Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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arsonous
adjective see arson
Arsonval, d'
biographical name (Jacques) Arsène 1851-1940 French biophysicist
arsphenamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary arsenic + phenamine Date: 1917 a light-yellow toxic hygroscopic powder C12Cl2H14As2N2O2•2H2O formerly used in the ...
art
I. Etymology: Middle English, from Old English eart; akin to Old Norse est, ert (thou) art, Old English is is archaic present second singular of be II. noun Etymology: Middle ...
art deco
noun Usage: often capitalized A&D Etymology: French Art Déco, from Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes, an exposition of modern decorative ...
art form
noun Date: 1868 1. a form or medium of expression recognized as fine art 2. a. an unconventional form or medium in which impulses regarded as artistic may be expressed ...
art glass
noun Date: 1886 articles of glass designed primarily for decorative purposes; especially novelty glassware
art historical
adjective Date: 1933 of or relating to the history of art • art historically adverb
art historically
adverb see art historical
art house
noun Date: 1951 art theater
art moderne
noun Usage: often capitalized A&M Etymology: French — more at art deco Date: 1931 art deco
art nouveau
noun Usage: often capitalized A&N Etymology: French, literally, new art Date: 1908 a design style of late 19th century origin characterized especially by sinuous lines and ...
art song
noun Date: 1890 a usually through-composed song for solo voice and accompaniment — compare folk song
art theater
noun Date: 1923 a theater that specializes in the presentation of art films
art-rock
noun Date: 1968 rock music that incorporates elements of traditional or classical music • art-rocker noun
art-rocker
noun see art-rock
Arta, Gulf of
geographical name — see Ambracian Gulf
Artaxerxes
biographical name name of 3 Persian kings: I died 425 B.C. (reigned 465-25); II died 359/58 B.C. (reigned 404-359/58); III died 338 B.C. (reigned 359/58-338)
artefact
chiefly British variant of artifact
Artemis
noun Etymology: Greek a Greek moon goddess often portrayed as a virgin huntress — compare Diana
artemisia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, artemisia, from Greek, wormwood Date: 14th century any of a genus (Artemisia) of aromatic composite herbs and shrubs (as sagebrush) — ...
arteri-
or arterio- combining form Etymology: Greek artēri-, artērio-, from artēria artery 1. artery 2. arterial and
arterial
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. of or relating to an artery b. relating to or being the bright red blood present in most arteries that has been oxygenated in lungs ...
arterially
adverb see arterial I
arterio-
combining form see arteri-
arteriogram
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1929 a radiograph of an artery made by arteriography
arteriographic
adjective see arteriography
arteriography
noun (plural -phies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1929 the radiographic visualization of an artery after injection of a radiopaque substance • ...
arteriolar
adjective see arteriole
arteriole
noun Etymology: French or New Latin; French artériole, probably from New Latin arteriola, diminutive of Latin arteria Date: 1830 any of the small terminal twigs of an artery ...
arteriosclerosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1881 a chronic disease characterized by abnormal thickening and hardening of the arterial walls with resulting loss of elasticity — compare ...
arteriosclerotic
adjective or noun see arteriosclerosis
arteriovenous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1880 of, relating to, or connecting the arteries and veins
arteritis
noun (plural arteritides) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1836 arterial inflammation
artery
noun (plural -teries) Etymology: Middle English arterie, from Latin arteria, from Greek artēria; akin to Greek aortē aorta Date: 14th century 1. any of the tubular ...
artesian well
noun Etymology: French artésien, literally, of Artois, from Old French, from Arteis Artois, France Date: 1835 1. a well in which water is under pressure; especially one in ...
Artevelde, van
biographical name Jacob circa 1295-1345 & his son Philip 1340-1382 Flemish leaders
artful
adjective Date: 1609 1. performed with or showing art or skill 2. a. using or characterized by art and skill ; dexterous b. adroit in attaining an end usually by ...
artfully
adverb see artful
artfulness
noun see artful
arthr-
or arthro- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from arthron; akin to Greek arariskein to fit — more at arm joint
arthralgia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1848 pain in one or more joints • arthralgic adjective
arthralgic
adjective see arthralgia
arthritic
adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or affected with arthritis 2. seemingly affected with or caused by arthritis • arthritic noun • arthritically ...
arthritically
adverb see arthritic
arthritis
noun (plural arthritides) Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from arthron Date: 1543 inflammation of joints due to infectious, metabolic, or constitutional causes; also a specific ...
arthro-
combining form see arthr-
arthrodesis
noun (plural arthrodeses) Etymology: New Latin, from arthr- + Greek desis binding, from dein to bind Date: circa 1901 the surgical immobilization of a joint so that the bones ...
arthropathy
noun (plural -thies) Date: circa 1860 a disease of a joint
arthropod
noun Etymology: New Latin Arthropoda, from arthr- + Greek pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: 1876 any of a phylum (Arthropoda) of invertebrate animals (as insects, ...
arthropodan
adjective see arthropod
arthroscope
noun Date: 1925 a fiber-optic instrument surgically inserted through an incision near a joint (as the knee) and used to visually examine the joint interior • arthroscopic ...
arthroscopic
adjective see arthroscope
arthroscopy
noun Date: 1931 examination of a joint with an arthroscope; also surgery on a joint using an arthroscope
arthrosis
noun (plural arthroses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek arthrōsis jointing, articulation, from arthroun to articulate, from arthron Date: 1634 1. an articulation between ...
arthrospore
noun Date: 1895 oidium 1b
Arthur
I. noun Date: 13th century a legendary king of the Britons whose story is based on traditions of a sixth century military leader II. biographical name Chester Alan 1829-1886 ...
Arthurian
adjective Date: 1612 of or relating to King Arthur and his court
artichoke
noun Etymology: Italian dialect articiocco, ultimately from Arabic al-khurshūf the artichoke Date: 1530 1. a tall Mediterranean composite herb (Cynara scolymus) resembling a ...
article
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin articulus joint, division, diminutive of artus joint, limb; akin to Greek arariskein to fit — more at arm ...
article of faith
Date: 15th century a basic belief
articulable
adjective Date: 1833 capable of being articulated
articulacy
noun Date: 1918 chiefly British the quality or state of being articulate
articular
adjective Etymology: Middle English articuler, from Latin articularis, from articulus Date: 15th century of or relating to a joint
articulate
I. adjective Etymology: Latin articulatus jointed, past participle of articulare, from articulus Date: 1586 1. a. divided into syllables or words meaningfully arranged ; ...
articulated
adjective Date: 1899 of a vehicle having a hinge or pivot connection especially to allow negotiation of sharp turns
articulately
adverb see articulate I
articulateness
noun see articulate I
articulation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. a joint or juncture between bones or cartilages in the skeleton of a vertebrate b. a movable joint between rigid parts of an animal 2. ...
articulative
adjective see articulate II
articulator
noun see articulate II
articulatory
adjective Date: 1818 of or relating to articulation
artifact
noun Etymology: Latin arte by skill (ablative of art-, ars skill) + factum, neuter of factus, past participle of facere to do — more at arm, do Date: 1821 1. a. something ...
artifactual
adjective see artifact
artifice
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin artificium, from artific-, artifex artificer, from Latin art-, ars + facere Date: circa 1604 1. a. clever or artful skill ; ...
artificer
noun Date: 14th century 1. a skilled or artistic worker or craftsman 2. one that makes or contrives ; deviser
artificial
adjective Date: 14th century 1. humanly contrived often on a natural model ; man-made 2. a. having existence in legal, economic, or political theory b. caused or ...
artificial horizon
noun Date: 1920 a gyroscopic flight instrument designed to indicate aircraft attitude with respect to the true horizon
artificial insemination
noun Date: 1897 introduction of semen into the uterus or oviduct by other than natural means
artificial intelligence
noun Date: 1956 1. a branch of computer science dealing with the simulation of intelligent behavior in computers 2. the capability of a machine to imitate intelligent human ...
artificial respiration
noun Date: 1817 the rhythmic forcing of air into and out of the lungs of a person whose breathing has stopped
artificiality
noun see artificial
artificially
adverb see artificial
artificialness
noun see artificial
artillerist
noun Date: 1757 gunner, artilleryman
artillery
noun (plural -leries) Etymology: Middle English artillerie, from Anglo-French, from artiller to equip, arm, alteration of Old French atillier, from Vulgar Latin *apticulare, from ...
artilleryman
noun Date: 1635 a soldier in the artillery
artily
adverb see arty I
artiness
noun see arty I
artiodactyl
noun Etymology: New Latin Artiodactyla, from Greek artios fitting, even-numbered + daktylos finger, toe; akin to Greek arariskein to fit — more at arm Date: circa 1879 any ...
artisan
noun Etymology: Middle French, from northern Italian dialect form of Tuscan artigiano, from arte art, from Latin art-, ars Date: 1538 1. a worker who practices a trade or ...
artisanal
adjective see artisan
artisanship
noun see artisan
artist
noun Date: circa 1507 1. a. obsolete one skilled or versed in learned arts b. archaic physician c. archaic artisan 1 2. a. one who professes and practices an ...
artiste
noun Etymology: French Date: 1823 1. a skilled adept public performer; specifically a musical or theatrical entertainer 2. an artistic or creative person
artistic
adjective Date: circa 1753 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of art or artists 2. showing imaginative skill in arrangement or execution • artistically adverb
artistically
adverb see artistic
artistry
noun Date: 1868 1. artistic quality of effect or workmanship 2. artistic ability
artless
adjective Date: 1589 1. lacking art, knowledge, or skill ; uncultured 2. a. made without skill ; crude b. free from artificiality ; natural 3. free from guile ...
artlessly
adverb see artless
artlessness
noun see artless
Artois
geographical name former province N France between Flanders & Picardy capital Arras
arts and crafts
noun Usage: often capitalized A&C Date: 1888 a movement in European and American design during the late 19th and early 20th centuries promoting handcraftsmanship over ...
artsy
adjective Date: 1902 arty
artsy-craftsy
also arty-crafty adjective Etymology: from the phrase arts and crafts Date: 1902 arty
artwork
noun Date: 1877 1. a. an artistic production b. artistic work 2. a. art 6 b. material (as a drawing or photograph) prepared for reproduction in printed matter
arty
I. adjective (artier; -est) Date: 1901 showily or pretentiously artistic • artily adverb • artiness noun II. abbreviation artillery
arty-crafty
adjective see artsy-craftsy
Aru Islands
geographical name islands E Indonesia S of W New Guinea area 3305 square miles (8593 square kilometers), population 29,604
Aruba
geographical name internally self-governing Dutch island off NW Venezuela; chief town Oranjestad area 69 square miles (179 square kilometers), population 69,000 • Aruban ...
Aruban
adjective or noun see Aruba
arugula
noun Etymology: probably from Italian dialect; akin to Italian dialect (Lombardy) arigola arugula, Italian ruca — more at rocket Date: 1967 a yellowish-flowered ...
arum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin arum, from Greek aron Date: 14th century any of a genus (Arum of the family Araceae, the arum family) of Eurasian plants having usually ...
Arunachal Pradesh
or formerly North East Frontier Agency geographical name state NE India N of Assam capital Itanagar area 32,269 square miles (83,577 square kilometers), population 864,558
Aruwimi
geographical name river 620 miles (998 kilometers) N Democratic Republic of the Congo flowing SW & W into Congo River
ARV
abbreviation American Revised Version
Arvad
geographical name see Arwad
Arvada
geographical name city N central Colorado NW of Denver population 102,153
ARVN
abbreviation Army of the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam)
Arwad
or biblical Arvad geographical name island Syria off coast of S Latakia
Aryan
I. adjective Etymology: Sanskrit ārya noble, belonging to an ancient people of northern India speaking an Indo-European dialect Date: 1839 1. Indo-European 2. a. of or ...
aryl
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary aromatic + -yl Date: 1906 having or being a monovalent organic radical (as phenyl) derived from an aromatic ...
arytenoid
adjective Etymology: New Latin arytaenoides, from Greek arytainoeidēs, literally, ladle-shaped, from arytaina ladle Date: circa 1751 1. relating to or being either of two ...
AS
abbreviation 1. after sight 2. airspeed 3. Anerican Samoa 4. Anglo-Saxon 5. antisubmarine 6. associate in science
As
I. abbreviation altostratus II. symbol arsenic
as
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English eallswā likewise, just as — more at also Date: before 12th century 1. to the same degree or amount 2. for ...
as a matter of fact
phrasal in fact ; actually
as a rule
phrasal for the most part ; generally
as best
phrasal as well, skillfully, or accurately as
as far as
I. conjunction Date: 14th century to the extent or degree that — often used in expressions like “as far as (something) goes” and “as far as (something) is ...
as follows
phrasal as comes next — used impersonally
as for
preposition Date: 15th century with regard to ; concerning
as good as
phrasal in effect ; virtually
as good as gold
phrasal 1. of the highest worth or reliability 2. well-behaved
as how
conjunction Date: 1741 that
as if
conjunction Date: 13th century 1. as it would be if 2. as one would do if 3. that
as is
phrasal in the presently existing condition without modification
as it were
phrasal as if it were so ; in a manner of speaking
as like as not
or like as not phrasal probably
as long as
conjunction Date: 15th century 1. provided that 2. inasmuch as, since
as many
phrasal the same in number
as much
phrasal 1. the same in quantity 2. to the same degree
as of
preposition Date: 1900 on, at, from — used to indicate a time or date at which something begins or ends
as one man
phrasal with the agreement and consent of all ; unanimously
as per
preposition Date: 1782 in accordance with ; according to
as per usual
phrasal as usual
as regards
also as respects preposition Date: 1633 in regard to ; with respect to
as respects
preposition see as regards
as soon as
conjunction Date: 14th century immediately at or shortly after the time that
as such
phrasal intrinsically considered ; in itself
as the crow flies
phrasal in a straight line
as though
conjunction Date: 13th century as if
as to
preposition Date: 14th century 1. as for, about 2. according to, by
as usual
phrasal in the accustomed or habitual way
as well
phrasal 1. in addition ; also 2. to the same extent or degree ; as much 3. with equivalent, comparable, or more favorable effect
as well as
I. conjunction Date: 15th century and in addition ; and II. preposition Date: 1589 in addition to ; besides
as who
phrasal archaic as one that ; as if someone
as who should say
phrasal archaic so to speak
as yet
phrasal up to the present or a specified time
as-
— see ad-
as-salaam alaikum
foreign term Etymology: Arabic as-salāmu ‘alaykum peace to you — used as a traditional greeting among Muslims
asafetida
or asafoetida noun Etymology: Middle English asafetida, from Medieval Latin asafoetida, from Persian azā mastic + Latin foetida, feminine of foetidus fetid Date: 14th century ...
asafoetida
noun see asafetida
Asahigawa
geographical name see Asahikawa
Asahikawa
or Asahigawa geographical name city Japan in central Hokkaido population 361,736
Asama
or Asamayama geographical name volcano 8300 feet (2530 meters) Japan in central Honshu
Asamayama
geographical name see Asama
asana
noun Etymology: Sanskrit āsana manner of sitting, from āste he sits; akin to Greek hēsthai to sit, Hittite es- Date: circa 1934 any of various yogic postures
Asansol
geographical name city NE India in West Bengal population 261,836
Asante
noun (plural Asante) Date: 1721 Ashanti
ASAP
abbreviation as soon as possible
asb
abbreviation asbestos
asbestos
noun Etymology: Middle English albeston mineral supposed to be inextinguishable when set on fire, probably from Middle French abeston, from Medieval Latin asbeston, alteration ...
asbestosis
noun (plural asbestoses) Date: 1927 a pneumoconiosis due to asbestos particles that is marked by thickening and scarring of lung tissue
Asbury
biographical name Francis 1745-1816 American (English-born) Methodist bishop
asc-
or asco- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from ascus ascus
ASCAP
abbreviation American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers
ascariasis
noun (plural ascariases) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1888 infestation with or disease caused by ascarids
ascarid
noun Etymology: ultimately from Late Latin ascarid-, ascaris intestinal worm, from Greek askarid-, askaris, probably by back-formation from askarizein to jump, throb, alteration ...
ascaris
noun (plural ascarides) Date: 14th century ascarid
ascend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ascendere, from ad- + scandere to climb — more at scan Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to move upward b. to ...
ascendable
adjective see ascend
ascendance
also ascendence noun Date: 1715 ascendancy
ascendancy
also ascendency noun Date: 1677 governing or controlling influence ; domination
ascendant
I. noun also ascendent Etymology: Middle English ascendent, from Medieval Latin ascendent-, ascendens, from Latin, present participle of ascendere Date: 14th century 1. the ...
ascendantly
adverb see ascendant II
ascendence
noun see ascendance
ascendency
noun see ascendancy
ascendent
I. noun see ascendant I II. adjective see ascendant II
ascender
noun Date: circa 1867 1. the part of a lowercase letter (as b) that rises above the main body of the letter; also a letter that has such a part 2. a device used for climbing ...
ascendible
adjective see ascend
ascending
adjective Date: 1581 1. a. rising or increasing to higher levels, values, or degrees b. mounting or sloping upward 2. rising upward usually from a more or less ...
ascension
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ascension-, ascensio, from ascendere Date: 14th century the act or process of ascending
Ascension
geographical name island in S Atlantic belonging to British colony of St. Helena area 34 square miles (88 square kilometers), population 1400
Ascension Day
noun Date: 14th century the Thursday 40 days after Easter observed in commemoration of Christ's ascension into Heaven
ascensional
adjective Date: 1594 of or relating to ascension or ascent
ascensive
adjective Date: 1602 rising or tending to rise
ascent
noun Etymology: irregular from ascend Date: circa 1596 1. a. the act of rising or mounting upward ; climb b. an upward slope or rising grade ; acclivity c. the degree ...
ascertain
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English acertainen to inform, give assurance to, from Anglo-French acerteiner, from a- (from Latin ad-) + certein, certain certain Date: 15th ...
ascertainable
adjective see ascertain
ascertainment
noun see ascertain
ascesis
also askesis noun (plural asceses; also askeses) Etymology: Late Latin or Greek; Late Latin, from Greek askēsis, literally, exercise, from askein Date: 1873 self-discipline, ...
ascetic
also ascetical adjective Etymology: Greek askētikos, literally, laborious, from askētēs one that exercises, hermit, from askein to work, exercise Date: 1646 1. practicing ...
ascetical
adjective see ascetic
ascetically
adverb see ascetic
asceticism
noun see ascetic
Asch
biographical name Sholem or Shalom or Sholom 1880-1957 American (Polish-born) Yiddish writer
Ascham
biographical name Roger 1515-1568 English scholar & author
ascidian
noun Etymology: New Latin Ascidia, group comprising tunicates, from Ascidium, genus name, from Greek askidion, diminutive of askos wineskin, bladder Date: 1835 any of a class ...
ASCII
noun Etymology: American Standard Code for Information Interchange Date: 1963 a code for representing alphanumeric information
ascites
noun (plural ascites) Etymology: Middle English aschytes, from Late Latin ascites, from Greek askitēs, from askos Date: 14th century abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in ...
ascitic
adjective see ascites
asclepiad
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek asklēpiad-, asklēpias celandine, from Asklēpios, Greek god of medicine Date: 1859 milkweed
asco-
combining form see asc-
ascocarp
noun Date: circa 1887 the mature fruiting body of an ascomycetous fungus; broadly such a body with its enclosed asci, spores, and paraphyses • ascocarpic adjective
ascocarpic
adjective see ascocarp
ascogonium
noun (plural ascogonia) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1875 the female sex organ in ascomycetous fungi
Ascoli Piceno
or ancient Asculum Picenum geographical name commune central Italy in Marche NE of Rome population 52,371
Ascoli Satriano
or ancient Asculum Apulum or Ausculum Apulum geographical name commune SE Italy in Puglia S of Foggia
ascomycete
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek askos + mykēt-, mykēs fungus; akin to Greek myxa mucus — more at mucus Date: 1872 any of a group (as class Ascomycetes or ...
ascomycetous
adjective see ascomycete
ascorbate
noun Date: 1941 a salt of ascorbic acid
ascorbic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary a- + New Latin scorbutus scurvy — more at scorbutic Date: 1933 vitamin C
ascospore
noun Date: 1875 any of the spores contained in an ascus • ascosporic adjective
ascosporic
adjective see ascospore
ascot
noun Etymology: Ascot Heath, racetrack near Ascot, England Date: 1898 a broad neck scarf that is looped under the chin
Ascot
geographical name village S England in Berkshire SW of London
ascribable
adjective see ascribe
ascribe
transitive verb (ascribed; ascribing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ascribere, from ad- + scribere to write — more at scribe Date: 15th century to refer to a ...
ascribed
adjective Date: 1969 acquired or assigned arbitrarily (as at birth)
ascription
noun Etymology: Late Latin ascription-, ascriptio, from Latin, written addition, from ascribere Date: 1598 1. the act of ascribing ; attribution 2. arbitrary placement (as ...
ascriptive
adjective Date: 1650 relating to, marked by, or involving ascription
Asculum Apulum
geographical name see Ascoli Satriano
Asculum Picenum
geographical name see Ascoli Piceno
ascus
noun (plural asci) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek askos wineskin, bladder Date: 1830 the membranous oval or tubular spore case of an ascomycete
Ascutney, Mount
geographical name mountain 3320 feet (1012 meters) SE Vermont
asdic
noun Etymology: from asdics underwater echo ranging, probably from Anti-Submarine Division (British Admiralty department 1916-18) + -ics Date: 1939 chiefly British sonar
ASE
abbreviation American Stock Exchange
ASEAN
abbreviation Association of Southeast Asian Nations
asepsis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1892 1. the condition of being aseptic 2. the methods of making or keeping aseptic
aseptic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1859 1. a. preventing infection b. free or freed from pathogenic microorganisms 2. lacking ...
aseptically
adverb see aseptic
asexual
adjective Date: 1830 1. lacking sex or functional sex organs 2. a. involving or reproducing by reproductive processes (as cell division, spore formation, fission, or ...
asexuality
noun see asexual
asexually
adverb see asexual
Asgard
noun Etymology: Old Norse āsgarthr Date: 1806 the home of the Norse gods
asgd
abbreviation assigned
asgmt
abbreviation assignment
ash
I. noun Etymology: Middle English asshe, from Old English æsc; akin to Old High German ask ash, Latin ornus mountain ash Date: before 12th century 1. any of a genus ...
ash can
noun Date: 1894 1. a metal receptacle for refuse 2. slang depth charge
Ash Shariqah
or Sharjah geographical name sheikhdom, member of United Arab Emirates
Ash Wednesday
noun Date: 14th century the first day of Lent — see Easter table
ash-blond
or ash-blonde adjective Date: 1865 pale or grayish blond
ash-blonde
adjective see ash-blond
ashamed
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English āscamod, past participle of āscamian to shame, from ā- (perfective prefix) + scamian to shame — more at abide, shame ...
ashamedly
adverb see ashamed
Ashanti
I. noun (plural Ashanti or Ashantis) Etymology: ultimately from Twi asànté Date: 1721 1. a member of a people of southern Ghana 2. the dialect of Akan spoken by the ...
Ashburton
I. biographical name Baron — see Alexander Baring II. geographical name river about 400 miles (644 kilometers) Australia in NW Western Australia flowing NW into Indian ...
Ashcan
adjective Date: 1939 of or relating to a group of 20th century American painters who depicted city life realistically
Ashcroft
I. biographical name John David 1942- United States attorney general (2001- ) II. biographical name Dame Peggy 1907-1991 British actress
Ashdod
geographical name city & port Israel W of Jerusalem population 76,600
Ashe
biographical name Arthur Robert 1943-1993 American tennis player
ashen
I. adjective Date: before 12th century of, relating to, or made from ash wood II. adjective Date: 14th century resembling ashes (as in color); especially deadly pale
Asher
noun Etymology: Hebrew Āshēr Date: 14th century a son of Jacob and the traditional eponymous ancestor of one of the tribes of Israel
Asheville
geographical name city W North Carolina population 68,889

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