Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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ADL
abbreviation 1. activities of daily living 2. Anti-Defamation League
Adler
I. biographical name Alfred 1870-1937 Austrian psychiatrist II. biographical name Cyrus 1863-1940 American educator & scholar III. biographical name Felix 1851-1933 ...
Adlerian
adjective Etymology: Alfred Adler Date: 1924 of, relating to, or being a theory and technique of psychotherapy emphasizing the importance of feelings of inferiority, a will ...
adm
abbreviation administration; administrative
ADM
abbreviation admiral
adman
noun Date: 1909 a person who writes, solicits, or places advertisements
admass
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: advertising + mass Date: 1955 chiefly British mass-media advertising; also the society influenced by it
admeasure
transitive verb (-sured; -suring) Etymology: Middle English amesuren, from Anglo-French amesurer, from a- (from Latin ad-) + mesurer to measure Date: 1641 to determine the ...
admeasurement
noun Date: 1523 1. determination and apportionment of shares 2. determination or comparison of dimensions 3. dimensions, size
Admetus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Admētos Date: 1567 a king of Pherae who is saved by Apollo from his fated death when his wife Alcestis offers to die in his place
admin
abbreviation administration; administrative
administer
verb (-istered; administering) Etymology: Middle English administren, from Anglo-French administrer, from Latin administrare, from ad- + ministrare to serve, from minister ...
administrable
adjective see administer
administrant
noun see administer
administrate
verb (-trated; -trating) Etymology: Latin administratus, past participle of administrare Date: 1550 administer
administration
noun Date: 14th century 1. performance of executive duties ; management 2. the act or process of administering 3. the execution of public affairs as distinguished from ...
administrative
adjective Date: circa 1731 of or relating to administration or an administration ; executive • administratively adverb
administrative county
noun Date: 1949 a British local administrative unit often not coincident with an older county
administrative law
noun Date: 1851 law dealing with the establishment, duties, and powers of and available remedies against authorized agencies in the executive branch of the government
administratively
adverb see administrative
administrator
noun Date: 15th century 1. a person legally vested with the right of administration of an estate 2. a. one who administers especially business, school, or governmental ...
administratrix
noun (plural administratrices) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1623 a woman who is an administrator especially of an estate
admirability
noun see admirable
admirable
adjective Date: 15th century 1. deserving the highest esteem ; excellent 2. obsolete exciting wonder ; surprising • admirability noun • admirableness noun • ...
admirableness
noun see admirable
admirably
adverb see admirable
admiral
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French amiral commander & Medieval Latin admiralis emir, admirallus admiral, from Arabic amīr-al- commander of the (as in ...
admiral of the fleet
Date: 1660 the highest-ranking officer of the British navy
admiralty
noun Date: 15th century 1. capitalized the executive department or officers formerly having general authority over British naval affairs 2. the court having jurisdiction over ...
Admiralty Inlet
geographical name branch of Puget Sound NW Washington
Admiralty Island
geographical name island 90 miles (145 kilometers) long SE Alaska in N Alexander Archipelago
Admiralty Islands
geographical name islands W Pacific N of New Guinea in Bismarck Archipelago area 800 square miles (2080 square kilometers), population 30,160
admiration
noun Date: 15th century 1. archaic wonder 2. an object of esteem 3. delighted or astonished approbation
admire
verb (admired; admiring) Etymology: Middle French admirer, to marvel at, from Latin admirari, from ad- + mirari to wonder, from mirus astonishing Date: 1560 transitive verb ...
admirer
noun see admire
admiringly
adverb see admire
admissibility
noun see admissible
admissible
adjective Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin admissibilis, from Latin admissus, past participle of admittere Date: 1611 1. capable of being allowed or conceded ; ...
admission
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act or process of admitting b. the state or privilege of being admitted c. a fee paid at or for admission 2. a. the granting of ...
admissive
adjective see admission
admit
verb (admitted; admitting) Etymology: Middle English admitten, from Latin admittere, from ad- + mittere to send Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. to allow scope ...
admittedly
adverb Date: 1804 1. as has been or must be admitted 2. it must be admitted
admix
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from obsolete admixt mingled (with), from Middle English, from Latin admixtus Date: 1533 to mix in
admixture
noun Etymology: Latin admixtus, past participle of admiscēre to mix with, from ad- + miscēre to mix — more at mix Date: 1605 1. a. the action of mixing b. the fact ...
admonish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English admonesten, from Anglo-French amonester, from Vulgar Latin *admonestare, alteration of Latin admonēre to warn, from ad- + monēre to ...
admonisher
noun see admonish
admonishingly
adverb see admonish
admonishment
noun see admonish
admonition
noun Etymology: Middle English amonicioun, from Anglo-French amonicion, from Latin admonition-, admonitio, from admonēre Date: 14th century 1. gentle or friendly reproof 2. ...
admonitorily
adverb see admonitory
admonitory
adjective Date: 1594 expressing admonition ; warning • admonitorily adverb
adnate
adjective Etymology: Latin adnatus, adgnatus, past participle of adgnasci to be born in addition, grow later — more at agnate Date: 1661 grown to a usually unlike part ...
adnation
noun see adnate
adnexa
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Latin annexa, neuter plural of annexus, past participle of annectere to bind to — more at annex Date: 1899 conjoined, subordinate, or ...
adnexal
adjective see adnexa
ado
noun Etymology: Middle English, from at do, from at + don, do to do Date: 14th century 1. heightened fuss or concern ; to-do 2. time-wasting bother over trivial details ...
adobe
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Arabic al-ṭūb the brick, from Coptic tōbe brick, from Egyptian dbt Date: 1748 1. a brick or building material of sun-dried earth and straw ...
adobelike
adjective see adobe
adobo
noun (plural -bos) Etymology: Spanish Date: circa 1951 a Philippine dish of fish or meat usually marinated in a sauce containing vinegar and garlic, browned in fat, and ...
adolescence
noun Date: 15th century 1. the state or process of growing up 2. the period of life from puberty to maturity terminating legally at the age of majority 3. a stage of ...
adolescent
I. noun Etymology: French, from Latin adolescent-, adolescens, present participle of adolescere to grow up — more at adult Date: 15th century one that is in the state of ...
adolescently
adverb see adolescent II
Adonai
noun Etymology: Hebrew 'ădhōnāy Date: before 12th century — used in place of YHWH as a name of the God of the Hebrews during prayer recitation
Adonis
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Adōnis Date: 1565 1. a youth loved by Aphrodite who is killed at hunting by a wild boar and restored to Aphrodite from Hades for a part of ...
adopt
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French adopter, from Latin adoptare, from ad- + optare to choose Date: 1500 transitive verb 1. to take by ...
adoptability
noun see adopt
adoptable
adjective see adopt
adoptee
noun Date: 1892 one who is adopted
adopter
noun see adopt
adoptianism
noun see adoptionism
adoption
noun Date: 14th century the act of adopting ; the state of being adopted
adoptionism
or adoptianism noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1874 the doctrine that Jesus of Nazareth became the Son of God by adoption • adoptionist noun, often capitalized
adoptionist
noun see adoptionism
adoptive
adjective Date: 15th century 1. made or acquired by adoption 2. of or relating to adoption • adoptively adverb
adoptively
adverb see adoptive
adorability
noun see adorable
adorable
adjective Date: 1611 1. worthy of being adored 2. extremely charming • adorability noun • adorableness noun • adorably adverb
adorableness
noun see adorable
adorably
adverb see adorable
adoration
noun Date: 15th century the act of adoring ; the state of being adored
adore
transitive verb (adored; adoring) Etymology: Middle English adouren, from Anglo-French aurer, adourer, from Latin adorare, from ad- + orare to speak, pray — more at oration ...
adorer
noun see adore
adoringly
adverb see adore
adorn
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin adornare, from ad- + ornare to furnish — more at ornate Date: 14th century 1. to enhance the appearance of especially ...
adornment
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of adorning ; the state of being adorned 2. something that adorns
Adour
geographical name river 208 miles (335 kilometers) SW France flowing from the Pyrenees NW & W into Bay of Biscay
ADP
noun Etymology: adenosine diphosphate Date: 1943 a nucleotide C10H15N5O10P2 composed of adenosine and two phosphate groups that is formed in living cells as an intermediate ...
adren-
or adreno- combining form Etymology: adrenal 1. adrenal glands 2. adrenaline
adrenal
I. adjective Etymology: ad- + renal Date: 1875 of, relating to, or derived from the adrenal glands or their secretions II. noun Date: 1882 adrenal gland
adrenal gland
noun Date: 1875 either of a pair of complex endocrine organs near the anterior medial border of the kidney consisting of a mesodermal cortex that produces glucocorticoid, ...
adrenalectomized
adjective see adrenalectomy
adrenalectomy
noun Date: circa 1910 surgical removal of an adrenal gland • adrenalectomized adjective
Adrenalin
trademark — used for a preparation of levorotatory epinephrine
adrenaline
noun Date: 1901 epinephrine — often used in nontechnical contexts
adrenalized
adjective Date: 1973 filled with a sudden rush of energy ; excited
adrenergic
adjective Etymology: adren- + -ergic Date: 1934 1. liberating, activated by, or involving adrenaline or a substance like adrenaline 2. resembling adrenaline especially in ...
adrenergically
adverb see adrenergic
adreno-
combining form see adren-
adrenochrome
noun Date: circa 1913 a red-colored mixture of quinones derived from epinephrine by oxidation
adrenocortical
adjective Date: 1936 of, relating to, or derived from the cortex of the adrenal glands
adrenocorticosteroid
noun Date: 1960 a steroid obtained from, resembling, or having physiological effects like those of the adrenal cortex
adrenocorticotrophic
adjective see adrenocorticotropic
adrenocorticotrophin
noun see adrenocorticotropin
adrenocorticotropic
also adrenocorticotrophic adjective Date: 1936 acting on or stimulating the adrenal cortex
adrenocorticotropic hormone
noun Date: 1937 ACTH
adrenocorticotropin
also adrenocorticotrophin noun Date: 1952 ACTH
adrenoleukodystrophy
noun Date: 1976 a rare demyelinating disease of the central nervous system that is inherited as a sex-linked recessive trait chiefly affecting males in childhood and that is ...
Adrian
I. biographical name name of 6 popes: especially IV (Nicholas Breakspear ) 1100?-1159 the only English pope (1154-59) II. biographical name Roman emperor — see Hadrian III. ...
Adrianople
geographical name — see Edirne
Adriatic Sea
geographical name arm of the Mediterranean between Italy & Balkan Peninsula
adrift
adverb or adjective Date: 1624 1. without motive power and without anchor or mooring 2. without ties, guidance, or security 3. free from restraint or support
adroit
adjective Etymology: French, from Old French, from a- (from Latin ad-) + droit right, droit Date: 1652 having or showing skill, cleverness, or resourcefulness in handling ...
adroitly
adverb see adroit
adroitness
noun see adroit
adscititious
adjective Etymology: Latin adscitus, from past participle of adsciscere to admit, adopt, from ad- + sciscere to get to know, from scire to know — more at science Date: 1620 ...
adsorb
verb Etymology: ad- + absorb Date: 1868 transitive verb to take up and hold by adsorption intransitive verb to become adsorbed • adsorbable adjective • adsorber ...
adsorbable
adjective see adsorb
adsorbate
noun Date: 1925 an adsorbed substance
adsorbent
noun Date: 1917 a usually solid substance that adsorbs another substance • adsorbent adjective
adsorber
noun see adsorb
adsorption
noun Etymology: ad- + absorption Date: 1882 the adhesion in an extremely thin layer of molecules (as of gases, solutes, or liquids) to the surfaces of solid bodies or liquids ...
adsorptive
adjective see adsorption
adularia
noun Etymology: Italian, from French adulaire, from Adula, Swiss mountain group Date: 1798 a transparent or translucent orthoclase
adulate
transitive verb see adulation
adulation
noun Etymology: Middle English adulacion, from Old French, from Latin adulation-, adulatio, from adulari to fawn on (of dogs), flatter Date: 14th century excessive or slavish ...
adulator
noun see adulation
adulatory
adjective see adulation
adult
I. adjective Etymology: Latin adultus, past participle of adolescere to grow up, from ad- + -olescere (from alescere to grow) — more at old Date: 1531 1. fully developed ...
adult education
noun Date: 1851 continuing education
adult-onset diabetes
noun Date: 1975 type 2 diabetes
adulterant
noun Date: circa 1755 an adulterating substance or agent • adulterant adjective
adulterate
I. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin adulteratus, past participle of adulterare, from ad- + alter other — more at else Date: 1531 to corrupt, debase, or make ...
adulteration
noun Date: 1506 1. the process of adulterating ; the condition of being adulterated 2. an adulterated product
adulterator
noun see adulterate I
adulterer
noun Date: 15th century a person who commits adultery; especially a man who commits adultery
adulteress
also adultress noun Date: 1577 a woman who commits adultery
adulterine
adjective Date: 1542 1. a. marked by adulteration ; spurious b. illegal 2. born of adultery
adulterous
adjective Date: 1558 relating to, characterized by, or given to adultery • adulterously adverb
adulterously
adverb see adulterous
adultery
noun (plural -teries) Etymology: Middle English, alteration of avoutrie, from Anglo-French avulterie, from Latin adulterium, from adulter adulterer, back-formation from ...
adulthood
noun see adult I
adultlike
adjective see adult II
adultly
adverb see adult I
adultness
noun see adult I
adultress
noun see adulteress
adumbrate
transitive verb (-brated; -brating) Etymology: Latin adumbratus, past participle of adumbrare, from ad- + umbra shadow — more at umbrage Date: 1581 1. to foreshadow vaguely ...
adumbration
noun see adumbrate
adumbrative
adjective see adumbrate
adumbratively
adverb see adumbrate
adust
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin adustus, past participle of adurere to set fire to, from ad- + urere to burn — more at ember Date: 15th century 1. scorched, ...
adv
abbreviation 1. adverb 2. [Latin adversus] against 3. advertisement; advertising 4. advisory
advance
I. verb (advanced; advancing) Etymology: Middle English advauncen, from Anglo-French avancer, from Vulgar Latin *abantiare, from Late Latin abante in front, from Latin ab- + ...
advance directive
noun Date: 1984 a legal document (as a living will) signed by a competent person to provide guidance for medical and health-care decisions (as the termination of life support ...
advance man
noun Date: 1906 an employee who makes arrangements and handles publicity in advance of an appearance or engagement by the employer (as a political candidate or a circus)
advanced
adjective Date: 1534 1. far on in time or course 2. a. being beyond others in progress or ideas b. being beyond the elementary or introductory c. greatly ...
advanced degree
noun Date: 1928 a university degree (as a master's or doctor's degree) higher than a bachelor's
Advanced level
noun Date: 1947 A level
advancement
noun Date: 1553 1. the action of advancing ; the state of being advanced: a. promotion or elevation to a higher rank or position b. progression to a higher stage of ...
advancer
noun see advance I
advantage
I. noun Etymology: Middle English avantage, from Anglo-French, from avant before, from Late Latin abante Date: 1523 1. superiority of position or condition 2. a factor ...
advantaged
adjective Date: 1950 having or providing an advantage and especially a social or financial advantage over others
advantageous
adjective Date: 1593 giving an advantage ; favorable • advantageously adverb • advantageousness noun
advantageously
adverb see advantageous
advantageousness
noun see advantageous
advect
transitive verb see advection
advection
noun Etymology: Latin advection-, advectio act of bringing, from advehere to carry to, from ad- + vehere to carry — more at way Date: 1910 the usually horizontal movement of ...
advective
adjective see advection
Advent
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin adventus, from Latin, arrival, from advenire Date: 12th century 1. the period beginning four Sundays before Christmas and ...
Advent Bay
geographical name inlet of Arctic Ocean Spitsbergen on W coast
Advent Sunday
noun Date: 15th century the first Sunday in Advent
Adventism
noun Date: 1874 1. the doctrine that the second coming of Christ and the end of the world are near at hand 2. the principles and practices of Seventh-Day Adventists • ...
Adventist
adjective or noun see Adventism
adventitia
noun Etymology: New Latin, alteration of Latin adventicia, neuter plural of adventicius coming from outside, from adventus, past participle Date: 1876 an external chiefly ...
adventitial
adjective see adventitia
adventitious
adjective Etymology: Latin adventicius Date: 1603 1. coming from another source and not inherent or innate 2. arising or occurring sporadically or in other than the usual ...
adventitiously
adverb see adventitious
adventive
adjective Date: circa 1859 1. introduced but not fully naturalized 2. adventitious 2 • adventive noun
adventure
I. noun Etymology: Middle English aventure, chance, risk, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *adventura, from Latin adventus, past participle of advenire to arrive, from ad- + ...
adventurer
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that adventures: as a. soldier of fortune b. one that engages in risky commercial enterprises for profit 2. one who seeks unmerited ...
adventuresome
adjective Date: circa 1731 inclined to take risks ; venturesome • adventuresomeness noun
adventuresomeness
noun see adventuresome
adventuress
noun Date: 1754 a female adventurer; especially one who seeks position or livelihood by questionable means
adventurism
noun Date: 1932 improvisation or experimentation (as in politics or military or foreign affairs) in the absence or in defiance of accepted plans or principles • adventurist ...
adventurist
noun see adventurism
adventuristic
adjective see adventurism
adventurous
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. disposed to seek adventure or to cope with the new and unknown b. innovative 2. characterized by unknown dangers and risks • ...
adventurously
adverb see adventurous
adventurousness
noun see adventurous
adverb
I. noun Etymology: Middle English adverbe, from Middle French, from Latin adverbium, from ad- + verbum word — more at word Date: 14th century a word belonging to one of the ...
adverbial
adjective Date: 1611 of, relating to, or having the function of an adverb • adverbial noun • adverbially adverb
adverbially
adverb see adverbial
adversarial
adjective Date: 1926 of, relating to, or characteristic of an adversary or adversary procedures ; adversary
adversariness
noun see adversary I
adversary
I. noun (plural -saries) Date: 14th century one that contends with, opposes, or resists ; enemy • adversariness noun II. adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, ...
adversative
adjective Date: 15th century expressing antithesis, opposition, or adverse circumstance • adversative noun • adversatively adverb
adversatively
adverb see adversative
adverse
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French advers, from Latin adversus, past participle of advertere Date: 14th century 1. acting against or in a contrary ...
adversely
adverb see adverse
adverseness
noun see adverse
adversity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 13th century a state, condition, or instance of serious or continued difficulty or adverse fortune Synonyms: see misfortune
advert
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to perceive, pay heed, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French advertir, from Latin advertere, from ad- + vertere to turn — ...
advertence
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action or process of adverting ; attention 2. advertency 1
advertency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1646 1. the quality or state of being advertent ; heedfulness 2. advertence 1
advertent
adjective Etymology: Latin advertent-, advertens, present participle of advertere Date: 1671 giving attention ; heedful • advertently adverb
advertently
adverb see advertent
advertise
verb (-tised; -tising) Etymology: Middle English, to pay heed to, observe, notify, from Anglo-French advertiss-, stem of advertir Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to ...
advertisement
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of advertising 2. a public notice; especially one published in the press or broadcast over the air
advertiser
noun see advertise
advertising
noun Date: 1751 1. the action of calling something to the attention of the public especially by paid announcements 2. advertisements 3. the business of preparing ...
advertorial
noun Etymology: blend of advertisement and editorial Date: 1946 an advertisement that imitates editorial format
advice
noun Etymology: Middle English avis, advis view, opinion, from Anglo-French, from the Old French phrase ce m'est a vis that appears to me, part translation of Latin mihi visum ...
advisability
noun see advisable
advisable
adjective Date: 1582 fit to be advised or done ; prudent Synonyms: see expedient • advisability noun • advisableness noun • advisably adverb
advisableness
noun see advisable
advisably
adverb see advisable
advise
verb (advised; advising) Etymology: Middle English, to look at, consider, advise, from Anglo-French aviser, from avis Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to give ...
advised
adjective Date: 14th century thought out ; considered — often used in combination • advisedly adverb
advisedly
adverb see advised
advisee
noun Date: 1824 one who is advised
advisement
noun Date: 14th century 1. careful consideration ; deliberation 2. the act or process of advising (as a college student)
adviser
noun see advise
advisor
noun see advise
advisory
I. adjective Date: 1778 1. having or exercising power to advise 2. containing or giving advice II. noun (plural -ries) Date: 1936 a report giving information (as on the ...
advocacy
noun Date: 15th century the act or process of advocating or supporting a cause or proposal
advocacy journalism
noun Date: 1970 journalism that advocates a cause or expresses a viewpoint • advocacy journalist noun
advocacy journalist
noun see advocacy journalism
advocate
I. noun Etymology: Middle English advocat, from Anglo-French, from Latin advocatus, from past participle of advocare to summon, from ad- + vocare to call, from voc-, vox voice ...
advocation
noun see advocate II
advocative
adjective see advocate II
advocator
noun see advocate II
advowson
noun Etymology: Middle English avoueson, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin advocation-, advocatio, from Latin, act of calling, from advocare Date: 14th century the right ...
advt
abbreviation advertisement
Adwa
geographical name town N Ethiopia S of Asmara population 17,476
Adygeya
geographical name republic S Russia in Europe capital Maykop area 2934 square miles (7599 square kilometers), population 437,400
adynamic
adjective Etymology: Greek adynamia lack of strength, from a- + dynamis power, from dynasthai to be able Date: 1829 characterized by or causing a loss of strength or function
adytum
noun (plural adyta) Etymology: Latin, from Greek adyton, neuter of adytos not to be entered, from a- + dyein to enter Date: 1611 the innermost sanctuary in an ancient temple ...
adz
noun see adze
adze
also adz noun Etymology: Middle English adse, from Old English adesa Date: before 12th century a cutting tool that has a thin arched blade set at right angles to the handle ...
Adzhar
noun see Adzharia
Adzharia
geographical name — see Ajaria • Adzhar noun • Adzharian adjective or noun
Adzharian
adjective or noun see Adzharia
adzuki
or azuki noun Etymology: Japanese azuki Date: 1727 adzuki bean
adzuki bean
or azuki bean noun Date: 1795 an annual bushy leguminous plant (Vigna angularis syn. Phaseolus angularis) widely grown in Japan and China for its seeds which are used as food ...
ae
adjective Etymology: Middle English (northern dialect) a, alteration of an Date: 1725 chiefly Scottish one
Aeacus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Aiakos Date: circa 1510 a son of Zeus who is given the Myrmidons as followers and becomes on his death a judge of the underworld
AEC
abbreviation Atomic Energy Commission
aecial
adjective see aecium
aeciospore
noun Date: 1905 one of the spores arranged within an aecium in a series like a chain
aecium
noun (plural aecia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek aikia outrage, assault, from aikēs, aeikēs unseemly, from a- + -eikēs, from eikenai to seem Date: 1905 the fruiting ...
aedes
noun (plural aedes) Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek aēdēs unpleasant, from a- + ēdos pleasure; akin to Greek hēdys sweet — more at sweet Date: circa 1909 ...
Aedilberct
biographical name see Aethelberht
aedile
noun Etymology: Latin aedilis, from aedes temple — more at edify Date: 1540 an official in ancient Rome in charge of public works and games, police, and the grain supply
aedine
adjective see aedes
AEF
abbreviation American Expeditionary Force
Aegates Islands
geographical name — see Egadi Islands
Aegean
adjective Etymology: Latin Aegaeus, from Greek Aigaios Date: 1550 1. of or relating to the arm of the Mediterranean Sea east of Greece 2. of or relating to the chiefly ...
Aegean Islands
geographical name islands Aegean Sea including the Cyclades & the Northern & Southern Sporades
Aegean Sea
geographical name arm of the Mediterranean between Asia Minor & Greece
Aegina
or Greek Aíyina geographical name island & ancient state SE Greece in Saronic Gulf • Aeginetan adjective or noun
Aeginetan
adjective or noun see Aegina
aegis
also egis noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek aigis, literally, goatskin, from aig-, aix goat; akin to Armenian ayc goat Date: 1581 1. a shield or breastplate emblematic of ...
Aegisthus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Aigisthos Date: 1567 a lover of Clytemnestra slain with her by her son Orestes
Aegospotami
or Aegospotamos geographical name river & town of ancient Thrace in the Chersonese
Aegospotamos
geographical name see Aegospotami

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