Слова на букву acto-axio (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву acto-axio (6389)

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ammonification
noun Date: 1886 1. the act or process of ammoniating 2. decomposition with production of ammonia or ammonium compounds especially by the action of bacteria on nitrogenous ...
ammonify
verb see ammonification
ammonite
noun Etymology: New Latin ammonites, from Latin cornu Ammonis, literally, horn of Ammon Date: 1758 any of a subclass (Ammonoidea) of extinct cephalopods especially abundant ...
Ammonite
noun Etymology: Late Latin Ammonites, from Hebrew ‘Ammōn Ammon (son of Lot), descendant of Ammon Date: 1530 a member of a Semitic people who in Old Testament times lived ...
ammonitic
adjective see ammonite
ammonium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from ammonia Date: 1808 an ion NH4+ derived from ammonia by combination with a hydrogen ion and known in compounds (as salts) that resemble in ...
Ammonium
geographical name — see Siwa
ammonium carbonate
noun Date: circa 1829 a carbonate of ammonium; specifically the commercial mixture of the bicarbonate and carbamate used especially in smelling salts
ammonium chloride
noun Date: 1869 a white crystalline volatile salt NH4Cl that is used in dry cells and as an expectorant — called also sal ammoniac
ammonium cyanate
noun Date: circa 1881 an inorganic white crystalline salt NH4CNO that can be converted into organic urea
ammonium hydroxide
noun Date: 1899 a weakly basic compound NH4OH that is formed when ammonia dissolves in water and that exists only in solution
ammonium nitrate
noun Date: 1869 a colorless crystalline salt NH4NO3 used in explosives and fertilizers and in veterinary medicine
ammonium phosphate
noun Date: 1880 a phosphate of ammonium; especially diammonium phosphate
ammonium sulfate
noun Date: 1869 a colorless crystalline salt (NH4)2SO4 used chiefly as a fertilizer
ammonoid
noun Date: 1884 ammonite
ammunition
noun Etymology: obsolete French amunition, from Middle French, alteration of munition Date: 1607 1. a. the projectiles with their fuses, propelling charges, or primers ...
Amn
abbreviation airman
amn't
Date: 1618 chiefly Scottish & Irish am not
Amne Machin
geographical name — see a'nyêmaqen
amnesia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek amnēsia forgetfulness, alteration of amnēstia Date: 1618 1. loss of memory due usually to brain injury, shock, fatigue, repression, or ...
amnesiac
adjective or noun see amnesia
amnesic
adjective or noun see amnesia
amnesty
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Greek amnēstia forgetfulness, from amnēstos forgotten, from a- + mnasthai to remember — more at mind Date: 1580 the act of an authority (as ...
amnio
noun (plural amnios) Date: 1983 amniocentesis
amniocentesis
noun (plural amniocenteses) Etymology: New Latin, from amnion + centesis puncture, from Greek kentesis, from kentein to prick — more at center Date: 1957 the surgical ...
amnion
noun (plural amnions or amnia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, caul, from amnos lamb — more at yean Date: 1667 1. a thin membrane forming a closed sac about the embryos or ...
amniote
noun Etymology: New Latin Amniota, from amnion Date: 1887 any of a group (Amniota) of vertebrates that undergo embryonic or fetal development within an amnion and include the ...
amniotic
adjective see amnion
amniotic fluid
noun Date: circa 1855 the serous fluid in which the embryo or fetus is suspended within the amnion
amniotic sac
noun Date: circa 1881 amnion
Amo
geographical name — see black
amobarbital
noun Etymology: amyl + -o- + barbital Date: 1949 a barbiturate C11H18N2O3 used as a hypnotic and sedative; also its sodium salt
amoeba
also ameba noun (plural -bas or amoebae) Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek amoibē change, from ameibein to change — more at migrate Date: 1855 any of a large ...
amoebiasis
variant of amebiasis
amoebic
adjective see amoeba
amoebocyte
also amebocyte noun Date: 1892 a cell (as a phagocyte) having amoeboid form or movements
amoeboid
also ameboid adjective Date: 1856 resembling an amoeba specifically in moving or changing in shape by means of protoplasmic flow
amok
I. noun or amuck Etymology: Malay amok Date: 1665 a murderous frenzy that has traditionally been regarded as occurring especially in Malaysian culture II. adverb or amuck ...
amole
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from Nahuatl ahmōlli soap Date: 1831 a plant part (as a root) possessing detergent properties and serving as a substitute for soap; also a ...
among
also amongst preposition Etymology: among from Middle English, from Old English on gemonge, from on + gemonge, dative of gemong crowd, from ge- (associative prefix) + -mong (akin ...
amongst
preposition see among
amontillado
noun (plural -dos) Etymology: Spanish, literally, done in the manner of Montilla, town in Andalusia Date: 1825 a medium dry sherry
amor patriae
foreign term Etymology: Latin love of one's country
amor vincit omnia
foreign term Etymology: Latin love conquers all things
amoral
adjective Date: 1779 1. a. being neither moral nor immoral; specifically lying outside the sphere to which moral judgments apply b. lacking moral sensibility 2. ...
amoralism
noun see amoral
amorality
noun see amoral
amorally
adverb see amoral
amoretto
noun (plural amoretti or -tos) Etymology: Italian, diminutive of amore love, cupid, from Latin amor Date: 1622 Cupid, cherub 2
Amorgós
geographical name island Greece in the Aegean in SE Cyclades SE of Naxos area 47 square miles (122 square kilometers)
amorist
noun Date: 1581 1. a devotee of love and especially sexual love ; gallant 2. one who writes about romantic love • amoristic adjective
amoristic
adjective see amorist
Amorite
noun Etymology: Hebrew Ĕmōrī Date: 1535 a member of one of various Semitic peoples living in Mesopotamia, Syria, and Palestine during the third and second millennia B.C. ...
amorous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin amorosus, from Latin amor love, from amare to love Date: 14th century 1. strongly moved by love and ...
amorously
adverb see amorous
amorousness
noun see amorous
amorphous
adjective Etymology: Greek amorphos, from a- + morphē form Date: circa 1731 1. a. having no definite form ; shapeless b. being without definite character or nature ; ...
amorphously
adverb see amorphous
amorphousness
noun see amorphous
amort
adjective Etymology: short for all-a-mort, by folk etymology from Middle French a la mort to the death Date: 1546 archaic being at the point of death
amortizable
adjective see amortize
amortization
noun Date: 1851 1. the act or process of amortizing 2. the result of amortizing
amortize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Etymology: Middle English amortisen to kill, alienate in mortmain, from Anglo-French amorteser, alteration of amortir, from Vulgar Latin ...
Amos
noun Etymology: Hebrew ‘Āmōs Date: before 12th century 1. a Hebrew prophet of the eighth century B.C. 2. a prophetic book of canonical Jewish and Christian Scripture — ...
amosite
noun Etymology: Amosa (from Asbestos Mines of South Africa) + 1-ite Date: circa 1918 an iron-rich amphibole that is a variety of asbestos
amount
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French amounter, from amount upward, from a- (from Latin ad-) + mont mountain — more at mount Date: 14th century ...
amour
noun Etymology: Middle English, love, affection, from Anglo-French, from Old Occitan amor, from Latin, from amare to love Date: 14th century a usually illicit love affair; ...
amour propre
noun Etymology: French amour-propre, literally, love of oneself Date: 1775 self-esteem
amoxicillin
noun Etymology: amino + ox- + penicillin Date: 1971 a semisynthetic penicillin C16H19N3O5S derived from ampicillin
amoxycillin
British variant of amoxicillin
Amoy
I. noun Date: 1904 the dialect of Chinese spoken in and near Xiamen (Amoy) in southeastern China II. geographical name — see Xiamen
AMP
noun Etymology: adenosine monophosphate Date: 1951 a nucleotide C10H12N5O3H2PO4 composed of adenosine and one phosphate group that is reversibly convertible to ADP and ATP in ...
amp
I. noun Etymology: by shortening Date: 1886 1. ampere 2. amplifier; also a unit consisting of an electronic amplifier and a loudspeaker II. transitive verb Date: 1972 ...
amp hr
abbreviation ampere-hour
amperage
noun Date: 1893 the strength of a current of electricity expressed in amperes
ampere
noun Etymology: André-Marie Ampère Date: 1881 1. the practical meter-kilogram-second unit of electric current that is equivalent to a flow of one coulomb per second or to ...
Ampère
biographical name André-Marie 1775-1836 French physicist
ampere-hour
noun Date: 1883 a unit quantity of electricity equal to the quantity carried past any point of a circuit in one hour by a steady current of one ampere
ampere-turn
noun Date: 1884 the meter-kilogram-second unit of magnetomotive force equal to the magnetomotive force around a path that links with one turn of wire carrying an electric ...
amperometric
adjective Etymology: ampere + -o- + -metric Date: 1940 relating to or being a chemical titration in which the measurement of the electric current flowing under an applied ...
ampersand
noun Etymology: alteration of and (&) per se and, literally, (the character) & by itself (is the word) and Date: 1835 a character typically & standing for the word and
amph-
prefix see amphi-
amphetamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary alpha + methyl + phen- + ethyl + amine Date: 1938 a racemic compound C9H13N or one of its derivatives (as dextroamphetamine ...
amphi-
or amph- prefix Etymology: Latin amphi- around, on both sides, from Greek amphi-, amph-, from amphi — more at ambi- on both sides ; of both kinds ; both
amphibia
noun plural Date: 1607 amphibians
amphibian
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek amphibion amphibious being, from neuter of amphibios Date: 1835 1. an amphibious organism; especially any of a class (Amphibia) of ...
amphibious
adjective Etymology: Greek amphibios, literally, living a double life, from amphi- + bios mode of life — more at quick Date: 1643 1. combining two characteristics 2. a. ...
amphibiously
adverb see amphibious
amphibiousness
noun see amphibious
amphibole
noun Etymology: French, from Late Latin amphibolus, from Greek amphibolos ambiguous, from amphiballein to throw round, doubt, from amphi- + ballein to throw — more at devil ...
amphibolite
noun Date: 1826 a usually metamorphic rock consisting essentially of amphibole
amphibology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: Middle English amphibologie, from Late Latin amphibologia, alteration of Latin amphibolia, from Greek, from amphibolos Date: 14th century a ...
amphiboly
noun (plural -lies) Etymology: Late Latin amphibolia Date: circa 1588 amphibology
amphibrach
noun Etymology: Latin amphibrachys, from Greek, literally, short at both ends, from amphi- + brachys short — more at brief Date: 1858 a metrical foot consisting of a long ...
amphibrachic
adjective see amphibrach
amphictyonic
adjective see amphictyony
amphictyony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: Greek amphiktyonia, from amphiktiones neighbors, from amphi- + -ktiones, from ktizein to found, inhabit — more at home Date: 1835 an ...
amphidiploid
noun Date: 1930 an interspecific hybrid having a complete diploid chromosome set from each parent form — called also allotetraploid • amphidiploid adjective • ...
amphidiploidy
noun see amphidiploid
amphimixis
noun (plural amphimixes) Etymology: New Latin, from amphi- + Greek mixis mingling, from mignynai to mix — more at mix Date: 1893 the union of gametes in sexual reproduction
Amphion
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Amphiōn Date: 15th century a musician of Greek mythology who builds the walls of Thebes by charming the stones into place with his lyre
amphioxus
noun (plural amphioxi or -oxuses) Etymology: New Latin, from amphi- + Greek oxys sharp Date: 1847 any of a genus (Branchiostoma) of lancelets; broadly lancelet
amphipathic
adjective Etymology: amphi- + -pathic (as in empathic) Date: 1936 amphiphilic
amphiphile
noun see amphiphilic
amphiphilic
adjective Date: 1948 of, relating to, or being a compound (as a surfactant) consisting of molecules having a polar water-soluble group attached to a water-insoluble ...
amphiploid
adjective Date: 1945 of an interspecific hybrid having at least one complete diploid set of chromosomes derived from each parent species • amphiploid noun • amphiploidy ...
amphiploidy
noun see amphiploid
amphipod
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek amphi- + pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: 1835 any of a large order (Amphipoda) of small crustaceans (as the sand flea) with a ...
amphiprostyle
adjective Etymology: Latin amphiprostylos, from Greek, from amphi- + prostylos having pillars in front, from pro- + stylos pillar — more at steer Date: 1850 having columns ...
amphisbaena
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek amphisbaina, from amphis on both sides (from amphi around) + bainein to walk, go — more at by, come Date: 14th century a serpent in ...
amphisbaenic
adjective see amphisbaena
amphitheater
noun Etymology: Latin amphitheatrum, from Greek amphitheatron, from amphi- + theatron theater Date: 14th century 1. an oval or circular building with rising tiers of seats ...
amphitheatric
adjective see amphitheater
amphitheatrical
adjective see amphitheater
amphitheatrically
adverb see amphitheater
Amphitryon
noun Etymology: Greek Amphitryōn Date: 1567 the husband of Alcmene
amphora
noun (plural amphorae or -ras) Etymology: Latin, modification of Greek amphoreus, amphiphoreus, from amphi- + phoreus bearer, from pherein to bear — more at bear Date: 14th ...
amphoteric
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek amphoteros each of two, from amphō both — more at ambi- Date: circa 1849 partly one and partly the ...
amphotericin B
noun Etymology: amphoteric + 1-in Date: 1955 an antifungal antibiotic obtained from a soil streptomycete (Streptomyces nodosus) and used especially to treat systemic fungal ...
ampicillin
noun Etymology: amino + penicillin Date: 1961 a penicillin C16H19N3O4S that is effective against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and is used to treat various ...
ample
adjective (ampler; amplest) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin amplus Date: 15th century 1. generous or more than adequate in size, scope, or capacity ...
ampleness
noun see ample
amplexus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, embrace, from amplecti to embrace, from am-, amb- around + plectere to braid — more at ambi-, ply Date: circa 1927 the mating embrace ...
amplification
noun Date: 1546 1. a. an act, example, or product of amplifying b. a usually massive replication of genetic material and especially of a gene or DNA sequence (as in a ...
amplifier
noun Date: 1546 one that amplifies; specifically an electronic device (as in a stereo system) for amplifying voltage, current, or power
amplify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English amplifien, from Middle French amplifier, from Latin amplificare, from amplus Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to expand ...
amplitude
noun Date: 1542 1. extent of dignity, excellence, or splendor 2. the quality or state of being ample ; fullness, abundance 3. the extent or range of a quality, property, ...
amplitude modulation
noun Date: 1921 modulation of the amplitude of a radio carrier wave in accordance with the strength of the audio or other signal; also a broadcasting system using such ...
amply
adverb see ample
ampoule
or ampule; also ampul noun Etymology: Middle English ampulle flask, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English ampulle & Anglo-French ampuille, from Latin ampulla Date: 1907 ...
ampul
noun see ampoule
ampule
noun see ampoule
ampulla
noun (plural ampullae) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Latin, diminutive of amphora Date: before 12th century 1. a glass or earthenware flask with a globular ...
ampulla of Lorenzini
Etymology: Stefano Lorenzini fl1678 Italian physician Date: 1898 any of the pores on the snouts of marine sharks and rays that contain receptors highly sensitive to weak ...
ampullary
adjective see ampulla
amputate
transitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin amputatus, past participle of amputare, from am-, amb- around + putare to cut, prune — more at ambi- Date: 1612 to remove ...
amputation
noun see amputate
amputee
noun Date: 1910 one that has had a limb amputated
Amraoti
geographical name see Amravati
Amravati
or formerly Amraoti geographical name city central India in NE Maharashtra; chief city of Berar region population 421,576
Amritsar
geographical name city N India in NW Punjab population 709,456
Amsterdam
geographical name city & port, official capital of the Netherlands population 713,407 • Amsterdammer noun
Amsterdammer
noun see Amsterdam
amt
abbreviation amount
amtrac
or amtrack noun Etymology: amphibious + tractor Date: 1944 a flat-bottomed military vehicle that moves on tracks on land or water
amtrack
noun see amtrac
amu
abbreviation atomic mass unit
Amu Dar'ya
or ancient Oxus geographical name river over 1500 miles (2400 kilometers), central & W Asia flowing from Pamir plateau into Aral Sea
amuck
variant of amok
amulet
noun Etymology: Latin amuletum Date: 1584 a charm (as an ornament) often inscribed with a magic incantation or symbol to aid the wearer or protect against evil (as disease or ...
Amundsen
biographical name Roald 1872-1928 Norwegian polar explorer
Amundsen Gulf
geographical name arm of Beaufort Sea N Canada
Amundsen Sea
geographical name arm of the S Pacific W Antarctica off Marie Byrd Land
Amur
or Chinese Heilong or Hei-lung geographical name river about 1780 miles (2865 kilometers) E Asia formed by junction of the Shilka & the Argun, flowing into the Pacific at N end ...
amuse
verb (amused; amusing) Etymology: Middle French amuser, from Old French, from a- (from Latin ad-) + muser to muse Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. a. archaic to ...
amusedly
adverb see amuse
amusement
noun Date: 1603 1. a means of amusing or entertaining 2. the condition of being amused 3. pleasurable diversion ; entertainment
amusement park
noun Date: 1909 a commercially operated park having various devices for entertainment (as a merry-go-round and roller coaster) and usually booths for the sale of food and drink
amuser
noun see amuse
amusing
adjective Date: 1681 giving amusement ; diverting • amusingly adverb • amusingness noun
amusingly
adverb see amusing
amusingness
noun see amusing
AMVETS
abbreviation American Veterans (of World War II)
Amvrakikós Kólpos
geographical name see Ambracian Gulf
amygdala
noun (plural amygdalae) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, almond, from Greek amygdalē Date: 1845 the one of the four basal ganglia in each cerebral hemisphere that is part of ...
amygdalin
noun Etymology: Latin amygdala Date: 1651 a white crystalline cyanogenetic glucoside C20H27NO11 found especially in the seeds of the apricot, peach, and bitter almond — ...
amygdaloid
adjective Etymology: Greek amygdaloeidēs, from amygdalē Date: 1836 1. almond-shaped 2. of, relating to, or affecting an amygdala
amygdaloid nucleus
noun see amygdala
amygdaloidal
adjective Date: 1813 of, being, or containing small cavities in igneous rock that are filled with deposits of different minerals (as chalcedony or calcite) • amygdaloid noun
amyl
noun Etymology: Latin amylum + English -yl Date: 1847 any of various isomeric alkyl radicals C5H11– derived from pentane
amyl acetate
noun Date: circa 1881 a colorless liquid acetate C7H14O2 of amyl alcohol that has a pleasant fruity odor and is used especially as a solvent and in the manufacture of ...
amyl alcohol
noun Date: 1863 any of eight isomeric alcohols C5H12O used especially as solvents and in making esters; also a commercially produced mixture of amyl alcohols used especially ...
amyl nitrate
noun Date: 1927 1. a colorless liquid ester C5H11NO3 of amyl alcohol and nitric acid 2. amyl nitrite — not used technically
amyl nitrite
noun Date: circa 1881 a pale yellow pungent flammable liquid ester C5H11NO2 of commercial amyl alcohol and nitrous acid that is used in medicine as a vasodilator and inhaled ...
amyl-
or amylo- combining form Etymology: Latin amylum, from Greek amylon, from neuter of amylos unmilled (of grain), from a- + mylē mill — more at meal starch
amylase
noun Date: 1893 any of a group of enzymes (as amylopsin) that catalyze the hydrolysis of starch and glycogen or their intermediate hydrolysis products
amylo-
combining form see amyl-
amyloid
noun Date: 1866 a waxy translucent substance consisting primarily of protein that is deposited in some animal organs and tissues under abnormal conditions (as Alzheimer's ...
amyloidosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1900 a disorder characterized by the deposition of amyloid in bodily organs and tissues
amylolytic
adjective Etymology: New Latin amylolysis, from amyl- + -lysis Date: 1876 characterized by or capable of the enzymatic splitting of starch into soluble products
amylopectin
noun Date: 1905 a component of starch that has a high molecular weight and branched structure and does not tend to gel in aqueous solutions
amyloplast
noun Date: 1886 a colorless plastid that forms and stores starch
amylopsin
noun Etymology: amyl- + -psin (as in trypsin) Date: circa 1881 the amylase of the pancreatic juice
amylose
noun Date: 1866 a component of starch characterized by its straight chains of glucose units
amyotonia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1907 deficiency of muscle tone
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
noun Etymology: 2a- + my- + -trophic Date: 1886 a rare progressive degenerative fatal disease affecting the motor neurons, usually beginning in middle age, and characterized ...
Amytal
trademark — used for amobarbital
AN
abbreviation airman (Navy)
an
I. indefinite article Etymology: Middle English, from Old English ān one — more at one Date: before 12th century a II Usage: see a II II. preposition Date: before 12th ...
an eye for an eye
phrasal retribution in kind
An Nafūd
or Nafud geographical name desert N Saudi Arabia in N Nejd
An Najaf
geographical name city S central Iraq W of the Euphrates population 242,603
An Nhon
or formerly Binh Dinh geographical name city central Vietnam in S Annam
an'
conjunction see an III
an-
— see a- II
An-ch'ing
geographical name — see Anqing
ANA
abbreviation American Nurses Association
ana
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Greek, at the rate of, literally, up Date: 14th century of each an equal quantity II. noun (plural ana or ...
ana-
or an- prefix Etymology: Latin, from Greek, up, back, again, from ana up — more at on 1. up ; upward 2. back ; backward
anabaptism
noun Etymology: New Latin anabaptismus, from Late Greek anabaptismos rebaptism, from anabaptizein to rebaptize, from Greek ana- again + baptizein to baptize Date: 1575 1. ...
Anabaptist
noun Date: 1532 a Protestant sectarian of a radical movement arising in the 16th century and advocating the baptism and church membership of adult believers only, ...
anabasis
noun (plural anabases) Etymology: Greek, inland march, from anabainein to go up or inland, from ana- + bainein to go — more at come Date: circa 1706 1. a going or marching ...
anabatic
adjective Etymology: Greek anabatos, verbal of anabainein Date: 1853 moving upward ; rising
anabolic
adjective see anabolism
anabolic steroid
noun Date: 1961 any of a group of usually synthetic hormones that are derivatives of testosterone, are used medically especially to promote tissue growth, and are sometimes ...
anabolism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary ana- + metabolism Date: 1886 the constructive part of metabolism concerned especially with macromolecular synthesis — ...
anachronic
adjective see anachronism
anachronism
noun Etymology: probably from Middle Greek anachronismos, from anachronizesthai to be an anachronism, from Late Greek anachronizein to be late, from Greek ana- + chronos time ...
anachronistic
adjective see anachronism
anachronistically
adverb see anachronism
anachronous
adjective see anachronism
anachronously
adverb see anachronism
anaclitic
adjective Etymology: Greek anaklitos, verbal of anaklinein to lean upon, from ana- + klinein to lean — more at lean Date: 1922 of, relating to, or characterized by the ...
anacoluthic
adjective see anacoluthon
anacoluthically
adverb see anacoluthon
anacoluthon
noun (plural anacolutha; also -thons) Etymology: Late Latin, from Late Greek anakolouthon inconsistency in logic, from Greek, neuter of anakolouthos inconsistent, from an- + ...
anaconda
noun Etymology: probably modification of Sinhalese henakandayā, a slender green snake Date: 1768 a large semiaquatic constricting snake (Eunectes murinus) of the boa family ...
Anacreon
biographical name circa 582-circa 485 B.C. Greek poet
anacreontic
noun Date: 1656 a poem in the manner of Anacreon; especially a drinking song or light lyric
Anacreontic
adjective Etymology: Latin anacreonticus, from Anacreont-, Anacreon Anacreon, from Greek Anakreont-, Anakreōn Date: 1611 1. of, relating to, or resembling the poetry of ...
anacrusis
noun (plural anacruses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek anakrousis beginning of a song, from anakrouein to begin a song, from ana- + krouein to strike, beat; akin to Lithuanian ...
anadama bread
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1954 a leavened bread made with flour, cornmeal, and molasses
anadem
noun Etymology: Latin anadema, from Greek anadēma, from anadein to wreathe, from ana- + dein to bind — more at diadem Date: 1598 archaic a wreath for the head ; garland
anadiplosis
noun (plural anadiploses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek anadiplōsis, literally, repetition, from anadiploun to double, from ana- + diploun to double — more at diploma ...
anadromous
adjective Etymology: Greek anadromos running upward, from anadramein to run upward, from ana- + dramein to run — more at dromedary Date: circa 1753 ascending rivers from the ...
Anadyr
geographical name river 694 miles (1117 kilometers) E Russia in Asia flowing S & E to Gulf of Anadyr
Anadyr, Gulf of
or Gulf of Anadir geographical name inlet of N Bering Sea E Russia in Asia S of Chukchi Peninsula
anaemia
chiefly British variant of anemia
anaemic
chiefly British variant of anemic
anaerobe
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 an anaerobic organism
anaerobic
adjective Date: circa 1881 1. a. living, active, occurring, or existing in the absence of free oxygen b. of, relating to, or being activity in which the body incurs an ...
anaerobically
adverb see anaerobic
anaerobiosis
noun (plural anaerobioses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1889 life in the absence of air or free oxygen
anaesthesia
chiefly British variant of anesthesia
anaesthesiologist
chiefly British variant of anesthesiologist
anaesthesiology
chiefly British variant of anesthesiology
anaesthetic
chiefly British variant of anesthetic
anaesthetise
chiefly British variant of anesthetize
anaesthetist
chiefly British variant of anesthetist
anagenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1889 evolutionary change producing a single lineage in which one taxon replaces another without branching — compare cladogenesis
anaglyph
noun Etymology: Late Latin anaglyphus embossed, from Greek anaglyphos, from anaglyphein to emboss, from ana- + glyphein to carve — more at cleave Date: 1651 1. a sculptured, ...
anaglyphic
adjective see anaglyph
anagnorisis
noun (plural anagnorises) Etymology: Greek anagnōrisis, from anagnōrizein to recognize, from ana- + gnōrizein to make known; akin to Greek gnōrimos well-known, gignōskein ...
anagoge
or anagogy noun (plural -ges or -gies) Etymology: Late Latin anagoge, from Late Greek anagōgē, from Greek, reference, from anagein to refer, from ana- + agein to lead — more ...
anagogic
adjective see anagoge
anagogical
adjective see anagoge
anagogically
adverb see anagoge
anagogy
noun see anagoge
anagram
I. noun Etymology: probably from Middle French anagramme, from New Latin anagrammat-, anagramma, modification of Greek anagrammatismos, from anagrammatizein to transpose ...
anagrammatic
adjective see anagram I
anagrammatical
adjective see anagram I
anagrammatically
adverb see anagram I
anagrammatization
noun see anagrammatize
anagrammatize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1588 to transpose (as letters in a word) so as to form an anagram • anagrammatization noun
Anaheim
I. noun Etymology: Anaheim, Calif. Date: 1936 a long tapered green usually mild chili pepper II. geographical name city SW California E of Long Beach population 328,014
Anáhuac
geographical name the central plateau of Mexico
anal
I. adjective Date: 1769 1. of, relating to, situated near, or involving the anus 2. a. of, relating to, characterized by, or being the stage of psychosexual development ...
anal-retentive
adjective Date: 1953 exhibiting or typifying personality traits (as frugality and obstinacy) held to be psychological consequences of toilet training • anal-retentive noun ...
anal-retentiveness
noun see anal-retentive
analcime
noun Etymology: French, from Greek analkimos weak, from an- + alkimos strong, from alkē strength Date: 1803 a white or slightly colored mineral that consists of hydrated ...
analecta
noun plural see analects
analects
also analecta noun plural Etymology: New Latin analecta, from Greek analekta, neuter plural of analektos, verbal of analegein to collect, from ana- + legein to gather — more at ...
analemma
noun Etymology: Latin, sundial on a pedestal, from Greek analēmma, lofty structure, sundial, from analambanein to take up, restore, from ana- + lambanein to take — more at ...
analemmatic
adjective see analemma
analeptic
noun Etymology: Greek analēptikos, from analambanein Date: 1671 a drug that stimulates the central nervous system • analeptic adjective

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