Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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Aravalli Range
geographical name mountain range NW India E of Thar Desert; highest peak Mt. Abu 5650 feet (1722 meters)
Arawak
noun (plural Arawak or Arawaks) Etymology: earlier Arwaca, Aroaca, an Arawak subgroup of 16th century Trinidad, perhaps from an Arawak name for the subgroup Date: 1769 1. a ...
Arawakan
noun (plural Arawakan or Arawakans) Date: 1901 1. a member of a group of Indian peoples of South America and the West Indies 2. the language family of the Arawakan peoples
Araxes
geographical name see Araks
arb
noun Date: 1979 arbitrageur
arbalest
or arbalist noun Etymology: Middle English arblast, from Anglo-French arblaste, arcbaleste, from Late Latin arcuballista, from Latin arcus bow + ballista — more at arrow Date: ...
arbalist
noun see arbalest
Arber
biographical name Werner 1929- Swiss microbiologist
Arbīl
or Irbīl or Erbīl geographical name city N Iraq E of Mosul population 460,758
arbiter
noun Etymology: Middle English arbitre, from Anglo-French, from Latin arbitr-, arbiter Date: 14th century 1. a person with power to decide a dispute ; judge 2. a person or ...
arbiter elegantiarum
noun Etymology: Latin, literally, arbiter of refinements Date: 1736 a person who prescribes, rules on, or is a recognized authority on matters of social behavior and taste
arbitrable
adjective Date: 1531 subject to decision by arbitration
arbitrage
I. noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, arbitration, from Old French, from arbitrer to render judgment, from Latin arbitrari, from arbitr-, arbiter Date: 1875 1. the ...
arbitrager
noun see arbitrageur
arbitrageur
or arbitrager noun Etymology: French arbitrageur, from arbitrage Date: 1870 one that practices arbitrage
arbitral
adjective Date: 1609 of or relating to arbiters or arbitration
arbitrament
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French arbitrement, from arbitrer Date: 15th century 1. archaic the right or power of deciding 2. the settling of a dispute by an ...
arbitrarily
adverb see arbitrary
arbitrariness
noun see arbitrary
arbitrary
adjective Date: 15th century 1. depending on individual discretion (as of a judge) and not fixed by law 2. a. not restrained or limited in the exercise of power ; ruling ...
arbitrate
verb (-trated; -trating) Date: 1592 transitive verb 1. archaic decide, determine 2. to act as arbiter upon 3. to submit or refer for decision to an arbiter ...
arbitration
noun Date: 15th century the action of arbitrating; especially the hearing and determination of a case in controversy by an arbiter • arbitrational adjective
arbitrational
adjective see arbitration
arbitrative
adjective see arbitrate
arbitrator
noun Date: 15th century one that arbitrates ; arbiter
Arblay, d'
biographical name Madame — see Fanny Burney
Arbon
geographical name commune NE Switzerland population 11,333
arbor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English erber, herber garden, from Anglo-French, from herbe herb, grass Date: 14th century a shelter of vines or branches or of latticework covered ...
Arbor Day
noun Etymology: Latin arbor tree Date: 1872 a day designated for planting trees
arbor-
or arbori- combining form Etymology: Latin arbor tree
arboreal
adjective Etymology: Latin arboreus of a tree, from arbor Date: circa 1667 1. of, relating to, or resembling a tree 2. inhabiting or frequenting trees • arboreally ...
arboreally
adverb see arboreal
arboreous
adjective Date: 1646 arboreal
arborescence
noun see arborescent
arborescent
adjective Date: 1675 resembling a tree in properties, growth, structure, or appearance • arborescence noun
arboretum
noun (plural -retums or arboreta) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, plantation of trees, from arbor Date: 1838 a place where trees, shrubs, and herbaceous plants are ...
arbori-
combining form see arbor-
arboricultural
adjective see arboriculture
arboriculture
noun Etymology: arbori- + -culture (as in agriculture) Date: 1828 the cultivation of trees and shrubs especially for ornamental purposes • arboricultural adjective
arborio rice
noun Usage: often capitalized A Etymology: Arborio, village in Piedmont region of Italy Date: 1976 a short-grain rice that has a creamy texture when cooked and is typically ...
arborist
noun Date: 1578 a specialist in the care and maintenance of trees
arborization
noun Date: 1794 formation of or into an arborescent figure arrangement; also such a figure or arrangement (as a dendritic process of a nerve cell)
arborize
intransitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1847 to branch freely and repeatedly
arborvitae
noun Etymology: New Latin arbor vitae, literally, tree of life Date: 1646 any of various evergreen trees and shrubs (especially genus Thuja) of the cypress family that ...
arbour
chiefly British variant of arbor
arbovirus
noun Etymology: arthropod-borne virus Date: 1957 any of various RNA viruses (as the causative agents of encephalitis, yellow fever, and dengue) transmitted chiefly by ...
Arbuckle Mountains
geographical name hilly region S central Oklahoma
Arbus
biographical name Diane 1923- née Nemerov American photographer
Arbuthnot
biographical name John 1667-1735 Scottish physician & author
arbutus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, strawberry tree Date: 1548 1. any of a genus (Arbutus) of shrubs and trees of the heath family with white or pink flowers and red or ...
ARC
abbreviation 1. AIDS-related complex 2. American Red Cross
arc
I. noun Etymology: Middle English ark, from Anglo-French arc bow, from Latin arcus bow, arch, arc — more at arrow Date: 14th century 1. the apparent path described above ...
arc lamp
noun Date: 1879 an electric lamp that produces light by an arc made when a current passes between two incandescent electrodes surrounded by gas — called also arc light
arc light
noun see arc lamp
arc minute
noun Date: 1971 minute 1b
arc second
noun Date: 1968 second III,1a
arcade
noun Etymology: French, from Italian arcata, from arco arch, from Latin arcus Date: 1725 1. a long arched building or gallery 2. an arched covered passageway or avenue (as ...
arcade game
noun Date: 1978 video game
arcaded
adjective Date: 1805 having, formed in, or decorated with arches or arcades
Arcades ambo
foreign term Etymology: Latin both Arcadians ; two persons of like occupations or tastes; also two rascals
arcadia
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Arcadia, region of ancient Greece frequently chosen as background for pastoral poetry Date: circa 1890 a region or scene of simple ...
Arcadia
geographical name 1. city SW California ENE of Los Angeles population 53,054 2. mountainous region S Greece in central Peloponnese
arcadian
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1565 1. a. of or relating to Arcadia or the Arcadians b. of or relating to Arcadian 2. idyllically pastoral; especially ...
Arcadian
noun Date: 1573 1. often not capitalized a person who lives a simple quiet life 2. a native or inhabitant of Arcadia 3. the dialect of ancient Greek used in Arcadia
arcading
noun Date: 1849 a series of arches or arcades used in the construction or decoration especially of a building
Arcady
noun Date: 14th century arcadia
arcane
adjective Etymology: Latin arcanus Date: 1547 known or knowable only to the initiate ; secret ; broadly mysterious, obscure
arcanum
noun (plural arcana) Etymology: Latin, from neuter of arcanus secret, from arca chest — more at ark Date: 15th century 1. mysterious or specialized knowledge, language, or ...
arccosine
noun Date: circa 1884 the inverse function of the cosine
Arch
abbreviation Archbishop
arch
I. noun Etymology: Middle English arche, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *arca, from Latin arcus — more at arrow Date: 14th century 1. a typically curved structural ...
arch-
I. prefix Etymology: Middle English arche-, arch-, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English arce-, from Late Latin arch- & Latin archi-; Anglo-French arch-, from Late Latin ...
archae-
or archaeo-; also archeo- combining form Etymology: Greek archaio-, from archaios ancient, from archē beginning ancient ; primitive
archaea
noun plural Etymology: New Latin, from Greek archaios Date: 1990 microorganisms of a domain (Archaea) including especially methane-producing forms, some red halophilic forms, ...
archaeal
adjective see archaea
Archaean
adjective see Archean
archaean
adjective or noun see archaea
archaebacterium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1977 any of the microorganisms comprising the archaea
archaeo-
combining form see archae-
archaeoastronomy
noun Date: 1971 the study of the astronomy of ancient cultures
archaeological
adjective see archaeology
archaeologically
adverb see archaeology
archaeologist
noun see archaeology
archaeology
or archeology noun Etymology: French archéologie, from Late Latin archaeologia antiquarian lore, from Greek archaiologia, from archaio- + -logia -logy Date: 1837 1. the ...
archaeopteryx
noun Etymology: New Latin, from archae- + Greek pteryx wing; akin to Greek pteron wing — more at feather Date: 1859 a primitive crow-sized bird (genus Archaeopteryx) of the ...
Archaeozoic
adjective see Archeozoic
archaic
adjective Etymology: French or Greek; French archaïque, from Greek archaïkos, from archaios Date: 1832 1. having the characteristics of the language of the past and ...
archaic smile
noun Date: circa 1902 an expression that resembles a smile and is characteristic of early Greek sculpture
archaically
adverb see archaic
archaism
noun Etymology: New Latin archaïsmus, from Greek archaïsmos, from archaios Date: 1643 1. the use of archaic diction or style 2. an instance of archaic usage 3. something ...
archaist
noun see archaism
archaistic
adjective see archaism
archaize
verb see archaism
archangel
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French archangle, from Late Latin archangelus, from Greek archangelos, from archi- + angelos angel Date: ...
Archangel
geographical name see Arkhangel'sk
Archangel, Gulf of
geographical name — see Dvina Gulf
archangelic
adjective see archangel
archbishop
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English arcebiscop, from Late Latin archiepiscopus, from Late Greek archiepiskopos, from archi- + episkopos bishop — more at bishop ...
archbishopric
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the see or province over which an archbishop exercises authority 2. the jurisdiction or office of an archbishop
archconservative
noun Date: 1934 an extreme conservative • archconservative adjective
archdeacon
noun Etymology: Middle English archedeken, from Old English arcediacon, from Late Latin archidiaconus, from Late Greek archidiakonos, from Greek archi- + diakonos deacon Date: ...
archdeaconry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1529 the district or residence of an archdeacon
archdiocesan
adjective see archdiocese
archdiocese
noun (plural archdioceses) Date: 1844 the diocese of an archbishop • archdiocesan adjective
archducal
adjective Etymology: French archiducal, from archiduc Date: 1665 of or relating to an archduke or archduchy
archduchess
noun Etymology: French archiduchesse, feminine of archiduc archduke, from Middle French archeduc Date: 1555 1. the wife or widow of an archduke 2. a woman having in her own ...
archduchy
noun Etymology: French archiduché, from Middle French archeduché, from arche- arch- + duché duchy Date: 1530 the territory of an archduke or archduchess
archduke
noun Etymology: Middle French archeduc, from arche- arch- + duc duke Date: 15th century 1. a sovereign prince 2. a prince of the imperial family of Austria • archdukedom ...
archdukedom
noun see archduke
Archean
or Archaean adjective Etymology: Greek archaios Date: 1872 1. of, relating to, or being the earliest eon of geological history or the corresponding system of rocks — see ...
archegonial
adjective see archegonium
archegonium
noun (plural archegonia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek archegonos originator, from archein to begin + gonos procreation; akin to Greek gignesthai to be born — more at arch-, ...
archenemy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1550 a principal enemy
archenteron
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1877 the cavity of a gastrula forming a primitive gut
archeo-
combining form see archae-
archeol
abbreviation archeology
archeology
noun see archaeology
Archeozoic
also Archaeozoic adjective Date: 1872 Archean 1 • Archeozoic noun
archer
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin arcarius, alteration of arcuarius, from arcuarius of a bow, from Latin arcus bow — more at arrow Date: 14th ...
Archer
biographical name William 1856-1924 Scottish critic & dramatist
archerfish
noun Date: circa 1889 any of several small East Indian bony fishes (genus Toxotes and especially T. ejaculator of the family Toxotidae) that catch insects by stunning them ...
archery
noun Date: 15th century 1. the art, practice, or skill of shooting with bow and arrow 2. an archer's weapons 3. a body of archers
Arches National Park
geographical name reservation E Utah including wind-eroded natural arch formations
archetypal
adjective see archetype
archetypally
adverb see archetype
archetype
noun Etymology: Latin archetypum, from Greek archetypon, from neuter of archetypos archetypal, from archein + typos type Date: 1545 1. the original pattern or model of which ...
archetypical
adjective see archetype
archetypically
adverb see archetype
archfiend
noun Date: 1667 a chief fiend; especially Satan
archfoe
noun Date: 1595 a principal foe ; archenemy
archi-
or arch- prefix Etymology: French or Latin; French, from Latin, from Greek — more at arch- primitive ; original ; primary
archidiaconal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin archidiaconus archdeacon Date: 15th century of or relating to an archdeacon
archiepiscopal
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin archiepiscopalis, from Late Latin archiepiscopus archbishop — more at archbishop Date: circa 1600 of or relating to an archbishop • ...
archiepiscopally
adverb see archiepiscopal
archiepiscopate
noun Date: 1792 archbishopric
archil
noun Etymology: Middle English orchell Date: 15th century 1. a violet dye obtained from lichens (genera Roccella and Lecanora) 2. a lichen that yields archil
archimandrite
noun Etymology: Late Latin archimandrites, from Late Greek archimandritēs, from Greek archi- + Late Greek mandra monastery, from Greek, fold, pen Date: 1591 a dignitary in an ...
Archimedean
adjective see Archimedes
Archimedes
biographical name circa 287-212 B.C. Greek mathematician & inventor • Archimedean adjective
Archimedes' screw
noun Etymology: Archimedes Date: 1728 a device made of a tube bent spirally around an axis or of a broad-threaded screw encased by a cylinder and used to raise water
archipelagic
adjective Date: 1841 of, relating to, or located in an archipelago
archipelago
noun (plural -goes or -gos) Etymology: Archipelago Aegean Sea, from Italian Arcipelago, literally, chief sea, from arci- (from Latin archi-) + Greek pelagos sea — more at ...
Archipenko
biographical name Aleksandr Porfiryevich 1887-1964 American (Ukrainian-born) sculptor
Archipiélago de Colón
geographical name see Galápagos Islands
architect
noun Etymology: Middle French architecte, from Latin architectus, from Greek architektōn master builder, from archi- + tektōn builder, carpenter — more at technical Date: ...
architectonic
adjective Etymology: Latin architectonicus, from Greek architektonikos, from architektōn Date: 1645 1. of, relating to, or according with the principles of architecture ; ...
architectonically
adverb see architectonic
architectonics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1660 1. (also architectonic) the science of architecture 2. a. (also architectonic) the unifying structural ...
architectural
adjective Date: 1786 1. of or relating to architecture ; conforming to the rules of architecture 2. having or conceived of as having a single unified overall design, form, or ...
architecturally
adverb see architectural
architecture
noun Date: 1555 1. the art or science of building; specifically the art or practice of designing and building structures and especially habitable ones 2. a. formation or ...
architrave
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Old Italian, from archi- + trave beam, from Latin trab-, trabs — more at thorp Date: 1563 1. the lowest division of an entablature ...
archival
adjective Date: circa 1828 of, relating to, contained in, suitable for, or constituting archives • archivally adverb
archivally
adverb see archival
archive
I. noun Etymology: French & Latin; French, from Latin archivum, from Greek archeion government house (in plural, official documents), from archē rule, government — more at ...
archivist
noun Date: 1753 a person in charge of archives
archivolt
noun Etymology: Italian archivolto, from Medieval Latin archivoltum Date: 1723 an ornamental molding around an arch corresponding to an architrave
archly
adverb Date: 1662 1. in an arch manner 2. extremely
archness
noun see arch III
archon
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek archōn, from present participle of archein Date: 1579 1. a chief magistrate in ancient Athens 2. a presiding officer
archosaur
noun Etymology: New Latin Archosauria, from Greek archōn + sauros lizard Date: 1933 any of a subclass (Archosauria) of reptiles comprising the dinosaurs, pterosaurs, and ...
archosaurian
adjective or noun see archosaur
archpriest
noun Date: 14th century a priest of preeminent rank
archrival
noun Date: 1941 a principal rival
archway
noun Date: 1751 a way or passage under an arch; also an arch over a passage
arcmin
abbreviation arc minute
arco
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, from arco bow, from Latin arcus — more at arrow Date: 1806 with the bow — usually used as a direction in music for players of ...
Arcos de la Frontera
geographical name commune SW Spain NE of Cádiz population 26,946
Arcot
geographical name city SE India in N Tamil Nadu WSW of Madras; once capital of the nabobs of Carnatic population 45,193
arcsec
abbreviation arc second
arcsine
noun Date: circa 1889 the inverse function of the sine
arctangent
noun Date: circa 1889 the inverse function of the tangent
Arctic
geographical name the Arctic Ocean and lands in it and adjacent to it
arctic
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English artik, from Latin arcticus, from Greek arktikos, from arktos bear, Ursa Major, north; akin to Latin ursus bear, Sanskrit ṛkṣa Date: ...
Arctic Archipelago
geographical name archipelago Canada in Nunavut & Northwest Territories in Arctic Ocean
arctic char
noun Date: circa 1902 a Holarctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) of arctic waters occurring in freshwater or anadromous populations
arctic circle
noun Usage: often capitalized A&C Date: 1622 the parallel of latitude that is approximately 66 1/2 degrees north of the equator and that circumscribes the northern frigid zone
arctic fox
noun Date: 1772 a small migratory Holarctic fox (Alopex lagopus) especially of coastal arctic and alpine tundra
arctic hare
noun Date: 1842 a gregarious hare (Lepus arcticus) of the tundra of Greenland and northern Canada that turns white in winter and is a major food source for arctic predators ...
Arctic Ocean
geographical name ocean N of the Arctic Circle
Arctic Red
geographical name river 310 miles (499 kilometers) Canada in W Northwest Territories flowing N into the Mackenzie
arctic tern
noun Date: 1844 a Holarctic tern (Sterna paradisaea) that breeds in arctic regions and migrates to southern Africa and South America
arctically
adverb see arctic I
Arcturus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Arktouros, literally, bear watcher a giant fixed star of the first magnitude in Boötes
arcuate
adjective Etymology: Latin arcuatus, past participle of arcuare to bend like a bow, from arcus bow Date: 1626 curved like a bow • arcuately adverb
arcuately
adverb see arcuate
Arcueil
geographical name commune N France S of Paris population 20,303
Ardabil
or Ardebil geographical name city NW Iran in E Azerbaijan region population 281,973
Ardebil
geographical name see Ardabil
Arden
geographical name district central England in SW Warwickshire W of Stratford-upon-Avon; site of former Forest of Arden
ardency
noun Date: 1549 the quality or state of being ardent
Ardennes
geographical name wooded plateau region in NE France, W Luxembourg, & SE Belgium E of the Meuse
ardent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin ardent-, ardens, present participle of ardēre to burn, from ardor Date: 14th century 1. characterized by ...
ardent spirits
noun plural Date: 1684 strong distilled liquors
ardently
adverb see ardent
Ardmore
geographical name city S Oklahoma population 23,711
ardor
noun Etymology: Middle English ardour, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin ardor burning, heat, ardor, from aridus dry — more at arid Date: 14th century 1. ...
ardour
chiefly British variant of ardor
Ards
geographical name district E Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 143 square miles (372 square kilometers), population 64,026
arduous
adjective Etymology: Latin arduus high, steep, difficult; akin to Old Irish ard high Date: 1538 1. a. hard to accomplish or achieve ; difficult b. marked by great ...
arduously
adverb see arduous
arduousness
noun see arduous
are
I. Etymology: Middle English, from Old English earun; akin to Old Norse eru, erum are, Old English is is present second singular or present plural of be II. noun Etymology: ...
area
noun Etymology: Latin, open space, threshing floor; perhaps akin to Latin arēre to be dry — more at arid Date: 1538 1. a level piece of ground 2. the surface included ...
area code
noun Date: 1961 a usually 3-digit number that identifies each telephone service area in a country (as the United States or Canada)
areal
adjective see area
areally
adverb see area
areaway
noun Date: 1867 a sunken space affording access, air, and light to a basement
areca
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Portuguese, from Malayalam aṭaykka Date: 1510 any of several tropical Asian palms (Areca or related genera); especially betel palm
Arecibo
geographical name city & port N Puerto Rico population 100,131
arecoline
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary areca + 1-ol + 2-ine Date: 1894 a toxic parasympathomimetic alkaloid C8H13NO2 that is used as a veterinary anthelmintic ...
Arelas
geographical name see Arles 2
Arelate
geographical name see Arles 2
Aremorica
geographical name see Armorica 1
aren't
Date: 1675 1. are not
arena
noun Etymology: Latin harena, arena sand, sandy place Date: 1600 1. an area in a Roman amphitheater for gladiatorial combats 2. a. an enclosed area used for public ...
arena football
noun Date: 1986 a game resembling American football that is played on a shorter indoor field between two teams of eight players each
arena theater
noun Date: 1943 theater-in-the-round
Arena, Point
geographical name promontory N California on the Pacific about midway between Cape Mendocino & San Francisco Bay
arenaceous
adjective Etymology: Latin arenaceus, from arena Date: 1646 1. resembling, made of, or containing sand or sandy particles 2. growing in sandy places
arenavirus
noun Etymology: New Latin, ultimately from Latin arena sand + New Latin virus; from the fine granules seen in cross sections of the virion Date: 1971 any of a family ...
arene
noun Etymology: aromatic + -ene Date: 1956 an aromatic hydrocarbon (as benzene or naphthalene)
arenicolous
adjective Etymology: Latin arena + English -i- + -colous Date: circa 1859 living, burrowing, or growing in sand
areola
noun (plural areolae or -las) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, small open space, diminutive of area Date: 1664 a small area between things or about something; especially a ...
areolar
adjective see areola
areolate
adjective see areola
areole
noun Date: circa 1934 a round or elongated often raised or depressed area on a cactus which is equivalent to a bud and from which spines, flowers, stems, or roots grow
Areopagite
noun Date: 14th century a member of the Areopagus • Areopagitic adjective
Areopagitic
adjective see Areopagite
Areopagus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Areios pagos, from Areios pagos (literally, hill of Ares), a hill in Athens where the tribunal met Date: 1586 the supreme tribunal of ...
arepa
noun Etymology: American Spanish, probably from Cumaná (Cariban language of the Venezuela coast) erepa corn, cornmeal cake, or from a cognate Cariban form Date: 1925 a ...
Arequipa
geographical name city S Peru at foot of El Misti population 621,700
Ares
noun Etymology: Greek Arabicēs Date: 1681 the Greek god of war — compare Mars
arête
noun Etymology: French, literally, fish bone, from Late Latin arista, from Latin, beard of grain Date: 1838 a sharp-crested ridge in rugged mountains
Arethusa
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Arethousa Date: 1513 a wood nymph who is changed into a spring while fleeing the advances of the river-god Alpheus
Aretino
biographical name Pietro 1492-1556 Italian satirist
Arezzo
geographical name commune central Italy in Tuscany population 91,527
arg
abbreviation 1. argent 2. argument
Arg
abbreviation Argentina
argil
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin argilla, from Greek argillos; akin to Greek argos white Date: 14th century clay; especially potter's clay
argillaceous
adjective Date: circa 1731 of, relating to, or containing clay or clay minerals ; clayey
argillite
noun Date: 1795 a compact argillaceous rock cemented by silica and having no slaty cleavage
arginase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 a crystalline enzyme that converts naturally occurring arginine into ornithine and urea
arginine
noun Etymology: German Arginin Date: 1886 a crystalline basic amino acid C6H14N4O2 derived from guanidine
Arginusae
geographical name group of small islands in the Aegean SE of Lesbos
Argive
adjective Etymology: Latin Argivus, from Greek Argeios, literally, of Argos, from Argos city-state of ancient Greece Date: 1598 of or relating to the Greeks or Greece and ...
argle-bargle
noun Etymology: reduplication of Scots & English argle, alteration of argue Date: 1872 chiefly British argy-bargy
Argo
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Argus), from Greek Argō Date: 1565 a large constellation in the southern hemisphere lying principally between Canis Major and the Southern ...
argol
noun Etymology: Middle English argoile, from Anglo-French argoil Date: 14th century crude tartar deposited in wine casks during aging
Argolic
adjective see Argolis
Argolis
geographical name district & ancient country S Greece in E Peloponnese comprising a plain around Argos & area between Gulf of Argolis & Saronic Gulf • Argolic adjective
Argolis, Gulf of
geographical name inlet of the Aegean S Greece on E coast of Peloponnese
argon
noun Etymology: Greek, neuter of argos idle, lazy, from a- + ergon work; from its relative inertness — more at work Date: 1894 a colorless odorless inert gaseous element ...
argonaut
noun Etymology: Latin Argonautes, from Greek Argonautēs, from Argō, ship in which the Argonauts sailed + nautēs sailor — more at nautical Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
Argonne
geographical name wooded plateau NE France S of the Ardennes near Belgian border between the Meuse & the Aisne
Argos
geographical name town Greece in E Peloponnese on Argive plain at head of Gulf of Argolis; once a Greek city-state
argosy
noun (plural -sies) Etymology: modification of Italian ragusea Ragusan vessel, from Ragusa, Dalmatia (now Dubrovnik, Croatia) Date: 1581 1. a large ship; especially a large ...
argot
noun Etymology: French Date: 1842 an often more or less secret vocabulary and idiom peculiar to a particular group
Argovie
geographical name — see Aargau
arguable
adjective Date: circa 1611 1. open to argument, dispute, or question 2. that can be plausibly or convincingly argued
arguably
adverb Date: 1890 as may be argued or shown by argument
argue
verb (argued; arguing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French arguer to reprove, argue & Latin arguere to demonstrate, prove; Anglo-French arguer, from Latin argutare to ...
Arguello, Point
geographical name cape SW California WNW of Santa Barbara
arguer
noun see argue
argufier
noun see argufy

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