [ intra- + G. koilia, cavity]
intracellular
Within a cell or cells.
intracerebellar
Within the cerebellum.
intracerebral
Within the cerebrum.
intracerebroventricular
The locus of administration of drugs or chemicals into the ventricular system of the brain. Often used in animal studies and occasionally for the introduction of antiinfectives ...
intracervical
SYN: endocervical (1).
intracisternal
Within one of the subarachnoid cisternae; usually refers to the introduction of a cannula into the cerebellomedullary cistern for aspiration of cerebrospinal fluid or the ...
intracolic
Within the colon.
intracordal
SYN: intracardiac. [ intra- + L. cor, heart]
intracoronal
Within the crown portion of a tooth.
Intracorporeal
Within the body or any structure anatomically called the corpus. For example, when men with erectile dysfunction fail intracorporeal (penile) injection therapy, sildenafil ...
intracorpuscular
Within a corpuscle, especially a red blood corpuscle. SYN: intraglobular (2).
intracostal
On the inner surface of the ribs.
Intracranial
Within the cranium, the bony dome that houses and protects the brain. An intracranial hemorrhage is bleeding within the cranium due, for example, to a stroke or leakage of blood ...
intracrine
Denoting self-stimulation through cellular production of a factor that acts within the cell. [ intra- + G. krino, to separate, secrete]
Intractable
Unstoppable. For example, intractable diarrhea or intractable pain. * * * 1. SYN: refractory (1). 2. SYN: obstinate (1). [L. in-tractabilis, fr. in- neg. + tracto, to draw, ...
intracutaneous
Within the substance of the skin, particularly the dermis. SYN: intradermal, intradermic. [ intra- + L. cutis, skin]
intracystic
Within a cyst or the urinary bladder.
Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)
A test-tube fertilization procedure in which a sperm is injected directly into an egg to achieve fertilization. ICSI is done for male infertility. Babies conceived by ICSI have ...
intrad
Toward the inner part.
Intradermal
In the skin. An intradermal injection is given into the skin.
Intradermal (ID)
In the skin. An intradermal (ID) injection is given into the skin. Intradermal tests are a type of skin test. An agent is injected into the skin to test the reaction to the ...
intradermal, intradermic
SYN: intracutaneous. [ intra- + G. derma, skin]
Intradiskal electrothermal therapy
A procedure designed to relieve back pain due to damage to the disks between the spine bones. Called IDET for short. Under local anesthesia and X-ray guidance, a needle is ...
intraduct
Within the duct or ducts of a gland.
intradural
Within or enclosed by the dura mater.
intraembryonic
Within the embryonic body, e.g., the portion of the umbilical vein within the embryo (in contrast to the portion in the umbilical cord which is discarded at birth). ...
intraepidermal
Within the epidermis.
intraepiphysial
Within the epiphysis of a long bone.
Intraepithelial
: Within the layer of cells that forms the surface or lining of an organ. * * * Within or among the epithelial cells.
Intrafallopian
A term meaning "within the fallopian tube." There are two fallopian tubes in female mammals, including human females. These tubes are also called oviducts. They serve as ...
intrafaradization
Application of a faradic cauterizing current to the inner surface of a cavity or hollow organ.
intrafascicular
Within the fasciculi of a tissue or structure ( e.g., fasciculus intrafasciculus).
intrafebrile
Occurring during the febrile stage of a disease. SYN: intrapyretic.
intrafilar
Lying within the meshes of a network. [ intra- + L. filum, thread]
intrafusal
Applied to structures within the muscle spindle.
intragalvanization
Application of a galvanic cauterizing current to the interior of a cavity or hollow organ.
intragastric
Within the stomach.
intragemmal
Within any budlike or bulblike body; denoting especially a nerve termination within an end bulb or taste bud. [ intra- + L. gemma, bud]
intragenal
Within a gene.
intraglandular
Within a gland or glandular tissue.
intraglobular
1. Within a globule in any sense. 2. SYN: intracorpuscular.
intragyral
Within a gyrus or convolution of the brain.
intrahepatic
Within the liver.
intrahyoid
Within the hyoid bone; denoting certain accessory thyroid glands that lie in the hollow or within the substance of the hyoid bone.
intralaryngeal
Within the larynx.
intraligamentous
Within a ligament, especially the broad ligament of the uterus.
intralobar
Within a lobe of any organ or other structure.
intralobular
Within a lobule.
intralocular
Within the loculi of any structure or part.
intraluminal
SYN: intratubal.
intramedullary
1. Within the bone marrow. 2. Within the spinal cord. 3. Within the medulla oblongata.
intramembranous
1. Within, or between the layers of, a membrane. 2. Denoting a method of bone formation directly from mesenchymal cells without an intervening cartilage stage (occurring, for ...
intrameningeal
Within or enclosed by the meninges of the brain or spinal cord.
intramitochondrial
Within the mitochondria.
intramolecular
Referring to situations and events within a molecule.
intramural
Within the substance of the wall of any cavity or hollow organ. SYN: intraparietal (1).
intramuscular
Within the substance of a muscle.
Intramuscular (IM)
An intramuscular (IM) medication is given by needle into the muscle. This is as opposed to a medication that is given by a needle, for example, into the skin (intradermal) or ...
intramyocardial
Within the myocardium.
intramyometrial
Within the muscular coat of the uterus.
intranasal
Within the nasal cavity.
intranatal
During or at the time of birth. [ intra- + L. natalis, relating to birth]
intraneural
Within a nerve. [ intra- + G. neuron, nerve]
intranuclear
Within the nucleus of a cell.
Intraocular
In the eye. The intraocular pressure is the pressure within the eye. * * * Within the eyeball.
Intraocular lens
The clouded (cataractous) lens is best removed in its entirety by surgery and replaced with an intraocular lens (IOL) made of plastic, an operation that takes about an hour and ...
Intraocular pressure
The pressure created by the continual renewal of fluids within the eye. The intraocular pressure is increased in glaucoma. In acute angle-closure glaucoma, the intraocular ...
Intraocular tension
The pressure within the eye. See: Intraocular pressure.
Intraoperative blood salvage
The recovery of blood lost into a body cavity during surgery or due to trauma. This blood can then be reintroduced into the patient’s circulation, reducing the need for donor ...
intraoral
Within the mouth. [ intra- + L. os, mouth]
intraorbital
Within the orbit.
intraosseous
Within bone. SYN: intraosteal. [ intra- + L. os, bone]
intraosteal
SYN: intraosseous.
intraovarian
Within the ovary.
intraovular
Within the ovum.
intraparietal
1. SYN: intramural. 2. Denoting the i. sulcus. See i. sulcus.
intrapartum
During labor and delivery or childbirth. Cf.:antepartum, postpartum. [ intra- + L. partus, childbirth]
intrapelvic
Within the pelvis.
intrapericardiac, intrapericardial
Within the pericardial cavity. SYN: endopericardiac.
Intraperitoneal
Within the peritoneal cavity, the area that contains the abdominal organs. * * * Within the peritoneal cavity.
intrapersonal
SYN: intrapsychic.
intrapial
Within the pia mater.
intrapleural
Within the pleura or the pleural cavity.
intrapontine
Within the pons of the brainstem.
intraprostatic
Within the prostate gland.
intraprotoplasmic
Within the protoplasm of a cell.
intrapsychic
Denoting the psychological dynamics that occur inside the mind without reference to the individual's exchanges with other persons or events. SYN: intrapersonal.
intrapulmonary
Within the lungs.
intrapyretic
SYN: intrafebrile. [ intra- + L. pyretos, fever]
intrarectal
Within the rectum.
intrarenal
Within the kidney. [ intra- + L. ren, kidney]
intraretinal
Within the retina.
intrarrhachidian, intrarachidian
SYN: intraspinal. [ intra- + G. rachis, spine]
intrascrotal
Within the scrotum.
intraspinal
Within the vertebral canal or spinal cord. SYN: intrarrhachidian, intrarachidian.
intrasplenic
Within the spleen.
intrastromal
Within the stroma or foundation substance of any organ or part.
Intrastromal corneal ring
A plastic ring designed to be implanted in the cornea, the transparent structure in the front of the eye. The aim of the corneal ring implant is to flatten the cornea and in so ...
intrasynovial
Within the synovial sac of a joint or a synovial tendon sheath.
intratarsal
Within the tarsus; among the tarsal bones.
intrathecal
1. Within a sheath. 2. Within either the subarachnoid or the subdural space.
intrathoracic
Within the cavity of the chest.
intratonsillar
Within the substance of a tonsil.
intratubal
Within any tube. SYN: intraluminal.
intratubular
Within any tubule.
intratympanic
Within the middle ear or tympanic cavity.
Intrauterine
In the uterus (the womb). As opposed to extrauterine: outside the uterus. For example, normal pregnancies are intrauterine; extrauterine pregnancies are distinctly abnormal. * ...
Intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD)
A device inserted into the uterus (womb) to prevent conception (pregnancy). The IUD can be a coil, loop, triangle, or T-shape. It can be plastic or metal. An IUD is inserted ...
Intrauterine growth restriction
The growth of the fetus is abnormally slow. When born, the baby appears too small, considering its' dates. Intrauterine growth restriction is associated with increased risk of ...
Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR)
The growth of the fetus is abnormally slow. When born, the baby appears too small, considering its' dates. Intrauterine growth retardation is associated with increased risk of ...
Intrauterine insemination (IUI)
A procedure in which a fine catheter (tube) is inserted through the cervix (the natural opening of the uterus) into the uterus (the womb) to deposit a sperm sample directly into ...
Intrauterine ultrasound
Creating an image of the developing fetus within the uterus by means of measuring the vibrations returned when a device emits high-frequency sound waves. Ultrasound imaging has ...
intravascular
Within the blood vessel s or lymphatics.
intravenous
Within a vein or veins. SYN: endovenous.
Intravenous immunoglobulin
A sterile solution of concentrated antibodies extracted from healthy people that is given straight into a vein. It is used to treat disorders of the immune system, or to boost ...
Intravenous pyelogram
: An x-ray of the kidneys and urinary tract. Structures are made visible by the injection of a substance that blocks x-rays. Also called IVP.
Intravenous tension
The pressure of the blood within a vein, the venous pressure.
intraventricular
Within a ventricle of the brain or heart.
intravesical
Within a bladder, especially the urinary bladder.
intravitelline
Within the vitellus yolk.
intravitreous
Within the vitreous body.
intrinsic
1. Belonging entirely to a part. 2. In anatomy, denoting those muscles whose origin and insertion are both within the structure under consideration, distinguished from the ...
intro-
Inwardly, into; opposite of extra-. Cf.:intra-. [L. intro, into]
introducer
An instrument, such as a catheter, needle, or endotracheal tube, for introduction of a flexible device. SYN: intubator. [L. intro-duco, to lead into, introduce]
introflection, introflexion
A bending inward. [ intro- + L. flecto, pp. flectus, to bend]
introgastric
Leading or passed into the stomach. [ intro- + G. gaster, belly, stomach]
Introitus
In anatomy, an introitus is an entrance, one that goes into a canal or hollow organ. The introitus of the facial canal is the entrance to the facial canal, a passage in the ...
Introitus, facial canal
In anatomy, an introitus is an entrance, one that goes into a canal or hollow organ. The introitus of the facial canal is the entrance to the facial canal, a passage in the ...
Introitus, vaginal
The vaginal opening is called the introitus of the vagina. The Latin word " introitus" comes from "intro", into, within + "ire", to go = to go into. In anatomy, an introitus is ...
introject
The dynamically endowed, enduring internal representation of an object.
introjection
A psychological defense mechanism involving appropriation of an external happening and its assimilation by the personality, making it a part of the self. [ intro- + L. jacto, ...
intromission
The insertion or introduction of one part into another. [ intro- + L. mitto, to send]
intromittent
Conveying or sending into a body or cavity.
intron
A portion of DNA that lies between two exons, is transcribed into RNA, but does not appear in that mRNA after maturation because the i. is removed and the exons spliced ...
introspection
Looking inward; self-scrutinizing; contemplating one's own mental processes. [ intro- + L. specto, to look at, inspect]
introspective
Relating to introspection.
introsusception
SYN: intussusception.
introversion
1. The turning of a structure into itself. SEE ALSO: intussusception, invagination. 2. A trait of preoccupation with oneself, as practiced by an introvert. Cf.:extraversion. [ ...
introvert
1. (in′tro-vert)One who tends to be unusually shy, introspective, self-centered, and avoids becoming concerned with or involved in the affairs of others. Cf.:extrovert. 2. ...
Intubate
To put a tube into a hollow organ or passageway, often into the airway. The opposite of intubate is extubate. * * * To insert a tube.
Intubation
The process of putting a tube into a hollow organ or passageway, often into the airway. The opposite of intubation is extubation. * * * Insertion of a tubular device into a ...
intubator
SYN: introducer.
intumesce
To swell up; to enlarge. [L. in-tumesco, to swell up, fr. tumeo, to swell]
intumescence
1. SYN: enlargement. 2. The process of enlarging or swelling; used to describe the spinal enlargements. - tympanic i. SYN: tympanic enlargement.
intumescent
Enlarging; becoming enlarged or swollen.
intumescentia
SYN: enlargement. [Mod. L.] - i. cervicalis [TA] SYN: cervical enlargement. - i. ganglioformis SYN: geniculate ganglion. - i. lumbosacralis [TA] SYN: lumbosacral ...
Intussusception
Telescoping (prolapse) of a portion of the intestine within another immediately adjacent portion of intestine. This decreases the supply of blood to the affected part of the ...
intussusceptive
Relating to or characterized by intussusception.
intussusceptum
The inner segment in an intussusception; that part of the bowel which is received within the other part.
intussuscipiens
The portion of the bowel, in intussusception, which receives the other portion. [L. intus, within, + suscipiens, pr. p. of suscipio, to take up]
inulase
SYN: inulinase.
inulin
A fructose polysaccharide from the rhizome of Inula helenium or elecampane (family Compositae) and other plants; used by intravenous injection, where it is filtered by the renal ...
inulinase
An enzyme acting upon 2,1-β-d-fructoside links in inulin, releasing d-fructose. SYN: inulase.
inulol
SYN: alantol.
inunction
Administration of a drug in ointment form by rubbing to cause absorption of the active ingredient. [L. inunctio, an anointing, fr. inunguo, pp. -unctus, to smear on]
invaccination
Obsolete term for accidental inoculation of some disease, e.g., syphilis, during vaccination.
invaginate
To ensheathe, infold, or insert a structure within itself or another. [L. in, in, + vagina, a sheath]
invagination
1. The ensheathing, enfolding, or insertion of a structure within itself or another. 2. The state of being invaginated. SEE ALSO: introversion, intussusception. - basilar i. ...
invaginator
An instrument for pushing inward any tissue.
invalid
1. Weak; sick. 2. A person partially or completely disabled. [L. in- neg. + validus, strong]
invalidism
The condition of being an invalid.
invasin
SYN: hyaluronidase (1).
invasion
1. The beginning or incursion of a disease. 2. Local spread of a malignant neoplasm by infiltration or destruction of adjacent tissue; for epithelial neoplasms, i. signifies ...
invasive
1. Denoting or characterized by invasion. 2. Denoting a procedure requiring insertion of an instrument or device into the body through the skin or a body orifice for diagnosis ...
inventory
A detailed, often descriptive, list of items. - Millon clinical multiaxial i. ( MCMI) SYN: Millon Clinical Multiaxial I. test. - Minnesota Multiphasic Personality I. SYN: ...
invermination
SYN: helminthiasis. [L. in, in, + vermis (vermin-), worm]
inversion
1. A turning inward, upside down, or in any direction contrary to the existing one. 2. Conversion of a disaccharide or polysaccharide by hydrolysis into a monosaccharide; ...
Inversion, chromosome
A chromosome segment is clipped out, turned upside down and reinserted back into the chromosome. A chromosome inversion can be inherited and have come from one of the parents to ...
Inversion, paracentric chromosome
A basic type of chromosome rearrangement in which a segment that does not include the centromere (and so is paracentric) has been snipped out of a chromosome, turned through 180 ...
Inversion, pericentric chromosome
A basic type of chromosome rearrangement in which a segment that includes the centromere (and so is pericentric) has been snipped out of a chromosome, turned through 180 degrees ...
Invert
1) To turn inward. To invert the foot is to move its forepart toward the midline of the body. 2) To turn upside down or inside out. Inversion of the nipple can be normal or be a ...
invertase
SYN: β-fructofuranosidase.
Invertebrata
A general category of the kingdom Animalia ( multicellular animals) including those phyla whose members lack a notochord; i.e., all animals except vertebrates in the phylum ...
invertebrate
1. Not possessed of a spinal or vertebral column. 2. Any animal that has no spinal column.
inverted repeat
A sequence of nucleotides that is repeated nearly without change except in the opposite direction, usually at some point distant from the original sequence; often associated with ...
invertin
SYN: β-fructofuranosidase.
invertor
A muscle that inverts or causes inversion or turns a part, such as the foot, inward. [see inversion]
Invest
In medicine, this has nothing to do with the stock market. It means to envelop, cover, or embed.
investing
1. In dentistry, covering or enveloping wholly or in part an object such as a denture, tooth, wax form, crown, etc., with a refractory investment material before curing, ...
investment
1. In dentistry, any material used in investing. 2. In psychoanalysis, the psychic charge or cathexis invested in an object. - refractory i. an i. material which can ...
inveterate
Long seated; firmly established; said of a disease or of confirmed habits. [L. in-vetero, pp. -atus, to render old, fr. vetus, old]
inviscation
1. Smearing with mucilaginous matter. 2. The mixing of the food, during mastication, with saliva. [L. in, in, on, + viscum, birdlime]
involucre
SYN: involucrum.
involucrin
A non–keratin-soluble precursor of the highly cross-linked protein known as the corneocyte envelope. [fr. L. involucrum, a wrapper]
involucrum
1. An enveloping membrane, e.g., a sheath or sac. 2. The sheath of new bone that forms around a sequestrum. SYN: involucre. [L. a wrapper, fr. in-volvo, to roll up]
Involuntary
Done other than in accordance with the conscious will of the individual. The opposite of voluntary. The terms "voluntary" and "involuntary" apply to the human nervous system and ...
Involuntary smoking
: The inhaling of environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) involuntarily by someone who is not smoking. Environmental tobacco smoke is generated from the sidestream (the burning end) ...
Involution
A retrograde change. After treatment, a tumor may involute. With advancing age, there may be physical and emotional involution. * * * 1. Return of an enlarged organ to normal ...
involutional
Relating to involution.
iobenzamic acid
A radiographic contrast medium formerly used for oral cholecystography.
iocetamic acid
A radiographic contrast medium formerly used for oral cholecystography.
iodamide
A radiographic contrast medium formerly used for oral cholecystography. SYN: ametriodinic acid.
Iodamoeba
A genus of parasitic amebae in the superclass Rhizopoda, order Amoebida. - I. bütschlii a parasitic ameba in the large intestine of man; trophozoites are usually 9–14 μm in ...
iodate
A salt of iodic acid.
iodic
1. Relating to, or caused by, iodine or an iodide. 2. Denoting a compound of iodine in its pentavalent state.
iodic acid
Crystalline powder, soluble in water; used as an astringent, caustic, disinfectant, deodorant, and formerly as an intestinal antiseptic.
Iodide
The chemical form to which iodine in the diet is reduced before it is absorbed through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream and carried through the blood to the thyroid ...
iodimetry
SYN: iodometry. [iodine + G. metron, measure]
iodinase
SYN: iodide peroxidase.
iodinate
To treat or combine with iodine.
Iodine
An essential element in the diet used by the thyroid gland to make thyroid hormones. The two most important thyroid hormones are thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). ...
Iodine deficiency
Iodine is a natural requirement of our diets. Iodine deficiency can lead to inadequate production of thyroid hormone from the thyroid gland (hypothyroidism). For example, in some ...
Iodine excess
Just as too little iodine can cause thyroid disease, so may prolonged intake of too much iodine also lead to the development of goiter (swelling of the thyroid gland) and ...
Iodine, radioactive
An isotope of the chemical element iodine that is radioactive. Radioactive iodine is used in diagnostic tests as well as in radiotherapy of an hyperactive thyroid gland ...
iodine-123
A radioisotope of iodine with a 159 keV gamma emission and a physical half-life of 13.2 h, used for studies of thyroid disease and of renal function.
iodine-125
Radioactive iodine isotope that decays by K-capture (internal conversion) with a half-life of 59.4 days; used as a label in immunoassay and in imaging; formerly used as a tracer ...
iodine-127
Stable, nonradioactive iodine, the most abundant iodide isotope found in nature; dietary deficiency causes simple goiter; used to block thyroid uptake of radioactive iodine ...

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