Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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argufy
verb (-fied; -fying) Date: 1698 transitive verb dispute, debate intransitive verb wrangle • argufier noun
argument
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin argumentum, from arguere Date: 14th century 1. obsolete an outward sign ; indication 2. a. a reason given in ...
argumentation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of forming reasons and of drawing conclusions and applying them to a case in discussion 2. debate, discussion
argumentative
also argumentive adjective Date: 15th century 1. characterized by argument ; controversial 2. given to argument ; disputatious • argumentatively adverb
argumentatively
adverb see argumentative
argumentive
adjective see argumentative
argumentum
noun (plural argumenta) Etymology: Latin Date: 1550 argument 3b
argumentum ad baculum
foreign term Etymology: Latin argument of the staff ; appeal to force
Argun
geographical name river 450 miles (724 kilometers) NE Asia forming boundary between Inner Mongolia (China) & Russia & uniting with the Shilka to form the Amur
Argus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Argos Date: 14th century 1. a hundred-eyed monster of Greek mythology 2. a watchful guardian
Argus-eyed
adjective Date: 1603 vigilantly observant
argy-bargy
noun Etymology: reduplication of Scots & English dialect argy, alteration of argue Date: 1887 chiefly British a lively discussion ; argument, dispute
argyle
also argyll noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Argyle, Argyll, branch of the Scottish clan of Campbell, from whose tartan the design was adapted Date: 1899 a geometric ...
Argyll
I. biographical name 9th Duke of — see John D. S. Campbell II. geographical name or Argyllshire former county W Scotland capital Lochgilphead
argyll
noun see argyle
Argyll and Bute
geographical name administrative area W Scotland area 2676 square miles (6930 square kilometers)
Argyllshire
geographical name see Argyll II
arhat
noun Etymology: Sanskrit, from present participle of arhati he deserves; akin to Greek alphein to gain Date: 1870 a Buddhist who has reached the stage of enlightenment • ...
arhatship
noun see arhat
Århus
or Aarhus geographical name city & port Denmark in E Jutland on the Kattegat population 259,493
aria
noun Etymology: Italian, literally, atmospheric air, modification of Latin aer Date: 1723 1. air, melody, tune; specifically an accompanied elaborate melody sung (as in an ...
Aria
geographical name 1. an E province of ancient Persian Empire; district now in NW Afghanistan & E Iran 2. — see Herat
Ariadne
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Ariadnē Date: 14th century a daughter of Minos who helps Theseus escape from the labyrinth
Arian
I. adjective Date: 14th century of or relating to Arius or his doctrines especially that the Son is not of the same substance as the Father but was created as an agent for ...
Arianism
noun see Arian I
Arias Sánchez
biographical name Oscar 1941- president of Costa Rica (1986-90)
ariboflavinosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1939 a deficiency disease due to inadequate intake of riboflavin and characterized by sores on the mouth
Arica
geographical name city & port N Chile population 177,330 — see Tacna
arid
adjective Etymology: French or Latin; French aride, from Latin aridus, from arēre to be dry; akin to Sanskrit āsa ash, Old English asce Date: 1652 1. excessively dry; ...
aridity
noun see arid
aridness
noun see arid
Ariel
noun Date: circa 1612 a prankish spirit in Shakespeare's The Tempest
Aries
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Arietis), literally, ram; perhaps akin to Greek eriphos kid, Old Irish heirp she-goat Date: before 12th century 1. a. the first sign of the ...
arietta
noun Etymology: Italian, diminutive of aria Date: circa 1724 a short aria
aright
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ariht, from 1a- + riht right Date: before 12th century right, correctly
Ariha
geographical name — see Jericho 1
Arikara
noun (plural Arikara) Etymology: probably from a Pawnee name for an Arikara band Date: 1811 1. a member of an American Indian people of the Missouri River valley in North ...
aril
noun Etymology: probably from New Latin arillus, from Medieval Latin, raisin, grape seed Date: 1794 an exterior covering or appendage of some seeds (as of the yew) that ...
arillate
adjective see aril
Arimathea
geographical name town in ancient Palestine; location not certainly identified
Ariminum
geographical name — see Rimini
arioso
noun (plural -sos; also ariosi) Etymology: Italian, from aria Date: circa 1724 a musical passage or composition having a mixture of free recitative and metrical song
Ariosto
biographical name Ludovico 1474-1533 Italian poet
Aripuanã
geographical name river 400 miles (644 kilometers) W central Brazil rising in Mato Grosso state & flowing N into the Madeira
arise
intransitive verb (arose; arisen; arising) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ārīsan, from ā-, perfective prefix + rīsan to rise — more at abide Date: before 12th ...
arista
noun (plural aristae or -tas) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, beard of grain Date: 1691 a bristlelike structure or appendage • aristate adjective
Aristarchus
biographical name circa 217-145 B.C. Greek grammarian
Aristarchus of Samos
biographical name circa 310-230 B.C. Greek astronomer
aristate
adjective see arista
Aristeides
biographical name see Aristides
Aristide
biographical name Jean-Bertrand 1953- president of Haiti (1991; 1994-96; 2001- )
Aristides
or Aristeides biographical name circa 530-circa 468 B.C. the Just Athenian statesman
Aristippus
biographical name circa 435-366 B.C. Greek philosopher
aristo
noun (plural -tos) Etymology: by shortening Date: 1864 aristocrat
aristocracy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French aristocratie, from Late Latin aristocratia, from Greek aristokratia, from aristos best + -kratia -cracy ...
aristocrat
noun Date: 1789 1. a member of an aristocracy; especially noble 2. a. one who has the bearing and viewpoint typical of the aristocracy b. one who favors aristocracy ...
aristocratic
adjective Etymology: Middle French aristocratique, from Medieval Latin aristocraticus, from Greek aristokratikos, from aristokratia Date: 1602 1. belonging to, having the ...
aristocratically
adverb see aristocratic
Aristophanes
biographical name circa 450-circa 388 B.C. Athenian dramatist • Aristophanic adjective
Aristophanes of Byzantium
biographical name circa 257-180 B.C. Greek scholar
Aristophanic
adjective see Aristophanes
Aristotelean
adjective see Aristotelian
Aristotelian
also Aristotelean adjective Etymology: Latin Aristoteles Aristotle, from Greek Aristotelēs Date: 1607 of or relating to the Greek philosopher Aristotle or his philosophy • ...
Aristotelianism
noun see Aristotelian
Aristotle
biographical name 384-322 B.C. Greek philosopher
arith
abbreviation arithmetic; arithmetical
arithmetic
noun Etymology: Middle English arsmetrik, from Anglo-French arismatike, from Latin arithmetica, from Greek arithmētikē, from feminine of arithmētikos arithmetical, from ...
arithmetic mean
noun Date: 1767 a value that is computed by dividing the sum of a set of terms by the number of terms
arithmetic progression
noun Date: 1594 a progression (as 3, 5, 7, 9) in which the difference between any term and its predecessor is constant
arithmetical
adjective see arithmetic
arithmetically
adverb see arithmetic
arithmetician
noun see arithmetic
Arius
I. biographical name circa A.D. 250-336 Greek theologian II. geographical name — see harīrud
Ariz
abbreviation Arizona
Arizona
geographical name state SW United States capital Phoenix area 113,909 square miles (296,163 square kilometers), population 5,130,632 • Arizonan or Arizonian adjective or ...
Arizonan
adjective or noun see Arizona
Arizonian
adjective or noun see Arizona
ark
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English arc, from Latin arca chest; akin to Latin arcēre to hold off, defend, Greek arkein, Hittite ḫark- to have, hold Date: before ...
Ark
abbreviation Arkansas
Arkansan
adjective or noun see Arkansas
Arkansas
geographical name 1. river 1450 miles (2334 kilometers) SW central United States rising in central Colorado & flowing E & SE through S Kansas, NE Oklahoma, & Arkansas into the ...
Arkhangel'sk
or Archangel geographical name city & port Russia in Europe on the Northern Dvina population 414,000
arkose
noun Etymology: French Date: 1839 a sandstone characterized by feldspar fragments that is derived from granite or gneiss which has disintegrated rapidly • arkosic adjective
arkosic
adjective see arkose
Arkwright
biographical name Sir Richard 1732-1792 English inventor
Arlberg
geographical name Alpine valley, pass, & tunnel W Austria in the Tirol
Arlen
I. biographical name Harold 1905-1986 American composer II. biographical name Michael 1895-1956 originally Dikran Kouyoumdjian British (Bulgarian-born) novelist
Arles
geographical name 1. medieval kingdom E & SE France; also called Kingdom of Burgundy 2. (or ancient Arelas) (or Arelate) city SE France on the Rhône population 52,593 • ...
Arlesian
noun see Arles
Arlington
geographical name 1. town E Massachusetts NW of Boston population 42,389 2. city N Texas E of Fort Worth population 332,969 3. unincorporated population center N Virginia ...
Arlington Heights
geographical name village NE Illinois NW of Chicago population 76,031
Arlon
geographical name commune SE Belgium capital of Luxembourg province population 23,422
Arm
abbreviation Armenian
ARM
abbreviation adjustable rate mortgage
arm
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English earm; akin to Latin armus shoulder, Sanskrit īrma arm Date: before 12th century 1. a human upper limb; especially the ...
arm in arm
phrasal with arms linked together
arm wrestling
noun Date: 1973 a form of wrestling in which two opponents sit face to face gripping usually their right hands, set corresponding elbows firmly on a surface (as a tabletop), ...
arm's length
noun Date: 1707 1. a distance discouraging personal contact or familiarity
arm's-length
adjective see arm's length
arm-twist
verb see arm-twisting
arm-twisting
noun Date: 1948 the use of direct personal pressure in order to achieve a desired end • arm-twist verb
armada
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Medieval Latin armata army, fleet, from Latin, feminine of armatus, past participle of armare to arm, from arma Date: 1533 1. a fleet of ...
armadillo
noun (plural -los) Etymology: Spanish, from diminutive of armado armed one, from Latin armatus Date: 1577 any of a family (Dasypodidae) of burrowing edentate mammals found ...
Armageddon
noun Etymology: Greek Armageddōn, Harmagedōn, scene of the battle foretold in Revelation 16:14-16 Date: 14th century 1. a. the site or time of a final and conclusive ...
Armagh
geographical name 1. traditional county SE Northern Ireland 2. district S Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 260 square miles (676 square kilometers), population 51,331 ...
Armagnac
I. noun Etymology: French, from Armagnac, region in southwest France Date: 1850 a brandy produced in the Gers department of France II. geographical name district SW France ...
armament
noun Etymology: French armement, from Latin armamenta (plural) utensils, military or naval equipment, from armare Date: 1699 1. a military or naval force 2. a. the ...
armamentarium
noun (plural armamentaria) Etymology: Latin, armory, from armamenta Date: circa 1860 a collection of resources available or utilized for an undertaking or field of activity; ...
armature
noun Etymology: Middle English, armor, from Latin armatura armor, equipment, from armatus Date: 15th century 1. an organ or structure (as teeth or thorns) for offense or ...
armband
noun Date: 1797 a band worn around the arm; especially a band worn around the upper part of a sleeve for identification or in mourning
armchair
I. noun Date: 1633 a chair with armrests II. adjective Date: 1858 1. remote from direct dealing with problems ; theoretical rather than practical 2. sharing ...
armed
I. adjective Date: 13th century 1. a. furnished with weapons b. furnished with something that provides security, strength, or efficacy 2. marked by the maintenance ...
armed forces
noun plural Date: 1829 the combined military, naval, and air forces of a nation — called also armed services
armed services
noun plural see armed forces
Armenia
geographical name 1. (or biblical Minni) former kingdom W Asia in mountainous region SE of Black Sea & SW of Caspian Sea; area now divided between Armenia, Turkey, & Iran 2. ...
Armenian
noun Date: 1537 1. a member of a people dwelling chiefly in Armenia and neighboring areas (as Turkey or Azerbaijan) 2. the Indo-European language of the Armenians — see ...
Armentières
geographical name commune N France W of Lille population 26,240
armful
noun (plural armfuls or armsful) Date: 1579 as much as the arm or arms can hold
armhole
noun Date: circa 1775 an opening for the arm in a garment
armiger
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, from Latin, armor-bearer, from armiger bearing arms, from arma arms + gerere to carry Date: 1577 1. squire 2. one entitled to bear heraldic ...
armigeral
adjective see armiger
armigerous
adjective Date: circa 1731 bearing heraldic arms
armillary sphere
noun Etymology: French sphère armillaire, from Medieval Latin armilla, from Latin, bracelet, iron ring, from armus shoulder — more at arm Date: 1664 an old astronomical ...
Armin
biographical name see Arminius I
Arminian
adjective Date: 1618 of or relating to Arminius or his doctrines opposing the absolute predestination of strict Calvinism and maintaining the possibility of salvation for all ...
Arminianism
noun see Arminian
Arminius
I. biographical name or Armin 18 B.C.?-A.D. 19 sometimes Hermann German hero II. biographical name Jacobus 1560-1609 Jacob Harmensen or Hermansz Dutch theologian
armistice
noun Etymology: French or New Latin; French, from New Latin armistitium, from Latin arma + -stitium (as in solstitium solstice) Date: circa 1707 temporary suspension of ...
Armistice Day
noun Etymology: from the armistice terminating World War I on November 11, 1918 Date: 1919 Veterans Day — used before the official adoption of Veterans Day in 1954
armless
adjective see arm I
armlet
noun Date: 1535 1. a band (as of cloth or metal) worn around the upper arm 2. a small arm (as of the sea)
armlike
adjective see arm I
armload
noun Date: 1870 armful
armlock
noun Date: 1905 hammerlock
armoire
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Old French armaire, from Latin armarium, from arma Date: 1571 a usually tall cupboard or wardrobe
armor
noun Etymology: Middle English armure, from Anglo-French, from Latin armatura — more at armature Date: 13th century 1. defensive covering for the body; especially covering ...
armored
adjective Date: 1594 1. a. equipped or protected with armor b. equipped with armored fighting vehicles 2. marked by the use of armor
armored scale
noun Date: circa 1903 any of a family (Diaspididae) of scale insects having a firm covering of wax best developed in the female
armorer
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that makes armor or arms 2. one that repairs, assembles, and tests firearms
armorial
adjective Etymology: armory (heraldry) Date: 1576 of, relating to, or bearing heraldic arms • armorially adverb
armorially
adverb see armorial
Armoric
I. noun see Armorican II. adjective see Armorican
Armorica
geographical name 1. (or Aremorica) ancient region NW France between the Seine & the Loire 2. Brittany
Armorican
or Armoric noun Date: 1606 a native or inhabitant of Armorica; especially Breton • Armorican or Armoric adjective
armorless
adjective see armor
armory
noun (plural armories) Date: 14th century 1. a. a supply of arms for defense or attack b. a collection of available resources 2. a place where arms and military ...
armour
chiefly British variant of armor
Armour
biographical name Philip Danforth 1832-1901 American industrialist
armoury
chiefly British variant of armory
armpit
noun Date: 14th century 1. the hollow beneath the junction of the arm and shoulder 2. the least desirable place ; pit
armrest
noun Date: circa 1889 a support for the arm
arms race
noun Date: 1937 a race between hostile nations to accumulate or develop weapons; broadly an ever escalating race or competition
Armstrong
I. biographical name Louis 1901-1971 Satchmo American jazz musician II. biographical name Neil Alden 1930- American astronaut III. biographical name William George ...
army
noun (plural armies) Etymology: Middle English armee, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin armata — more at armada Date: 14th century 1. a. a large organized body of ...
army ant
noun Date: 1874 any of a subfamily (Dorylinae) of aggressive nomadic tropical ants that prey on insects and spiders
armyworm
noun Date: 1816 any of numerous moths whose larvae travel in multitudes from field to field destroying grass, grain, and other crops; especially the common armyworm ...
Arne
biographical name Thomas Augustine 1710-1778 English composer
Arnhem
geographical name commune E Netherlands capital of Gelderland population 132,928
Arnhem Land
geographical name region N Australia on N coast of Northern Territory
arnica
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1753 any of a genus (Arnica) of composite herbs including some with bright yellow ray flowers
Arno
or ancient Arnus geographical name river 150 miles (241 kilometers) central Italy flowing W from the Apennines through Florence into Ligurian Sea
Arnold
I. biographical name Benedict 1741-1801 American Revolutionary general & traitor II. biographical name Henry Harley 1886-1950 Hap Arnold American general III. biographical ...
Arnoldian
adjective see Arnold III
Arnus
geographical name see Arno
aroid
adjective Etymology: New Latin Arum Date: 1886 of or relating to the arum family • aroid noun
aroint
verb imperative Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1605 archaic begone
aroma
noun Etymology: Middle English aromat spice, from Anglo-French, from Latin aromat-, aroma, from Greek arōmat-, arōma Date: 1796 1. a. a distinctive pervasive and usually ...
aromatase
noun Etymology: aromatic + -ase Date: 1984 an enzyme or complex of enzymes that promotes the conversion of an androgen into estrogen
aromatherapeutic
adjective see aromatherapy
aromatherapist
noun see aromatherapy
aromatherapy
noun Etymology: French aromathérapie, from Latin aroma + French thérapie therapy Date: 1949 massage of the body and especially of the face with a preparation of fragrant ...
aromatic
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or having aroma: a. fragrant b. having a strong smell c. having a distinctive quality 2. of an organic compound ...
aromatically
adverb see aromatic I
aromaticity
noun see aromatic I
aromatization
noun see aromatize
aromatize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 15th century 1. to make aromatic ; flavor 2. to convert into one or more aromatic compounds • aromatization noun
Aroostook
geographical name river 140 miles (225 kilometers) N Maine flowing NE across New Brunswick border & into St. John River
arose
past of arise
Arouet
biographical name François-Marie — see Voltaire
around
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from 1a- + 2round Date: 14th century 1. a. in a circle or in circumference b. in, along, or through a circuit 2. a. on ...
around the bend
phrasal mad, crazy
around the clock
also round the clock phrasal 1. continuously for 24 hours ; day and night without cessation 2. without relaxation and heedless of time
around the corner
phrasal at hand ; imminent
around-the-clock
adjective Date: 1853 being in effect, continuing, or lasting 24 hours a day ; constant
arousal
noun see arouse
arouse
verb (aroused; arousing) Etymology: a- (as in arise) + rouse Date: 1593 transitive verb 1. to awaken from sleep 2. to rouse or stimulate to action or to physiological ...
Arp
biographical name Jean (or Hans) 1887-1966 French artist & poet
Árpád
biographical name died 907 Hungarian national hero
arpeggiate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1953 to play (as a chord or passage) in arpeggio
arpeggio
noun (plural -gios) Etymology: Italian, from arpeggiare to play on the harp, from arpa harp, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German harpha harp Date: circa 1724 1. ...
arpent
noun (plural arpents) Etymology: Middle French Date: 1580 1. any of various old French units of land area; especially one used in French sections of Canada and the United ...
arquebus
variant of harquebus
arr
abbreviation 1. arranged 2. arrival; arrive
arrack
or arak noun Etymology: ultimately from Arabic ‘araq sweet juice, liquor Date: 1521 an Asian alcoholic beverage like rum that is distilled from a fermented mash of malted ...
arraign
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English arreinen, from Anglo-French areisner, arener, from a- (from Latin ad-) + raisner to address, from Vulgar Latin *rationare, from Latin ...
arraignment
noun see arraign
Arran
geographical name island SW Scotland in Firth of Clyde area 165 square miles (429 square kilometers)
arrange
verb (-ranged; -ranging) Etymology: Middle English arangen, from Middle French arenger, from a- + renger to set in ranks, from renc, ranc row — more at rank Date: 1638 ...
arrangement
noun Date: 1690 1. a. the state of being arranged ; order b. the act of arranging 2. something arranged: as a. a preliminary measure ; preparation b. an ...
arranger
noun see arrange
arrant
adjective Etymology: alteration of errant Date: 14th century being notoriously without moderation ; extreme • arrantly adverb
arrantly
adverb see arrant
arras
noun (plural arras) Etymology: Middle English, from Arras, France Date: 15th century 1. a tapestry of Flemish origin used especially for wall hangings and curtains 2. a ...
Arras
geographical name city N France SSW of Lille population 42,715
Arrau
biographical name Claudio 1903-1991 American (Chilean-born) pianist
array
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French arraier, from Vulgar Latin *arredare, from Latin ad- + a base of Germanic origin; akin to Gothic garaiths ...
arrayer
noun see array I
arrear
noun Etymology: Middle English arrere behind, backward, from Anglo-French arere, from Vulgar Latin *ad retro backward, from Latin ad to + retro backward, behind — more at at, ...
arrearage
noun Date: 14th century 1. the condition of being in arrears 2. something that is in arrears; especially something unpaid and overdue
arrectis auribus
foreign term Etymology: Latin with ears pricked up ; attentively
arrest
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English aresten, from Anglo-French arester to stop, arrest, from Vulgar Latin *arrestare, from Latin ad- + restare to remain — more at ...
arrestant
noun Date: 1962 a substance that stimulates an insect to stop locomotion
arrestee
noun Date: 1944 a person who is under arrest
arrester
noun see arrest I
arresting
adjective Date: 1792 catching the attention ; striking, impressive • arrestingly adverb
arrestingly
adverb see arresting
arrestment
noun see arrest I
arrestor
noun see arrest I
Arrhenius
biographical name Svante August 1859-1927 Swedish physicist & chemist
arrhythmia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, lack of rhythm, from arrhythmos unrhythmical, from a- + rhythmos rhythm Date: circa 1860 an alteration in rhythm of the heartbeat either ...
arrhythmic
adjective Etymology: Greek arrhythmos Date: 1853 lacking rhythm or regularity
arrière-ban
noun Etymology: French Date: 1523 a proclamation of a king (as of France) calling his vassals to arms; also the body of vassals summoned
arrière-pensée
noun Etymology: French, from arrière in back + pensée thought Date: 1824 mental reservation
arris
noun (plural arris or arrises) Etymology: probably modification of Middle French areste, literally, fishbone, from Late Latin arista — more at arête Date: 1677 the sharp ...
arrival
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act of arriving 2. the attainment of an end or state 3. one that has recently arrived
arrive
intransitive verb (arrived; arriving) Etymology: Middle English ariven, from Anglo-French ariver, from Vulgar Latin *arripare to come to shore, from Latin ad- + ripa shore — ...
arrivé
noun Etymology: French, from past participle of arriver to arrive, from Old French ariver Date: 1925 one who has risen rapidly to success, power, or fame
arrive at
phrasal to reach by effort or thought
arrivederci
foreign term Etymology: Italian till we meet again ; farewell
arriver
noun see arrive
arriviste
noun Etymology: French, from arriver Date: 1901 one that is a new and uncertain arrival (as in social position or artistic endeavor)
arroba
noun Etymology: Spanish & Portuguese, from Arabic al-rub‘, literally, the quarter Date: 1555 1. an old Spanish unit of weight equal to about 25 pounds 2. an old Portuguese ...
arrogance
noun Date: 14th century an attitude of superiority manifested in an overbearing manner or in presumptuous claims or assumptions
arrogant
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin arrogant-, arrogans, present participle of arrogare Date: 14th century 1. exaggerating or disposed to exaggerate one's own ...
arrogantly
adverb see arrogant
arrogate
transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin arrogatus, past participle of arrogare, from ad- + rogare to ask — more at right Date: 1537 1. a. to claim or seize ...
arrogation
noun see arrogate
arrondissement
noun Etymology: French Date: 1807 1. an administrative district of some large French cities 2. the largest division of a French department
arrow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English arwe, from Old English; akin to Gothic arhwazna arrow, Latin arcus bow, arch, arc Date: before 12th century 1. a missile shot from a bow and ...
arrowhead
noun Date: 14th century 1. a wedge-shaped piercing tip usually fixed to an arrow 2. something resembling an arrowhead 3. any of a genus (Sagittaria) of marsh or aquatic ...
arrowroot
noun Date: 1696 1. a. any of a genus (Maranta of the family Marantaceae, the arrowroot family) of tropical American plants with tuberous roots; especially one (M. ...
arrowwood
noun Date: 1709 any of several common viburnums (especially Viburnum dentatum) of eastern North America
arrowworm
noun Date: circa 1889 any of a phylum (Chaetognatha) of small planktonic wormlike marine organisms having curved bristles on either side of the head for seizing prey
arrowy
adjective Date: 1616 1. resembling or suggesting an arrow ; especially swiftly moving 2. consisting of arrows
arroyo
noun (plural -royos) Etymology: Spanish Date: 1843 1. a watercourse (as a creek) in an arid region 2. a water-carved gully or channel
arroz con pollo
noun Etymology: Spanish, literally, rice with chicken Date: 1938 a dish of chicken cooked with rice and usually flavored with saffron
ARRT
abbreviation American Registry of Radiologic Technologists
ars est celare artem
foreign term Etymology: Latin it is (true) art to conceal art
ars longa, vita brevis
foreign term Etymology: Latin art is long, life is short ; human life span limits all that might be accomplished
Arsanias
geographical name — see Murat
arse
variant of ass
arsenal
noun Etymology: Italian arsenale, ultimately from Arabic dār ṣinā‘a house of manufacture Date: 1555 1. a. an establishment for the manufacture or storage of arms and ...
arsenate
noun Date: 1800 a salt or ester of an arsenic acid
arsenic
I. noun Etymology: Middle English arsenik orpiment, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin arsenicum, from Greek arsenikon, arrhenikon, from Syriac zarnīg, of ...
arsenic trioxide
noun see arsenic I
arsenical
adjective Date: 1605 of, relating to, containing, or caused by arsenic • arsenical noun
arsenide
noun Date: 1854 a binary compound of arsenic with a more electropositive element
arsenious
adjective Date: 1810 of, relating to, or containing arsenic especially when trivalent
arsenite
noun Date: 1800 a salt or ester of an arsenious acid
arsenopyrite
noun Date: 1868 a silver-white mineral consisting of a combined sulfide and arsenide of iron that occurs in prismatic orthorhombic crystals or in masses or grains and that is ...
arsine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from arsenic Date: 1869 a colorless flammable extremely poisonous gas AsH3 with an odor like garlic; also a derivative of ...
arsis
noun (plural arses) Etymology: Late Latin & Greek; Late Latin, raising of the voice, accented part of foot, from Greek, upbeat, less important part of foot, literally, act of ...
arson
noun Etymology: Anglo-French arsoun, from ars, past participle of arder, ardre to burn, from Latin ardēre — more at ardor Date: circa 1680 the willful or malicious burning ...
arsonist
noun see arson

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