Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
Apalachicola
geographical name river 90 miles (145 kilometers) NW Florida flowing from Lake Seminole S into Apalachicola Bay (inlet of Gulf of Mexico)
apanage
variant of appanage
Apaporis
geographical name river about 550 miles (885 kilometers) S Colombia flowing SE into the Japurá on Colombia-Brazil boundary
aparejo
noun (plural -jos) Etymology: American Spanish Date: 1834 a packsaddle of stuffed leather or canvas
apart
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French a part, literally, to one side Date: 14th century 1. a. at a little distance b. away from one another in space ...
apart from
preposition Date: 1833 other than ; besides, except for
apartheid
noun Etymology: Afrikaans, from apart apart + -heid -hood Date: 1947 1. racial segregation; specifically a former policy of segregation and political and economic ...
apartment
noun Etymology: French appartement, from Italian appartamento Date: 1641 1. a room or set of rooms fitted especially with housekeeping facilities and usually leased as a ...
apartment building
noun Date: 1883 a building containing separate residential apartments — called also apartment house
apartment hotel
noun Date: 1909 a hotel containing apartments as well as accommodations for transients
apartment house
noun see apartment building
apartmental
adjective see apartment
apartness
noun see apart II
apathetic
adjective Date: 1744 1. having or showing little or no feeling or emotion ; spiritless 2. having little or no interest or concern ; indifferent Synonyms: see impassive • ...
apathetically
adverb see apathetic
apathy
noun Etymology: Greek apatheia, from apathēs without feeling, from a- + pathos emotion — more at pathos Date: 1594 1. lack of feeling or emotion ; impassiveness 2. lack ...
apatite
noun Etymology: German Apatit, from Greek apatē deceit Date: 1803 any of a group of calcium phosphate minerals occurring in various colors as hexagonal crystals, as granular ...
apatosaurus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek apatē + sauros lizard Date: circa 1899 brontosaurus
APB
abbreviation all points bulletin
APC
noun Etymology: armored personnel carrier Date: 1966 an armored vehicle used to transport military personnel
ape
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English apa; akin to Old High German affo ape Date: before 12th century 1. a. monkey; especially one of the larger tailless ...
ape-man
noun Date: 1873 a primate (as an australopithecine) intermediate in character between Homo sapiens and the higher apes
apeak
adjective or adverb Etymology: alteration of earlier apike, probably from French à pic vertically Date: 1596 being in a vertical position
Apeldoorn
geographical name commune E central Netherlands N of Arnhem population 148,745
apelike
adjective see ape I
Apelles
biographical name 4th century B.C. Greek painter
Apennine
adjective see Apennines
Apennines
geographical name mountain chain Italy extending the length of the peninsula — see corno (Monte) • Apennine adjective
aper
noun see ape II
aperçu
noun (plural aperçus) Etymology: French, from aperçu, past participle of apercevoir to perceive, from Old French aperceivre, from a- (from Latin ad-) + perceivre to perceive ...
aperient
adjective Etymology: Latin aperient-, aperiens, present participle of aperire Date: 1626 gently moving the bowels ; laxative • aperient noun
aperiodic
adjective Date: 1879 1. of irregular occurrence ; not periodic 2. not having periodic vibrations ; not oscillatory • aperiodically adverb • aperiodicity noun
aperiodically
adverb see aperiodic
aperiodicity
noun see aperiodic
aperitif
noun Etymology: French apéritif aperient, aperitif, from Middle French aperitif, adjective, aperient, from Medieval Latin aperitivus, irregular from Latin aperire Date: 1894 ...
aperture
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin apertura, from apertus, past participle of aperire to open Date: 15th century 1. an opening or open space ; hole 2. a. the ...
apetalous
adjective Date: circa 1706 having no petals
apex
noun (plural apexes or apices) Etymology: Latin Date: 1601 1. a. the uppermost point ; vertex b. the narrowed or pointed end ; tip 2. the highest or culminating ...
Apgar score
noun Etymology: Virginia Apgar died 1974 American anesthesiologist Date: 1962 an index used to evaluate the condition of a newborn infant based on a rating of 0, 1, or 2 for ...
aphaeresis
noun (plural aphaereses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek aphairesis, literally, taking off, from aphairein to take away, from apo- + hairein to take Date: circa 1550 the ...
aphaeretic
adjective see aphaeresis
aphasia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from a- + -phasia Date: 1867 loss or impairment of the power to use or comprehend words usually resulting from brain damage • aphasic ...
aphasic
noun or adjective see aphasia
aphelion
noun (plural aphelia) Etymology: New Latin, from apo- + Greek hēlios sun — more at solar Date: 1656 the point in the path of a celestial body (as a planet) that is farthest ...
apheresis
noun, plural (aphereses) Etymology: from -apheresis (as in plasmapheresis) Date: 1977 withdrawal of blood from a donor's body, removal of one or more blood components (as ...
aphesis
noun (plural apheses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, release, from aphienai to let go, from apo- + hienai to send — more at jet Date: 1880 aphaeresis consisting of the ...
aphetic
adjective see aphesis
aphetically
adverb see aphesis
aphid
noun Date: 1861 any of numerous very small soft-bodied homopterous insects (superfamily Aphidoidea) that suck the juices of plants
aphid lion
noun Date: 1949 any of several insect larvae (as a lacewing or ladybug larva) that feed on aphids — called also aphis lion
aphis
noun (plural aphides) Etymology: New Latin Aphid-, Aphis, genus name Date: 1771 any of a genus (Aphis) of aphids; broadly aphid
aphis lion
noun see aphid lion
aphonia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek aphōnia, from aphōnos voiceless, from a- + phōnē sound — more at ban Date: 1778 loss of voice and of all but whispered speech • ...
aphonic
adjective see aphonia
aphorism
noun Etymology: Middle French aphorisme, from Late Latin aphorismus, from Greek aphorismos definition, aphorism, from aphorizein to define, from apo- + horizein to bound — more ...
aphorist
noun see aphorism
aphoristic
adjective see aphorism
aphoristically
adverb see aphorism
aphorize
intransitive verb (-rized; -rizing) Date: 1669 to write or speak in or as if in aphorisms
aphotic
adjective Date: circa 1900 being the deep zone of an ocean or lake receiving too little light to permit photosynthesis
aphrodisiac
noun Etymology: Greek aphrodisiakos sexual, gem with aphrodisiac properties, from aphrodisia heterosexual pleasures, from neuter plural of aphrodisios of Aphrodite, from ...
aphrodisiacal
adjective see aphrodisiac
Aphrodite
noun Etymology: Greek Aphroditē Date: 1565 the Greek goddess of love and beauty — compare Venus
Apia
geographical name town & port capital of independent Samoa on Upolu Island
apiarian
adjective Date: 1801 of or relating to beekeeping or bees
apiarist
noun Date: 1816 beekeeper
apiary
noun (plural -aries) Etymology: Latin apiarium, from apis bee Date: 1654 a place where bees are kept; especially a collection of hives or colonies of bees kept for their honey
apical
adjective Etymology: probably from New Latin apicalis, from Latin apic-, apex Date: 1828 1. of, relating to, or situated at an apex 2. of, relating to, or formed with the ...
apical dominance
noun Date: 1947 inhibition of the growth of lateral buds by the terminal bud of a shoot
apical meristem
noun Date: circa 1934 a meristem at the apex of a root or shoot that is responsible for increase in length
apically
adverb see apical
apiculate
adjective Etymology: New Latin apiculus, diminutive of Latin apic-, apex Date: 1830 ending abruptly in a small distinct point
apicultural
adjective see apiculture
apiculture
noun Etymology: probably from French, from Latin apis bee + French culture Date: 1864 the keeping of bees especially on a large scale • apicultural adjective • ...
apiculturist
noun see apiculture
apiece
adverb Date: 15th century for each one ; individually
Apis
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from Egyptian ḥp Date: 14th century a sacred bull worshipped by the ancient Egyptians
apish
adjective Date: circa 1527 resembling an ape: as a. extremely silly or affected b. given to slavish imitation • apishly adverb • apishness noun
apishly
adverb see apish
apishness
noun see apish
APL
noun Etymology: a programming language Date: 1966 a computer programming language designed especially for the concise representation of algorithms
aplanatic
adjective Etymology: a- + Greek planasthai to wander — more at planet Date: 1794 free from or corrected for spherical aberration
aplastic anemia
noun Date: 1928 anemia that is characterized by defective function of the blood-forming organs (as the bone marrow) and is caused by toxic agents (as chemicals or X-rays) or is ...
aplenty
I. adjective Date: 1830 being in plenty or abundance — used postpositively II. adverb Date: 1846 1. in abundance ; plentifully 2. very much ; extremely
aplite
noun Etymology: probably from German Aplit, from Greek haploos simple — more at hapl- Date: 1879 a fine-grained light-colored granite consisting almost entirely of quartz ...
aplitic
adjective see aplite
aplomb
noun Etymology: French, literally, perpendicularity, from Middle French, from a plomb, literally, according to the plummet Date: 1823 complete and confident composure or ...
apnea
noun Etymology: New Latin, from a- + -pnea Date: circa 1719 1. transient cessation of respiration; especially sleep apnea 2. asphyxia • apneic adjective
apneic
adjective see apnea
apnoea
chiefly British variant of apnea
apo
noun, plural (apos) Date: 1983 apolipoprotein — usually used with a letter or letter and number
APO
abbreviation army post office
Apo, Mount
geographical name volcano 9692 feet (2954 meters) S Philippines in SE Mindanao; highest peak in the Philippines
apo-
or ap- prefix Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from apo — more at of 1. away from ; off 2. detached ; separate 3. formed from ; related to
Apoc
abbreviation 1. Apocalypse 2. Apocrypha 3. apocryphal
apocalypse
noun Etymology: Middle English, revelation, Revelation, from Anglo-French apocalipse, from Late Latin apocalypsis, from Greek apokalypsis, from apokalyptein to uncover, from ...
Apocalypse
noun see revelation
apocalyptic
also apocalyptical adjective Date: 1663 1. of, relating to, or resembling an apocalypse 2. forecasting the ultimate destiny of the world ; prophetic 3. foreboding imminent ...
apocalyptical
adjective see apocalyptic
apocalyptically
adverb see apocalyptic
apocalypticism
or apocalyptism noun Date: 1884 apocalyptic expectation; especially a doctrine concerning an imminent end of the world and an ensuing general resurrection and final judgment
apocalyptism
noun see apocalypticism
apocalyptist
noun Date: 1835 the writer of an apocalypse
apochromatic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1886 free from chromatic and spherical aberration
apocope
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek apokopē, literally, cutting off, from apokoptein to cut off, from apo- + koptein to cut — more at capon Date: circa 1550 the loss of ...
apocrine
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary apo- + Greek krinein to separate — more at certain Date: 1926 producing a fluid secretion by pinching off one end of ...
apocrypha
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Late Latin, neuter plural of apocryphus secret, not canonical, from Greek apokryphos obscure, ...
apocryphal
adjective Date: 1590 1. of doubtful authenticity ; spurious 2. often capitalized of or resembling the Apocrypha Synonyms: see fictitious • apocryphally adverb • ...
apocryphally
adverb see apocryphal
apocryphalness
noun see apocryphal
apodeictic
adjective see apodictic
apodictic
also apodeictic adjective Etymology: Latin apodicticus, from Greek apodeiktikos, from apodeiknynai to demonstrate, from apo- + deiknynai to show — more at diction Date: circa ...
apodictically
adverb see apodictic
apodosis
noun (plural apodoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from apodidonai to give back, deliver, from apo- + didonai to give — more at date Date: 1604 the main clause of a ...
apoenzyme
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1936 a protein that forms an active enzyme system by combination with a coenzyme and determines the specificity of ...
apogamy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1878 development of a sporophyte from a gametophyte without fertilization
apogean
adjective see apogee
apogee
noun Etymology: French apogée, from New Latin apogaeum, from Greek apogaion, from neuter of apogeios, apogaios far from the earth, from apo- + gē, gaia earth Date: 1594 1. ...
apolipoprotein
noun Date: 1970 a protein that combines with a lipid to form a lipoprotein — often used with a letter or letter and number
apolitical
adjective Date: 1935 1. having no interest or involvement in political affairs; also having an aversion to politics or political affairs 2. having no political significance ...
apolitically
adverb see apolitical
apoliticism
noun see apolitical
Apollinaire
biographical name Guillaume 1880-1918 originally Wilhelm Apollinaris de Kostrowitzki French poet
Apollinian
adjective Date: 1924 Apollonian
Apollo
noun Etymology: Latin Apollin-, Apollo, from Greek Apollōn Date: 13th century 1. the Greek and Roman god of sunlight, prophecy, music, and poetry 2. [Apollo, an asteroid of ...
Apollonian
adjective Date: 1663 1. of, relating to, or resembling the god Apollo 2. harmonious, measured, ordered, or balanced in character — compare Dionysian
Apollonius
biographical name of Rhodes 3d century B.C. Greek poet • Apollonian adjective
Apollyon
noun Etymology: Greek Apollyōn Date: 14th century the angel of the bottomless pit in the Book of Revelation
apologetic
I. noun Date: 15th century apologetics 1 II. adjective Etymology: Greek apologētikos, from apologeisthai to defend, from apo- + logos speech Date: 1649 1. a. offered ...
apologetically
adverb see apologetic II
apologetics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1733 1. systematic argumentative discourse in defense (as of a doctrine) 2. a branch of theology devoted to ...
apologia
noun Etymology: Late Latin Date: 1784 a defense especially of one's opinions, position, or actions Synonyms: see apology
apologia pro vita sua
foreign term Etymology: Latin defense of one's life ; a written justification for one's beliefs or course of conduct
apologise
British variant of apologize
apologist
noun Date: 1640 one who speaks or writes in defense of someone or something
apologize
intransitive verb (-gized; -gizing) Date: 1596 to make an apology • apologizer noun
apologizer
noun see apologize
apologue
noun Etymology: French, from Latin apologus, from Greek apologos, from apo- + logos speech, narrative Date: circa 1555 an allegorical narrative usually intended to convey a ...
apology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French apologie, from Late Latin apologia, from Greek, from apo- + logos speech — more at legend Date: 1533 ...
apolune
noun Etymology: apo- + Latin luna moon — more at lunar Date: circa 1968 the point in the path of a body orbiting the moon that is farthest from the center of the moon — ...
apomict
noun Etymology: probably back-formation from International Scientific Vocabulary apomictic, from apo- + Greek mignynai to mix — more at mix Date: circa 1938 one produced or ...
apomictic
adjective see apomict
apomictically
adverb see apomict
apomixis
noun (plural apomixes) Etymology: New Latin, from apo- + Greek mixis act of mixing, from mignynai Date: 1913 reproduction (as apogamy or parthenogenesis) involving specialized ...
apomorphine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1888 a crystalline morphine derivative C17H17NO2 that is a dopamine agonist and is administered in the form of its ...
aponeurosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek aponeurōsis, from aponeurousthai to pass into a tendon, from apo- + neuron sinew — more at nerve Date: 1676 a broad flat sheet of ...
aponeurotic
adjective see aponeurosis
apophasis
noun Etymology: Late Latin, repudiation, from Greek, denial, negation, from apophanai to deny, from apo- + phanai to say — more at ban Date: 1657 the raising of an issue by ...
apophthegm
chiefly British variant of apothegm
apophyllite
noun Etymology: French, from apo- + Greek phyllon leaf — more at blade Date: 1810 a mineral composed of a hydrous silicate of potassium, calcium, and fluorine that is ...
apophyseal
adjective see apophysis
apophysis
noun (plural apophyses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from apo- + phyein to bring forth — more at be Date: 1646 an expanded or projecting part especially of an organism ...
Apopka
geographical name city central Florida NW of Orlando population 26,642
apoplectic
adjective Etymology: French or Late Latin; French apoplectique, from Late Latin apoplecticus, from Greek apoplēktikos, from apoplēssein Date: 1611 1. of, relating to, or ...
apoplectically
adverb see apoplectic
apoplexy
noun Etymology: Middle English apoplexie, from Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin apoplexia, from Greek apoplēxia, from apoplēssein to cripple by a ...
apoptosis
noun (plural apoptoses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek apoptōsis a falling off, from apopiptein to fall off, from apo- + piptein to fall — more at feather Date: 1972 a ...
apoptotic
adjective see apoptosis
aporia
noun Etymology: French aporie, ultimately from Greek aporia difficulty, perplexity, from aporos impassable, from a- + poros passage — more at fare Date: circa 1550 1. an ...
aport
adverb Date: 1627 on or toward the left side of a ship
apos
plural of apo
aposematic
adjective Etymology: apo- + Greek sēmat-, sēma sign Date: 1890 being conspicuous and serving to warn • aposematically adverb
aposematically
adverb see aposematic
aposiopesis
noun (plural aposiopeses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek aposiōpēsis, from aposiōpan to be fully silent, from apo- + siōpan to be silent, from siōpē silence Date: 1555 ...
aposiopetic
adjective see aposiopesis
apospory
noun Date: 1884 production of gametophytes directly from diploid cells of the sporophytes without spore formation (as in certain ferns and mosses)
apostasy
noun (plural -sies) Etymology: Middle English apostasie, from Late Latin apostasia, from Greek, literally, revolt, from aphistasthai to revolt, from apo- + histasthai to stand ...
apostate
noun Date: 14th century one who commits apostasy • apostate adjective
apostatise
British variant of apostatize
apostatize
intransitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1611 to commit apostasy
apostle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Old English; Anglo-French apostle & Old English apostol, both from Late Latin apostolus, from Greek apostolos, from ...
Apostles' Creed
noun Date: 1602 a Christian statement of belief ascribed to the Twelve Apostles and used especially in public worship
apostleship
noun see apostle
apostolate
noun Etymology: Late Latin apostolatus, from apostolus Date: 14th century 1. the office or mission of an apostle 2. an association of persons dedicated to the propagation of ...
apostolic
adjective Date: 13th century 1. a. of or relating to an apostle b. of, relating to, or conforming to the teachings of the New Testament apostles 2. a. of or ...
apostolic delegate
noun Date: circa 1907 an ecclesiastical representative of the Holy See to the Catholic hierarchy of another country
Apostolic Father
noun Date: 1828 a church father of the first or second century A.D.
apostolicity
noun see apostolic
apostrophe
I. noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek apostrophē, literally, act of turning away, from apostrephein to turn away, from apo- + strephein to turn Date: 1533 the addressing of ...
apostrophic
I. adjective see apostrophe I II. adjective see apostrophe II
apostrophise
British variant of apostrophize
apostrophize
verb (-phized; -phizing) Date: 1718 transitive verb to address by or in apostrophe intransitive verb to make use of apostrophe
apothecaries' measure
noun Date: circa 1900 a system of liquid units of measure used chiefly by pharmacists — called also apothecary measure
apothecaries' weight
noun Date: 1765 a system of weights used chiefly by pharmacists — called also apothecary weight — see weight table
apothecary
noun (plural -caries) Etymology: Middle English apothecarie, from Medieval Latin apothecarius, from Late Latin, shopkeeper, from Latin apotheca storehouse, from Greek ...
apothecary measure
noun see apothecaries' measure
apothecary weight
noun see apothecaries' weight
apothecial
adjective see apothecium
apothecium
noun (plural apothecia) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin apotheca Date: 1830 a spore-bearing structure in many lichens and fungi consisting of a discoid or cupped body bearing ...
apothegm
noun Etymology: Greek apophthegmat-, apophthegma, from apophthengesthai to speak out, from apo- + phthengesthai to utter Date: circa 1587 a short, pithy, and instructive ...
apothegmatic
adjective see apothegm
apothem
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary apo- + -them (from Greek thema something laid down, theme) Date: circa 1856 the perpendicular from the center of a regular ...
apotheosis
noun (plural apotheoses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek apotheōsis, from apotheoun to deify, from apo- + theos god Date: circa 1580 1. elevation to divine status ; ...
apotheosize
transitive verb see apotheosis
apotropaic
adjective Etymology: Greek apotropaios, from apotrepein to avert, from apo- + trepein to turn Date: 1883 designed to avert evil • apotropaically adverb
apotropaically
adverb see apotropaic
app
I. noun Date: 1987 application 1a(3) II. abbreviation 1. apparatus 2. appendix 3. appliance
appal
verb see appall
Appalachia
geographical name region E United States comprising Appalachian Mountains from S central New York to central Alabama
Appalachian
noun Date: 1949 a white native or resident of the Appalachian mountain area
Appalachian dulcimer
noun Date: 1962 dulcimer 2
Appalachian Mountains
geographical name mountain system E North America extending from Labrador & New Brunswick SW to N Alabama; highest peak Mt. Mitchell 6684 feet (2037 meters)
appall
also appal verb (appalled; appalling) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French apalir, from Old French, from a- (from Latin ad-) + palir to grow pale, from Latin pallescere, ...
appalling
adjective Date: 1817 inspiring horror, dismay, or disgust • appallingly adverb
appallingly
adverb see appalling
Appaloosa
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1947 any of a breed of rugged saddle horses developed in western North America and usually having a white or solid-colored coat with small ...
appanage
also apanage noun Etymology: French apanage, from Old French, from apaner to provide for a younger offspring, from Medieval Latin appanare, from Latin ad- + panis bread — more ...
apparat
noun Etymology: Russian Date: 1941 apparatus 2
apparatchik
noun (plural -chiks; also apparatchiki) Etymology: Russian, from apparat Date: 1941 1. a member of a Communist apparat 2. a blindly devoted official, follower, or member of ...
apparatus
noun (plural -tuses or -tus) Etymology: Latin, from apparare to prepare, from ad- + parare to prepare — more at pare Date: circa 1628 1. a. a set of materials or ...
apparel
I. transitive verb (-eled or -elled; -eling or -elling) Etymology: Middle English appareillen, from Anglo-French apparailler to prepare, from Vulgar Latin *appariculare, from ...
apparent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French apparant, from Latin apparent-, apparens, present participle of apparēre to appear Date: 14th century 1. open to view ; ...
apparent magnitude
noun Date: 1785 the luminosity of a celestial body (as a star) as observed from the earth — compare absolute magnitude
apparent time
noun Date: 1694 the time of day indicated by the hour angle of the sun or by a sundial
apparently
adverb Date: 1566 it seems apparent
apparentness
noun see apparent
apparition
noun Etymology: Middle English apparicioun, from Anglo-French aparicion, from Late Latin apparition-, apparitio appearance, from Latin apparēre Date: 15th century 1. a. an ...
apparitional
adjective see apparition
apparitor
noun Etymology: Latin, from apparēre Date: 15th century an official formerly sent to carry out the orders of a magistrate, judge, or court
appeal
I. noun Etymology: Middle English appel, from Anglo-French apel, from apeler Date: 13th century 1. a legal proceeding by which a case is brought before a higher court for ...
appealability
noun see appeal II
appealable
adjective see appeal II
appealer
noun see appeal II
appealing
adjective Date: 1813 1. marked by earnest entreaty ; imploring 2. having appeal ; pleasing • appealingly adverb
appealingly
adverb see appealing
appear
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English apperen, from Anglo-French aparer, aparoir, from Latin apparēre, from ad- + parēre to show oneself Date: 13th century 1. a. to ...
appearance
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. external show ; semblance b. outward aspect ; look c. plural outward indication 2. a. a sense impression or aspect of a thing ...
appeasable
adjective see appease
appease
transitive verb (appeased; appeasing) Etymology: Middle English appesen, from Anglo-French apeser, apaiser, from a- (from Latin ad-) + pais peace — more at peace Date: 14th ...
appeasement
noun see appease
appeaser
noun see appease
appellant
I. adjective Date: 14th century of or relating to an appeal ; appellate II. noun Date: 15th century one that appeals; specifically one that appeals from a judicial ...
appellate
adjective Etymology: Latin appellatus, past participle of appellare Date: 1768 of, relating to, or recognizing appeals; specifically having the power to review the judgment ...
appellation
noun Date: 15th century 1. an identifying name or title ; designation 2. archaic the act of calling by a name 3. a geographical name (as of a region, village, or vineyard) ...
appellative
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to a common noun 2. of, relating to, or inclined to the giving of names • appellative noun • appellatively adverb
appellatively
adverb see appellative
appellee
noun Date: 1531 one against whom an appeal is taken
append
transitive verb Etymology: Latin appendere, to hang, weigh out, from ad- + pendere to weigh — more at pendant Date: 1646 1. attach, affix 2. to add as a supplement or ...
appendage
noun Date: 1647 1. an adjunct to something larger or more important ; appurtenance 2. a usually projecting part of an animal or plant body that is typically smaller and of ...
appendant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French apendaunt, present participle of apendre to belong, be subject, from Medieval Latin appendēre to be attached, belong to, ...
appendectomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Latin appendic-, appendix + English -ectomy Date: circa 1895 surgical removal of the vermiform appendix
appendicectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1894 British appendectomy
appendicitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1886 inflammation of the vermiform appendix
appendicular
adjective Date: 1651 of or relating to an appendage and especially a limb
appendix
noun (plural -dixes or appendices) Etymology: Latin appendic-, appendix, from appendere Date: 1542 1. a. appendage b. supplementary material usually attached at the end ...
Appenzell
geographical name former canton NE Switzerland, now divided into Appenzell Inner Rhodes (or German Appenzell Inner Rhoden) (capital Appenzell area 67 square miles or 174 ...
apperceive
transitive verb (-ceived; -ceiving) Etymology: French apercevoir Date: 1843 to have apperception of
apperception
noun Etymology: French aperception, from apercevoir, from Middle French aperceivre, from a- (from Latin ad-) + perceivre to perceive Date: 1753 1. introspective ...
apperceptive
adjective see apperception
appertain
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English apperteinen, from Anglo-French apurtenir, from Late Latin appertinēre, from Latin ad- + pertinēre to belong — more at pertain ...
appetence
noun Date: 1598 appetency
appetency
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Latin appetentia, from appetent-, appetens, present participle of appetere Date: 1611 a fixed and strong desire ; appetite • appetent ...
appetent
adjective see appetency
appetiser
British variant of appetizer
appetising
British variant of appetizing
appetite
noun Etymology: Middle English apetit, from Anglo-French, from Latin appetitus, from appetere to strive after, from ad- + petere to go to — more at feather Date: 14th ...
appetitive
adjective see appetite
appetizer
noun Date: 1820 1. a food or drink that stimulates the appetite and is usually served before a meal 2. something that stimulates a desire for more
appetizing
adjective Date: 1653 appealing to the appetite especially in appearance or aroma; also appealing to one's taste Synonyms: see palatable • appetizingly adverb
appetizingly
adverb see appetizing
Appian Way
geographical name ancient paved highway extending from Rome to the Adriatic
Appius Claudius
biographical name — see Claudius
appl
abbreviation applied
applaud
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French aplaudir, from Latin applaudere, from ad- + plaudere to applaud Date: 15th century intransitive verb ...
applaudable
adjective see applaud

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.047 c;