Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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aegri somnia
foreign term Etymology: Latin a sick man's dreams
Aemilia
geographical name — see Emilia-Romagna
Aeneas
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Aineias Date: 14th century a son of Anchises and Aphrodite, defender of Troy, and hero of Virgil's Aeneid
Aeneas Silvius
or Sylvius biographical name — see pius ii
Aeneolithic
adjective Etymology: Latin aeneus of copper or bronze, from aes copper, bronze — more at ore Date: 1901 of or relating to a transitional period between the Neolithic and ...
Aeolia
geographical name see Aeolis
Aeolian
I. adjective Date: 1567 of or relating to Aeolis or its inhabitants II. noun Date: circa 1726 1. a member of a group of Greek peoples of Thessaly and Boeotia that ...
aeolian
I. adjective Date: 1595 1. often capitalized of or relating to Aeolus 2. giving forth or marked by a moaning or sighing sound or musical tone produced by or as if by the ...
aeolian harp
noun Date: 1765 a box-shaped musical instrument having stretched strings usually tuned in unison on which the wind produces varying harmonics over the same fundamental tone
Aeolic
I. adjective Date: 1641 aeolian II. noun Date: 1889 a group of ancient Greek dialects used by the Aeolians
Aeolis
or Aeolia geographical name ancient country of NW Asia Minor
Aeolus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Aiolos the Greek god of the winds
aeon
or eon noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek aiōn — more at aye Date: 1647 1. an immeasurably or indefinitely long period of time ; age 2. a. (usually eon) a very large ...
aeonian
or aeonic adjective Date: 1765 lasting for an immeasurably or indefinitely long period of time
aeonic
adjective see aeonian
aepyornis
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek aipys high + ornis bird — more at erne Date: 1851 elephant bird
aeq
abbreviation Etymology: Latin aequalis equal
aequam servare mentem
foreign term Etymology: Latin to preserve a calm mind
aequo animo
foreign term Etymology: Latin with even mind ; calmly
aer-
or aero- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek aer-, aero-, from aēr 1. a. air ; atmosphere b. air and 2. gas 3. aviation
aerate
transitive verb (aerated; aerating) Date: 1789 1. to supply or impregnate (as the soil or a liquid) with air 2. to supply (the blood) with oxygen by respiration 3. a. ...
aeration
noun see aerate
aerator
noun Date: 1861 one that aerates; especially an apparatus for aerating something (as sewage)
aere perennius
foreign term Etymology: Latin more lasting than bronze
aerenchyma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1893 modified parenchymatous tissue having large intracellular air spaces that is found especially in aquatic plants where it facilitates ...
aerial
I. adjective Etymology: Latin aerius, from Greek aerios, from aēr Date: 1604 1. a. of, relating to, or occurring in the air or atmosphere b. existing or growing in the ...
aerial ladder
noun Date: 1904 a mechanically operated extensible ladder usually mounted on a fire truck
aerial perspective
noun Date: 1704 the expression of space in painting by gradation of color and distinctness
aerialist
noun Date: 1905 one who performs feats in the air or above the ground especially on the trapeze
aerially
adverb see aerial I
aerie
also aery noun Etymology: Medieval Latin aerea, from Old French aire, probably from Vulgar Latin *agrum origin, nest, lair, from Latin ager field — more at acre Date: 1554 1. ...
aerily
adverb see aery I
aero
I. adjective Etymology: aero- Date: 1874 of or relating to aircraft or aeronautics II. abbreviation aerodynamic
aero-
combining form see aer-
aerobat
noun see aerobatics
aerobatic
adjective see aerobatics
aerobatics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: aer- + acrobatics Date: circa 1911 spectacular flying feats and maneuvers (as rolls and dives) • aerobat ...
aerobe
noun Etymology: French aérobie, from aéro- aer- + -bie (from Greek -bion, from bios life) — more at quick Date: 1886 an organism (as a bacterium) that lives only in the ...
aerobic
adjective Date: 1884 1. living, active, or occurring only in the presence of oxygen 2. of, relating to, or induced by aerobes 3. a. involving, utilizing, or increasing ...
aerobically
adverb see aerobic
aerobicize
verb (-cized; -cizing) Date: 1981 transitive verb to bring to good physical condition through aerobics intransitive verb to engage in aerobics
aerobics
noun plural Date: 1967 1. singular or plural in construction a system of physical conditioning involving exercises (as running, walking, swimming, or calisthenics) ...
aerobiological
adjective see aerobiology
aerobiology
noun Date: circa 1937 the science dealing with the occurrence, transportation, and effects of airborne materials (as viruses, pollen, or pollutants) • aerobiological ...
aerobiosis
noun (plural aerobioses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1900 life in the presence of air or oxygen
aerobrake
transitive verb Date: 1965 to decelerate (as a spacecraft) by passage through a planetary atmosphere
aerodrome
noun Date: 1908 chiefly British airfield
aerodynamic
adjective see aerodynamics
aerodynamical
adjective see aerodynamics
aerodynamically
adverb see aerodynamics
aerodynamicist
noun Date: 1926 one who specializes in aerodynamics
aerodynamics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1837 a branch of dynamics that deals with the motion of air and other gaseous fluids and with the forces acting ...
aerodyne
noun Etymology: aerodynamic Date: circa 1906 a heavier-than-air aircraft (as an airplane, helicopter, or glider) — compare aerostat
aeroelastic
adjective see aeroelasticity
aeroelasticity
noun Date: 1935 distortion (as from bending) in a structure (as an airplane wing or a building) caused by aerodynamic forces • aeroelastic adjective
aeroembolism
noun Date: circa 1939 decompression sickness caused by rapid ascent to high altitudes and resulting exposure to rapidly lowered air pressure
aerofoil
noun Date: 1907 chiefly British airfoil
aerogram
or aerogramme noun Date: 1920 air letter 2
aerogramme
noun see aerogram
aerographer's mate
noun Date: circa 1952 a navy petty officer specializing in meteorology
aerolite
noun Date: circa 1815 a stony meteorite
aeromagnetic
adjective Date: 1946 of, relating to, or derived from a study of the earth's magnetic field especially from the air
aeromechanics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1909 mechanics that deals with the equilibrium and motion of gases and of solid bodies immersed in them
aeromedical
adjective Date: 1937 1. of or relating to aeromedicine 2. relating to or involving air transportation to a hospital
aeromedicine
noun Date: 1942 a branch of medicine that deals with the diseases and disturbances arising from flying and the associated physiological and psychological problems
aerometer
noun Etymology: probably from French aéromètre, from aér- + -mètre -meter Date: 1794 an instrument for ascertaining the weight or density of air or other gases
aeronaut
noun Etymology: French aéronaute, from aér- aer- + Greek nautēs sailor — more at nautical Date: 1784 one who operates or travels in an airship or balloon
aeronautic
adjective see aeronautics
aeronautical
adjective see aeronautics
aeronautically
adverb see aeronautics
aeronautics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: circa 1824 1. a science dealing with the operation of aircraft 2. the art or science of flight • aeronautical also ...
aeronomer
noun see aeronomy
aeronomic
adjective see aeronomy
aeronomist
noun see aeronomy
aeronomy
noun Date: 1946 a science that deals with the physics and chemistry of the upper atmosphere of planets • aeronomer noun • aeronomic adjective • aeronomist noun
aerophobe
noun see aerophobia
aerophobia
noun Date: 1911 fear or strong dislike of flying • aerophobe noun • aerophobic adjective or noun
aerophobic
adjective or noun see aerophobia
aeroplane
noun Etymology: French aéroplane, from aéro- aer- + -plane, probably from feminine of plan flat, level, from Latin planus — more at floor Date: 1873 chiefly British ...
aerosol
noun Etymology: aer- + 4sol Date: 1923 1. a suspension of fine solid or liquid particles in gas ; also plural the fine particles of an aerosol 2. a substance (as an ...
aerosolization
noun see aerosolize
aerosolize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1944 to disperse as an aerosol • aerosolization noun
aerospace
I. noun Date: circa 1958 1. space comprising the earth's atmosphere and the space beyond 2. a physical science that deals with aerospace 3. the aerospace industry II. ...
aerospace plane
noun Date: 1960 an airplane designed to be able to reach low earth orbit
aerostat
noun Etymology: French aérostat, from aér- + -stat Date: 1784 a lighter-than-air aircraft (as a balloon or blimp) — compare aerodyne
aerostatics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: modification of New Latin aerostatica, from aer- + statica statics Date: 1784 a branch of statics that deals ...
aerothermodynamic
adjective see aerothermodynamics
aerothermodynamics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1949 the thermodynamics of gases and especially of air • aerothermodynamic adjective
aery
I. adjective (aerier; -est) Etymology: Latin aerius — more at aerial Date: 14th century having an aerial quality ; ethereal • aerily adverb II. variant of aerie
Aeschines
biographical name 389-314 B.C. Athenian orator
Aeschylean
adjective see Aeschylus
Aeschylus
biographical name 525-456 B.C. Greek dramatist • Aeschylean adjective
Aesculapian
adjective Etymology: Aesculapius, Greco-Roman god of medicine, from Latin, from Greek Asklēpios Date: 1605 of or relating to Aesculapius or the healing art
Aesir
noun plural Etymology: Old Norse Æsir, plural of āss god the principal race of Norse gods
Aesop
biographical name Greek fabulist; probably legendary
Aesopian
also Aesopic adjective Date: 1728 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Aesop or his fables 2. conveying an innocent meaning to an outsider but a hidden meaning to a ...
Aesopic
adjective see Aesopian
aesthete
also esthete noun Etymology: back-formation from aesthetic Date: 1881 one having or affecting sensitivity to the beautiful especially in art
aesthetic
I. adjective also esthetic or aesthetical or esthetical Etymology: German ästhetisch, from New Latin aestheticus, from Greek aisthētikos of sense perception, from ...
aesthetic distance
noun Date: 1938 the frame of reference that an artist creates by the use of technical devices in and around the work of art to differentiate it psychologically from reality
aesthetical
adjective see aesthetic I
aesthetically
adverb see aesthetic I
aesthetician
also esthetician noun Date: 1829 1. a specialist in aesthetics 2. cosmetologist
aestheticism
also estheticism noun Date: 1855 1. a doctrine that the principles of beauty are basic to other and especially moral principles 2. devotion to or emphasis on beauty or the ...
aestheticize
also estheticize transitive verb (-cized; -cizing) Date: 1864 to make aesthetic
aestival
variant of estival
aestivate
variant of estivate
aestivation
variant of estivation
aet
or aetat abbreviation Etymology: Latin aetatis of age; aged
aetat
abbreviation see aet
Aethelberht
or Ethelbert or Aedilberct biographical name died 616 king of Kent (560-616)
Aethelred
or Ethelred II biographical name 968?-1016 the Unready king of England (978-1016)
aether
variant of ether 2a
aetiology
chiefly British variant of etiology
Aetolia
geographical name region W central Greece N of Gulf of Patras & E of Acarnania • Aetolian adjective or noun
Aetolian
adjective or noun see Aetolia
af
abbreviation affix
AF
abbreviation 1. air force 2. audio frequency
af-
— see ad-
afar
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English afer, from on fer at a distance and of fer from a distance Date: 14th century from, to, or at a great distance II. noun Date: 14th ...
Afars and the Issas, French Territory of the
geographical name — see Djibouti 1
AFB
abbreviation air force base
AFC
abbreviation 1. American Football Conference 2. automatic frequency control
AFDC
abbreviation Aid to Families with Dependent Children
afeard
or afeared adjective Etymology: Middle English afered, from Old English āfǣred, past participle of āfǣran to frighten, from ā-, perfective prefix + fǣran to frighten — ...
afeared
adjective see afeard
afebrile
adjective Date: 1875 not marked by or having a fever
aff
abbreviation affirmative
affability
noun see affable
affable
adjective Etymology: Middle English affabyl, from Anglo-French, from Latin affabilis, from affari to speak to, from ad- + fari to speak — more at ban Date: 15th century 1. ...
affably
adverb see affable
affair
noun Etymology: Middle English afere, from Anglo-French afaire, from a faire to do Date: 14th century 1. a. plural commercial, professional, public, or personal business ...
affaire
noun see affair 3
affect
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin affectus, from afficere Date: 14th century 1. obsolete feeling, affection 2. the conscious subjective ...
affectability
noun see affect III
affectable
adjective see affect III
affectation
noun Date: 1548 1. a. the act of taking on or displaying an attitude or mode of behavior not natural to oneself or not genuinely felt b. speech or conduct not natural to ...
affected
adjective Date: 1587 1. inclined, disposed 2. a. given to or marked by affectation b. assumed artificially or falsely ; pretended • affectedly adverb • ...
affectedly
adverb see affected
affectedness
noun see affected
affecting
adjective Date: 1720 evoking a strong emotional response Synonyms: see moving • affectingly adverb
affectingly
adverb see affecting
affection
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French affection, from Latin affection-, affectio, from afficere Date: 13th century 1. a moderate feeling or emotion 2. tender ...
affectional
adjective Date: 1859 of or relating to the affections • affectionally adverb
affectionally
adverb see affectional
affectionate
adjective Date: 15th century 1. obsolete inclined, disposed 2. having affection or warm regard ; loving 3. motivated by affection ; tender • affectionately adverb
affectionately
adverb see affectionate
affectioned
adjective Date: 1555 archaic having a tendency, disposition, or inclination ; disposed
affectionless
adjective see affection
affective
adjective Date: 1623 1. relating to, arising from, or influencing feelings or emotions ; emotional 2. expressing emotion • affectively adverb • affectivity noun
affective disorder
noun Date: 1937 mood disorder
affectively
adverb see affective
affectivity
noun see affective
affectless
adjective Date: 1967 showing or expressing no emotion; also unfeeling • affectlessness noun
affectlessness
noun see affectless
affenpinscher
noun Etymology: German, from Affe ape + Pinscher, a breed of hunting dog Date: 1903 any of a breed of toy dogs with a wiry black, red, tan, or gray coat, erect ears, large ...
afferent
I. adjective Etymology: Latin afferent-, afferens, present participle of afferre to bring to, from ad- + ferre to bear — more at bear Date: circa 1847 bearing or conducting ...
afferently
adverb see afferent I
affiance
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from affier to pledge, trust, from Medieval Latin affidare to pledge, from Latin ad- + Vulgar Latin *fidare to trust — ...
affiant
noun Etymology: French, from present participle of affier, from Old French Date: 1807 one who swears to an affidavit; broadly deponent
afficionado
variant of aficionado
affidavit
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, he has made an oath, from affidare Date: 1593 a sworn statement in writing made especially under oath or on affirmation before an authorized ...
affiliate
I. verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Medieval Latin affiliatus, past participle of affiliare to adopt as a son, from Latin ad- + filius son — more at feminine Date: 1761 ...
affiliated
adjective Date: 1795 closely associated with another typically in a dependent or subordinate position
affiliation
noun see affiliate I
affine
I. noun Etymology: Anglo-French affin, from Latin affinis, from affinis related Date: circa 1509 a relative by marriage ; in-law II. adjective Etymology: Latin affinis, ...
affined
adjective Date: 1597 1. joined in a close relationship ; connected 2. bound by obligation
affinely
adverb see affine II
affinity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English affinite, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French affinité, from Latin affinitas, from affinis bordering on, related by marriage, ...
affinity card
noun Date: 1979 a credit card which is issued in affiliation with a participating organization (as a charity or an airline) and the use of which earns a benefit for the ...
affinity chromatography
noun Date: 1970 chromatography in which a macromolecule (as a protein) is isolated and purified by passing it in solution through a column treated with a substance having a ...
affinity group
noun Date: 1970 a group of people having a common interest or goal or acting together for a specific purpose (as for a chartered tour)
affirm
verb Etymology: Middle English affermen, from Anglo-French afermer, from Latin affirmare, from ad- + firmare to make firm, from firmus firm — more at firm Date: 14th century ...
affirmable
adjective see affirm
affirmance
noun see affirm
affirmation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act of affirming b. something affirmed ; a positive assertion 2. a solemn declaration made under the penalties of perjury by a person ...
affirmative
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. asserting a predicate of a subject 2. asserting that the fact is so 3. positive 4. favoring or supporting a proposition or motion ...
affirmative action
noun Date: 1965 an active effort to improve the employment or educational opportunities of members of minority groups and women; also a similar effort to promote the rights or ...
affirmatively
adverb see affirmative I
affix
I. transitive verb Etymology: Latin affixus, past participle of affigere to fasten to, from ad- + figere to fasten — more at fix Date: 1533 1. to attach physically 2. ...
affixable
adjective see affix I
affixal
adjective see affix II
affixation
noun see affix I
affixial
adjective see affix II
affixment
noun see affix I
afflatus
noun Etymology: Latin, act of blowing or breathing on, from afflare to blow on, from ad- + flare to blow — more at blow Date: 1660 a divine imparting of knowledge or power ; ...
afflict
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin afflictus, past participle of affligere to cast down, from ad- + fligere to strike — more at profligate Date: 14th ...
affliction
noun Date: 14th century 1. the state of being afflicted 2. the cause of persistent pain or distress 3. great suffering
afflictive
adjective Date: 1611 causing affliction ; distressing, troublesome • afflictively adverb
afflictively
adverb see afflictive
affluence
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an abundant flow or supply ; profusion b. abundance of property ; wealth 2. a flowing to or toward a point ; influx
affluency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1664 affluence
affluent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin affluent-, affluens, present participle of affluere to flow to, flow abundantly, from ad- + fluere to flow — more at fluid ...
affluently
adverb see affluent I
afford
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English aforthen, from Old English geforthian to carry out, from ge-, perfective prefix + forthian to carry out, from forth — more at co-, ...
affordability
noun see afford
affordable
adjective see afford
affordably
adverb see afford
afforest
transitive verb see afforestation
afforestation
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin afforestation-, afforestatio, from afforestare to put under forest laws, from Latin ad- + Medieval Latin foresta, forestis forest Date: 1649 the ...
affray
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from affraier Date: 14th century 1. archaic fray, brawl 2. chiefly British a fight between two or more people in a ...
affricate
noun Etymology: probably from German Affrikata, from Latin affricata, feminine of affricatus, past participle of affricare to rub against, from ad- + fricare to rub — more at ...
affricative
noun or adjective see affricate
affright
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English afyrht, afright frightened, from Old English āfyrht, past participle of āfyrhtan to frighten, from ā-, perfective prefix + ...
affront
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English afronten, from Anglo-French afrunter to defy, from Vulgar Latin *affrontare, from Latin ad- + front-, frons forehead Date: 14th ...
afft
abbreviation affidavit
affusion
noun Etymology: Late Latin affusion-, affusio, from Latin affundere to pour on, from ad- + fundere to pour — more at found Date: 1615 an act of pouring a liquid on (as in ...
Afghan
noun Etymology: Persian afghān Pashtun Date: 1767 1. a. (1) Pashtun (2) Pashto b. a native or inhabitant of Afghanistan 2. not capitalized a blanket or shawl ...
Afghan hound
noun Date: 1925 any of a breed of tall slim swift hunting dogs originating in Afghanistan with a coat of silky thick hair and a long silky topknot
afghani
noun Etymology: Persian afghānī, literally, of the Pashtuns Date: 1927 — see money table
Afghani
adjective see Afghan
Afghanistan
geographical name country W Asia E of Iran capital Kabul area 250,775 square miles (649,507 square kilometers), population 18,052,000
aficionada
noun Etymology: Spanish, feminine of aficionado Date: 1952 a woman who is an aficionado
aficionado
also afficionado noun (plural -dos) Etymology: Spanish, from past participle of aficionar to inspire affection, from afición affection, from Latin affection-, affectio — more ...
afield
adverb or adjective Date: before 12th century 1. to, in, or on the field 2. away from home ; abroad 3. out of the way ; astray
afire
adjective or adverb Date: 13th century 1. being on fire ; blazing 2. being in a state of great excitement or energy
AFL
abbreviation American Football League
AFL-CIO
abbreviation American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations
aflame
adjective or adverb Date: 1555 afire
aflatoxin
noun Etymology: New Latin Aspergillus flavus, species of mold + English toxin Date: 1962 any of several carcinogenic mycotoxins that are produced especially in stored ...
afloat
adjective or adverb Etymology: Middle English aflot, from Old English on flot, from on + flot, from flot deep water, sea; akin to Old English flēotan to float — more at fleet ...
aflutter
adjective Date: 1830 1. being in a flutter ; fluttering 2. nervously excited 3. filled with or marked by the presence of fluttering things
Afognak
geographical name island S Alaska N of Kodiak Island
Afonso
biographical name name of 6 kings of Portugal: especially I Henriques 1109?-1185 (1st king of Portugal; reigned 1139-85); V 1432-1481 (reigned 1438-81)
afoot
adverb or adjective Date: 13th century 1. on foot 2. in the process of development ; under way
afore
adverb or conjunction or preposition Etymology: Middle English, from Old English onforan, from on + foran before — more at before Date: before 12th century chiefly dialect ...
aforementioned
adjective Date: 1587 mentioned previously
aforesaid
adjective Date: 14th century said or named before or above
aforethought
adjective Date: 1581 previously in mind ; premeditated, deliberate
afoul of
preposition Date: 1819 1. in or into conflict with 2. in or into collision or entanglement with
AFP
abbreviation alpha-fetoprotein
Afr
abbreviation Africa; African
Afr-
or Afro- combining form Etymology: Latin Afr-, Afer African ; African and
afraid
adjective Etymology: Middle English affraied, from past participle of affraien to frighten — more at affray Date: 14th century 1. filled with fear or apprehension 2. ...
afreet
or afrit noun Etymology: Arabic ‘ifrīt Date: 1786 a powerful evil jinni, demon, or monstrous giant in Arabic mythology
afresh
adverb Date: 15th century from a fresh beginning ; anew, again
Africa
geographical name continent of the eastern hemisphere S of the Mediterranean & adjoining Asia on NE area 11,677,239 square miles (30,244,049 square kilometers)
African
I. noun Date: before 12th century 1. a native or inhabitant of Africa 2. a person and especially a black person of African ancestry II. adjective Date: 1564 of, relating ...
African buffalo
noun Date: 1902 Cape buffalo
African daisy
noun Date: circa 1889 any of a genus (Arctotis) of widely cultivated composite herbs native to southern Africa
African elephant
noun Date: 1607 elephant 1a
African gray
noun Date: 1878 a parrot (Psittacus erithacus) native to equatorial Africa that has gray plumage, a red tail, and a whitish face and is commonly domesticated especially for ...
African hunting dog
noun see African wild dog
African mahogany
noun Date: 1842 mahogany 1b
African violet
noun Date: 1902 any of several tropical African gesneriads (especially Saintpaulia ionantha) widely grown as houseplants for their velvety fleshy leaves and showy purple, ...
African wild dog
noun Date: 1978 a powerful canid (Lycaon pictus) having a mottled coat of black, white, and reddish yellow that was formerly common in sub-Saharan Africa where it hunted in ...
African-American
noun Date: 1855 Afro-American • African-American adjective
Africana
noun plural Date: 1908 materials (as books, documents, or artifacts) relating to African history and culture
Africander
or Afrikander noun Etymology: Afrikaans Afrikaner, Afrikaander, literally, Afrikaner Date: 1852 any of a breed of tall red large-horned humped southern African cattle used ...
Africanise
British variant of Africanize
Africanism
noun Date: 1641 1. a characteristic feature (as a custom or belief) of African culture 2. a characteristic feature of an African language occurring in a non-African language ...
Africanist
noun Date: 1895 a specialist in African languages or cultures
Africanization
noun see Africanize
Africanize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1849 1. to cause to acquire a distinctively African trait 2. to bring under the influence, control, or cultural or civil supremacy of ...
Africanized bee
noun Date: 1970 a honeybee that originated in Brazil as an accidental hybrid between an aggressive African subspecies (Apis mellifera scutellata) and previously established ...
Africanized honeybee
noun see Africanized bee
Africanness
noun see African II
Afrikaans
I. noun Etymology: Afrikaans, from afrikaans, adjective, African, from obsolete Afrikaans afrikanisch, ultimately from Latin africanus Date: 1908 a language developed from ...
Afrikander
noun see Africander
Afrikaner
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Afrikaans, literally, African, from Latin africanus Date: 1824 a South African of European descent whose native language is ...
Afrikanerdom
noun see Afrikaner
afrit
noun see afreet
Afro
noun (plural Afros) Date: 1938 a hairstyle of tight curls in a full evenly rounded shape • Afroed adjective
Afro-
combining form see Afr-
Afro-American
noun Date: 1853 an American of African and especially of black African descent • Afro-American adjective

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