Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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applaudably
adverb see applaud
applauder
noun see applaud
applause
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin applausus, from Latin, beating of wings, from applaudere Date: 15th century 1. marked commendation ; acclaim 2. approval publicly expressed ...
apple
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English appel, from Old English æppel; akin to Old High German apful apple, Old Irish ubull, Old Church Slavic ablŭko Date: ...
apple butter
noun Date: circa 1774 a thick brown spread made by cooking apples with sugar and spices usually in cider
apple maggot
noun Date: 1867 a dipteran fly (Rhagoletis pomonella) whose larva burrows in and feeds especially on apples
apple of one's eye
phrasal one that is highly cherished
apple scab
noun Date: circa 1899 a disease of apple trees caused by a fungus (Venturia inaequalis) producing dark blotches or lesions on the leaves, fruit, and sometimes the young twigs
Apple Valley
geographical name 1. town SE California N of San Bernardino population 54,239 2. city SE Minnesota population 45,527
apple-cheeked
adjective Date: 1847 having cheeks the color of red apples
apple-knocker
noun Date: 1919 rustic
apple-pie
adjective Date: 1780 1. excellent, perfect 2. of, relating to, or characterized by traditionally American values (as honesty or simplicity)
apple-polish
verb Etymology: from the traditional practice of schoolchildren bringing a shiny apple as a gift to their teacher Date: 1935 intransitive verb to attempt to ingratiate ...
apple-polisher
noun see apple-polish
applecart
noun Date: 1788 a plan, system, situation, or undertaking that may be disrupted or terminated
applejack
noun Date: 1816 brandy distilled from hard cider; also an alcoholic beverage traditionally made by freezing hard cider and siphoning off the concentrated liquor
applesauce
noun Date: 1704 1. a relish or dessert made of apples stewed to a pulp and sweetened 2. slang bunkum, nonsense
Appleseed
biographical name Johnny — see John chapman
applet
noun Etymology: application + 1-et Date: 1990 a short computer application especially for performing a simple specific task
Appleton
I. biographical name Sir Edward 1892-1965 English physicist II. geographical name city E Wisconsin population 70,087
appliance
noun Date: 1561 1. an act of applying 2. a. a piece of equipment for adapting a tool or machine to a special purpose ; attachment b. an instrument or device designed ...
applicability
noun see applicable
applicable
adjective Date: 1655 capable of or suitable for being applied ; appropriate Synonyms: see relevant • applicability noun
applicant
noun Date: 1776 one who applies
application
noun Etymology: Middle English applicacioun, from Latin application-, applicatio inclination, from applicare Date: 15th century 1. an act of applying: a. (1) an act of ...
applicative
adjective Date: 1638 1. applicable, practical 2. put to use ; applied • applicatively adverb
applicatively
adverb see applicative
applicator
noun Date: 1659 one that applies; specifically a device for applying a substance (as medicine or polish)
applicatory
adjective Date: 1649 capable of being applied
applied
adjective Date: 1656 1. put to practical use ; especially applying general principles to solve definite problems 2. working in an applied science
applier
noun see apply
appliqué
I. noun Etymology: French, past participle of appliquer to put on, from Latin applicare Date: 1801 a cutout decoration fastened to a larger piece of material II. transitive ...
apply
verb (applied; applying) Etymology: Middle English applien, from Anglo-French aplier, from Latin applicare, from ad- + plicare to fold — more at ply Date: 14th century ...
appoggiatura
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, support Date: 1753 an embellishing note or tone preceding an essential melodic note or tone and usually written as a note of smaller size
appoint
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French appointer, from a- (from Latin ad-) + point point Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to fix or set officially ...
appointee
noun Date: 1768 1. one who is appointed 2. one to whom an estate is appointed
appointive
adjective Date: 1880 of, relating to, or filled by appointment
appointment
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. an act of appointing ; designation b. the designation by virtue of a vested power of a person to enjoy an estate 2. an arrangement for a ...
apportion
transitive verb (-tioned; apportioning) Etymology: Middle French apportionner, from a- (from Latin ad-) + portionner to portion Date: 1574 to divide and share out according to ...
apportionable
adjective see apportion
apportionment
noun Date: 1579 an act or result of apportioning; especially the apportioning of representatives or taxes among the states according to United States law
appose
transitive verb (apposed; apposing) Etymology: Middle French aposer, from Old French, from a- + poser to put — more at pose Date: 1596 1. archaic to put before ; apply (one ...
apposite
adjective Etymology: Latin appositus, from past participle of apponere to place near, from ad- + ponere to put — more at position Date: 1621 highly pertinent or appropriate ...
appositely
adverb see apposite
appositeness
noun see apposite
apposition
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a grammatical construction in which two usually adjacent nouns having the same referent stand in the same syntactical relation to the rest of ...
appositional
adjective see apposition
appositive
adjective Date: 1693 of, relating to, or standing in grammatical apposition • appositive noun • appositively adverb
appositively
adverb see appositive
appraisal
noun Date: 1817 an act or instance of appraising; especially a valuation of property by the estimate of an authorized person
appraise
transitive verb (appraised; appraising) Etymology: Middle English appraysen, probably from Anglo-French *appreiser, from a- (from Latin ad-) + preiser to prize, praise Date: ...
appraisee
noun see appraise
appraisement
noun see appraise
appraiser
noun see appraise
appraisingly
adverb see appraise
appraisive
adjective see appraise
appreciable
adjective Date: 1818 capable of being perceived or measured Synonyms: see perceptible • appreciably adverb
appreciably
adverb see appreciable
appreciate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin appretiatus, past participle of appretiare, from Latin ad- + pretium price — more at price Date: 1655 transitive verb 1. a. ...
appreciation
noun Date: 1604 1. a. judgment, evaluation; especially a favorable critical estimate b. sensitive awareness; especially recognition of aesthetic values c. an ...
appreciative
adjective Date: circa 1698 having or showing appreciation • appreciatively adverb • appreciativeness noun
appreciatively
adverb see appreciative
appreciativeness
noun see appreciative
appreciator
noun see appreciate
appreciatory
adjective see appreciate
apprehend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin apprehendere, literally, to seize, from ad- + prehendere to seize — more at get Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. arrest, ...
apprehensible
adjective Date: 15th century capable of being apprehended • apprehensibly adverb
apprehensibly
adverb see apprehensible
apprehension
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin apprehension-, apprehensio, from Latin apprehendere Date: 14th century 1. a. the act or power of perceiving or comprehending ...
apprehensive
adjective Date: 14th century 1. capable of apprehending or quick to do so ; discerning 2. having apprehension ; cognizant 3. viewing the future with anxiety or alarm ...
apprehensively
adverb see apprehensive
apprehensiveness
noun see apprehensive
apprentice
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English aprentis, from Anglo-French apprentiz, from aprendre to learn, from Latin apprendere, apprehendere Date: 14th ...
apprenticeship
noun see apprentice I
appressed
adjective Etymology: Latin appressus, past participle of apprimere to press to, from ad- + premere to press — more at press Date: 1613 pressed close to or lying flat against ...
appressorium
noun (plural appressoria) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin apprimere Date: 1897 the flattened thickened tip of a hyphal branch by which some parasitic fungi attach to and ...
apprise
transitive verb (apprised; apprising) Etymology: French appris, past participle of apprendre to learn, teach, from Old French aprendre Date: 1694 to give notice to ; tell ...
apprize
transitive verb (apprized; apprizing) Etymology: Middle English apprisen, from Anglo-French *appriser, from a- (from Latin ad-) + preiser, priser to value, prize — more at ...
appro
abbreviation approval
approach
I. verb Etymology: Middle English approchen, from Anglo-French aprocher, from Late Latin appropiare, from Latin ad- + prope near; akin to Latin pro before — more at for Date: ...
approachability
noun see approachable
approachable
adjective Date: 1571 capable of being approached ; accessible; specifically easy to meet or deal with • approachability noun
approbate
transitive verb (-bated; -bating) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin approbatus, past participle of approbare — more at approve Date: 15th century approve, sanction
approbation
noun Date: 14th century 1. obsolete proof 2. a. an act of approving formally or officially b. commendation, praise • approbatory adjective
approbatory
adjective see approbation
appropriable
adjective see appropriate I
appropriate
I. transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin appropriatus, past participle of appropriare, from Latin ad- + proprius own Date: 15th century 1. ...
appropriately
adverb see appropriate II
appropriateness
noun see appropriate II
appropriation
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of appropriating 2. something that has been appropriated; specifically money set aside by formal action for a specific use • ...
appropriative
adjective see appropriation
appropriator
noun see appropriate I
approvable
adjective Date: 15th century capable or worthy of being approved • approvably adverb
approvably
adverb see approvable
approval
noun Date: 1613 an act or instance of approving ; approbation
approve
verb (approved; approving) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French apruer, approver, from Latin approbare, from ad- + probare to prove — more at prove Date: 14th century ...
approved school
noun Date: 1932 British a school for juvenile delinquents
approvingly
adverb see approve
approx
abbreviation approximate; approximately
approximate
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin approximatus, past participle of approximare to come near, from Latin ad- + proximare to come near — more at proximate Date: 15th century ...
approximately
adverb see approximate I
approximation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of drawing together 2. the quality or state of being close or near 3. something that is approximate; especially a ...
approximative
adjective see approximation
appt
abbreviation appoint; appointed; appointment
apptd
abbreviation appointed
appurtenance
noun Date: 14th century 1. an incidental right (as a right-of-way) attached to a principal property right and passing in possession with it 2. a subordinate part or adjunct ...
appurtenant
adjective Etymology: Middle English apertenant, from Anglo-French appurtenant, present participle of apurtenir to belong — more at appertain Date: 14th century 1. ...
Apr
abbreviation April
APR
abbreviation annual percentage rate
Apra Harbor
geographical name seaport Guam on W coast
apractic
adjective see apraxia
apraxia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, inaction, from a- + praxis action, from prassein to do — more at practical Date: circa 1881 loss or impairment of the ability to ...
apraxic
adjective see apraxia
après
preposition Etymology: French après-, from après after Date: 1951 after — usually used in combination
après moi le déluge
or après nous le déluge foreign term Etymology: French after me the deluge — attributed to Louis XV
après nous le déluge
foreign term see après moi le déluge
après-ski
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French après after + ski ski, skiing Date: 1951 social activity (as at a ski lodge) after a day's skiing
apricot
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: alteration of earlier abrecock, ultimately from Arabic al-birqūq the apricot, ultimately from Latin (persicum) praecox, literally, ...
April
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French avrill, from Latin Aprilis Date: before 12th century the fourth month of the Gregorian calendar
April fool
noun Date: 1687 the butt of a joke or trick played on April Fools' Day; also such a joke or trick
April Fool's Day
noun see April Fools' Day
April Fools' Day
also April Fool's Day noun Date: 1817 April 1 characteristically marked by the playing of practical jokes
apriority
noun see a priori
apron
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, alteration (resulting from false division of a napron) of napron, from Middle French naperon, diminutive of nape cloth, ...
apron string
noun Date: 1542 the string of an apron — usually used in plural as a symbol of dominance or complete control
aproned
adjective see apron
apropos
I. adverb Etymology: French à propos, literally, to the purpose Date: 1668 1. at an opportune time ; seasonably 2. by way of interjection or further comment ; with regard ...
apropos of
preposition Date: 1746 with regard to ; concerning
aprotic
adjective Etymology: 2a- + proton + 1-ic Date: 1931 of a solvent incapable of acting as a proton donor
apse
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin & Latin; Medieval Latin apsis, from Latin Date: 1822 1. apsis 1 2. a projecting part of a building (as a church) that is usually semicircular ...
Apsheron
geographical name peninsula E Azerbaijan projecting into the Caspian Sea
apsidal
adjective Date: 1846 of or relating to an apse or apsis
apsis
noun (plural apsides) Etymology: New Latin apsid-, apsis, from Latin, arch, orbit, from Greek hapsid-, hapsis, from haptein to fasten Date: 1658 1. the point in an ...
apt
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin aptus, literally, fastened, from past participle of apere to fasten; akin to Latin apisci to grasp, obtain, apud near, Hittite ...
apterous
adjective Etymology: Greek apteros, from a- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1775 lacking wings
apteryx
noun Etymology: New Latin, from a- + Greek pteryx wing; akin to Greek pteron Date: 1813 kiwi 1
aptitude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin aptitudo, from Late Latin, fitness, from Latin aptus Date: 15th century 1. a. inclination, tendency b. a natural ...
aptitude test
noun Date: 1923 a standardized test designed to predict an individual's ability to learn certain skills
aptitudinal
adjective see aptitude
aptitudinally
adverb see aptitude
aptly
adverb see apt I
aptness
noun see apt I
APU
abbreviation auxiliary power unit
Apuleius
biographical name Lucius circa A.D. 124-after 170? Roman philosopher & rhetorician
Apulia
geographical name — see Puglia • Apulian adjective or noun
Apulian
adjective or noun see Apulia
Apure
geographical name river 509 miles (819 kilometers) W Venezuela flowing E into the Orinoco
Apurímac
geographical name river 428 miles (689 kilometers) S & central Peru flowing N to unite with the Urubamba forming the Ucayali
apyrase
noun Etymology: adenosine + pyrophosphate + -ase Date: 1945 any of several enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP to AMP with the liberation of phosphate and energy
aq
abbreviation 1. aqua 2. aqueous
Aqaba
or Al-‘Aqabah or ancient Elath geographical name town & port SW Jordan on border of Israel at head of NE arm ( Gulf of Aqaba) of Red Sea
Aqmola
geographical name — see Astana
aqua
noun Etymology: Latin — more at island Date: 14th century 1. plural aquae water; especially water 5a(2) 2. plural aquas a light greenish-blue color
aqua et igni interdictus
foreign term Etymology: Latin forbidden to be furnished with water and fire ; outlawed
aqua fortis
noun Etymology: New Latin aqua fortis, literally, strong water Date: 15th century nitric acid
aqua regia
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, royal water Date: 1612 a mixture of nitric and hydrochloric acids that dissolves gold or platinum
aqua vitae
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, literally, water of life Date: 15th century a strong alcoholic liquor (as brandy)
Aqua-Lung
trademark — used for an underwater breathing apparatus
aquacade
noun Etymology: Aquacade, a water spectacle originally at Cleveland, Ohio Date: 1937 a water spectacle that consists usually of exhibitions of swimming and diving with ...
aquacultural
adjective see aquaculture
aquaculture
also aquiculture noun Etymology: Latin aqua + English -culture (as in agriculture) Date: 1867 the cultivation of aquatic organisms (as fish or shellfish) especially for food ...
aquaculturist
noun see aquaculture
aquamarine
noun Etymology: New Latin aqua marina, from Latin, sea water Date: 1677 1. a transparent blue, blue-green, or green variety of beryl used as a gem 2. a pale blue to light ...
aquanaut
noun Etymology: Latin aqua + English -naut (as in aeronaut) Date: 1881 a scuba diver who lives and operates both inside and outside an underwater shelter for an extended ...
aquaplane
I. noun Date: 1914 a board towed behind a speeding motorboat and ridden by a person standing on it • aquaplaner noun II. intransitive verb Date: 1914 1. to ride on an ...
aquaplaner
noun see aquaplane I
aquarelle
noun Etymology: French, from obsolete Italian acquarella (now acquerello), from acqua water, from Latin aqua Date: 1849 a drawing usually in transparent watercolor • ...
aquarellist
noun see aquarelle
Aquarian
noun Date: 1911 Aquarius 2b • Aquarian adjective
aquarist
noun Date: 1900 a person who keeps or maintains an aquarium
aquarium
noun (plural -iums or aquaria) Etymology: probably alteration of aquatic vivarium Date: circa 1847 1. a container (as a glass tank) or an artificial pond in which living ...
Aquarius
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Aquarii), literally, water carrier Date: 14th century 1. a. the 11th sign of the zodiac in astrology — see zodiac table b. one born ...
aquatic
I. adjective Date: 1610 1. growing or living in or frequenting water 2. taking place in or on water • aquatically adverb II. noun Date: circa 1600 1. an aquatic ...
aquatically
adverb see aquatic I
aquatint
noun Etymology: Italian acqua tinta dyed water Date: 1782 a method of etching a printing plate so that tones similar to watercolor washes can be reproduced; also a print ...
aquatinter
noun see aquatint
aquatintist
noun see aquatint
aquavit
also akvavit noun Etymology: Swedish, Danish, & Norwegian akvavit, from Medieval Latin aqua vitae Date: 1873 a clear Scandinavian liquor flavored with caraway seeds
aqueduct
noun Etymology: Latin aquaeductus, from aquae (genitive of aqua) + ductus act of leading — more at duct Date: 1538 1. a. a conduit for water; especially one for carrying ...
aqueous
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin aqueus, from Latin aqua Date: 1646 1. a. of, relating to, or resembling water b. made from, with, or by water 2. of or relating ...
aqueous humor
noun Date: 1643 a transparent fluid occupying the space between the crystalline lens and the cornea of the eye
aquiculture
noun see aquaculture
Aquidneck Island
or Rhode Island geographical name island SE Rhode Island in Narragansett Bay; site of city of Newport
aquifer
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin aqua + -fer Date: 1901 a water-bearing stratum of permeable rock, sand, or gravel • aquiferous adjective
aquiferous
adjective see aquifer
Aquila
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Aquilae), literally, eagle Date: 14th century a constellation in the northern hemisphere represented by the figure of an eagle
aquilegia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1871 columbine
aquiline
adjective Etymology: Latin aquilinus, from aquila eagle Date: 1646 1. curving like an eagle's beak 2. of, relating to, or resembling an eagle • aquilinity noun
aquilinity
noun see aquiline
Aquinas
biographical name Saint Thomas — see Thomas Aquinas
Aquino
biographical name (Maria) Corazon 1933- née Cojuangco president of Philippines (1986-92)
Aquitaine
geographical name old region of SW France comprising area later known as Guienne capital Toulouse
Aquitania
geographical name a Roman division of SW Gaul under Caesar consisting of country between Pyrenees & Garonne River & under Augustus expanded to Loire & Allier rivers • ...
Aquitanian
adjective or noun see Aquitania
aquiver
adjective Date: 1864 marked by trembling or quivering
AR
abbreviation 1. accounts receivable 2. acknowledgment of receipt 3. all rail 4. all risks 5. annual return 6. Arkansas 7. army regulation 8. autonomous republic
Ar
I. abbreviation Arabic II. symbol argon
ar
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century the letter r II. abbreviation arrival; arrive
Arab
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Arabus, Arabs, from Greek Arab-, Araps, of Semitic origin; akin to Akkadian Arabu, Aribi desert nomads, Arabic A‘rāb Bedouins ...
arabesque
I. adjective Etymology: French, from Italian arabesco Arabian in fashion, from arabo Arab, from Latin Arabus Date: circa 1656 of, relating to, or being in the style of ...
Arabia
or Arabian Peninsula geographical name peninsula SW Asia about 1200 miles (1930 kilometers) long & 1300 miles (2090 kilometers) wide including Saudi Arabia, Yemen, & Persian ...
Arabian
I. noun Date: 14th century 1. a native or inhabitant of Arabia 2. Arabian horse II. adjective Date: 14th century Arabic 1
Arabian Desert
geographical name desert E Egypt between the Nile & the Red Sea
Arabian horse
noun Date: 1588 any of an ancient breed of swift compact horses developed in Arabia and usually having gray or chestnut silky hair
Arabian Peninsula
geographical name see Arabia
Arabian Sea
geographical name sea, NW section of the Indian Ocean between India & Arabia
Arabic
I. noun Date: 14th century a Semitic language originally of the Arabs of the Hejaz and Nejd that is now the prevailing speech of a wide region of southwestern Asia and ...
Arabic alphabet
noun Date: 1820 an alphabet of 28 letters derived from the Aramaic alphabet which is used for writing Arabic and also with adaptations for other languages of the Islamic world
Arabic numeral
noun Date: 1799 any of the number symbols 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 — see number table
arabica
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: New Latin, specific epithet of Coffea arabica, from Latin, feminine of Arabicus Arabian Date: 1922 1. an evergreen shrub or tree ...
arabicization
noun see arabicize
arabicize
transitive verb (-cized; -cizing) Usage: often capitalized Date: 1869 1. to adapt (a language or elements of a language) to the phonetic or structural pattern of Arabic 2. ...
arability
noun see arable I
arabinose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary arabin (the solid principle in gum arabic, from gum arabic + 1-in) + -ose Date: 1883 a white crystalline aldose sugar ...
arabinoside
noun Date: 1927 a glycoside that yields arabinose on hydrolysis
Arabise
British variant of Arabize
Arabism
noun Date: 1614 1. a characteristic feature of Arabic occurring in another language 2. devotion to Arab interests, culture, aspirations, or ideals
Arabist
noun Date: 1753 1. a specialist in the Arabic language or in Arabic culture 2. a person who favors Arab interests and positions in international affairs
Arabization
noun see Arabize
Arabize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1883 1. a. to cause to acquire Arabic customs, manners, speech, or outlook b. to modify (a population) by intermarriage with Arabs ...
arable
I. adjective Etymology: Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin arabilis, from arare to plow; akin to Old English erian to plow, Greek aroun Date: 15th century 1. fit ...
Araby
geographical name Arabia
Aracaju
geographical name city & port NE Brazil capital of Sergipe population 293,285
arachidonic acid
noun Etymology: New Latin Arachid-, Arachis + English -onic (as in gluconic acid) Date: 1913 a liquid unsaturated fatty acid C20H32O2 that occurs in most animal fats, is a ...
arachis oil
noun Etymology: New Latin Arachis, genus that includes the peanut, from Greek arakis, diminutive of arakos, a legume Date: circa 1889 peanut oil
arachn-
or arachno- combining form Etymology: New Latin & Greek; New Latin, from Greek, from arachnē spider, spiderweb; perhaps akin to Latin aranea spider, Greek arkys net spider ...
arachnid
noun Date: 1869 any of a class (Arachnida) of arthropods comprising chiefly terrestrial invertebrates, including the spiders, scorpions, mites, and ticks, and having a ...
arachno-
combining form see arachn-
arachnoid
I. adjective Date: 1789 1. of or relating to a thin membrane of the brain and spinal cord that lies between the dura mater and the pia mater 2. covered with or composed of ...
arachnological
adjective see arachnologist
arachnologist
noun Date: 1816 a person who specializes in the study of spiders and other arachnids • arachnological adjective • arachnology noun
arachnology
noun see arachnologist
arachnophobe
noun see arachnophobia
arachnophobia
noun Date: 1925 pathological fear or loathing of spiders • arachnophobe noun • arachnophobic adjective or noun
arachnophobic
adjective or noun see arachnophobia
Arad
geographical name city W Romania on the Mures population 191,428
Arafura Sea
geographical name sea between N Australia & W New Guinea
Aragon
geographical name region NE Spain bordering on France; once an independent kingdom capital Saragossa • Aragonese adjective or noun
Aragonese
adjective or noun see Aragon
aragonite
noun Etymology: German Aragonit, from Aragon, Spain Date: 1803 a mineral similar to calcite in consisting of calcium carbonate but differing from calcite in its orthorhombic ...
aragonitic
adjective see aragonite
Araguaia
or Araguaya geographical name river about 1365 miles (2195 kilometers), central Brazil flowing N into the Tocantins
Araguaya
geographical name see Araguaia
arak
variant of arrack
Arāk
geographical name city W Iran SW of Tehran population 265,349
Arakan
geographical name coast region SW Myanmar on Bay of Bengal; chief town Sittwe
Araks
or Aras or ancient Araxes geographical name river 635 miles (1022 kilometers) W Asia rising in mountains of Turkish Armenia & flowing E to join the Kura in E Azerbaijan
Aral Sea
or formerly Lake Aral geographical name brackish lake between Kazakhstan & Kyrgyzstan present area roughly half its pre-1960 peak of 25,500 square miles (66,000 square ...
Aram
I. biographical name Eugene 1704-1759 English philologist & murderer II. geographical name ancient Syria — its Hebrew name
Aramaean
also Aramean noun Etymology: Latin Aramaeus, from Greek Aramaios, from Hebrew ‘Ărām Aramaic, ancient name for Syria Date: 1839 1. Aramaic 2. a member of a Semitic ...
Aramaic
noun Date: 1828 a Semitic language known since the ninth century B.C. as the speech of the Aramaeans and later used extensively in southwest Asia as a commercial and ...
Aramaic alphabet
noun Date: 1890 1. an extinct North Semitic alphabet dating from the ninth century B.C. which was for several centuries the commercial alphabet of southwest Asia and the parent ...
Aramean
noun see Aramaean
aramid
noun Etymology: aromatic polyamide Date: 1972 any of a group of lightweight but very strong heat-resistant synthetic aromatic polyamide materials that are fashioned into ...
Aran Islands
geographical name islands W Ireland off coast of Galway; largest island Inishmore
Aransas Bay
geographical name inlet of Gulf of Mexico S Texas NE of Corpus Christi Bay between mainland & San Jose Island
Aransas Pass
geographical name channel S Texas between Mustang & San Jose islands leading to Corpus Christi & Aransas bays
Arapaho
or Arapahoe noun (plural -ho or -hos or -hoe or -hoes) Etymology: probably from Hidatsa arúpahu Arapaho, or a cognate word in another Siouan language Date: 1812 1. a member ...
Arapahoe
noun see Arapaho
Ararat
or Agri Dagi geographical name mountain 16,946 feet (5165 meters) E Turkey near border of Iran
Aras
geographical name see Araks
Araucan
noun see Araucanian
Araucanian
also Araucan noun Etymology: Spanish araucano, from Arauco, former province in Chile Date: 1788 1. a member of a group of Indian peoples of south central Chile and adjacent ...
araucaria
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Arauco Date: 1809 any of a genus (Araucaria of the family Araucariaceae, the araucaria family) of South American or Australian coniferous ...
araucarian
adjective see araucaria

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