Слова на букву leni-micr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
Mancha, La
geographical name — see La Mancha
Manche, La
geographical name — see English Channel
Manchegan
adjective or noun see La Mancha
Manchester
geographical name 1. town central Connecticut E of Hartford population 54,740 2. city S New Hampshire on the Merrimack population 107,006 3. city NW England ENE of ...
Manchester terrier
noun Etymology: Manchester, England Date: 1891 any of a breed of small short-haired black-and-tan terriers developed in England
manchineel
noun Etymology: French mancenille, from Spanish manzanilla, from diminutive of manzana apple Date: 1630 a poisonous tropical American tree (Hippomane mancinella) of the ...
Manchu
noun (plural Manchu or Manchus) Etymology: ultimately from Manchu manju, a self-designation Date: 1697 1. a member of an indigenous people of Manchuria who conquered China ...
Manchukuo
geographical name former country (1931-45) E Asia in Manchuria & E Inner Mongolia capital Changchun
Manchuria
geographical name region NE China S of the Amur including Heilongjiang, Jilin, & Liaoning provinces & part of Inner Mongolia • Manchurian adjective or noun
Mancini
biographical name Henry 1924-1994 originally Enrico Nicola Mancini American composer & conductor
manciple
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin mancipium office of steward, from Latin, act of purchase, from mancip-, manceps purchaser — more at ...
Mancunian
adjective or noun see Manchester
Mandaean
noun Etymology: ultimately from Mandaean mandayyā having knowledge Date: 1767 1. a member of a Gnostic sect of the lower Tigris and Euphrates regions 2. a form of Aramaic ...
mandala
noun Etymology: Sanskrit maṇḍala circle Date: 1859 1. a Hindu or Buddhist graphic symbol of the universe; specifically a circle enclosing a square with a deity on each ...
Mandalay
geographical name city central Myanmar population 453,000
mandalic
adjective see mandala
mandamus
noun Etymology: Latin, we enjoin, from mandare Date: 1535 a writ issued by a superior court commanding the performance of a specified official act or duty
Mandan
noun (plural Mandan or Mandans) Etymology: French Mantanne, Mendanne, from Dakota (Santee dialect) mawátąna or a cognate Sioux form Date: 1790 1. a member of an American ...
mandarin
I. noun Etymology: Portuguese mandarim, from Malay mĕntĕri, from Sanskrit mantrin counselor, from mantra counsel — more at mantra Date: 1589 1. a. a public official in ...
mandarin collar
noun Date: 1947 a narrow stand-up collar usually open in front
mandarin orange
noun Date: 1771 mandarin 3
mandarinate
noun Etymology: probably from French mandarinat, from mandarin mandarin, from Portuguese mandarim Date: 1728 1. the office or status of a mandarin 2. a body of mandarins ...
mandarinic
adjective see mandarin I
mandarinism
noun see mandarin I
mandatary
noun (plural -taries) Date: 15th century mandatory
mandate
I. noun Etymology: Middle French & Latin; Middle French mandat, from Latin mandatum, from neuter of mandatus, past participle of mandare to entrust, enjoin, probably irregular ...
mandator
noun Date: 1681 one that gives a mandate
mandatorily
adverb see mandatory I
mandatory
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. containing or constituting a command ; obligatory 2. of, by, relating to, or holding a League of Nations mandate • mandatorily ...
Mande
noun Date: 1883 1. Mandingo 2. a branch of the Niger-Congo language family spoken primarily in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Mali, and Burkina Faso
Mandel
biographical name Georges 1885-1944 originally Louis-Georges Rothschild French politician
Mandela
biographical name Nelson Rolihlahla 1918- South African black political leader; president of South Africa (1994-99)
Mandelbrot
biographical name Benoit 1924- American (Polish-born) mathematician & scientist
Mandelbrot set
noun Etymology: Benoit Mandelbrot Date: 1984 a fractal that when plotted on a computer screen roughly resembles a series of heart-shaped disks to which smaller disks are ...
Mandeville
I. biographical name Bernard de 1670-1733 British (Dutch-born) satirist & philosopher II. biographical name Sir John flourished 1356 pseudonym of an unidentified travel writer
mandible
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin mandibula, from Latin mandere to chew; probably akin to Greek masasthai to chew Date: 15th century 1. a. jaw 1a; especially ...
mandibular
adjective see mandible
mandibulate
adjective see mandible
Mandingo
noun (plural Mandingo or Mandingoes or Mandingos) Date: 1623 1. a member of a people of western Africa in or near the upper Niger valley 2. the language of the Mandingo
Mandinka
noun (plural Mandinka or Mandinkas) Date: 1934 Malinke
mandioca
variant of manioc
mandola
noun Etymology: Italian, from French mandore, modification of Late Latin pandura 3-stringed lute — more at bandore Date: 1758 a 16th and 17th century lute that is the ...
mandolin
also mandoline noun Etymology: Italian mandolino, diminutive of mandola Date: 1707 1. a musical instrument of the lute family that has a usually pear-shaped body and fretted ...
mandoline
noun see mandolin
mandolinist
noun see mandolin
mandragora
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Latin mandragoras, from Greek Date: before 12th century mandrake 1
mandrake
noun Etymology: Middle English, probably alteration of mandragora Date: 14th century 1. a. a Mediterranean herb (Mandragora officinarum) of the nightshade family with ...
mandrel
also mandril noun Etymology: Medieval Latin maundrellus, probably ultimately from Old Occitan mandre kingpin Date: 1554 1. a. a usually tapered or cylindrical axle, ...
mandril
noun see mandrel
mandrill
noun Etymology: probably from 1man + 3drill Date: 1774 a large baboon (Mandrillus sphinx syn. Papio sphinx) of central Africa west of the Congo River with the male having a ...
mane
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English manu; akin to Old High German mana mane, Latin monile necklace Date: before 12th century 1. long and heavy hair growing about ...
maned
adjective see mane
maned wolf
noun Date: 1902 a yellowish-red wild canid (Chrysocyon brachyurus) of South American grasslands having black coloration on the nape and lower legs
manège
also manege noun Etymology: French manège, from Italian maneggio training of a horse — more at manage Date: 1644 1. a school for teaching horsemanship and for training ...
manege
noun see manège
manes
noun plural Etymology: Latin Date: 14th century 1. often capitalized the deified spirits of the ancient Roman dead honored with graveside sacrifices 2. the venerated or ...
Manet
biographical name Édouard 1832-1883 French painter
maneuver
I. noun Etymology: French manœuvre, from Old French maneuvre work done by hand, from Medieval Latin manuopera, from manu operare to perform manual labor — more at manure ...
maneuverability
noun see maneuver II
maneuverable
adjective see maneuver II
maneuverer
noun see maneuver II
manful
adjective Date: 14th century having or showing courage and resolution • manfully adverb • manfulness noun
manfully
adverb see manful
manfulness
noun see manful
mangabey
noun (plural -beys) Etymology: French, from Mangabe, town in eastern Madagascar Date: 1774 any of a genus (Cercocebus) of slender long-tailed African monkeys
Mangaia
geographical name island S Pacific in SE Cook Islands; completely encircled by reef area 20 square miles (52 square kilometers)
Mangalore
geographical name city S India in Karnataka on Malabar Coast W of Bangalore population 272,819
mangan-
combining form Etymology: German Mangan, from French manganèse manganese
manganate
noun Date: 1839 1. a salt containing manganese in the anion MnO4 2. manganite
manganese
noun Etymology: French manganèse, from Italian manganese manganese dioxide Date: 1783 a grayish-white usually hard and brittle metallic element that resembles iron but is ...
manganese dioxide
noun Date: 1866 a dark insoluble compound MnO2 used especially as an oxidizing agent, as a depolarizer of dry cells, and in making glass and ceramics
manganesian
adjective see manganese
manganic
adjective Date: 1790 of, relating to, or derived from manganese; especially containing this element with a valence of three or six
manganite
noun Date: 1827 1. a metallic gray to black mineral MnO(OH) that is a hydroxide and minor ore of manganese 2. any of various unstable salts made by reaction of manganese ...
manganous
adjective Date: 1842 of, relating to, or derived from manganese; especially containing this element with a valence of two
Mangareva
geographical name island S Pacific, chief of the Gambier Islands area 7 square miles (18 square kilometers)
mange
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English manjewe, from Anglo-French manjue, from manger to eat Date: 1540 any of various persistent contagious skin diseases marked ...
mangel
noun Etymology: short for mangel-wurzel Date: 1860 a large coarse yellow- to reddish-orange beet grown chiefly as food for cattle
mangel-wurzel
noun Etymology: German, alteration of Mangoldwurzel, from Mangold beet + Wurzel root Date: 1767 mangel
manger
noun Etymology: Middle English mangeour, manger, from Anglo-French mangure, from manger to eat, from Latin manducare to chew, devour, from manducus glutton, from mandere to chew ...
manginess
noun see mangy
mangle
I. transitive verb (mangled; mangling) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French mangler, mahangler, perhaps from mahaigner to maim — more at mayhem Date: 15th century 1. ...
mangler
I. noun see mangle I II. noun see mangle III
mango
noun (plural mangoes; also mangos) Etymology: Portuguese manga, probably from Malayalam māṅṅa Date: 1582 1. a tropical usually large ovoid or oblong fruit with a firm ...
mangonel
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, probably from Medieval Latin manganellus, diminutive of Late Latin manganum philter, mangonel, from Greek manganon Date: 13th ...
mangosteen
noun Etymology: modification of Malay manggisutan Date: 1598 a dark reddish-purple fruit of southeastern Asia with a thick rind and juicy flesh having a flavor suggestive of ...
mangrove
noun Etymology: probably from Portuguese mangue mangrove (from Spanish mangle, probably from Taino) + English grove Date: 1613 1. any of a genus (Rhizophora, especially R. ...
mangy
adjective (mangier; -est) Date: 1515 1. affected with or resulting from mange 2. a. having many worn or bare spots b. seedy, shabby • manginess noun
manhandle
transitive verb Date: 1851 1. to handle roughly 2. to move or manage by human force
manhattan
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Manhattan, borough of New York City Date: 1884 a cocktail consisting of vermouth, whiskey, and sometimes a dash of bitters
Manhattan
geographical name 1. city NE central Kansas on Kansas River population 44,831 2. island 13 miles (21 kilometers) long SE New York on New York Bay 3. borough of New York ...
Manhattan Beach
geographical name city SW California SW of Los Angeles population 33,852
Manhattan clam chowder
noun Date: 1910 chowder made with chopped clams, tomatoes, vegetables, and seasonings
Manhattanite
noun see Manhattan
manhole
noun Date: 1793 a hole through which one may go especially to gain access to an underground or enclosed structure
manhood
noun Date: 13th century 1. the condition of being a human being 2. qualities associated with men ; manliness 3. the condition of being an adult male as distinguished from ...
manhunt
noun Date: 1833 an organized and usually intensive hunt for a person and especially for one charged with a crime
mania
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Greek, from mainesthai to be mad; akin to Greek menos spirit — more at mind Date: 14th century 1. excitement ...
maniac
noun Etymology: Late Latin maniacus maniacal, from Greek maniakos, from mania Date: circa 1763 1. madman, lunatic 2. a person characterized by an inordinate or ...
maniacal
also maniac adjective Date: 1526 1. affected with or suggestive of madness 2. characterized by ungovernable excitement or frenzy ; frantic • maniacally adverb
maniacally
adverb see maniacal
manic
adjective Date: circa 1824 affected with, relating to, characterized by, or resulting from mania • manic noun • manically adverb
manic depression
noun Date: 1911 bipolar disorder
manic-depressive
adjective Date: 1902 characterized by or affected with either mania or depression or alternating mania and depression (as in bipolar disorder) • manic-depressive noun
manic-depressive illness
noun Date: 1951 bipolar disorder
manically
adverb see manic
Manichaean
or Manichean or Manichee noun Etymology: Late Latin manichaeus, from Late Greek manichaios, from Manichaios Manes died ab A.D. 276 Persian founder of the sect Date: 1556 1. a ...
Manichaeanism
noun see Manichaean
Manichaeism
noun see Manichaean
Manichean
I. noun see Manichaean II. adjective see Manichaean
Manicheanism
noun see Manichaean
Manichee
noun see Manichaean
Manicheism
noun see Manichaean
manicotti
noun (plural manicotti) Etymology: Italian, plural of manicotto muff, from manica sleeve, from Latin, from manus hand Date: 1947 tubular pasta shells that may be stuffed ...
manicure
I. noun Etymology: French, from Latin manus hand + French -icure (as in pédicure pedicure) — more at manual Date: 1880 1. manicurist 2. a treatment for the care of the ...
manicurist
noun Date: 1889 a person who gives manicures
manifest
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French manifeste, from Latin manifestus caught in the act, flagrant, obvious, perhaps from manus + ...
manifest destiny
noun Usage: often capitalized M&D Date: 1845 a future event accepted as inevitable ; broadly an ostensibly benevolent or necessary policy of imperialistic expansion
manifestant
noun Date: 1880 a person who makes or participates in a manifestation
manifestation
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the act, process, or an instance of manifesting b. (1) something that manifests or is manifest (2) a perceptible, outward, or ...
manifester
noun see manifest II
manifestly
adverb see manifest I
manifesto
I. noun (plural -tos or -toes) Etymology: Italian, denunciation, manifest, from manifestare to manifest, from Latin, from manifestus Date: 1620 a written statement declaring ...
manifold
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English manigfeald, from manig many + -feald -fold Date: before 12th century 1. a. marked by diversity or variety b. ...
manifoldly
adverb see manifold I
manifoldness
noun see manifold I
Manihiki
geographical name island, chief of the Northern Cook Islands; an atoll population 408
Manihiki Islands
geographical name — see Northern Cook Islands
manikin
also mannikin noun Etymology: Dutch mannekijn little man, from Middle Dutch, diminutive of man; akin to Old English man Date: circa 1536 1. mannequin 2. a little man ; ...
manila
also manilla adjective Date: 1820 1. capitalized made from Manila hemp 2. made of manila paper • manila noun
Manila
geographical name city & port capital of the Philippines on W coast of Luzon on Manila Bay (inlet of South China Sea) population 1,587,000
Manila hemp
noun Etymology: Manila, Philippine Islands Date: 1814 abaca
manila paper
noun Usage: often capitalized M Date: 1866 a strong and durable paper of a brownish or buff color and smooth finish made originally from Manila hemp
manilla
adjective see manila
manille
noun Etymology: modification of Spanish malilla Date: 1674 the second highest trump in various card games (as ombre)
manioc
also mandioca noun Etymology: French manioc & Spanish & Portuguese mandioca, all ultimately from Tupi maniʔóka, mandiʔóka Date: circa 1554 cassava
maniple
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin manipulus, from Latin, handful, from manus hand + -pulus (perhaps akin to Latin plēre to fill); from its having been ...
manipulability
noun see manipulable
manipulable
adjective Date: 1881 capable of being manipulated • manipulability noun
manipular
adjective Date: 1623 1. of or relating to the ancient Roman maniple 2. of, relating to, or performed by manipulation ; manipulative
manipulatable
adjective see manipulate
manipulate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: back-formation from manipulation, from French, from manipuler to handle an apparatus in chemistry, ultimately from Latin manipulus ...
manipulation
noun see manipulate
manipulative
adjective see manipulate
manipulatively
adverb see manipulate
manipulativeness
noun see manipulate
manipulatives
noun plural Date: 1965 objects (as blocks) that a student is instructed to use in a way that teaches or reinforces a lesson
manipulator
noun see manipulate
manipulatory
adjective see manipulate
Manipur
geographical name 1. river 210 miles (338 kilometers) NE India & W Myanmar flowing into the Chindwin 2. state NE India between Assam & Myanmar capital Imphal area 8628 square ...
Manisa
or Manissa or ancient Magnesia geographical name city W Turkey NE of Izmir population 158,928
Manissa
geographical name see Manisa
manito
noun see manitou
Manitoba
geographical name province S central Canada capital Winnipeg area 211,468 square miles (547,703 square kilometers), population 1,150,034 • Manitoban adjective or noun
Manitoba, Lake
geographical name lake over 120 miles (193 kilometers) long Canada in S Manitoba area 1817 square miles (4724 square kilometers)
Manitoban
adjective or noun see Manitoba
manitou
or manitu; also manito noun Etymology: Ojibwa manito• Date: 1671 a supernatural force that according to an Algonquian conception pervades the natural world
Manitoulin Island
geographical name island 80 miles (129 kilometers) long Canada in S Ontario in Lake Huron area 1068 square miles (2777 square kilometers)
Manitowoc
geographical name city E Wisconsin population 34,053
manitu
noun see manitou
Manizales
geographical name city W central Colombia in Cauca valley population 327,100
Mankato
geographical name city S Minnesota population 32,427
mankind
noun singular but singular or plural in construction Date: 13th century 1. the human race ; the totality of human beings 2. men especially as distinguished from women
manless
adjective see man I
manlike
adjective see man I
manliness
noun see manly II
manly
I. adverb Date: before 12th century in a manly manner II. adjective (manlier; -est) Date: 13th century 1. having qualities generally associated with a man ; strong, virile ...
Mann
I. biographical name Horace 1796-1859 American educator II. biographical name Thomas 1875-1955 American (German-born) author
manna
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin, from Greek, from Hebrew mān Date: before 12th century 1. a. food miraculously supplied to the ...
manna grass
noun Date: 1759 any of a genus (Glyceria) of chiefly North American perennial grasses of wetland or aquatic habitats
mannan
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary mannose + 3-an Date: 1895 any of several polysaccharides that are polymers of mannose and occur especially in plant cell ...
Mannar, Gulf of
geographical name inlet of Indian Ocean between Sri Lanka & S tip of India S of Palk Strait
manned
adjective Date: 1617 carrying or performed by a human being
mannequin
noun Etymology: French, from Dutch mannekijn little man — more at manikin Date: 1730 1. an artist's, tailor's, or dressmaker's lay figure; also a form representing the ...
manner
noun Etymology: Middle English manere, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *manuaria, from Latin, feminine of manuarius of the hand, from manus hand — more at manual Date: ...
mannered
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having manners of a specified kind 2. a. having or displaying a particular manner b. having an artificial or stilted character
Mannerheim
biographical name Baron Carl Gustaf Emil von 1867-1951 Finnish general & statesman
mannerism
noun Date: 1803 1. a. exaggerated or affected adherence to a particular style or manner ; artificiality, preciosity b. often capitalized an art style in late 16th ...
mannerist
noun or adjective see mannerism
manneristic
adjective see mannerism
mannerless
adjective see manner
mannerliness
noun see mannerly
mannerly
adjective Date: circa 1529 showing good manners • mannerliness noun • mannerly adverb
Mannheim
geographical name city SW Germany at confluence of the Rhine & the Neckar population 314,685
mannikin
noun see manikin
Manning
biographical name Henry Edward 1808-1892 English cardinal
mannish
adjective Date: 14th century 1. resembling or suggesting a man rather than a woman 2. generally associated with or characteristic of a man rather than a woman • ...
mannishly
adverb see mannish
mannishness
noun see mannish
mannite
noun Etymology: French, from manna, from Late Latin Date: 1827 mannitol
mannitol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1879 a slightly sweet crystalline alcohol C6H14O6 found in many plants and used especially as a diuretic and in ...
mannose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary mannite + 2-ose Date: 1888 an aldose C6H12O6 whose dextrorotatory enantiomer occurs especially as a structural unit of ...
mano
noun (plural manos) Etymology: Spanish, literally, hand, from Latin manus — more at manual Date: circa 1892 a stone used as the upper millstone for grinding foods (as ...
mano a mano
adverb or adjective Etymology: Spanish, literally, hand to hand Date: 1950 in direct competition or conflict especially between two people
manoeuvre
chiefly British variant of maneuver
manometer
noun Etymology: French manomètre, from Greek manos sparse, loose, rare (akin to Armenian manr small) + French -mètre Date: circa 1730 1. an instrument (as a pressure ...
manometric
adjective see manometer
manometrically
adverb see manometer
manometry
noun see manometer
manor
noun Etymology: Middle English maner, from Old French manoir, from manoir to sojourn, dwell, from Latin manēre — more at mansion Date: 14th century 1. a. the house or ...
manor house
noun Date: 1575 the house of the lord of a manor
manorial
adjective see manor
manorialism
noun see manor
manpack
adjective Date: 1965 designed to be carried by one person
manpower
noun see man power 2
manqué
adjective Etymology: French, from past participle of manquer to lack, fail, from Italian mancare, from manco lacking, left-handed, from Latin, having a crippled hand, probably ...
manrope
noun Date: 1769 a side rope (as to a ship's gangway or ladder) used as a handrail
mansard
noun Etymology: French mansarde, from François Mansart died 1666 French architect Date: circa 1734 a roof having two slopes on all sides with the lower slope steeper than ...
mansarded
adjective see mansard
manse
noun Etymology: Middle English manss, from Medieval Latin mansa, mansus, mansum, from Latin mansus lodging, from manēre Date: 15th century 1. archaic the dwelling of a ...
manservant
noun (plural menservants) Date: 14th century a male servant
Mansfield
I. biographical name Katherine 1888-1923 pseudonym of Kathleen Mansfield Beauchamp British (N.Z.-born) writer II. geographical name 1. city N central Ohio population 49,346 ...
Mansfield, Mount
geographical name mountain 4393 feet (1339 meters) N Vermont; highest in Green Mountains & in state
mansion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin mansion-, mansio, from manēre to remain, dwell; akin to Greek menein to remain Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
manslaughter
noun Date: 14th century the unlawful killing of a human being without express or implied malice
manslayer
noun Date: 14th century one who commits homicide
Manson
biographical name Sir Patrick 1844-1922 British parasitologist
Manstein
biographical name Fritz Erich von 1887-1973 originally surname von Lewinski German field marshal
mansuetude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin mansuetudo, from mansuescere to tame, from manus hand + suescere to accustom; akin to Greek ēthos custom — more at manual, sib ...
Manṣūr, al-
biographical name 709(to 714)-775 in full Abū Ja‘far al-Manṣūr or al-Manṣūr al-‘Abbāsī Arab caliph (754-775) & founder of Baghdad
Mansûra, El
or Mansurah, Al geographical name — see el mansura
Mansurah, Al
geographical name see Mansûra, El
manta
noun Etymology: Spanish, alteration of manto cloak, from Late Latin mantus, probably back-formation from Latin mantellum mantle Date: 1697 1. a square piece of cloth or ...
manta ray
noun Date: 1951 any of several extremely large rays (genera Manta and Mobula) that are widely distributed in warm seas and have enlarged pectoral fins resembling wings
manteau
noun Etymology: French, from Old French mantel Date: 1671 a loose cloak, coat, or robe
Manteca
geographical name city central California S of Stockton population 49,258
Mantegna
biographical name Andrea 1431-1506 Italian painter & engraver
mantel
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, mantle Date: 15th century 1. a. a beam, stone, or arch serving as a lintel to support the masonry above a fireplace b. ...
mantelet
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, diminutive of mantel Date: 14th century 1. a very short cape or cloak 2. (or mantlet) a movable shelter formerly used by ...
mantelpiece
noun Date: 1686 1. a mantel with its side elements 2. mantel 2
mantelshelf
noun Date: circa 1828 mantel 2
mantic
adjective Etymology: Greek mantikos, from mantis Date: 1839 of or relating to the faculty of divination ; prophetic
manticore
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin mantichora, from Greek mantichōras Date: 14th century a legendary animal with the head of a man, the body of a lion, and the tail ...
mantid
noun Etymology: New Latin Mantidae, group name, from Mantis, genus name Date: 1895 mantis
mantilla
noun Etymology: Spanish, diminutive of manta Date: 1717 1. a light scarf worn over the head and shoulders especially by Spanish and Latin-American women 2. a short light ...
mantis
noun (plural mantises; also mantes) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, literally, diviner, prophet; akin to Greek mainesthai to be mad — more at mania Date: 1646 any of an ...
mantis shrimp
noun Date: 1871 stomatopod
mantissa
noun Etymology: Latin mantisa, mantissa makeweight, from Etruscan Date: 1846 the part of a logarithm to the right of the decimal point
Mantle
biographical name Mickey (Charles) 1931-1995 American baseball player
mantle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mantel, from Anglo-French, from Latin mantellum Date: 13th century 1. a. a loose sleeveless garment worn over other clothes ; cloak b. ...
mantlet
noun see mantelet 2
Mantoux test
noun Etymology: Charles Mantoux died 1947 French physician Date: circa 1923 an intradermal test for hypersensitivity to tuberculin that indicates past or present infection ...
Mantova
geographical name see Mantua
mantra
noun Etymology: Sanskrit, sacred counsel, formula, from manyate he thinks; akin to Latin mens mind — more at mind Date: 1795 a mystical formula of invocation or incantation ...
mantrap
noun Date: 1775 a trap for catching humans ; snare
mantric
adjective see mantra
mantua
noun Etymology: modification of French manteau mantle Date: 1678 a usually loose-fitting gown worn especially in the 17th and 18th centuries
Mantua
or Mantova geographical name commune N Italy in Lombardy WSW of Venice population 52,948 • Mantuan adjective or noun
Mantuan
adjective or noun see Mantua
Manu
noun Etymology: Sanskrit Date: 1839 the progenitor of the human race and giver of the religious laws of Manu according to Hindu mythology
Manua Islands
geographical name islands SW Pacific in American Samoa E of Tutuila area 22 square miles (57 square kilometers)
manual
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English manuel, from Anglo-French, from Latin manualis, from manus hand; akin to Old English mund hand and perhaps to Greek marē hand Date: 15th ...
manual alphabet
noun Date: circa 1864 an alphabet especially for the deaf in which the letters are represented by finger positions
manually
adverb see manual I
manubrium
noun (plural manubria; also -briums) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, handle, from manus Date: 1705 an anatomical process or part shaped like a handle: as a. the ...
manufactory
noun Date: 1641 factory 2a
manufacturability
noun see manufacture II
manufacturable
adjective see manufacture II
manufacture
I. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Medieval Latin manufactura, from Latin manu factus, literally, made by hand Date: 1567 1. something made from raw materials by hand or ...
manufacturer
noun Date: circa 1687 one that manufactures; especially an employer of workers in manufacturing
manufacturing
noun see manufacture II
manumission
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin manumission-, manumissio, from manumittere Date: 15th century the act or process of manumitting; especially ...
manumit
transitive verb (-mitted; -mitting) Etymology: Middle English manumitten, from Anglo-French manumettre, from Latin manumittere, from manus hand + mittere to let go, send Date: ...
manure
I. transitive verb (manured; manuring) Etymology: Middle English manouren, from Anglo-French mainouverer, meinourer to till (land), construct, create, from Medieval Latin manu ...

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.047 c;