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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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Lyonnais
or Lyonais geographical name former province SE central France NE of Auvergne & W of the Saône & the Rhône capital Lyon
lyonnaise
adjective Etymology: French (à la) lyonnaise in the manner of Lyons, France Date: 1846 prepared with onions
Lyonnesse
noun Date: 15th century a country that according to Arthurian legend was contiguous to Cornwall before sinking beneath the sea
Lyons
biographical name Joseph Aloysius 1879-1939 Australian statesman; prime minister (1931-39)
lyophile
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1934 1. of or relating to freeze-drying 2. or lyophiled obtained by freeze-drying
lyophilic
adjective Date: 1911 marked by strong affinity between a dispersed phase and the liquid in which it is dispersed
lyophilise
British variant of lyophilize
lyophilization
noun see lyophilize
lyophilize
transitive verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 1938 freeze-dry • lyophilization noun • lyophilizer noun
lyophilizer
noun see lyophilize
Lyra
noun Etymology: Latin (genitive Lyrae), literally, lyre Date: 1551 a northern constellation representing the lyre of Orpheus or Mercury and containing Vega
lyrate
adjective Date: circa 1760 having or suggesting the shape of a lyre
lyre
noun Etymology: Middle English lire, from Anglo-French, from Latin lyra, from Greek Date: 13th century 1. a stringed instrument of the harp class having an approximately ...
lyrebird
noun Date: 1834 either of two Australian passerine birds (genus Menura) distinguished in the male by very long tail feathers displayed in the shape of a lyre during courtship
lyric
I. noun Date: 1581 1. a lyric composition; specifically a lyric poem 2. the words of a song — often used in plural II. adjective Etymology: Middle French or Latin; ...
lyrical
adjective Date: 1581 lyric • lyrically adverb • lyricalness noun
lyrically
adverb see lyrical
lyricalness
noun see lyrical
lyricism
noun Date: 1760 1. the quality or state of being lyric ; songfulness 2. a. an intense personal quality expressive of feeling or emotion in an art (as poetry or music) ...
lyricist
noun Date: 1881 a writer of lyrics
lyrism
noun Date: 1859 lyricism
lyrist
noun Date: circa 1656 1. a player on the lyre 2. lyricist
Lys
or in Belgium Leie geographical name river 120 miles (193 kilometers) France & Belgium flowing NE into the Schelde
lys-
or lysi- or lyso- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek lys-, lysi- loosening, from lysis lysis
Lysander
biographical name died 395 B.C. Spartan commander
lysate
noun Date: 1922 a product of lysis
lyse
verb (lysed; lysing) Etymology: back-formation from New Latin lysis Date: 1924 transitive verb to cause to undergo lysis intransitive verb to undergo lysis
Lysenko
biographical name Trofim Denisovich 1898-1976 Soviet biologist
Lysenkoism
noun Etymology: Trofim Lysenko Date: 1948 a biological doctrine asserting the fundamental influence of somatic and environmental factors on heredity in contradiction of ...
lysergic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary lys- + ergot + 1-ic Date: 1934 a crystalline acid C16H16N2O2 from ergotic alkaloids; also LSD
lysergic acid diethylamide
noun Date: 1944 LSD
lysi-
combining form see lys-
Lysias
biographical name circa 445-after 380 B.C. Athenian orator
Lysimachus
biographical name circa 355-circa 281 B.C. Macedonian general under Alexander the Great; king of Thrace (306)
lysimeter
noun Date: 1879 a device for measuring the percolation of water through soils and for determining the soluble constituents removed in the drainage • lysimetric adjective
lysimetric
adjective see lysimeter
lysin
noun Date: 1900 a substance (as an antibody) capable of causing lysis
lysine
noun Date: 1892 a crystalline essential amino acid C6H14N2O2 obtained from the hydrolysis of various proteins
Lysippus
biographical name 4th century B.C. Greek sculptor
lysis
noun (plural lyses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, act of loosening, dissolution, remission of fever, from lyein to loosen — more at lose Date: 1543 1. the gradual ...
lyso-
combining form see lys-
lysogen
noun Date: circa 1934 a lysogenic bacterium or bacterial strain
lysogenic
adjective Etymology: from the capacity of the prophage to lyse other bacteria Date: 1899 1. harboring a prophage as hereditary material 2. temperate 3 • lysogenicity ...
lysogenicity
noun see lysogenic
lysogenise
British variant of lysogenize
lysogenization
noun see lysogenize
lysogenize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: 1953 to render lysogenic • lysogenization noun
lysogeny
noun Date: 1956 the state of being lysogenic
lysolecithin
noun Date: 1923 a hydrolytic substance formed by the enzymatic hydrolysis (as by some snake venoms) of a lecithin
lysosomal
adjective see lysosome
lysosome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary lys- + 3-some Date: 1955 a saclike cellular organelle that contains various hydrolytic enzymes — see cell illustration ...
lysozyme
noun Date: 1922 a basic bacteriolytic protein that hydrolyzes peptidoglycan and is present in egg white and in human tears and saliva
lytic
adjective Etymology: Greek lytikos able to loose, from lyein Date: 1889 of or relating to lysis or a lysin; also productive of or effecting lysis (as of cells) • ...
lytically
adverb see lytic
Lyttelton
geographical name borough New Zealand on South Island; port for Christchurch on Port Lyttelton (inlet) population 3190
Lytton
I. biographical name 1st Baron 1803-1873 Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton ; brother of Sir Henry Bulwer English author II. biographical name 1st Earl of 1831-1891 (Edward) ...
LZ
abbreviation landing zone
M
abbreviation 1. Mach 2. magnitude 3. March 4. May 5. medium 6. mega- 7. million 8. molar; molarity 9. monsieur
m
I. noun (plural m's or ms) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 13th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
M and A
abbreviation mergers and acquisitions
M phase
noun Etymology: mitosis Date: 1945 the period in the cell cycle during which cell division takes place — compare G1 phase, G2 phase, S phase
M'Carthy
biographical name Justin 1830-1912 Irish writer & politician
M'Clure Strait
geographical name channel N Canada between Banks Island & Melville Island opening on the W into Arctic Ocean
m-
abbreviation meta-
M-day
noun Etymology: mobilization day Date: 1924 a day on which a military mobilization is to begin
M1 rifle
noun Date: 1938 a .30 caliber gas-operated clip-fed semiautomatic rifle used by United States troops in World War II
M16
noun Etymology: model 16 Date: 1968 a .223 caliber (5.56 millimeter) gas-operated magazine-fed rifle for semiautomatic or automatic operation used by United States troops ...
ma
noun Etymology: short for mama Date: 1829 mother
mA
abbreviation milliampere
MA
abbreviation 1. [Medieval Latin magister artium] master of arts 2. Massachusetts 3. mental age 4. Middle Ages
Ma
I. abbreviation million years ago II. biographical name Yo-Yo 1955- American (French-born of Chinese parents) cellist
MA Ed
abbreviation see MAE
ma foi
foreign term Etymology: French my faith! ; indeed
ma huang
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) máhuáng Date: 1926 1. any of several eastern Asian ephedras (especially Ephedra sinica) having stems and roots yielding ephedrine 2. ...
ma'am
noun Date: 1668 madam
ma-and-pa
adjective Date: 1965 mom-and-pop
MAA
abbreviation master of applied arts
Maarianhamina
geographical name — see Mariehamn
Maas
geographical name — see Meuse
Maastricht
or Maestricht geographical name commune SE Netherlands on the Meuse capital of Limburg population 118,152
Mab
noun Date: circa 1595 a queen of fairies in English literature
mabe
noun see mabe pearl
mabe pearl
noun Etymology: mabe probably from Ryukyuan Japanese (Amami dialect), the pearl oyster Pteria penguin Date: 1951 a cultured pearl essentially hemispherical in form — called ...
mac
or mack noun Date: 1901 British mackintosh
MAC
abbreviation military airlift command
Mac
I. noun Etymology: Mac-, Mc-, patronymic prefix in Scottish and Irish surnames Date: circa 1918 fellow — used informally to address a man whose name is not known II. ...
Mac-Mahon
biographical name Marie-Edme-Patrice-Maurice 1808-1893 Comte de Mac-Mahon; duc de Magenta marshal (1859) & president (1873-79) of France
macabre
adjective Etymology: French, from (danse) macabre dance of death, from Middle French (danse de) Macabré Date: 1889 1. having death as a subject ; comprising or including a ...
macadam
noun Etymology: John L. McAdam died 1836 British engineer Date: 1824 macadamized roadway or pavement especially with a bituminous binder
macadamia
noun see macadamia nut
macadamia nut
noun Etymology: New Latin Macadamia, from John Macadam died 1865 Australian chemist Date: 1929 a hard-shelled nut somewhat resembling a filbert and produced by an Australian ...
macadamize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1824 to construct or finish (a road) by compacting into a solid mass a layer of small broken stone on a convex well-drained roadbed and ...
Macanese
noun see Macao
Macao
or Macau or Chinese Aomen geographical name 1. peninsula SE China in Guangdong in Xi Delta W of Hong Kong 2. special administrative region SE China comprising Macao Peninsula ...
Macapá
geographical name city & port N Brazil capital of Amapá population 179,609
Macapagal-Arroyo
biographical name Gloria 1947- president of Philippines (2001- )
macaque
noun Etymology: French, from Portuguese macaco, from kaku mangabey, plural makaku, in one or more Bantu languages of Gabon and Congo Date: 1757 any of a genus (Macaca) of ...
macaroni
noun Etymology: Italian maccheroni, plural of maccherone, from Italian dialect maccarone dumpling, macaroni Date: 1599 1. pasta made from semolina and shaped in the form of ...
macaroni penguin
noun Etymology: probably from the resemblance of the penguin's crest to headgear supposedly worn by macaronis Date: 1832 a small penguin (Eudyptes chrysolophus) that has an ...
macaronic
adjective Etymology: New Latin macaronicus, from Italian dialect maccarone macaroni Date: 1638 1. characterized by a mixture of vernacular words with Latin words or with ...
macaroon
noun Etymology: French macaron, from Italian dialect maccarone Date: circa 1611 a small cookie composed chiefly of egg whites, sugar, and ground almonds or coconut
MacArthur
I. biographical name Arthur 1845-1912 American general II. biographical name Charles 1895-1956 American dramatist III. biographical name Douglas 1880-1964 son of Arthur ...
Macassar
geographical name — see Makassar 1 • Macassarese noun
Macassarese
noun see Macassar
Macau
geographical name see Macao
Macaulay
I. biographical name Dame Rose 1881-1958 English novelist II. biographical name Thomas Babington 1800-1859 1st Baron Macaulay English historian, author, & statesman
macaw
noun Etymology: Portuguese (now obsolete) macao Date: 1625 any of numerous parrots (especially genus Ara) of South and Central America including some of the largest and ...
Macbeth
I. noun Date: circa 1606 a Scottish general who is the protagonist of Shakespeare's tragedy Macbeth II. biographical name died 1057 king of Scotland (1040-57)
MacBride
biographical name Seán 1904-1988 Irish statesman
Macc
abbreviation see Mac III
Maccabean
adjective see Maccabees I
Maccabees
I. noun plural Etymology: Greek Makkabaioi, from plural of Makkabaios, surname of Judas Maccabaeus 2d century B.C. Jewish patriot Date: 1587 1. a priestly family leading a ...
Macclesfield
geographical name town W England in E Cheshire SSE of Manchester population 147,000
MacDiarmid
I. biographical name Alan Graham 1927- American (N.Z.-born) chemist II. biographical name Hugh 1892-1978 pseudonym of Christopher Murray Grieve Scottish poet
MacDonald
biographical name (James) Ramsay 1866-1937 British statesman; prime minister (1924; 1929-31; 1931-35)
Macdonald
I. biographical name George 1824-1905 Scottish novelist & poet II. biographical name Sir John Alexander 1815-1891 Canadian statesman; 1st prime minister of Dominion of Canada ...
Macdonnell Ranges
geographical name series of mountain ridges central Australia in S Northern Territory; highest point Mt. Ziel 5023 feet (1531 meters)
Macdonough
biographical name Thomas 1783-1825 American naval officer
MacDowell
biographical name Edward Alexander 1860-1908 American composer
Mace
trademark — used for a temporarily disabling liquid usually used as a spray
mace
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Old French mascie, macis, from Medieval Latin macis Date: 13th century an aromatic spice consisting of the dried ...
macédoine
noun Etymology: French, from Macédoine Macedonia; perhaps from the mixture of ethnic groups in Macedonia Date: 1820 1. a confused mixture ; medley 2. a mixture of fruits ...
Macedonia
geographical name 1. region S Europe in Balkan Peninsula in NE Greece, the former Yugoslav section of Macedonia, & SW Bulgaria including territory of ancient kingdom of ...
Macedonian
noun Date: 1556 1. the language of ancient Macedonia of uncertain affinity but generally assumed to be Indo-European 2. a native or inhabitant of Macedonia 3. the Slavic ...
Maceió
geographical name city NE Brazil capital of Alagoas population 628,209
macerate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin maceratus, past participle of macerare to soften, steep Date: 1547 transitive verb 1. to cause to waste away by or as if by excessive ...
maceration
noun see macerate
macerator
noun see macerate
Macgillicuddy's Reeks
geographical name mountain range SW Ireland in County Kerry — see Carrantuohill
MacGuffin
or McGuffin noun Etymology: coined by Alfred Hitchcock Date: circa 1939 an object, event, or character in a film or story that serves to set and keep the plot in motion ...
mach
abbreviation machine; machinery; machinist
Mach
I. noun Etymology: Mach number Date: 1946 a usually high speed expressed by a Mach number II. biographical name Ernst 1838-1916 Austrian physicist & philosopher
Mach number
noun Etymology: Ernst Mach died 1916 Austrian physicist Date: 1937 a number representing the ratio of the speed of a body (as an aircraft) to the speed of sound in a ...
Machabees
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin Machabaei, modification of Greek Makkabaioi Date: 14th century Maccabees
Machado y Morales
biographical name Gerardo 1871-1939 president of Cuba (1925-33)
mâche
noun Etymology: French, perhaps alteration of French dialect pomache, from Vulgar Latin *pomasca, from Latin pomum fruit Date: 1961 corn salad
machete
noun Etymology: Spanish Date: circa 1575 a large heavy knife used for cutting sugarcane and underbrush and as a weapon
Machiavelli
biographical name Niccolò 1469-1527 Italian politician philosopher
Machiavellian
adjective Etymology: Niccolo Machiavelli Date: 1572 1. of or relating to Machiavelli or Machiavellianism 2. suggesting the principles of conduct laid down by Machiavelli; ...
Machiavellianism
noun Date: 1626 the political theory of Machiavelli; especially the view that politics is amoral and that any means however unscrupulous can justifiably be used in achieving ...
machicolated
adjective see machicolation
machicolation
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin machicolare to furnish with machicolations, from Middle French machicoller, from machicoleis machicolation, from macher to crush + col neck, from ...
Machida
geographical name city Japan on Honshu population 355,843
Machilipatnam
or Bandar geographical name city & port SE India in E Andhra Pradesh SW of Kakinada population 159,007
machinability
noun see machine II
machinable
adjective see machine II
machinate
verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin machinatus, past participle of machinari, from machina machine, contrivance Date: 1602 intransitive verb to plan or plot especially ...
machination
noun Date: 15th century 1. an act of machinating 2. a scheming or crafty action or artful design intended to accomplish some usually evil end Synonyms: see plot
machinator
noun see machinate
machine
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle French, from Latin machina, from Greek mēchanē (Doric dialect machana), from mēchos means, expedient — more at may ...
machine code
noun see machine language
machine gun
noun Date: 1867 a gun for sustained rapid fire that uses bullets; broadly an automatic weapon • machine-gun verb • machine gunner noun
machine gunner
noun see machine gun
machine language
noun Date: 1949 1. the set of symbolic instruction codes usually in binary form that is used to represent operations and data in a machine (as a computer) — called also ...
machine pistol
noun Date: 1940 a small submachine gun with a pistol grip
machine shop
noun Date: 1827 a workshop in which work is machined to size and assembled
machine tool
noun Date: 1854 a machine designed for shaping solid work
machine-gun
adjective Date: 1906 characterized by rapidity and sharpness ; rapid-fire
machine-readable
adjective Date: 1961 directly usable by a computer
machineability
noun see machine II
machineable
adjective see machine II
machinelike
adjective Date: circa 1712 resembling or suggesting a machine especially in regularity of action or stereotyped uniformity of product
machinery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1687 1. a. machines in general or as a functioning unit b. the working parts of a machine 2. the means or system by which something is kept ...
machinist
noun Date: circa 1706 1. a. a worker who fabricates, assembles, or repairs machinery b. a craftsman skilled in the use of machine tools c. one who operates a machine ...
machismo
noun Etymology: Spanish, from macho Date: circa 1948 1. a strong sense of masculine pride ; an exaggerated masculinity 2. an exaggerated or exhilarating sense of power or ...
macho
I. adjective Etymology: Spanish, literally, male, from Latin masculus — more at masculine Date: 1928 characterized by machismo ; aggressively virile II. noun (plural ...
Machu Picchu
geographical name site SE Peru of ancient Inca city on a mountain NW of Cuzco
Macías Nguema Biyogo
geographical name — see Bioko
macintosh
noun see mackintosh
mack
variant of mac
MacKaye
biographical name Percy 1875-1956 American poet & dramatist
Mackensen
biographical name August von 1849-1945 German field marshal
Mackenzie
I. biographical name Alexander 1822-1892 Canadian (Scottish-born) statesman; prime minister (1873-78) II. biographical name Sir Compton 1883-1972 English novelist III. ...
Mackenzie Mountains
geographical name mountain range NW Canada in the Rockies in Yukon Territory & W Northwest Territories
mackerel
noun (plural mackerel or mackerels) Etymology: Middle English makerel, from Anglo-French Date: 14th century 1. a scombroid fish (Scomber scombrus of the family Scombridae) of ...
mackerel shark
noun Date: 1819 any of a family (Lamnidae) of large pelagic sharks including the great white shark and mako sharks; especially porbeagle
mackerel sky
noun Date: 1667 a sky covered with rows of altocumulus or cirrocumulus clouds resembling the patterns on a mackerel's back
Mackinac
or formerly Michilimackinac geographical name island N Michigan in Straits of Mackinac
Mackinac, Straits of
geographical name channel N Michigan connecting Lake Huron & Lake Michigan; 4 miles (6.4 kilometers) wide at narrowest point
mackinaw
noun Etymology: Mackinaw (Mackinac), trading post at site of Mackinaw City, Michigan Date: 1833 1. a heavy woolen blanket formerly distributed by the United States ...
mackinaw trout
noun Usage: often capitalized M Date: 1840 a large dark North American char (Salvelinus namaycush) that is an important commercial food fish in northern lakes — called also ...
Mackinder
biographical name Sir Halford John 1861-1947 English geographer
mackintosh
also macintosh noun Etymology: Charles Macintosh died 1843 Scottish chemist & inventor Date: 1836 1. chiefly British raincoat 2. a lightweight waterproof fabric originally ...
Maclaren
biographical name Ian — see John Watson
Maclaurin series
noun Etymology: Colin Maclaurin died 1746 Scottish mathematician Date: 1902 a Taylor series that is expanded about the reference point zero and that takes the form f(x) = ...
Maclaurin's series
noun see Maclaurin series
macle
noun Etymology: French, wide-meshed net, lozenge voided, macle, from Old French, mesh, lozenge voided, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German masca mesh — more at mesh ...
macled
adjective see macle
MacLeish
biographical name Archibald 1892-1982 American poet & administrator
MacLennan
biographical name (John) Hugh 1907-1990 Canadian novelist
Macleod
biographical name John James Rickard 1876-1935 Scottish physiologist
Macmillan
biographical name (Maurice) Harold 1894-1986 British prime minister (1957-63)
MacMillan
biographical name Donald Baxter 1874-1970 American explorer
MacNeice
biographical name Louis 1907-1963 Irish poet
macon
also mâcon noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French mâcon, from Mâcon, France Date: 1863 a dry red or white wine produced in the area around Mâcon, France
Macon
geographical name city central Georgia on the Ocmulgee population 97,255
Mâcon
geographical name city E central France population 38,508
mâcon
noun see macon
Macpherson
biographical name James 1736-1796 Scottish writer
Macquarie
geographical name river 590 miles (949 kilometers) SE Australia in E central New South Wales flowing NNW to Darling River
macr-
or macro- combining form Etymology: French & Latin, from Greek makr-, makro- long, from makros — more at meager 1. long 2. large
macramé
also macrame noun Etymology: French or Italian; French macramé, from Italian macramè, from Turkish makrama napkin, towel, from Arabic miqrama coverlet Date: 1865 a coarse ...
macrame
noun see macramé
Macready
biographical name William Charles 1793-1873 English actor
macro
I. adjective Etymology: macr- Date: 1923 1. being large, thick, or exceptionally prominent 2. a. of, involving, or intended for use with relatively large quantities or ...
macro lens
noun Etymology: macr-, from the fact that the focal length is greater than normal Date: 1961 a camera lens designed to focus at very short distances with up to life-size ...
macro-
combining form see macr-
macroaggregate
noun Date: 1926 a relatively large particle (as of soil or a protein) • macroaggregated adjective
macroaggregated
adjective see macroaggregate
macrobiotic
adjective Date: 1965 of, relating to, or being a diet based on the Chinese cosmological principles of yin and yang that consists of whole cereals and grains supplemented ...
macrobiotics
noun plural but singular in construction see macrobiotic
macrocosm
noun Etymology: French macrocosme, from Medieval Latin macrocosmos, from Latin macr- + Greek kosmos order, universe Date: 1600 1. the great world ; universe 2. a complex ...
macrocosmic
adjective see macrocosm
macrocosmically
adverb see macrocosm
macrocyclic
adjective Date: 1936 containing or being a chemical ring that consists usually of 15 or more atoms
macrocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1889 an exceptionally large red blood cell occurring chiefly in anemias • macrocytic adjective
macrocytic
adjective see macrocyte
macrocytosis
noun (plural macrocytoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1893 the occurrence of macrocytes in the blood
macroeconomic
adjective see macroeconomics
macroeconomics
noun plural but usually singular in construction Date: 1948 a study of economics in terms of whole systems especially with reference to general levels of output and income and ...
macroevolution
noun Date: 1939 evolution that results in relatively large and complex changes (as in species formation) • macroevolutionary adjective
macroevolutionary
adjective see macroevolution
macrofossil
noun Date: 1937 a fossil large enough to be observed by direct inspection
macrogamete
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1899 the larger and usually female gamete of a heterogamous organism
macroglobulin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1952 a highly polymerized globulin (as IgM) of high molecular weight
macroglobulinemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1949 a disorder characterized by increased blood serum viscosity and the presence of macroglobulins in the serum • macroglobulinemic ...
macroglobulinemic
adjective see macroglobulinemia
macroinstruction
noun Date: 1959 macro
macrolepidoptera
noun plural Etymology: New Latin Date: 1882 lepidoptera (as butterflies, skippers, saturniids, and noctuids) that include most of the large forms and none of the minute ones
macromere
noun Date: 1877 a large blastomere — see blastula illustration
macromolecular
adjective see macromolecule
macromolecule
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1929 a very large molecule (as of a protein or rubber) • macromolecular adjective
macron
noun Etymology: Greek makron, neuter of makros long Date: 1851 a mark - placed over a vowel to indicate that the vowel is long or placed over a syllable or used alone to ...
macronuclear
adjective see macronucleus
macronucleus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1892 a relatively large densely staining nucleus of most ciliate protozoans that is derived from micronuclei and controls various ...
macronutrient
noun Date: 1942 1. a chemical element (as nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium) of which relatively large quantities are essential to the growth and health of a plant 2. a ...
macrophage
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 a phagocytic tissue cell of the immune system that may be fixed or freely motile, is derived from a monocyte, ...
macrophagic
adjective see macrophage
macrophotograph
noun see macrophotography
macrophotography
noun Date: 1889 the making of photographs in which the object is either unmagnified or slightly magnified up to a limit often of about 10 diameters • macrophotograph noun
macrophyte
noun Date: 1903 a member of the macroscopic plant life especially of a body of water • macrophytic adjective
macrophytic
adjective see macrophyte
macropterous
adjective Etymology: Greek makropteros, from makr- + pteron wing — more at feather Date: circa 1836 having long or large wings
macroscale
noun Date: 1931 a large often macroscopic scale
macroscopic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary macr- + -scopic (as in microscopic) Date: 1872 1. large enough to be observed by the naked eye 2. considered in ...
macroscopically
adverb see macroscopic
macrostructural
adjective see macrostructure
macrostructure
noun Date: circa 1899 the structure (as of metal, a body part, or the soil) revealed by visual examination with little or no magnification • macrostructural adjective
Mactan
geographical name island S central Philippines off E coast of Cebu
macula
noun (plural maculae; also -las) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Date: 14th century 1. spot, blotch; especially macule 2. an anatomical structure having the form of ...
macula lutea
noun (plural maculae luteae) Etymology: New Latin, literally, yellow spot Date: 1848 a small yellowish area lying slightly lateral to the center of the retina that ...
macular
adjective see macula
macular degeneration
noun Date: 1918 a gradual loss of the central part of the field of vision usually affecting both eyes that occurs especially in the elderly and that in a slowly progressing ...
maculate
or maculated adjective Etymology: Latin maculatus, past participle of maculare to stain, from macula Date: 15th century 1. marked with spots ; blotched 2. impure, besmirched
maculated
adjective see maculate
maculation
noun Date: 15th century 1. archaic the state of being spotted 2. a. a blemish in the form of a discrete spot b. the arrangement of spots and markings on an animal ...
macule
noun Etymology: French, from Latin macula Date: 1863 a patch of skin that is altered in color but usually not elevated and that is a characteristic feature of various ...
macumba
noun Etymology: Brazilian Portuguese Date: 1939 a polytheistic religion of African origin involving syncretistic elements and practiced mainly by Brazilian blacks in urban ...
MAD
abbreviation mutual assured destruction; mutually assured destruction
mad
I. adjective (madder; maddest) Etymology: Middle English medd, madd, from Old English gemǣd, past participle of *gemǣdan to madden, from gemād silly, mad; akin to Old High ...
mad cow disease
noun Date: 1988 bovine spongiform encephalopathy
mad money
noun Date: 1922 money that a woman carries to pay her fare home in case a date ends in a quarrel; also money set aside for an emergency or personal use
mad-brained
adjective Date: 1562 rash, hotheaded
Madagascan
adjective or noun see Madagascar

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