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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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mass spectrograph
noun Date: 1920 an instrument used to separate and often to determine the masses of isotopes
mass spectrometer
noun see mass spectrometry
mass spectrometric
adjective see mass spectrometry
mass spectrometry
noun Date: 1943 an instrumental method for identifying the chemical constitution of a substance by means of the separation of gaseous ions according to their differing mass ...
mass spectroscopy
noun see mass spectrometry
mass spectrum
noun Date: 1920 the spectrum of a stream of gaseous ions separated according to their differing mass and charge
mass-market
adjective Date: 1952 1. sold through such retail outlets as supermarkets and drugstores as well as through bookstores ; also of, relating to, or publishing mass-market ...
mass-produce
transitive verb Etymology: back-formation from mass production Date: 1923 to produce in quantity usually by machinery • mass production noun
massa
noun Etymology: by alteration Date: 1766 Southern master
Massachuset
noun see Massachusett
Massachusett
or Massachuset noun (plural Massachusetts or Massachusett or Massachusets or Massachuset) Etymology: Massachusett, a locality, literally, at the big hill Date: 1616 1. a ...
Massachusetts
geographical name state NE United States capital Boston area 8284 square miles (21,456 square kilometers), population 6,349,097
Massachusetts Bay
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic E Massachusetts
massacre
I. noun Etymology: Middle French Date: circa 1578 1. the act or an instance of killing a number of usually helpless or unresisting human beings under circumstances of ...
massacrer
noun see massacre II
massage
I. noun Etymology: French, from masser to massage, from Arabic massa to stroke Date: circa 1860 manipulation of tissues (as by rubbing, kneading, or tapping) with the hand ...
massage parlor
noun Date: 1906 an establishment that provides massage treatments; also one offering sexual services in addition to or in lieu of massage
massager
noun see massage II
Massanutten Mountain
geographical name ridge N Virginia in Blue Ridge Mountains
massasauga
noun Etymology: Missisauga River, Ontario, Canada Date: 1835 a small North American rattlesnake (Sistrurus catenatus)
Massasoit
biographical name died 1661 Wampanoag Indian chief
Massawa
or Mits'iwa geographical name city & port Eritrea on an inlet of the Red Sea population 16,579
massé
noun Etymology: French, from past participle of masser to make a massé shot, from masse sledgehammer, from Middle French mace mace Date: 1873 a shot in billiards or pool ...
Masséna
biographical name André 1758-1817 Duc de Rivoli; Prince d'Essling French general
Massenet
biographical name Jules (-Émile-Frédéric) 1842-1912 French composer
masseter
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek masētēr, from masasthai to chew — more at mandible Date: 1578 a large muscle that raises the lower jaw and assists in mastication ...
masseteric
adjective see masseter
masseur
noun Etymology: French, from masser Date: 1876 a man who practices massage
masseuse
noun Etymology: French, feminine of masseur Date: 1879 a woman who practices massage
Massey
biographical name William Ferguson 1856-1925 New Zealand statesman
massif
noun Etymology: French, from massif, adjective, from Middle French, alteration of Old French massiz Date: 1873 1. a principal mountain mass 2. a block of the earth's crust ...
Massif Central
geographical name plateau central France rising sharply just W of the Rhône-Saône valley & sloping N to the Paris basin & W to the basin of Aquitaine
Massilia
geographical name see Marseille
Massillon
geographical name city NE Ohio population 31,325
Massine
biographical name Léonide 1896-1979 originally Leonid Fedorovich Miassin American (Russian-born) dancer & choreographer
Massinger
biographical name Philip 1583-1640 English dramatist
Massinissa
biographical name see Masinissa
massive
adjective Etymology: Middle English massiffe, from Anglo-French mascif, alteration of massiz, from Vulgar Latin *massicius, from Latin massa mass Date: 15th century 1. ...
Massive, Mount
geographical name mountain 14,421 feet (4396 meters) central Colorado in Sawatch Range N of Mt. Elbert
massively
adverb see massive
massively parallel
adjective Date: 1977 of, relating to, or being a computer system that uses a large number of separate processors simultaneously to increase power and speed
massiveness
noun see massive
massless
adjective Date: 1879 having no mass
Masson
biographical name David 1822-1907 Scottish editor & author
Massorete
noun see Masorete
massy
adjective Date: 14th century massive, weighty
Massys
or Matsys or Messys or Metsys biographical name Quentin circa 1466-1530 Flemish painter
mast
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mæst; akin to Old High German mast mast, Latin malus Date: before 12th century 1. a long pole or spar rising from the ...
mast cell
noun Etymology: part translation of German Mastzelle, from Mast food, mast (from Old High German) + Zelle cell Date: circa 1890 a granulocyte that occurs especially in ...
mastaba
noun Etymology: Arabic maṣṭaba stone bench Date: 1882 an Egyptian tomb of the time of the Memphite dynasties that is oblong in shape with sloping sides and a flat roof
mastectomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: Greek mastos breast + English -ectomy Date: circa 1923 surgical removal of all or part of the breast and sometimes associated lymph nodes and ...
masted
adjective see mast I
master
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English magister & Anglo-French meistre, both from Latin magister; akin to Latin magnus large — more at much Date: before 12th ...
master bedroom
noun Date: 1925 a large or principal bedroom
master chief petty officer
noun Date: 1958 an enlisted man in the navy or coast guard ranking above a senior chief petty officer
master chief petty officer of the coast guard
Date: 1966 the ranking petty officer in the coast guard serving as adviser to the commandant
master chief petty officer of the navy
Date: 1966 the ranking petty officer in the navy serving as adviser to the chief of naval operations
master class
noun Date: 1952 a seminar for advanced music students conducted by a master musician
master gunnery sergeant
noun Date: 1958 a noncommissioned officer in the marine corps ranking above a master sergeant
master key
noun Date: 1577 a key designed to open several different locks
master of arts
Usage: often capitalized M&A Date: 15th century 1. the recipient of a master's degree that usually signifies that the recipient has passed an integrated course of study in ...
master of ceremonies
Date: circa 1610 1. a person who determines the forms to be observed on a public occasion 2. a person who acts as host at a formal event 3. a person who acts as host for a ...
master of science
Usage: often capitalized M&S Date: 1898 1. the recipient of a master's degree that usually signifies that the recipient has passed an integrated course of study in one or ...
master plan
noun Date: 1914 a plan giving overall guidance
master race
noun Date: 1856 a people held to be racially preeminent and hence fitted to rule or enslave other peoples
master sergeant
noun Date: 1920 a noncommissioned officer ranking in the army above a sergeant first class and below a staff sergeant major, in the air force above a technical sergeant and ...
master's
noun Date: 1939 a master's degree
master-at-arms
noun (plural masters-at-arms) Date: 1732 a petty officer charged with maintaining discipline aboard ship
masterful
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. inclined and usually competent to act as master b. suggestive of a domineering nature 2. having or reflecting the power and skill of ...
masterfully
adverb see masterful
masterfulness
noun see masterful
masterliness
noun see masterly
masterly
adjective Date: 15th century 1. suitable to or resembling that of a master; especially indicating thorough knowledge or superior skill and power 2. having the power and ...
mastermind
I. noun Date: 1872 a person who supplies the directing or creative intelligence for a project II. transitive verb Date: 1940 to be the mastermind of
masterpiece
noun Date: 1600 1. a work done with extraordinary skill; especially a supreme intellectual or artistic achievement 2. a piece of work presented to a medieval guild as ...
masters
adjective Date: 1971 competing in, relating to, or being a competition for athletes over a specified age (as 40)
Masters
biographical name Edgar Lee 1869-1950 American author
mastership
noun see master I
mastersinger
noun Date: 1810 Meistersinger
masterstroke
noun Date: 1679 a masterly performance or move
masterwork
noun Date: 1617 masterpiece
mastery
noun Etymology: Middle English maistrie, from Anglo-French mestrie, maistrie, from meistre master Date: 13th century 1. a. the authority of a master ; dominion b. the ...
masthead
noun Date: 15th century 1. the top of a mast 2. a. the printed matter in a newspaper or periodical that gives the title and details of ownership, advertising rates, and ...
mastic
noun Etymology: Middle English mastik, from Latin mastiche, from Greek mastichē, probably back-formation from mastichan Date: 14th century 1. an aromatic resinous exudate ...
mastic tree
noun Date: 15th century a small Mediterranean evergreen tree (Pistacia lentiscus) of the cashew family that yields mastic
masticate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Late Latin masticatus, past participle of masticare, from Greek mastichan to gnash the teeth; akin to Greek masasthai to chew — more at ...
mastication
noun see masticate
masticator
noun see masticate
masticatory
I. noun (plural -ries) Date: 1583 a substance chewed to increase saliva II. adjective Date: 1611 1. used for or adapted to chewing 2. of, relating to, or involving the ...
mastiff
noun Etymology: Middle English mastif, from Medieval Latin mastivus, from Vulgar Latin *masuetivus, from Latin mansuetus tame — more at mansuetude Date: 14th century any of ...
mastigophoran
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek mastig-, mastix whip + pherein to carry — more at bear Date: circa 1911 any of a subphylum (Mastigophora) of protozoans comprising ...
mastitic
adjective see mastitis
mastitis
noun (plural mastitides) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek mastos breast Date: circa 1842 inflammation of the breast or udder usually caused by infection • mastitic ...
mastodon
noun Etymology: New Latin mastodont-, mastodon, from Greek mastos + odont-, odōn, odous tooth — more at tooth Date: 1811 1. any of various extinct mammals (genus Mammut ...
mastodonic
adjective see mastodon
mastodont
adjective or noun see mastodon
mastoid
I. adjective Etymology: New Latin mastoides resembling a nipple, mastoid, from Greek mastoeidēs, from mastos breast Date: 1732 1. being the process of the temporal bone ...
mastoid cell
noun Date: 1800 one of the small cavities in the mastoid process that develop after birth and are filled with air
mastoidectomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1898 surgical removal of part of the mastoid process of the temporal bone
mastoiditis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1881 inflammation of the mastoid and especially of the mastoid cells
masturbate
verb (-bated; -bating) Etymology: Latin masturbatus, past participle of masturbari Date: 1839 intransitive verb to practice masturbation transitive verb to practice ...
masturbation
noun Date: 1603 erotic stimulation especially of one's own genital organs commonly resulting in orgasm and achieved by manual or other bodily contact exclusive of sexual ...
masturbator
noun see masturbate
masturbatory
adjective Date: 1864 1. of, relating to, or involving masturbation 2. excessively self-absorbed or self-indulgent
Masuren
geographical name see Masuria
Masuria
or German Masuren geographical name region NE Poland SE of Gulf of Gdańsk; formerly in East Prussia, Germany • Masurian adjective
Masurian
adjective see Masuria
mat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English meatte, from Late Latin matta, of Semitic origin; akin to Hebrew miṭṭāh bed Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) ...
Matabeleland
geographical name region SW Zimbabwe between the Limpopo & the Zambezi; chief town Bulawayo
Matadi
geographical name town & port W Democratic Republic of the Congo population 172,926
matador
noun Etymology: Spanish, from matar to kill Date: 1681 a bullfighter who has the principal role and who kills the bull in a bullfight
Matagorda Bay
geographical name inlet of Gulf of Mexico 30 miles (48 kilometers) long SE Texas
Matamoros
geographical name city NE Mexico in Tamaulipas on Rio Grande opposite Brownsville, Texas population 303,392
Matanuska
geographical name river 90 miles (145 kilometers) S Alaska flowing SW to head of Cook Inlet
Matanzas
geographical name city & port W Cuba on Straits of Florida E of Havana population 113,724
Matapan
geographical name — see tainaron
match
I. noun Etymology: Middle English macche, from Old English gemæcca mate, equal; akin to Old English macian to make — more at make Date: before 12th century 1. a. a ...
match play
noun Date: 1893 golf competition in which the winner is the person or team winning the greater number of holes — compare stroke play
match point
noun Date: 1921 a situation (as in tennis) in which one player or side will win the match by winning the next point; also the point itself
matchable
adjective see match II
matchboard
noun Date: circa 1858 a board with a groove cut along one edge and a tongue along the other so as to fit snugly with the edges of similarly cut boards
matchbook
noun Date: 1937 a small folder containing rows of paper matches
matchbox
noun Date: 1786 a box for matches
matcher
noun see match II
matchless
adjective Date: circa 1530 having no equal ; peerless • matchlessly adverb
matchlessly
adverb see matchless
matchlock
noun Date: circa 1637 1. a musket equipped with a matchlock 2. a slow-burning match lowered over a hole in the breech of a musket to ignite the charge
matchmaker
noun Date: 1638 one that arranges a match; especially one who tries to bring two unmarried individuals together in an attempt to promote a marriage • matchmaking noun
matchmaking
noun see matchmaker
matchstick
noun Date: 1791 1. a slender piece especially of wood from which a match is made 2. something resembling a matchstick especially in slenderness
matchup
noun Date: 1959 match I
matchwood
noun Date: 1786 small pieces of wood ; splinters
maté
or mate noun Etymology: French & American Spanish; French maté, from American Spanish mate maté, vessel for drinking it, from Quechua mati vessel Date: 1758 1. a tealike ...
mate
I. transitive verb (mated; mating) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French mater, from mat, noun, checkmate, ultimately from Arabic māt (in shāh māt) Date: 14th ...
matelot
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from Middle Dutch mattenoot, literally, bedmate Date: circa 1847 British sailor
matelote
noun Etymology: French, literally, sailor's wife, from matelot Date: circa 1723 a stew made usually of fish in a seasoned wine sauce
mater
noun Etymology: Latin — more at mother Date: circa 1859 chiefly British mother
materfamilias
noun Etymology: Latin, from mater + familias, archaic genitive of familia household — more at family Date: 1756 a woman who is head of a household
materia medica
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, medical matter Date: 1663 1. substances used in the composition of medical remedies ; drugs, medicine 2. a. a branch of medical ...
material
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English materiel, from Middle French & Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin materialis, from Latin materia matter — more at matter Date: ...
materialise
British variant of materialize
materialism
noun Date: 1733 1. a. a theory that physical matter is the only or fundamental reality and that all being and processes and phenomena can be explained as manifestations or ...
materialist
noun or adjective see materialism
materialistic
adjective see materialism
materialistically
adverb see materialism
materiality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1570 1. the quality or state of being material 2. something that is material
materialization
noun Date: 1843 1. the action of materializing or becoming materialized 2. something that has been materialized; especially apparition
materialize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1710 transitive verb 1. a. to make material ; objectify b. to cause to appear in bodily form 2. to cause to be materialistic ...
materializer
noun see materialize
materially
adverb see material I
materialness
noun see material I
materials science
noun Date: 1956 the scientific study of the properties and applications of materials of construction or manufacture (as ceramics, metals, polymers, and composites) • ...
materials scientist
noun see materials science
matériel
or materiel noun Etymology: French matériel, from matériel, adjective Date: 1819 equipment, apparatus, and supplies used by an organization or institution
materiel
noun see matériel
maternal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French & Medieval Latin; Middle French maternel, from Medieval Latin maternalis, from Latin maternus, from mater mother — more ...
maternally
adverb see maternal
maternity
I. noun (plural -ties) Date: 1611 1. a. the quality or state of being a mother ; motherhood b. the qualities of a mother ; motherliness 2. a hospital facility designed ...
matey
adjective Date: 1915 chiefly British companionable • mateyness noun, chiefly British
mateyness
noun see matey
math
I. noun Date: circa 1847 mathematics II. abbreviation mathematical; mathematician
mathematic
adjective see mathematical
mathematical
also mathematic adjective Etymology: Middle English mathematicalle, from Latin mathematicus, from Greek mathēmatikos, from mathēmat-, mathēma learning, mathematics, from ...
mathematical expectation
noun Date: 1838 expected value
mathematical induction
noun Date: 1838 induction 2b
mathematical logic
noun Date: 1853 symbolic logic
mathematically
adverb see mathematical
mathematician
noun Date: 15th century a specialist or expert in mathematics
mathematics
noun plural but usually singular in construction Date: 1573 1. the science of numbers and their operations, interrelations, combinations, generalizations, and abstractions and ...
mathematization
noun Date: 1908 reduction to mathematical form • mathematize verb
mathematize
verb see mathematization
Mather
I. biographical name Cotton 1663-1728 American clergyman & author II. biographical name Increase 1639-1723 father of Cotton American clergyman & author; president Harvard ...
maths
noun plural Date: 1911 chiefly British mathematics
Mathura
or Muttra geographical name city N India in W Uttar Pradesh NW of Agra population 226,850
matin
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French Date: 14th century of or relating to matins or to early morning
matinal
adjective Date: 1803 1. of or relating to matins 2. early
matinee
or matinée noun Etymology: French matinée, literally, morning, from Old French, from matin morning, from Latin matutinum, from neuter of matutinus of the morning, from Matuta, ...
matinée
noun see matinee
matinee idol
noun Date: 1902 a handsome male performer
matins
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English matines, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin matutinae, from Latin, ...
Matisse
biographical name Henri (-Émile-Benoît) 1869-1954 French painter
Matlock
geographical name town N England capital of Derbyshire population 20,610
Mato Grosso
or formerly Matto Grosso geographical name 1. state SW Brazil capital Cuiabá area 352,400 square miles (912,716 square kilometers), population 2,020,581 2. plateau region in ...
Mato Grosso do Sul
geographical name state SW Brazil capital Campo Grande area 140,219 square miles (350,548 square kilometers), population 1,778,494
Mato Tepee
geographical name — see Devils Tower
matr-
or matri- or matro- combining form Etymology: Latin matr-, matri-, from matr-, mater mother
matri-
combining form see matr-
matriarch
noun Date: 1606 a woman who rules or dominates a family, group, or state; specifically a mother who is head and ruler of her family and descendants • matriarchal adjective
matriarchal
adjective see matriarch
matriarchate
noun Date: 1884 matriarchy 1
matriarchy
noun (plural -chies) Date: 1885 1. a family, group, or state governed by a matriarch 2. a system of social organization in which descent and inheritance are traced through ...
matricidal
adjective see matricide
matricide
noun Date: 1594 1. [Latin matricidium, from matr- + -cidium -cide] murder of a mother by her son or daughter 2. [Latin matricida, from matr- + -cida -cide] one that murders ...
matriculant
noun see matriculate
matriculate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Medieval Latin matriculatus, past participle of matriculare, from Late Latin matricula public roll, diminutive of matric-, matrix list, from ...
matriculation
noun see matriculate
matrilineal
adjective Date: 1904 relating to, based on, or tracing descent through the maternal line • matrilineally adverb
matrilineally
adverb see matrilineal
matrimonial
adjective Date: 15th century of or relating to marriage, the married state, or married persons • matrimonially adverb
matrimonially
adverb see matrimonial
matrimony
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French matrimoignie, from Latin matrimonium, from matr-, mater mother, matron — more at mother Date: 14th century the union of ...
matrimony vine
noun Date: circa 1818 a shrub or vine (genus Lycium) of the nightshade family with often showy flowers and usually red berries
matrix
noun (plural matrices or matrixes) Etymology: Latin, female animal used for breeding, parent plant, from matr-, mater Date: 1555 1. something within or from which something ...
matro-
combining form see matr-
matron
noun Etymology: Middle English matrone, from Anglo-French, from Latin matrona, from matr-, mater Date: 14th century 1. a. a married woman usually marked by dignified ...
matron of honor
Date: 1903 a bride's principal married wedding attendant — compare maid of honor
matronly
adjective Date: 1656 having the character of or suitable to a matron
matronymic
noun Etymology: matr- + -onymic (as in patronymic) Date: 1794 a name derived from that of the mother or a maternal ancestor
Matruh
or Marsa Matruh geographical name town NW Egypt
Matsu
geographical name island off SE China in Taiwan Strait; administered by Taiwan population 11,002
Matsudo
geographical name city Japan on Honshu, a suburb of Tokyo population 456,211
Matsuo
biographical name Bashō 1644-1694 pseudonym of Matsuo Munefusa Japanese haiku poet
Matsuoka
biographical name Yōsuke 1880-1946 Japanese statesman
Matsushima
geographical name group of over 200 islets Japan off N Honshu NE of Sendai
matsutake
noun (plural matsutake; also matsutakes) Etymology: Japanese matsu-take, matsudake, from matsu pine tree + take mushroom Date: 1883 a large brownish edible Japanese mushroom ...
Matsuyama
geographical name city & port Japan in W Shikoku population 443,317
Matsys
biographical name see Massys
Matt
abbreviation Matthew
matt
I. transitive verb see mat III, 1 II. see matte I III. adjective see matte II
Mattagami
geographical name river 275 miles (442 kilometers) Canada in E Ontario
Mattaponi
geographical name river 125 miles (201 kilometers) E Virginia
matte
I. or matt variant of mat III 1 II. adjective also mat or matt Etymology: French mat, from Old French, faded, defeated Date: circa 1648 lacking or deprived of luster or ...
Matteotti
biographical name Giacomo 1885-1924 Italian socialist
matter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English matere, from Anglo-French, from Latin materia matter, physical substance, from mater Date: 13th century 1. a. a subject under ...
matter of course
Date: 1739 something that is to be expected as a natural or logical consequence
matter-of-fact
adjective Date: 1712 adhering to the unembellished facts; also being plain, straightforward, or unemotional • matter-of-factly adverb • matter-of-factness noun
matter-of-factly
adverb see matter-of-fact
matter-of-factness
noun see matter-of-fact
Matterhorn
or French Mont Cervin geographical name mountain 14,691 feet (4478 meters) in Pennine Alps on border between Switzerland & Italy
mattery
adjective Date: 14th century producing or containing pus or material resembling pus
Matthaean
adjective see Matthean
Matthean
or Matthaean adjective Etymology: Late Latin Matthaeus Date: 1897 of, relating to, or characteristic of the evangelist Matthew or the gospel ascribed to him
Matthew
noun Etymology: French Mathieu, from Late Latin Matthaeus, from Greek Matthaios, from Hebrew Mattithyāh Date: 14th century 1. an apostle traditionally identified as the ...
Matthews
biographical name (James) Brander 1852-1929 American educator & author
matting
I. noun Date: circa 1847 1. material for mats 2. mats II. noun Etymology: from gerund of 4mat Date: 1854 a dull lusterless surface (as on gilding, metalwork, or satin)
mattins
Usage: often capitalized chiefly British variant of matins
Matto Grosso
geographical name see Mato Grosso
mattock
noun Etymology: Middle English mattok, from Old English mattuc Date: before 12th century a digging and grubbing tool with features of an adze and an ax or pick
mattress
noun Etymology: Middle English materas, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin materacium, from Arabic maṭraḥ place where something is thrown Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
maturate
verb (-rated; -rating) Date: 1622 mature
maturation
noun Date: 1541 1. a. the process of becoming mature b. the emergence of personal and behavioral characteristics through growth processes c. the final stages of ...
maturational
adjective see maturation
mature
I. adjective (maturer; -est) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin maturus ripe; akin to Latin mane in the morning, manus good Date: 15th century 1. based on slow careful ...
maturely
adverb see mature I
Maturín
geographical name city NE Venezuela population 207,382
maturity
noun Date: 15th century 1. the quality or state of being mature; especially full development 2. termination of the period that an obligation has to run
matutinal
adjective Etymology: Late Latin matutinalis, from Latin matutinus — more at matinee Date: circa 1656 of, relating to, or occurring in the morning ; early • matutinally ...
matutinally
adverb see matutinal
MATV
abbreviation master antenna television
matzo
or matzoh noun (plural matzoth or matzos or matzohs) Etymology: Yiddish matse, from Hebrew maṣṣāh Date: 1650 1. unleavened bread eaten especially at the Passover 2. a ...
matzo ball
noun Date: 1917 a small ball-shaped dumpling made from matzo meal
matzoh
noun see matzo
mau-mau
verb (mau-maued; mau-mauing) Usage: often capitalized both Ms Etymology: Mau Mau, anti-European secret society in colonial Kenya Date: 1970 transitive verb to intimidate ...
maudlin
adjective Etymology: alteration of Mary Magdalene; from her depiction as a weeping penitent Date: 1509 1. drunk enough to be emotionally silly 2. weakly and effusively ...
Maugham
biographical name (William) Somerset 1874-1965 English novelist & dramatist
maugre
preposition Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French malgré, from malgré ill will, from mal, mau evil + gré grace, favor Date: 13th century archaic in spite of
Maui
geographical name island Hawaii NW of Hawaii (island) area 728 square miles (1893 square kilometers)
maul
I. noun Etymology: Middle English malle mace, maul, from Anglo-French mail, from Latin malleus; akin to Old Church Slavic mlatŭ hammer, Latin molere to grind — more at meal ...
mauler
noun see maul II
maulstick
also mahlstick noun Etymology: part translation of Dutch maalstok, from obsolete Dutch malen to paint + Dutch stok stick, stock Date: circa 1658 a stick used by painters as a ...
Maumee
geographical name river 175 miles (282 kilometers) NE Indiana & NW Ohio flowing NE into Lake Erie at Toledo
maun
verbal auxiliary Etymology: Middle English man, from Old Norse, present of munu shall, will; akin to Old English gemynd mind — more at mind Date: 13th century chiefly ...
Mauna Kea
geographical name extinct volcano 13,796 feet (4205 meters) Hawaii in N central Hawaii (island)
Mauna Loa
geographical name volcano 13,680 feet (4170 meters) Hawaii in S central Hawaii (island) in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park
maunder
intransitive verb (maundered; maundering) Etymology: probably imitative Date: 1621 1. chiefly British grumble 2. to wander slowly and idly 3. to speak indistinctly or ...

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