Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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analgesia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek analgēsia, from an- + algēsis sense of pain, from algein to suffer pain, from algos pain Date: circa 1706 insensibility to pain without ...
analgesic
adjective or noun see analgesia
analgetic
adjective or noun see analgesia
anality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1939 the psychological state or quality of being anal
anally
adverb see anal I
analog
adjective Date: 1946 1. of, relating to, or being an analogue 2. a. of, relating to, or being a mechanism in which data is represented by continuously variable physical ...
analog computer
noun Date: 1948 a computer that operates with numbers represented by directly measurable quantities (as voltages or rotations) — compare digital computer, hybrid computer
analogic
adjective see analogical
analogically
adverb see analogical
analogist
noun Date: 1788 one who searches for or reasons from analogies
analogize
verb (-gized; -gizing) Date: 1655 intransitive verb to use or exhibit analogy transitive verb to compare by analogy
analogous
adjective Etymology: Latin analogus, from Greek analogos, literally, proportionate, from ana- + logos reason, ratio, from legein to gather, speak — more at legend Date: 1646 ...
analogously
adverb see analogous
analogousness
noun see analogous
analogue
I. noun or analog Etymology: French analogue, from analogue analogous, from Greek analogos Date: 1826 1. something that is analogous or similar to something else 2. an ...
analogy
noun (plural -gies) Date: 15th century 1. inference that if two or more things agree with one another in some respects they will probably agree in others 2. a. resemblance ...
analphabet
noun Etymology: Greek analphabētos not knowing the alphabet, from an- + alphabētos alphabet Date: 1881 a person who cannot read ; illiterate • analphabetic adjective or ...
analphabetic
adjective or noun see analphabet
analphabetism
noun see analphabet
analysand
noun Etymology: analyse + -and (as in multiplicand) Date: 1917 a person who is undergoing psychoanalysis
analyse
chiefly British variant of analyze
analysis
noun (plural analyses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from analyein to break up, from ana- + lyein to loosen — more at lose Date: 1581 1. separation of a whole into its ...
analysis of variance
Date: 1918 analysis of variation in an experimental outcome and especially of a statistical variance in order to determine the contributions of given factors or variables to ...
analysis situs
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, analysis of situation Date: circa 1909 topology 2a(1)
analyst
noun Etymology: French analyste, from analyse analysis Date: 1656 1. a person who analyzes or who is skilled in analysis 2. psychoanalyst
analyte
noun Date: 1978 a chemical substance that is the subject of chemical analysis
analytic
or analytical adjective Etymology: Late Latin analyticus, from Greek analytikos, from analyein Date: 1601 1. of or relating to analysis or analytics; especially separating ...
analytic geometry
noun Date: 1835 the study of geometric properties by means of algebraic operations upon symbols defined in terms of a coordinate system — called also coordinate geometry
analytic philosophy
noun Date: 1891 a philosophical movement that seeks the solution of philosophical problems in the analysis of propositions or sentences — called also philosophical analysis ...
analytical
adjective see analytic
analytically
adverb see analytic
analyticity
noun see analytic
analytics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1590 the method of logical analysis
analyzability
noun see analyze
analyzable
adjective see analyze
analyzation
noun Date: 1742 analysis
analyze
transitive verb (-lyzed; -lyzing) Etymology: probably irregular from analysis Date: 1587 1. to study or determine the nature and relationship of the parts of by analysis 2. ...
analyzer
noun see analyze
anamnesis
noun (plural anamneses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek anamnēsis, from anamimnēskesthai to remember, from ana- + mimnēskesthai to remember — more at mind Date: circa ...
anamnestic
adjective Etymology: Greek anamnēstikos easily recalled, from anamimnēskesthai Date: circa 1753 1. of or relating to an anamnesis 2. of or relating to a secondary response ...
anamorphic
adjective Etymology: New Latin anamorphosis distorted optical image Date: circa 1925 producing, relating to, or marked by intentional distortion (as by unequal magnification ...
anandamide
noun Etymology: Sanskrit ānanda joy, bliss + English amide Date: 1992 a derivative of arachidonic acid that occurs naturally in the brain and in some foods (as chocolate) and ...
Ananias
noun Etymology: Greek, probably from Hebrew Ḥānanyāh Date: 14th century 1. an early Christian struck dead for lying 2. liar
anapest
noun Etymology: Latin anapaestus, from Greek anapaistos, literally, struck back (a dactyl reversed), from ana- + -paistos, verbal of paiein to strike Date: circa 1678 a ...
anapestic
adjective or noun see anapest
anaphase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 the stage of mitosis and meiosis in which the chromosomes move toward the poles of the spindle • anaphasic ...
anaphasic
adjective see anaphase
anaphor
noun (plural anaphors; also anaphora) Etymology: back-formation from anaphoric Date: 1975 a word or phrase with an anaphoric function
anaphora
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Late Greek, from Greek, act of carrying back, reference, from anapherein to carry back, refer, from ana- + pherein to carry — more at bear ...
anaphoric
adjective Date: 1904 of or relating to anaphora ; especially being a word or phrase that takes its reference from another word or phrase and especially from a preceding word ...
anaphorically
adverb see anaphoric
anaphrodisiac
adjective Date: 1823 inhibiting or discouraging sexual desire • anaphrodisiac noun
anaphylactic
adjective Date: 1907 of, relating to, affected by, or causing anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock • anaphylactically adverb • anaphylactoid adjective
anaphylactic shock
noun Date: 1910 an often severe and sometimes fatal systemic reaction in a susceptible individual upon exposure to a specific antigen (as wasp venom or penicillin) after ...
anaphylactically
adverb see anaphylactic
anaphylactoid
adjective see anaphylactic
anaphylaxis
noun (plural anaphylaxes) Etymology: New Latin, from ana- + prophylaxis Date: 1907 1. hypersensitivity (as to foreign proteins or drugs) resulting from sensitization following ...
anaplasia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1909 reversion of cells to a more primitive or undifferentiated form • anaplastic adjective
anaplasmosis
noun (plural anaplasmoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Anaplasma, genus name, from ana- + plasma (protoplasm) Date: 1920 a tick-borne disease of cattle and sheep caused by a ...
anaplastic
adjective see anaplasia
anarch
noun Etymology: back-formation from anarchy Date: 1667 a leader or advocate of revolt or anarchy
anarchic
also anarchical adjective Date: 1649 1. a. of, relating to, or advocating anarchy b. likely to bring about anarchy 2. lacking order, regularity, or definiteness ...
anarchical
adjective see anarchic
anarchically
adverb see anarchic
anarchism
noun Date: 1642 1. a political theory holding all forms of governmental authority to be unnecessary and undesirable and advocating a society based on voluntary cooperation ...
anarchist
noun Date: 1678 1. a person who rebels against any authority, established order, or ruling power 2. a person who believes in, advocates, or promotes anarchism or anarchy; ...
anarchistic
adjective see anarchist
anarcho-syndicalism
noun Date: circa 1928 syndicalism • anarcho-syndicalist noun or adjective
anarcho-syndicalist
noun or adjective see anarcho-syndicalism
anarchy
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin anarchia, from Greek, from anarchos having no ruler, from an- + archos ruler — more at arch- Date: 1539 1. a. absence of government b. a ...
anasarca
noun Etymology: New Latin, from ana- + Greek sark-, sarx flesh — more at sarcasm Date: 14th century generalized edema with accumulation of serum in the connective tissue ...
anasarcous
adjective see anasarca
Anasazi
noun (plural Anasazi) Etymology: Navajo anaasází, literally, enemy ancestors Date: 1938 a prehistoric American Indian inhabitant of the canyons of northern Arizona and New ...
Añasco
geographical name municipality W Puerto Rico N of Mayaguez population 28,348
anastigmat
noun Etymology: German, back-formation from anastigmatisch anastigmatic Date: 1890 an anastigmatic lens
anastigmatic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 not astigmatic — used especially of lenses that are able to form approximately point images of object ...
anastomose
verb (-mosed; -mosing) Etymology: probably back-formation from anastomosis Date: 1697 transitive verb to connect or join by anastomosis intransitive verb to communicate ...
anastomosis
noun (plural anastomoses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek anastomōsis, from anastomoun to provide with an outlet, from ana- + stoma mouth, opening — more at stomach Date: ...
anastomotic
adjective see anastomosis
anastrophe
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Greek anastrophē, literally, turning back, from anastrephein to turn back, from ana- + strephein to turn Date: circa 1550 inversion of ...
anat
abbreviation anatomical; anatomy
anatase
noun Etymology: French, from Greek anatasis extension, from anateinein to extend, from ana- + teinein to stretch — more at thin Date: circa 1828 a tetragonal mineral ...
anathema
noun Etymology: Late Latin anathemat-, anathema, from Greek, thing devoted to evil, curse, from anatithenai to set up, dedicate, from ana- + tithenai to place, set — more at ...
anathematize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1566 to pronounce an anathema upon
Anatolia
geographical name the part of Turkey comprising the peninsula of Asia Minor
Anatolian
noun Date: 1590 1. a native or inhabitant of Anatolia and specifically of the western plateau lands of Turkey in Asia 2. a branch of the Indo-European language family that ...
Anatolian shepherd
noun Date: 1970 any of a breed of large rugged working dogs of Turkish origin
anatomic
adjective see anatomy
anatomical
adjective see anatomy
anatomically
adverb see anatomy
anatomise
British variant of anatomize
anatomist
noun Date: 1543 1. a specialist in anatomy 2. one who analyzes minutely and critically
anatomize
transitive verb (-mized; -mizing) Date: 15th century 1. to cut in pieces in order to display or examine the structure and use of the parts ; dissect 2. analyze
anatomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Late Latin anatomia dissection, from Greek anatomē, from anatemnein to dissect, from ana- + temnein to cut Date: 14th century 1. a branch of ...
anatropous
adjective Date: circa 1846 having or being a plant ovule inverted so that the micropyle is bent down to the funiculus to which the body of the ovule is united
Anaxagoras
biographical name circa 500-circa 428 B.C. Greek philosopher • Anaxagorean adjective
Anaxagorean
adjective see Anaxagoras
Anaximander
biographical name 610-circa 547 B.C. Greek philosopher & astronomer • Anaximandrian adjective
Anaximandrian
adjective see Anaximander
anc
abbreviation ancient
ANC
abbreviation African National Congress
ancestor
noun Etymology: Middle English ancestre, from Anglo-French, from Latin antecessor predecessor, from antecedere to go before, from ante- + cedere to go Date: 13th century 1. ...
ancestor worship
noun Date: 1854 the custom of venerating deceased ancestors who are considered still a part of the family and whose spirits are believed to have the power to intervene in the ...
ancestral
adjective Date: 15th century of, relating to, or inherited from an ancestor • ancestrally adverb
ancestrally
adverb see ancestral
ancestress
noun Date: 1580 a female ancestor
ancestry
noun Date: 14th century 1. line of descent ; lineage; especially honorable, noble, or aristocratic descent 2. persons initiating or comprising a line of descent ; ancestors
Anchises
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Anchisēs the father of Aeneas rescued by his son from the burning city of Troy
ancho
noun (plural anchos) Etymology: American Spanish (chile) ancho, literally, wide chili Date: 1902 a poblano chili pepper especially when mature and dried to a reddish black
anchor
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English ancre, from Old English ancor, from Latin anchora, from Greek ankyra; akin to Old English anga hook — more at ...
anchorage
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a place where vessels anchor ; a place suitable for anchoring b. the act of anchoring ; the condition of being anchored 2. a means of ...
Anchorage
geographical name city S central Alaska at head of Cook Inlet population 260,283
anchoress
or ancress noun Etymology: Middle English ankeresse, from anker hermit, from Old English ancor, from Old Irish anchara, from Late Latin anachoreta Date: 14th century a woman ...
anchoret
noun see anchorite
anchorite
also anchoret noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin anchorita, alteration of Late Latin anachoreta, from Late Greek anachōrētēs, from Greek anachōrein to ...
anchoritic
adjective see anchorite
anchoritically
adverb see anchorite
anchorless
adjective see anchor I
anchorman
noun Date: 1911 1. a person who is last: as a. the member of a team who competes last b. the student who has the lowest scholastic standing in a graduating class 2. a ...
anchorpeople
noun plural Date: 1974 anchorpersons
anchorperson
noun Date: 1973 an anchorman or anchorwoman
anchorwoman
noun Date: 1973 a woman who anchors a broadcast
anchoveta
also anchovetta noun Etymology: Spanish anchoveta, diminutive of anchova Date: 1940 a small anchovy (Cetengraulis mysticetus) of the Pacific coast of America from southern ...
anchovetta
noun see anchoveta
anchovy
noun (plural -vies or -vy) Etymology: Spanish anchova Date: 1595 any of a family (Engraulidae) of small fishes resembling herrings that includes several (as Engraulis ...
ancien régime
noun Etymology: French, literally, old regime Date: 1794 1. the political and social system of France before the Revolution of 1789 2. a system or mode no longer prevailing
ancienne noblesse
foreign term Etymology: French old-time nobility ; the French nobility before the Revolution of 1789
ancient
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English ancien, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *anteanus, from Latin ante before — more at ante- Date: 14th century 1. having had an ...
ancient history
noun Date: 1555 1. the history of ancient times 2. knowledge or information that is widespread and has lost its initial freshness or importance ; common knowledge
anciently
adverb Date: 15th century in ancient times ; long ago
ancientness
noun see ancient I
ancientry
noun Date: 1580 antiquity, ancientness
ancilla
noun (plural ancillae) Etymology: Latin, female servant Date: 1902 an aid to achieving or mastering something difficult
ancillary
adjective Date: 1667 1. subordinate, subsidiary 2. auxiliary, supplementary • ancillary noun
Ancohuma
geographical name mountain peak 20,958 feet (6388 meters) W Bolivia; highest in the Illampu Massif
Ancona
geographical name city & port central Italy capital of Marche on the Adriatic population 101,179
ancress
noun see anchoress
ancylostomiasis
also ankylostomiasis noun (plural ancylostomiases) Etymology: New Latin, from Ancylostoma, genus of hookworms, from Greek ankylos hooked (akin to Old English anga hook) + stoma ...
Ancyra
geographical name see Ankara
and
conjunction Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German unti and Date: before 12th century 1. — used as a function word to indicate connection or ...
AND
noun Date: 1949 a logical operator that requires both of two inputs to be present or two conditions to be met for an output to be made or a statement to be executed
and all
phrasal and everything else especially of a kind suggested by a previous context
and counting
phrasal with more to come
and how
adverb Date: 1865 — used to emphasize the preceding idea
and so forth
phrasal 1. and others or more of the same or similar kind 2. further in the same or similar manner 3. and the rest 4. and other things
and so on
phrasal and so forth
and the like
phrasal et cetera
and then some
phrasal with much more in addition
and/or
conjunction Date: 1853 — used as a function word to indicate that two words or expressions are to be taken together or individually
Andalucía
geographical name see Andalusia
Andalusia
or Spanish Andalucía geographical name region S Spain including Sierra Nevada & valley of the Guadalquivir • Andalusian adjective or noun
Andalusian
noun Etymology: Andalusia, Spain Date: 1966 any of a breed of horses of Spanish origin that have a high-stepping gait
andalusite
noun Etymology: French andalousite, from Andalousie Andalusia, region in Spain Date: circa 1828 a mineral consisting of a silicate of aluminum usually in thick orthorhombic ...
Andaman and Nicobar
geographical name union territory India comprising Andaman & Nicobar groups capital Port Blair area 3202 square miles (8293 square kilometers), population 280,661
Andaman Islands
geographical name islands India in Bay of Bengal S of Myanmar & N of Nicobar Islands area 2461 square miles (6374 square kilometers) • Andamanese adjective or noun
Andaman Sea
geographical name sea SE Asia, the E section of Bay of Bengal
Andamanese
adjective or noun see Andaman Islands
andante
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, literally, going, present participle of andare to go Date: 1724 moderately slow — usually used as a direction in music II. noun ...
andantino
I. adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, diminutive of andante Date: 1819 slightly faster than andante — used as a direction in music II. noun (plural -nos) Date: 1845 ...
Andean
adjective see Andes
Andean condor
noun Date: 1980 condor 1a
Anderlecht
geographical name commune central Belgium population 87,884
Andermatt
geographical name commune central Switzerland S of Altdorf
Anders
biographical name Władysław 1892-1970 Polish general
Andersen
biographical name Hans Christian 1805-1875 Danish writer
Anderson
I. biographical name Carl David 1905-1991 American physicist II. biographical name John 1882-1958 1st Viscount Waverley British politician III. biographical name Dame ...
Andes
geographical name mountain system of South America extending along W coast from Panama to Tierra del Fuego — see Aconcagua • Andean adjective • Andine adjective
andesite
noun Etymology: German Andesit, from Andes Date: 1850 an extrusive usually dark grayish rock consisting essentially of oligoclase or feldspar • andesitic adjective
andesitic
adjective see andesite
Andhra Pradesh
geographical name state SE India N of Tamil Nadu state bordering on Bay of Bengal capital Hyderabad area 106,272 square miles (275,244 square kilometers), population ...
Andijon
or Andizhan geographical name city Uzbekistan ESE of Tashkent population 298,300
Andine
adjective see Andes
andiron
noun Etymology: Middle English aundiren, modification of Anglo-French aundyre, alteration of Old French andier Date: 14th century either of a pair of metal supports for ...
Andizhan
geographical name see Andijon
Andorra
geographical name country SW Europe in E Pyrenees between France & Spain; a republic capital Andorra la Vella area 180 square miles (482 square kilometers), population ...
Andorran
adjective or noun see Andorra
andouille
noun Etymology: French, from Old French andoille, from Vulgar Latin *inductilia, neuter plural of *inductilis made by insertion, from Latin inductus, past participle of inducere ...
andouillette
noun Etymology: French, diminutive of andouille Date: 1611 a fresh pork sausage made with tripe or chitterlings
Andover
geographical name 1. town NE Massachusetts population 31,247 2. city E Minnesota N of Minneapolis population 26,588
andr-
or andro- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from andr-, anēr; akin to Oscan ner- man, Sanskrit nar-, Old Irish nert strength 1. male human being 2. male
andradite
noun Etymology: José B. de Andrada e Silva died 1838 Brazilian geologist Date: 1868 a calcium-iron garnet occurring in various colors ranging from yellow and green to brown ...
Andrássy
biographical name Gyula, count; father 1823-1890 & son 1860-1929 Hungarian statesmen
André
biographical name John 1750-1780 British spy
Andrea del Sarto
biographical name 1486-1530 Andrea d'Agnolo Florentine painter
Andreanof Islands
geographical name islands SW Alaska in central Aleutian chain — see Adak, Atka
Andreotti
biographical name Giulio 1919- prime minister of Italy (1972-73; 1976-79; 1989-92)
Andrews
biographical name Roy Chapman 1884-1960 American naturalist
Andreyev
biographical name Leonid Nikolayevich 1871-1919 Russian author
Andria
geographical name commune SE Italy in Puglia population 89,762
Andrić
biographical name Ivo 1892-1975 Serbo-Croatian author
andro
noun Date: 1997 androstenedione
andro-
combining form see andr-
androcentric
adjective Date: 1903 dominated by or emphasizing masculine interests or a masculine point of view • androcentrism noun
androcentrism
noun see androcentric
Androcles
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Androklēs Date: 1607 a fabled Roman slave spared in the arena by a lion from whose foot he had years before extracted a thorn
androecium
noun (plural androecia) Etymology: New Latin, from andr- + Greek oikion, diminutive of oikos house — more at vicinity Date: circa 1839 the aggregate of stamens in the flower ...
androgen
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1936 a male sex hormone (as testosterone) • androgenic adjective
androgenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1900 development of an embryo containing only paternal chromosomes due to failure of the egg to participate in fertilization • ...
androgenetic
adjective see androgenesis
androgenic
adjective see androgen
androgyne
noun Etymology: Middle English androgine, from Latin androgynus Date: 12th century one that is androgynous
androgynous
adjective Etymology: Latin androgynus hermaphrodite, from Greek androgynos, from andr- + gynē woman — more at queen Date: 1651 1. having the characteristics or nature of ...
androgynously
adverb see androgynous
androgyny
noun see androgynous
android
noun Etymology: Late Greek androeidēs manlike, from Greek andr- + -oeidēs -oid Date: circa 1751 a mobile robot usually with a human form
andrology
Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1899 a branch of medicine concerned with male diseases and especially with those affecting the male reproductive ...
Andromache
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Andromachē Date: 14th century the wife of Hector
andromeda
noun Etymology: New Latin Andromeda, genus name, from Latin Date: circa 1760 any of several evergreen shrubs (genera Pieris and Andromeda) of the heath family; especially ...
Andromeda
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Andromedē Date: 1551 1. an Ethiopian princess of Greek mythology rescued from a monster by her future husband Perseus 2. [Latin (genitive ...
Andropov
I. biographical name Yuri Vladimirovich 1914-1984 Russian politician; president U.S.S.R. (1982-84); 1st secretary of Communist party (1982-84) II. geographical name — see ...
Andros
I. biographical name Sir Edmund 1637-1714 British colonial governor in America II. geographical name 1. island, largest of Bahamas area 1600 square miles (4160 square ...
Androscoggin
geographical name river 157 miles (253 kilometers) NE New Hampshire & SW Maine flowing into the Kennebec
androstenedione
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary androsterone + -ene + di- + -one Date: 1935 a steroid sex hormone C19H26O2 that is secreted by the testes, ovaries, and ...
androsterone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1934 an androgenic hormone that is a hydroxy ketone C19H30O2 found especially in male urine
ane
adjective or noun or pronoun Date: before 12th century chiefly Scottish one
anecdotage
noun Date: 1823 1. the telling of anecdotes; also anecdotes 2. garrulous old age
anecdotal
adjective Date: 1836 1. a. of, relating to, or consisting of anecdotes b. anecdotic 2 2. based on or consisting of reports or observations of usually unscientific ...
anecdotalism
noun see anecdotalist
anecdotalist
or anecdotist noun Date: 1837 a person who is given to or is skilled in telling anecdotes • anecdotalism noun
anecdotally
adverb see anecdotal
anecdote
noun (plural anecdotes; also anecdota) Etymology: French, from Greek anekdota unpublished items, from neuter plural of anekdotos unpublished, from a- + ekdidonai to publish, from ...
anecdotic
or anecdotical adjective Date: circa 1744 1. anecdotal 1a 2. given to or skilled in telling anecdotes • anecdotically adverb
anecdotical
adjective see anecdotic
anecdotically
adverb see anecdotic
anecdotist
noun see anecdotalist
anechoic
adjective Date: 1946 free from echoes and reverberations
anelastic
adjective Date: 1947 relating to the property of a substance in which there is no definite relation between stress and strain • anelasticity noun
anelasticity
noun see anelastic
anem-
or anemo- combining form Etymology: Greek, from anemos — more at animate wind
anemia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek anaimia bloodlessness, from a- + -aimia -emia Date: 1824 1. a. a condition in which the blood is deficient in red blood cells, in ...
anemic
adjective Date: 1852 1. relating to or affected with anemia 2. a. lacking force, vitality, or spirit b. lacking interest or savor ; insipid c. lacking in ...
anemically
adverb see anemic
anemo-
combining form see anem-
anemograph
noun Date: 1863 a recording anemometer
anemometer
noun Date: circa 1751 an instrument for measuring and indicating the force or speed of the wind
anemometry
noun Date: 1847 the process of ascertaining the force, speed, and direction of wind or an airflow
anemone
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek anemōnē Date: 1548 1. any of a large genus (Anemone) of perennial herbs of the buttercup family having lobed or divided leaves and showy ...
anemophilous
adjective Date: 1874 pollinated by wind
anencephalic
adjective see anencephaly
anencephaly
noun (plural -lies) Etymology: 2a- + encephal- + 2-y Date: circa 1889 congenital absence of all or a major part of the brain • anencephalic adjective
anent
preposition Etymology: Middle English onevent, anent, from Old English on efen alongside, from on + efen even Date: 13th century about, concerning
anergy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary 2a- + -ergy (as in allergy Date: circa 1923 a condition in which the body fails to react to an antigen
aneroid
adjective Etymology: French anéroïde, from Greek a- + Late Greek nēron water, from Greek, neuter of nearos, nēros fresh; akin to Greek neos new — more at new Date: circa ...
anesthesia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek anaisthēsia insensibility, from a- + aisthēsis perception, from aisthanesthai to perceive — more at audible Date: circa 1721 loss of ...
anesthesiologist
noun Date: 1942 anesthetist; specifically a physician specializing in anesthesiology
anesthesiology
noun Date: circa 1914 a branch of medical science dealing with anesthesia and anesthetics
anesthetic
I. adjective Date: 1846 1. of, relating to, or capable of producing anesthesia 2. lacking awareness or sensitivity • anesthetically adverb II. noun Date: 1848 1. a ...
anesthetically
adverb see anesthetic I
anesthetist
noun Date: 1882 one who administers anesthetics
anesthetize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1848 to subject to anesthesia
anestrous
adjective Date: circa 1909 1. not exhibiting estrus 2. of or relating to anestrus
anestrus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1927 the period of sexual quiescence between two periods of sexual activity in cyclically breeding mammals
Aneto, Pico de
or French Pic de Néthou geographical name mountain 11,168 feet (3404 meters) NE Spain; highest in the Pyrenees
aneuploid
adjective Date: 1926 having or being a chromosome number that is not an exact multiple of the usually haploid number — compare euploid • aneuploid noun • aneuploidy noun
aneuploidy
noun see aneuploid
aneurism
noun see aneurysm
aneurysm
also aneurism noun Etymology: Greek aneurysma, from aneurynein to dilate, from ana- + eurynein to stretch, from eurys wide — more at eury- Date: 15th century an abnormal ...
aneurysmal
adjective see aneurysm
anew
adverb Etymology: Middle English of newe, from Old English of nīwe, from of + nīwe new Date: before 12th century 1. for an additional time ; again 2. in a new or ...
anfractuosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1596 1. the quality or state of being anfractuous 2. a winding channel or course; especially an intricate path or process (as of the mind)
anfractuous
adjective Etymology: French anfractueux, from Late Latin anfractuosus, from Latin anfractus coil, bend, from an- (from ambi- around) + -fractus, from frangere to break — more ...
Angara
geographical name river 1100 miles (1770 kilometers) Russia flowing from Lake Baikal into the Yenisey — see Tunguska
Angarsk
geographical name city S Russia in Asia on the Angara NW of Irkutsk population 269,000
angel
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English engel & Anglo-French angele; both from Late Latin angelus, from Greek angelos, literally, messenger Date: before 12th century ...

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