Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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autoinfection
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 reinfection with larvae produced by parasitic worms already in the body
autointoxication
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 a state of being poisoned by toxic substances produced within the body
autoloader
noun Date: 1937 a semiautomatic firearm
autoloading
adjective Date: 1923 semiautomatic b
autologous
adjective Etymology: aut- + -ologous (as in homologous) Date: circa 1921 1. derived from the same individual 2. involving one individual as both donor and recipient
autolysate
also autolyzate noun Date: 1910 a product of autolysis
autolyse
British variant of autolyze
autolysis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1902 breakdown of all or part of a cell or tissue by self-produced enzymes • autolytic adjective
autolytic
adjective see autolysis
autolyzate
noun see autolysate
autolyze
verb (-lyzed; -lyzing) Etymology: back-formation from autolysis Date: 1903 intransitive verb to undergo autolysis transitive verb to subject to autolysis
automaker
noun Date: circa 1905 a manufacturer of automobiles
Automat
service mark — used for a cafeteria in which food is obtained especially from vending machines
automatable
adjective see automate
automate
verb (-mated; -mating) Etymology: back-formation from automation Date: 1952 transitive verb 1. to operate by automation 2. to convert to largely automatic operation ...
automated teller
noun Date: 1981 atm
automated teller machine
noun Date: 1974 atm
automatic
I. adjective Etymology: Greek automatos self-acting, from aut- + -matos (akin to Latin ment-, mens mind) — more at mind Date: 1748 1. a. largely or wholly involuntary; ...
automatic pilot
noun Date: 1916 1. autopilot 1 2. a state or condition in which activity or behavior is regulated automatically in a predetermined or instinctive manner
automatic teller
noun Date: 1971 atm
automatic teller machine
noun Date: 1977 atm
automatic writing
noun Date: 1872 writing produced without conscious intention as if of telepathic or spiritualistic origin
automatically
adverb see automatic I
automaticity
noun see automatic I
automation
noun Etymology: 1automatic Date: 1912 1. the technique of making an apparatus, a process, or a system operate automatically 2. the state of being operated automatically 3. ...
automatism
noun Etymology: French automatisme, from automate automaton, from Latin automaton Date: 1838 1. a. the quality or state of being automatic b. an automatic action 2. ...
automatist
noun or adjective see automatism
automatization
noun see automatize
automatize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Etymology: 1automatic Date: 1929 to make (an action) reflexive • automatization noun
automaton
noun (plural -atons or automata) Etymology: Latin, from Greek, neuter of automatos Date: 1645 1. a mechanism that is relatively self-operating; especially robot 2. a ...
automobile
I. adjective Etymology: French, from aut- + mobile Date: 1883 automotive II. noun Date: circa 1889 a usually four-wheeled automotive vehicle designed for passenger ...
automobilist
noun see automobile II
automobility
noun Date: 1903 the use of automobiles as the major means of transportation
automorphism
noun Etymology: aut- + isomorphism Date: 1903 an isomorphism of a set (as a group) with itself
automotive
adjective Date: 1898 1. of, relating to, or concerned with self-propelled vehicles or machines 2. self-propelled
autonomic
adjective Date: 1898 1. acting or occurring involuntarily 2. relating to, affecting, or controlled by the autonomic nervous system or its effects or activity • ...
autonomic nervous system
noun Date: 1898 a part of the vertebrate nervous system that innervates smooth and cardiac muscle and glandular tissues and governs involuntary actions (as secretion and ...
autonomically
adverb see autonomic
autonomist
noun Date: 1865 one who advocates autonomy
autonomous
adjective Etymology: Greek autonomos independent, from aut- + nomos law — more at nimble Date: 1800 1. of, relating to, or marked by autonomy 2. a. having the right or ...
autonomously
adverb see autonomous
autonomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: circa 1623 1. the quality or state of being self-governing; especially the right of self-government 2. self-directing freedom and especially moral ...
autopilot
noun Date: 1935 1. a device for automatically steering ships, aircraft, and spacecraft 2. automatic pilot 2
autopolyploid
noun Date: 1930 an individual or strain whose chromosome complement consists of more than two complete copies of the genome of a single ancestral species • autopolyploid ...
autopolyploidy
noun see autopolyploid
autopsy
noun (plural -sies) Etymology: Greek autopsia act of seeing with one's own eyes, from aut- + opsis sight, appearance — more at optic Date: 1678 1. an examination of a body ...
autoradiogram
noun Date: 1949 autoradiograph
autoradiograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 an image produced on a photographic film or plate by the radiations from a radioactive substance in an object ...
autoradiographic
adjective see autoradiograph
autoradiography
noun see autoradiograph
autorotate
intransitive verb see autorotation
autorotation
noun Date: 1918 the turning of the rotor of an autogiro or a helicopter with the resulting lift caused solely by the aerodynamic forces induced by motion of the rotor along ...
autoroute
noun Etymology: French, from automobile + route Date: 1951 an expressway especially in France
autos-da-fé
plural of auto-da-fe
autosexing
adjective Date: 1936 exhibiting different characters in the two sexes at birth or hatching
autosomal
adjective see autosome
autosomally
adverb see autosome
autosome
noun Date: circa 1906 a chromosome other than a sex chromosome • autosomal adjective • autosomally adverb
autostrada
noun (plural -stradas or autostrade) Etymology: Italian, from automobile + strada street, from Late Latin strata paved road — more at street Date: 1927 an expressway ...
autosuggest
transitive verb see autosuggestion
autosuggestion
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 an influencing of one's own attitudes, behavior, or physical condition by mental processes other than conscious ...
autotelic
adjective Etymology: Greek autotelēs, from aut- + telos end — more at telos Date: circa 1901 having a purpose in and not apart from itself
autotetraploid
noun Date: 1930 an individual or strain whose chromosome complement consists of four copies of a single genome due to doubling of an ancestral chromosome complement • ...
autotetraploidy
noun see autotetraploid
autotomize
verb see autotomy
autotomous
adjective see autotomy
autotomy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1897 reflex separation of a part (as an appendage) from the body ; division of the body into two or more pieces • ...
autotransformer
noun Date: 1895 a transformer in which the primary and secondary coils have part or all of their turns in common
autotransfusion
noun Date: circa 1923 return of autologous blood to the patient's own circulatory system
autotroph
noun Etymology: German, from autotroph, adjective Date: 1938 an autotrophic organism
autotrophic
adjective Etymology: probably from German autotroph, from Greek autotrophos supplying one's own food, from aut- + trephein to nourish Date: 1893 1. requiring only carbon ...
autotrophically
adverb see autotrophic
autotrophy
noun see autotrophic
autoworker
noun Date: 1941 a person employed in the automobile manufacturing industry
autoxidation
noun Date: 1883 oxidation by direct combination with oxygen (as in air) at ordinary temperatures
autres temps, autres mœurs
foreign term Etymology: French other times, other customs
autumn
noun Etymology: Middle English autumpne, from Latin autumnus Date: 14th century 1. the season between summer and winter comprising in the northern hemisphere usually the ...
autumn crocus
noun Date: 1881 an autumn-blooming colchicum (Colchicum autumnale)
autumnal
adjective see autumn
autumnally
adverb see autumn
autunite
noun Etymology: Autun, town in France Date: circa 1852 a radioactive usually lemon-yellow calcium phosphate mineral that occurs in tabular crystals and in scales and that is ...
Auvergne
geographical name region & former province S central France capital Clermont (now Clermont-Ferrand)
Auvergne Mountains
geographical name mountains S central France; highest in the Massif Central — see sancy (Puy de)
aux
abbreviation auxiliary verb
aux armes
foreign term Etymology: French to arms
Aux Cayes
geographical name — see Cayes
Aux Sources, Mont
geographical name mountain 10,822 feet (3298 meters) N Lesotho in Drakensberg Mountains on South Africa border
auxiliary
I. adjective Etymology: Latin auxiliaris, from auxilium help; akin to Latin augēre to increase — more at eke Date: 15th century 1. a. offering or providing help b. ...
auxiliary bishop
noun see auxiliary II
auxin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek auxein to increase — more at eke Date: 1934 1. any of various usually acidic organic substances that promote ...
auxinic
adjective see auxin
auxotroph
noun Date: 1950 an auxotrophic strain or individual
auxotrophic
adjective Etymology: Greek auxein to increase + -o- + English -trophic Date: 1944 requiring a specific growth substance beyond the minimum required for normal metabolism and ...
auxotrophy
noun see auxotrophic
Auyán-tepuí
or Devil Mountain geographical name plateau about 20 miles (32 kilometers) long SE Venezuela E of the Caroní — see Angel Falls
Auyuittuq National Park
geographical name reservation NE Canada in E Baffin Island
av
abbreviation 1. avenue 2. average 3. avoirdupois
AV
abbreviation 1. ad valorem 2. audiovisual 3. Authorized Version
avail
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, Anglo-French availler, probably from a- (from Latin ad-) + valer, valoir to be of worth, from Latin valēre — more at wield Date: 14th ...
avail of
phrasal see avail oneself of
avail oneself of
also avail of phrasal to make use of ; take advantage of
availability
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1803 1. the quality or state of being available 2. an available person or thing
available
adjective Date: 15th century 1. archaic having a beneficial effect 2. valid — used of a legal plea or charge 3. present or ready for immediate use 4. accessible, ...
availableness
noun see available
availably
adverb see available
avalanche
I. noun Etymology: French, from French dialect (Franco-Provençal) lavantse, avalantse Date: 1771 1. a large mass of snow, ice, earth, rock, or other material in swift motion ...
Avalon
I. noun Date: 13th century a paradise to which Arthur is carried after his death II. geographical name peninsula Canada in SE Newfoundland
Avalon, Isle of
geographical name — see Isle of Avalon
avant
adjective Etymology: French avant- fore-, front, from avant before, from Latin abante Date: 1965 culturally or stylistically advanced ; avant-garde
avant la lettre
foreign term Etymology: French before the letter ; before a (specified) name or entity existed
avant-garde
I. noun Etymology: French, vanguard Date: 1910 an intelligentsia that develops new or experimental concepts especially in the arts • avant-gardism noun • avant-gardist ...
avant-gardism
noun see avant-garde I
avant-gardist
noun see avant-garde I
avant-propos
foreign term Etymology: French preface
avarice
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin avaritia, from avarus avaricious, from avēre to crave — more at avid Date: 14th century excessive or ...
avaricious
adjective Date: 15th century greedy of gain ; excessively acquisitive especially in seeking to hoard riches Synonyms: see covetous • avariciously adverb • avariciousness ...
avariciously
adverb see avaricious
avariciousness
noun see avaricious
Avarua
geographical name village capital of the Cook Islands on Rarotonga
avascular
adjective Date: circa 1900 having few or no blood vessels • avascularity noun
avascular necrosis
noun Date: 1953 necrosis of bone tissue due to impaired or disrupted blood supply (as that caused by traumatic injury or disease)
avascularity
noun see avascular
avast
verb imperative Etymology: perhaps from Dutch houd vast hold fast Date: 1681 — a nautical command to stop or cease
avatar
noun Etymology: Sanskrit avatāraḥ descent, from avatarati he descends, from ava- away + tarati he crosses over — more at ukase, through Date: 1784 1. the incarnation of a ...
avaunt
adverb Etymology: Middle English, literally, forward, from Anglo-French avant, from Latin abante forward, before, from ab from + ante before — more at of, ante- Date: 15th ...
AVC
abbreviation automatic volume control
avdp
abbreviation avoirdupois
ave
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, hail Date: 13th century 1. an expression of greeting or of leave-taking ; hail, farewell 2. often capitalized Ave Maria II. ...
ave atque vale
foreign term Etymology: Latin hail and farewell
Ave Maria
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, hail, Mary Date: 13th century Hail Mary 1
Avebury
I. biographical name 1st Baron — see Lubbock II. geographical name village S England in Wiltshire E of Bristol; has megalithic remains
avellan
or avellane adjective Etymology: Latin abellana, avellana filbert, from feminine of Abellanus of Abella, from Abella, ancient town in Italy Date: 1610 of a heraldic cross ...
avellane
adjective see avellan
Avellaneda
geographical name city E Argentina, E suburb of Buenos Aires, on Río de la Plata population 346,620
Avenches
or ancient Aventicum geographical name town W Switzerland in Vaud canton capital of ancient Helvetia
avenge
transitive verb (avenged; avenging) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French avenger, from a- (from Latin ad-) + venger to avenge — more at vengeance Date: 14th century ...
avenger
noun see avenge
avens
noun (plural avens) Etymology: Middle English avence, from Anglo-French avance, avence Date: 13th century any of a genus (Geum) of perennial herbs of the rose family with ...
aventail
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French aventaille, alteration of ventaille Date: 14th century ventail
Aventicum
geographical name see Avenches
Aventine
geographical name hill in Rome, Italy, one of seven (including also the Caelian, Capitoline, Esquiline, Palatine, Quirinal, & Viminal) on which the ancient city was built
Aventura
geographical name city SE Florida NNE of Miami population 25,267
aventurine
noun Etymology: French, from aventure chance — more at adventure Date: 1811 1. glass containing opaque sparkling particles of foreign material usually copper or chromic ...
avenue
noun Etymology: Middle French, from feminine of avenu, past participle of avenir to come to, from Latin advenire — more at adventure Date: 1600 1. a way of access ; route ...
Avenzoar
biographical name — see Ibn Zuhr
aver
transitive verb (averred; averring) Etymology: Middle English averren, from Anglo-French averer, from Medieval Latin adverare to confirm as authentic, from Latin ad- + verus true ...
average
I. noun Etymology: from earlier average proportionally distributed charge for damage at sea, modification of Middle French avarie damage to ship or cargo, from Old Italian ...
averagely
adverb see average II
averageness
noun see average II
averment
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act of averring 2. something that is averred ; affirmation
Avernus, Lake
or Italian Lago d'Averno geographical name lake S Italy in crater of extinct volcano W of Naples
Averrhoës
biographical name see Averroës
Averroës
or Averrhoës biographical name 1126-1198 also Ibn-Rushd Spanish-Arab philosopher & physician
averse
adjective Etymology: Latin aversus, past participle of avertere Date: 1597 having an active feeling of repugnance or distaste — usually used with to Synonyms: see ...
aversely
adverb see averse
averseness
noun see averse
aversion
noun Date: 1596 1. obsolete the act of turning away 2. a. a feeling of repugnance toward something with a desire to avoid or turn from it b. a settled dislike ; ...
aversion therapy
noun Date: 1946 therapy intended to suppress an undesirable habit or behavior (as smoking) by associating the habit or behavior with a noxious or punishing stimulus (as ...
aversive
adjective Date: 1923 tending to avoid or causing avoidance of a noxious or punishing stimulus • aversively adverb • aversiveness noun
aversively
adverb see aversive
aversiveness
noun see aversive
avert
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French avertir, from Latin avertere, from ab- + vertere to turn — more at worth Date: 15th century 1. to turn away or ...
Avery
biographical name Milton Clark 1885-1965 American artist
Avesta
noun Etymology: Middle Persian abestāg, literally, text Date: 1856 the book of the sacred writings of Zoroastrianism
Avestan
noun Date: 1856 an ancient Iranian language in which the sacred books of Zoroastrianism were written — see Indo-European languages table • Avestan adjective
avg
abbreviation average
avgas
noun Etymology: aviation gasoline Date: 1943 gasoline for airplanes
avgolemono
noun Etymology: New Greek augolemono, from augo egg + lemoni lemon Date: 1961 a soup or sauce made of chicken stock, rice, egg yolks, and lemon juice
avian
adjective Etymology: Latin avis Date: 1870 of, relating to, or derived from birds
aviary
noun (plural -aries) Etymology: Latin aviarium, from avis bird; akin to Greek aetos eagle Date: 1577 a place for keeping birds confined
aviate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: back-formation from aviation Date: 1887 to navigate the air (as in an airplane)
aviation
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French, from Latin avis Date: 1866 1. the operation of heavier-than-air aircraft 2. military airplanes 3. airplane manufacture, ...
aviator
noun Date: 1887 the operator or pilot of an aircraft and especially an airplane
aviator glasses
noun plural Date: 1968 eyeglasses having a lightweight metal frame and relatively large usually tinted lenses
aviatrix
noun (plural aviatrixes or aviatrices) Date: 1910 a woman who is an aviator
Avicenna
biographical name 980-1037 also Ibn Sīnā Islamic (Persian-born) philosopher & scientist
aviculture
noun Etymology: Latin avis + English culture Date: circa 1879 the raising and care of birds and especially of wild birds in captivity • aviculturist noun
aviculturist
noun see aviculture
avid
adjective Etymology: French or Latin; French avide, from Latin avidus, from avēre to desire, crave; akin to Welsh ewyllys desire, Old Irish con-oí he protects Date: 1769 1. ...
avidin
noun Etymology: from its avidity for biotin Date: 1941 a protein found in egg white that inactivates biotin by combining with it
avidity
noun (plural -ities) Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being avid: a. keen eagerness b. consuming greed 2. affinity 2b(2)
avidly
adverb see avid
avidness
noun see avid
avifauna
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin avis + New Latin fauna Date: 1873 the birds or the kinds of birds of a region, period, or environment • avifaunal adjective
avifaunal
adjective see avifauna
Avignon
geographical name city SE France population 89,440
Ávila
geographical name 1. province central Spain area 3107 square miles (8047 square kilometers), population 174,378 2. city, its capital, WNW of Madrid population 45,977
Ávila Camacho
biographical name Manuel 1897-1955 Mexican soldier & politician; president of Mexico (1940-46)
avionic
adjective see avionics
avionics
noun plural Etymology: aviation electronics Date: 1949 electronics designed for use in aerospace vehicles • avionic adjective
avirulent
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1900 not virulent — compare nonpathogenic
avitaminosis
noun (plural avitaminoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1914 disease (as pellagra) resulting from a deficiency of one or more vitamins • avitaminotic adjective
avitaminotic
adjective see avitaminosis
Avlona
geographical name — see vlore
avo
noun (plural avos) Etymology: Portuguese, from avo fractional part, from -avo ordinal suffix (as in oitavo eighth, from Latin octavus) — more at octave Date: circa 1909 — ...
avocado
noun (plural -dos; also -does) Etymology: modification of Spanish aguacate, from Nahuatl āhuacatl avocado, testicle Date: 1697 1. a pulpy green- to purple-skinned ...
avocado pear
noun Date: 1830 chiefly British avocado 1
avocation
noun Etymology: Latin avocation-, avocatio, from avocare to call away, from ab- + vocare to call, from voc-, vox voice — more at voice Date: circa 1617 1. archaic diversion, ...
avocational
adjective Date: 1921 1. of or relating to an avocation 2. being such by avocation • avocationally adverb
avocationally
adverb see avocational
avocet
noun Etymology: French & Italian; French avocette, from Italian avocetta Date: 1766 any of a genus (Recurvirostra) of rather large long-legged shorebirds with webbed feet and ...
Avogadro
biographical name Amedeo 1776-1856 Conte di Quaregna e Ceretto Italian chemist & physicist
Avogadro number
noun see Avogadro's number
Avogadro's number
noun Etymology: Count Amedeo Avogadro Date: 1924 the number 6.022 × 1023 indicating the number of atoms or molecules in a mole of any substance — called also Avogadro number
avoid
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French avoider, alteration of Old French esvuider, from es- (from Latin ex-) + vuider to empty — more at void Date: 14th ...
avoidable
adjective see avoid
avoidably
adverb see avoid
avoidance
noun Date: 14th century 1. obsolete a. an action of emptying, vacating, or clearing away b. outlet 2. annulment 1 3. an act or practice of avoiding or withdrawing ...
avoider
noun see avoid
avoirdupois
I. noun Etymology: Middle English avoir de pois goods sold by weight, from Anglo-French, literally, goods of weight Date: 15th century 1. avoirdupois weight 2. weight, ...
avoirdupois weight
noun Date: 1619 the series of units of weight based on the pound of 16 ounces and the ounce of 16 drams — see weight table
Avon
I. biographical name Earl of — see Anthony Eden II. geographical name 1. river 96 miles (154 kilometers) central England rising in Northamptonshire & flowing WSW past ...
Avondale
geographical name city S central Arizona W of Tempe population 35,883
avouch
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to cite as authority, from Middle French avochier to summon, from Latin advocare — more at advocate Date: 15th century 1. to ...
avouchment
noun Date: 1574 an act of avouching ; avowal
avow
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French avuer, avouer, from Latin advocare Date: 14th century 1. to declare assuredly 2. to declare openly, bluntly, ...
avowal
noun Date: circa 1686 an open declaration or acknowledgment
avowedly
adverb Date: 1656 1. with open acknowledgment ; frankly 2. by unsupported assertion or profession alone ; allegedly
avower
noun see avow
Avranches
geographical name town NW France in SW Normandy
avulse
transitive verb (avulsed; avulsing) Etymology: Latin avulsus, past participle of avellere to tear off, from ab- + vellere to pluck — more at vulnerable Date: circa 1765 to ...
avulsion
noun Date: 1622 a forcible separation or detachment: as a. a tearing away of a body part accidentally or surgically b. a sudden cutting off of land by flood, currents, ...
avuncular
adjective Etymology: Latin avunculus maternal uncle — more at uncle Date: 1831 1. of or relating to an uncle 2. suggestive of an uncle especially in kindliness or ...
avuncularity
noun see avuncular
avuncularly
adverb see avuncular
aw
interjection Date: 1852 — used to express mild disappointment, gentle entreaty, or real or mock sympathy or sentiment
AW
abbreviation 1. actual weight 2. aircraft warning 3. articles of war 4. automatic weapon
aw-shucks
adjective Date: 1951 being or marked by an unsophisticated, self-conscious, or self-effacing manner
AWACS
abbreviation airborne warning and control system
await
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French aweiter, aguaiter, from a- (from Latin ad-) + guaiter to watch — more at wait Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. ...
Awaji
geographical name island Japan S of Honshu & NE of Shikoku
awake
I. verb (awoke; also awaked; awoken or awaked; also awoke; awaking) Etymology: Middle English awaken (from Old English awacan, onwacan, from 1a-, on + wacan to awake) & awakien, ...
awaken
verb (awakened; awakening) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English awæcnian, from a- + wæcnian to waken Date: before 12th century awake • awakener noun
awakener
noun see awaken
award
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to decide, from Anglo-French awarder, agarder to look at, examine, resolve, from a- (from Latin ad-) + warder, garder to look ...
awardable
adjective see award I
awardee
noun see award I
awarder
noun see award I
aware
adjective Etymology: Middle English iwar, from Old English gewær, from ge- (associative prefix) + wær wary — more at co-, wary Date: before 12th century 1. archaic ...
awareness
noun see aware
awash
adjective Date: 1831 1. a. alternately covered and exposed by waves or tide b. washing about ; afloat c. covered with water ; flooded 2. filled, covered, or ...
Awash
geographical name river 500 miles (805 kilometers) E Ethiopia flowing NE
away
I. adverb Date: before 12th century 1. on the way ; along 2. from this or that place 3. a. in a secure place or manner b. in another direction 4. out of ...
awayness
noun see away II
awd
abbreviation all-wheel drive
awe
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old Norse agi; akin to Old English ege awe, Greek achos pain Date: 13th century 1. an emotion variously combining dread, veneration, ...
aweary
adjective Date: 1537 archaic being weary
aweather
adverb Date: 1599 on or toward the weather or windward side — compare alee
awed
adjective Date: 1592 showing awe
aweigh
adjective Date: 1670 raised just clear of the bottom — used of an anchor
aweless
also awless adjective Date: 14th century 1. feeling no awe 2. obsolete inspiring no awe
awesome
adjective Date: 1598 1. expressive of awe 2. a. inspiring awe b. terrific, extraordinary • awesomely adverb • awesomeness noun
awesomely
adverb see awesome
awesomeness
noun see awesome
awestricken
adjective see awestruck
awestruck
also awestricken adjective Date: 1634 filled with awe
awful
I. adjective Date: 13th century 1. inspiring awe 2. filled with awe: as a. obsolete afraid, terrified b. deeply respectful or reverential 3. extremely disagreeable ...
awfully
adverb see awful I
awfulness
noun see awful I
awhile
adverb Date: before 12th century for a while Usage: Although considered a solecism by many commentators, awhile, like several other adverbs of time and place, is often ...
awhirl
adjective Date: 1843 being in a whirl
awkward
adjective Etymology: Middle English awkeward in the wrong direction, from awke turned the wrong way, from Old Norse ǫfugr; akin to Old High German abuh turned the wrong way ...
awkwardly
adverb see awkward
awkwardness
noun see awkward
awl
noun Etymology: Middle English al, from Old English æl; akin to Old High German āla awl, Sanskrit ārā Date: before 12th century a pointed tool for marking surfaces or ...

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