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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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maunderer
noun see maunder
Maundy Thursday
noun Etymology: Middle English maunde ceremony of washing the feet of the poor on Maundy Thursday, from Anglo-French mandet, from Latin mandatum command; from Jesus' words in ...
Maupassant
biographical name (Henri-René-Albert-) Guy de 1850-1893 French writer
Maures, Monts des
geographical name mountains SE France at W end of the Riviera
Mauretania
or Mauritania geographical name ancient country N Africa W of Numidia in modern Morocco & W Algeria • Mauretanian or Mauritanian adjective or noun
Mauretanian
adjective or noun see Mauretania
Mauriac
biographical name François 1885-1970 French author
Maurice
German Moritz biographical name 1521-1553 elector of Saxony (1547-53) & general
Maurice of Nassau
biographical name 1567-1625 Prince of Orange Dutch general & statesman
Mauritania
or French Mauritanie geographical name country NW Africa bordering on the Atlantic N of Senegal River; a republic within the French Community, formerly a territory capital ...
Mauritanian
I. adjective or noun see Mauretania II. adjective or noun see Mauritania
Mauritanie
geographical name see Mauritania
Mauritian
adjective or noun see Mauritius
Mauritius
geographical name island in Indian Ocean in central Mascarenes; constitutes with Rodrigues & other dependencies a dominion of the Commonwealth of Nations capital Port Louis ...
Maurois
biographical name André 1885-1967 pseudonym of Émile-Salomon-Wilhelm Herzog French writer
Maury
biographical name Matthew Fontaine 1806-1873 American naval officer & oceanographer
Mauser
biographical name Peter Paul 1838-1914 & his brother Wilhelm 1834-1882 German inventors
mausoleum
noun (plural -leums or mausolea) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek mausōleion, from Mausōlos Mausolus died ab 353 B.C., ruler of Caria Date: 15th century 1. ...
mauvais quart d'heure
foreign term Etymology: French bad quarter hour ; an uncomfortable though brief experience
mauvaise honte
foreign term Etymology: French bad shame ; bashfulness
mauve
noun Etymology: French, literally, mallow, from Old French, from Latin malva Date: 1859 1. a. a moderate purple, violet, or lilac color b. a strong purple 2. a ...
maven
also mavin noun Etymology: Yiddish meyvn, from Late Hebrew mēbhīn Date: 1950 one who is experienced or knowledgeable ; expert; also freak 4a
maverick
I. noun Etymology: Samuel A. Maverick died 1870 American pioneer who did not brand his calves Date: 1867 1. an unbranded range animal; especially a motherless calf 2. an ...
mavin
noun see maven
mavis
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French mauviz Date: 14th century song thrush
mavourneen
noun Etymology: Irish mo mhuirnín Date: 1800 Irish my darling
maw
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English maga; akin to Old High German mago stomach, Lithuanian makas purse Date: before 12th century 1. the receptacle into which ...
mawkish
adjective Etymology: Middle English mawke maggot, probably from Old Norse mathkr — more at maggot Date: circa 1697 1. having an insipid often unpleasant taste 2. sickly ...
mawkishly
adverb see mawkish
mawkishness
noun see mawkish
Mawson
biographical name Sir Douglas 1882-1958 Australian polar explorer
max
noun Date: 1851 1. maximum 1 2. maximum 2 • max adjective
max out
verb Date: 1967 intransitive verb to reach an upper limit or a peak transitive verb to push to a limit or an extreme; also to use up all available credit on
maxi
noun (plural maxis) Etymology: maxi- Date: 1967 a long skirt, dress, or coat
maxi-
combining form Etymology: maximum 1. extra long 2. extra large
maxilla
noun (plural maxillae or maxillas) Etymology: Latin, diminutive of mala jaw Date: 1676 1. a. jaw 1a b. (1) an upper jaw especially of humans and other mammals in ...
maxillary
adjective or noun see maxilla
maxilliped
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary maxilli- (from Latin maxilla) + -ped Date: 1846 any of the crustacean appendages that comprise the first pair or first ...
maxillofacial
adjective Date: circa 1923 of, relating to, or treating the maxilla and the face
maxim
noun Etymology: Middle English maxime, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin maxima, from Latin, feminine of maximus, superlative of magnus large — more at much Date: 1567 ...
Maxim
I. biographical name Sir Hiram Stevens 1840-1916 British (American-born) inventor II. biographical name Hudson 1853-1927 brother of Sir Hiram American inventor
maximal
adjective Date: 1882 1. being an upper limit ; highest 2. most comprehensive ; complete • maximally adverb
maximalist
noun Date: 1907 one who advocates immediate and direct action to secure the whole of a program or set of goals • maximalist adjective
maximally
adverb see maximal
Maximilian
biographical name 1832-1867 brother of Francis Joseph I of Austria emperor of Mexico (1864-67)
Maximilian I
biographical name 1459-1519 Holy Roman emperor (1493-1519)
Maximilian II
biographical name 1527-1576 Holy Roman emperor (1564-76)
maximin
noun Etymology: maximum + minimum Date: 1951 the maximum of a set of minima; especially the largest of a set of minimum possible gains each of which occurs in the least ...
maximise
British variant of maximize
maximization
noun see maximize
maximize
transitive verb (-mized; -mizing) Date: 1802 1. to increase to a maximum 2. to make the most of 3. to find a maximum value of • maximization noun • maximizer noun
maximizer
noun see maximize
maximum
noun (plural maxima or maximums) Etymology: Latin, neuter of maximus biggest — more at maxim Date: 1740 1. a. the greatest quantity or value attainable or attained b. ...
maximum likelihood
noun Date: 1922 a statistical method for estimating population parameters (as the mean and variance) from sample data that selects as estimates those parameter values ...
maxixe
noun (plural maxixes) Etymology: Brazilian Portuguese Date: 1914 a ballroom dance of Brazilian origin that resembles the two-step
maxwell
noun Etymology: James Clerk Maxwell Date: 1900 the centimeter-gram-second electromagnetic unit of magnetic flux equal to the flux per square centimeter of normal cross ...
Maxwell
biographical name James Clerk 1831-1879 Scottish physicist • Maxwellian adjective
Maxwellian
adjective see Maxwell
May
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French & Latin; Anglo-French mai, from Latin Maius, from Maia, Roman goddess Date: 12th century 1. the fifth month of the ...
may
I. verbal auxiliary (past might; present singular & plural may) Etymology: Middle English (1st & 3d singular present indicative), from Old English mæg; akin to Old High German ...
May Day
noun Date: 13th century May 1 celebrated as a springtime festival and in some countries as Labor Day
May, Cape
geographical name cape S New Jersey at entrance to Delaware Bay
maya
noun Etymology: Sanskrit māyā Date: 1788 the sense-world of manifold phenomena held in Vedanta to conceal the unity of absolute being; broadly illusion
Maya
noun (plural Maya or Mayas) Etymology: Spanish Date: 1825 1. a. a Mayan language of the ancient Maya peoples recorded in inscriptions b. Yucatec; especially the older ...
Mayaguana
geographical name island in SE Bahamas NNE of Great Inagua Island area 110 square miles (285 square kilometers)
Mayagüez
geographical name city & port W Puerto Rico population 98,434
Mayakovski
biographical name Vladimir Vladimirovich 1893-1930 Russian poet
Mayan
noun Date: 1900 1. a member of the peoples speaking Mayan languages 2. an extensive language family of Central America and Mexico • Mayan adjective
Mayanist
noun Date: 1950 a specialist in Mayan civilization and often languages
Mayapán
geographical name ruined city capital of the Mayas SE Mexico in Yucatán SSE of Mérida
mayapple
noun Etymology: May Date: circa 1733 a North American herb (Podophyllum peltatum) of the barberry family with a poisonous rootstock, one or two large-lobed peltate leaves, ...
maybe
I. adverb Date: 15th century perhaps II. noun Date: circa 1586 uncertainty
Mayday
Etymology: French m'aider help me Date: 1927 — an international radio-telephone signal word used as a distress call
Mayence
geographical name — see Mainz
Mayenne
geographical name river 125 miles (201 kilometers) NW France uniting with the Sarthe to form the Maine (8 miles or 13 kilometers long, flowing into the Loire)
mayest
or mayst archaic present second singular of may
Mayfair
geographical name district of W London, England, in Westminster borough
mayflower
noun Date: 1594 any of various spring-blooming plants; especially arbutus 2
mayfly
noun Date: circa 1653 any of an order (Ephemeroptera) of insects with an aquatic nymph and a short-lived fragile adult having membranous wings and two or three long caudal ...
mayhap
adverb Etymology: from the phrase may hap Date: circa 1531 perhaps
mayhem
noun Etymology: Middle English mayme, mahaime, from Anglo-French mahaim mutilation, mayhem, from maheimer, mahaigner to maim, probably of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High ...
maying
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 14th century the celebrating of May Day
Maykop
geographical name city S Russia in Europe capital of Adygeya population 163,000
mayn't
Date: circa 1631 may not
Maynooth
geographical name town E Ireland in County Kildare population 4768
mayo
noun Date: circa 1960 mayonnaise
Mayo
I. biographical name Charles Horace 1865-1939 & his brother William James 1861-1939 American surgeons II. geographical name 1. river 250 miles (402 kilometers) NW Mexico in ...
Mayon
geographical name volcano 8077 feet (2462 meters) Philippines in SE Luzon
mayonnaise
noun Etymology: French Date: 1841 a dressing made of egg yolks, vegetable oils, and vinegar or lemon juice
mayor
noun Etymology: Middle English maire, from Anglo-French, from Latin major greater — more at major Date: 14th century an official elected or appointed to act as chief ...
mayoral
adjective see mayor
mayoralty
noun Etymology: Middle English mairaltee, from Anglo-French mairalté, from maire Date: 14th century the office or term of office of a mayor
mayoress
noun Date: 15th century chiefly British 1. the wife or official hostess of a mayor 2. a woman holding the office of mayor
Mayotte
geographical name island of the Comoros; a French dependency area 144 square miles (374 square kilometers), population 90,000 — see Comoros
maypole
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1554 a tall flower-wreathed pole forming a center for May Day sports and dances
maypop
noun Etymology: alteration of maracock, perhaps from Virginia Algonquian Date: 1851 a climbing perennial passionflower (Passiflora incarnata) of the southern United States ...
Mayr
biographical name Ernst 1904- American (German-born) biologist
mayst
see mayest
Maytime
noun Date: 14th century the month of May
Maywood
geographical name 1. city SW California W of Whittier population 28,083 2. village NE Illinois W of Chicago population 26,987
Mayyali
geographical name — see mahe 2
Mazaca
geographical name — see Kayseri
mazard
or mazzard noun Etymology: obsolete English mazard mazer, alteration of English mazer Date: 1602 chiefly dialect head, face
Mazarin
biographical name Jules 1602-1661 French cardinal & statesman
Mazatlán
geographical name city & port W Mexico in Sinaloa on the Pacific population 314,249
maze
I. transitive verb (mazed; mazing) Etymology: Middle English Date: 13th century 1. chiefly dialect stupefy, daze 2. bewilder, perplex II. noun Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
mazel tov
interjection Etymology: Late Hebrew mazzāl tōbh, literally, good luck Date: 1862 — used to express congratulations
mazelike
adjective see maze II
mazer
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German masar gnarled excrescence on a tree Date: 14th century a large drinking bowl ...
mazourka
noun see mazurka
Mazowiecki
biographical name Tadeusz 1927- prime minister of Poland (1989-91)
mazurka
also mazourka noun Etymology: Russian, from Polish mazurek, from Mazury Masuria, region of northeastern Poland Date: 1818 1. a Polish folk dance in moderate triple measure ...
mazy
adjective Date: 1579 resembling a maze
mazzard
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1578 sweet cherry; especially wild or seedling sweet cherry used as a rootstock for grafting II. variant of mazard
Mazzini
biographical name Giuseppe 1805-1872 Italian patriot
mb
abbreviation millibar
Mb
abbreviation megabit
MB
abbreviation 1. bachelor of medicine 2. Manitoba 3. megabyte 4. municipal borough
MBA
abbreviation master of business administration
Mbabane
geographical name town capital of Swaziland population 23,109
Mbandaka
or formerly Coquilhatville geographical name city W Democratic Republic of the Congo on Congo River population 165,623
mbaqanga
noun Etymology: Zulu umbaqanga, literally, steamed cornmeal bread Date: 1987 a South African dance music that combines traditional elements (as chanting and drumming) with ...
mbd
abbreviation million barrels per day
MBD
abbreviation minimal brain dysfunction
MBE
abbreviation member of the Order of the British Empire
Mbeki
biographical name Thabo 1942- president of South Africa (1999- )
Mbini
or formerly Río Muni geographical name mainland portion of Equatorial Guinea bordering on Gulf of Guinea capital Bata area 10,040 square miles (26,104 square kilometers)
mbira
noun Etymology: Shona Date: circa 1911 an African musical instrument that consists of a wooden or gourd resonator and a varying number of tuned metal or wooden strips that ...
MBO
abbreviation management by objective
Mbomou
geographical name — see Bomu
Mbps
abbreviation megabits per second
MBS
abbreviation Mutual Broadcasting System
Mbuji-Mayi
or formerly Bakwanga geographical name city S Democratic Republic of the Congo population 613,027
mc
abbreviation 1. megacycle 2. millicurie
MC
I. noun Date: 1790 master of ceremonies II. abbreviation member of Congress
Mc-
prefix Etymology: McDonald's, chain of fast food restaurants — used to indicate an inexpensive, convenient, or easy but usually low-quality or commercialized version of ...
McAdoo
biographical name William Gibbs 1863-1941 American administrator
McAllen
geographical name city S Texas WNW of Brownsville population 106,414
MCAT
abbreviation Medical College Admission Test
MCC
abbreviation mission control center
McCarthy
I. biographical name Eugene Joseph 1916- American politician II. biographical name Joseph Raymond 1908-1957 American politician III. biographical name Mary Therese ...
McCarthyism
noun Etymology: Joseph R. McCarthy Date: 1950 a mid-20th century political attitude characterized chiefly by opposition to elements held to be subversive and by the use of ...
McCarthyist
adjective see McCarthyism
McCarthyite
noun or adjective see McCarthyism
McClellan
biographical name George Brinton 1826-1885 American general & politician
McClintock
biographical name Barbara 1902-1992 American botanist
McCloskey
biographical name John 1810-1885 1st American cardinal
McCloy
biographical name John Jay 1895-1989 American banker & government official
McClure
biographical name Samuel Sidney 1857-1949 American (Irish-born) editor & publisher
McCormack
I. biographical name John 1884-1945 American (Irish-born) tenor II. biographical name John William 1891-1980 American politician
McCormick
I. biographical name Cyrus Hall 1809-1884 American inventor II. biographical name Robert Rutherford 1880-1955 American newspaper publisher
McCoy
noun Etymology: alteration of Mackay (in the phrase the real Mackay), of unknown origin Date: 1922 something that is neither imitation nor substitute — often used in the ...
McCullers
biographical name Carson 1917-1967 née Smith American writer
McDowell
biographical name Irvin 1818-1885 American general
McFadden
biographical name Daniel L. 1937- American economist
mcg
abbreviation microgram
McGill
biographical name James 1744-1813 Canadian (Scottish-born) businessman & philanthropist
McGovern
biographical name George Stanley 1922- American politician
McGuffey
biographical name William Holmes 1800-1873 American educator
McGuffin
variant of MacGuffin
McIntosh
noun Etymology: John McIntosh fl1796 Canadian settler Date: 1878 a juicy bright red eating apple with a thin skin, white flesh, and aromatic slightly tart flavor
McJob
noun Date: 1986 a low-paying job that requires little skill and provides little opportunity for advancement
McKeesport
geographical name city SW Pennsylvania S of Pittsburgh population 24,040
McKenna
biographical name Siobhan 1923?-1986 Irish actress
McKim
biographical name Charles Follen 1847-1909 American architect
McKinley
biographical name William 1843-1901 25th president of the United States (1897-1901)
McKinley, Mount
or Denali geographical name mountain 20,320 feet (6194 meters) central Alaska in Alaska Range; highest in United States & North America; in Denali National Park
McKinney
geographical name city NE Texas N of Dallas population 54,369
MCL
abbreviation Marine Corps League
McLuhan
biographical name (Herbert) Marshall 1911-1980 Canadian educator
McMahon
biographical name Sir William 1908-1988 prime minister of Australia (1971-72)
McMillan
biographical name Edwin Mattison 1907-1991 American chemist
McMinnville
geographical name city NW Oregon NW of Salem population 26,499
McMurdo Sound
geographical name inlet of W Ross Sea Antarctica between Ross Island & coast of Victoria Land
McNamara
biographical name Robert Strange 1916- United States secretary of defense (1961-68)
McNaughton
biographical name Andrew George Latta 1887-1966 Canadian general & diplomat
MCP
abbreviation male chauvinist pig
MCPO
abbreviation master chief petty officer
MD
abbreviation 1. [New Latin medicinae doctor] doctor of medicine 2. [Italian mano destra] right hand 3. Maryland 4. medical department 5. minidisc 6. months after ...
Md
I. abbreviation Maryland II. symbol mendelevium
MDC
abbreviation more developed country
MDiv
abbreviation master of divinity
MDMA
noun Etymology: methylene + di- + methamphetamine ecstasy 4
mdse
abbreviation merchandise
MDT
abbreviation mountain daylight time
me
pronoun, objective case of i Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mē; akin to Old High German mīh me, Latin me, Greek me, Sanskrit mā Usage: Me is used in many ...
Me
abbreviation methyl
ME
abbreviation 1. (or Me) Maine 2. managing editor 3. mechanical engineer 4. medical examiner
me judice
foreign term Etymology: Latin I being judge ; in my judgment
Me Nam
geographical name — see Chao Phraya
me-too
adjective Date: 1926 1. marked by similarity to or by adoption of successful or persuasive policies or practices used or promoted by someone else 2. similar or identical to ...
me-tooer
noun see me-too
me-tooism
noun see me-too
mea culpa
noun Etymology: Latin, through my fault Date: 1602 a formal acknowledgment of personal fault or error
Mead
biographical name Margaret 1901-1978 American anthropologist
mead
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mede, from Old English medu; akin to Old High German metu mead, Greek methy wine Date: before 12th century a fermented beverage made of ...
Mead, Lake
geographical name reservoir NW Arizona & SE Nevada formed by Hoover Dam in Colorado River
Meade
I. biographical name George Gordon 1815-1872 American general II. biographical name James Edward 1907-1995 British economist
meadow
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English medwe, from Old English mǣdwe, oblique case form of mǣd; akin to Old English māwan to mow — more at mow Date: ...
meadow beauty
noun Date: 1840 any of a genus (Rhexia of the family Melastomaceae, the meadow-beauty family) of perennial North American herbs with showy solitary or cymose flowers
meadow fescue
noun Date: 1794 a tall vigorous broad-leaved European fescue grass (Festuca pratensis) cultivated for forage and hay
meadow grass
noun Date: 13th century any of various grasses (as of the genus Poa) that thrive in the presence of abundant moisture; especially Kentucky bluegrass
meadow mouse
noun see meadow vole
meadow mushroom
noun Date: 1884 a common edible brown-spored agaric (Agaricus campestris) that occurs in moist open organically rich soil and is often cultivated
meadow nematode
noun Date: 1946 any of numerous plant-parasitic nematodes (especially genus Pratylenchus) that are destructive to plant roots
meadow rue
noun Date: 1668 any of a genus (Thalictrum) of widely distributed perennial herbs of the buttercup family growing in typically damp areas
meadow saffron
noun Date: 1578 autumn crocus
meadow spittlebug
noun Date: 1942 a widely distributed spittlebug (Philaenus spumarius) that does severe damage especially to grasses
meadow vole
noun Date: 1801 any of various voles (genus Microtus) that frequent open fields; especially one (M. pennsylvanicus) that is widespread in North America — called also ...
meadowfoam
noun Date: 1897 any of a genus (Limnanthes of the family Limnanthaceae) of annual herbs of the Pacific coast of North America having white or yellow flowers and including some ...
meadowland
noun Date: 1530 land that is or is used for meadow
meadowlark
noun Date: 1611 any of several American songbirds (genus Sturnella of the family Icteridae) that are streaked brown above and in northernmost forms have a yellow breast ...
meadowsweet
noun Date: 1530 1. any of several spireas; especially a North American native or naturalized spirea (as Spiraea alba and S. latifolia) 2. any of a genus (Filipendula) of ...
meadowy
adjective see meadow
meager
or meagre adjective Etymology: Middle English megre, from Anglo-French megre, meigre, from Latin macr-, macer lean; akin to Old English mæger lean, Greek makros long Date: ...
meagerly
adverb see meager
meagerness
noun see meager
meagre
adjective see meager
meal
I. noun Etymology: Middle English meel appointed time, meal, from Old English mǣl; akin to Old High German māl time, Latin metiri to measure — more at measure Date: before ...
meal ticket
noun Date: circa 1899 one that serves as the ultimate source of one's income
mealie
noun Etymology: Afrikaans mielie, from obsolete Dutch milie millet, maize, from Middle French mil millet — more at millet Date: 1855 South African Indian corn; also an ...
meals-on-wheels
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1961 a service that delivers daily hot meals to the homes of elderly or disabled people
mealtime
noun Date: 12th century the usual time for serving a meal
mealworm
noun Date: 1658 the larva of a darkling beetle (especially genus Tenebrio) that infests grain products but is often raised as food for insectivorous animals, for laboratory ...
mealy
adjective (mealier; -est) Date: 1591 1. containing meal ; farinaceous 2. soft, dry, and friable 3. a. covered with meal or with fine granules b. flecked with another ...
mealybug
noun Date: 1824 any of a family (Pseudococcidae) of scale insects that have a white cottony or waxy covering and are destructive pests especially of fruit trees
mealymouthed
adjective Date: circa 1572 not plain and straightforward ; devious
mean
I. verb (meant; meaning) Etymology: Middle English menen, from Old English mǣnan; akin to Old High German meinen to have in mind, Old Church Slavic měniti to mention Date: ...
mean business
phrasal to be in earnest
mean deviation
noun Date: 1858 the mean of the absolute values of the numerical differences between the numbers of a set (as statistical data) and their mean or median
mean distance
noun Date: 1830 the arithmetical mean of the maximum and minimum distances of an orbiting celestial object from its primary
mean free path
noun Date: 1879 the average distance traversed between collisions by particles (as molecules of a gas or free electrons in metal) in a system of agitated particles
mean proportional
noun Date: 1571 geometric mean; especially the square root (as x) of the product of two numbers (as a and b) when expressed as the means of a proportion (as a/x = x/b)
mean solar day
noun Date: 1816 the interval between successive transits of a given meridian by the mean sun
mean solar time
noun see mean time
mean square
noun Date: 1845 the mean of the squares of a set of values
mean square deviation
noun Date: 1920 1. variance 5 2. standard deviation
mean sun
noun Date: 1765 a fictitious sun used for timekeeping that moves uniformly along the celestial equator and maintains a constant rate of apparent motion equal to the average ...
mean time
noun Date: 1751 time that is based on the motion of the mean sun — called also mean solar time
mean value theorem
noun Date: 1900 1. a theorem in differential calculus: if a function of one variable is continuous on a closed interval and differentiable on the interval minus its endpoints ...
mean-spirited
adjective Date: 1694 exhibiting or characterized by meanness of spirit • mean-spiritedness noun
mean-spiritedness
noun see mean-spirited
meander
I. noun Etymology: Latin maeander, from Greek maiandros, from Maiandros (now Menderes), river in Asia Minor Date: 1576 1. a winding path or course; especially labyrinth 2. ...
meandrous
adjective see meander I
meaner
noun see mean I
meanie
also meany noun (plural meanies) Date: 1910 a mean or spiteful person
meaning
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. the thing one intends to convey especially by language ; purport b. the thing that is conveyed especially by language ; import 2. ...
meaningful
adjective Date: 1852 1. a. having a meaning or purpose b. full of meaning ; significant 2. having an assigned function in a language system • meaningfully ...
meaningfully
adverb see meaningful
meaningfulness
noun see meaningful
meaningless
adjective Date: 1797 1. having no meaning; especially lacking any significance 2. having no assigned function in a language system • meaninglessly adverb • ...
meaninglessly
adverb see meaningless
meaninglessness
noun see meaningless
meaningly
adverb see meaning
meanly
I. adverb Date: 14th century obsolete fairly well ; moderately II. adverb Date: 15th century in a mean manner: as a. in a lowly manner ; humbly b. in an inferior ...
meanness
noun see mean II
means test
noun Date: 1930 an examination into the financial state of a person to determine his eligibility for public assistance • means-tested adjective
means-tested
adjective see means test
meantime
I. noun Date: 14th century the intervening time II. adverb Date: 1588 meanwhile
meanwhile
I. noun Date: 14th century meantime II. adverb Date: 14th century 1. during the intervening time 2. at the same time
Meany
biographical name George 1894-1980 American labor leader
meany
noun see meanie
Mearns, The
geographical name — see Kincardine
meas
abbreviation measure
measle
noun Etymology: singular of measles Date: 1863 a cysticercus tapeworm larva; specifically one found in the muscles of a domesticated mammal

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