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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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measles
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Middle English meseles, plural of mesel measles, spot characteristic of measles; akin to Middle Dutch masel spot ...
measly
adjective (measlier; -est) Date: 1687 1. infected with measles 2. a. containing larval tapeworms b. infested with trichinae 3. contemptibly small
measurability
noun see measure II
measurable
adjective see measure II
measurably
adverb see measure II
measure
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mesure, from Anglo-French, from Latin mensura, from mensus, past participle of metiri to measure; akin to Old English mǣth measure, Greek ...
measure up
intransitive verb Date: 1854 1. to have necessary or fitting qualifications — often used with to 2. to be the equal (as in ability) — used with to
measured
adjective Date: 14th century 1. marked by due proportion 2. a. marked by rhythm ; regularly recurrent b. metrical 3. deliberate, calculated • measuredly adverb
measuredly
adverb see measured
measureless
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having no observable limit ; immeasurable 2. very great
measurement
noun Date: 1751 1. the act or process of measuring 2. a figure, extent, or amount obtained by measuring ; dimension 3. measure 2b
measurement ton
noun Date: circa 1934 ton 1c
measurer
noun see measure II
measuring worm
noun Date: 1843 looper 1
meat
noun Etymology: Middle English mete, from Old English; akin to Old High German maz food Date: before 12th century 1. a. food; especially solid food as distinguished from ...
meat and potatoes
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1951 the most interesting or fundamental part ; meat 4
meat loaf
noun Date: 1892 a dish of ground meat seasoned and baked in the form of a loaf
meat market
noun Date: 1896 a depersonalizing environment in which people are treated as sexual or economic resources
meat-and-potatoes
adjective Date: 1949 1. of fundamental importance ; basic; also concerned with or emphasizing the basic aspects of something 2. unpretentious, simple 3. providing or ...
meat-ax
noun Date: 1831 1. cleaver 1 2. an extreme or heavy-handed method of cutting or altering something
meatball
noun Date: 1877 a small ball of chopped or ground meat often mixed with bread crumbs and spices
meated
adjective see meat
Meath
geographical name county E Ireland in NE Leinster capital Trim area 903 square miles (2348 square kilometers), population 105,370
meathead
noun Date: 1863 a stupid or bungling person
meatiness
noun see meaty
meatless
adjective see meat
meatpacking
noun Date: 1857 the wholesale meat industry
meatus
noun (plural meatuses or meatus) Etymology: Late Latin, from Latin, going, passage, from meare to go — more at permeate Date: 1580 a natural body passage
meaty
adjective (meatier; -est) Date: circa 1787 1. a. full of meat b. having the character of meat 2. rich especially in matter for thought ; substantial • meatiness ...
Meaux
geographical name commune N France ENE of Paris population 49,409
mecamylamine
noun Etymology: from Mecamylamine, a trademark Date: 1955 a drug that is used orally in the form of its hydrochloride C11H21N•HCl as a ganglionic blocking agent to effect a ...
mecca
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Mecca, Saudi Arabia, a destination of pilgrims in the Islamic world Date: 1843 a place regarded as a center for a specified group, ...
Mecca
geographical name city Saudi Arabia capital of Hejaz population 366,801 • Meccan adjective or noun
Meccan
adjective or noun see Mecca
mech
abbreviation mechanic; mechanical
mechan-
or mechano- combining form Etymology: Greek, from mēchanē machine — more at machine mechanical
mechanic
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, probably from Middle French mecanique, adjective & noun, from Latin mechanicus, from Greek mēchanikos, from mēchanē Date: 14th ...
mechanical
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) of or relating to machinery or tools (2) produced or operated by a machine or tool b. of or relating to manual ...
mechanical advantage
noun Date: 1852 the advantage gained by the use of a mechanism in transmitting force; specifically the ratio of the force that performs the useful work of a machine to the ...
mechanical drawing
noun Date: 1811 1. drawing done with the aid of instruments 2. a drawing made with instruments
mechanical engineer
noun see mechanical engineering
mechanical engineering
noun Date: circa 1890 a branch of engineering concerned primarily with the industrial application of mechanics and with the production of tools, machinery, and their products ...
mechanically
adverb see mechanical I
mechanician
noun Date: 1570 mechanic, machinist
mechanics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1612 1. a branch of physical science that deals with energy and forces and their effect on bodies 2. the practical ...
mechanism
noun Date: 1662 1. a. a piece of machinery b. a process, technique, or system for achieving a result 2. mechanical operation or action ; working 2 3. a doctrine that ...
mechanist
noun Date: 1606 1. archaic mechanic 2. an adherent of the doctrine of mechanism
mechanistic
adjective Date: 1884 1. mechanically determined 2. of or relating to a mechanism or the doctrine of mechanism 3. mechanical • mechanistically adverb
mechanistically
adverb see mechanistic
mechanizable
adjective see mechanize
mechanization
noun see mechanize
mechanize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: 1678 1. to make mechanical; especially to make automatic or routine 2. a. to equip with machinery especially to replace human or ...
mechanizer
noun see mechanize
mechano-
combining form see mechan-
mechanochemical
adjective see mechanochemistry
mechanochemistry
noun Date: 1928 chemistry that deals with the conversion of chemical energy into mechanical work (as in the contraction of a muscle) • mechanochemical adjective
mechanoreception
noun see mechanoreceptor
mechanoreceptive
adjective see mechanoreceptor
mechanoreceptor
noun Date: 1927 a neural end organ (as a tactile receptor) that responds to a mechanical stimulus (as a change in pressure) • mechanoreception noun • mechanoreceptive ...
Mechelen
geographical name see Mechlin II
Mechlin
I. noun Etymology: Mechlin, Belgium Date: 1701 a delicate bobbin lace used for dresses and millinery II. geographical name or Flemish Mechelen or French Malines commune N ...
Mecklenburg
geographical name region NE Germany SE of Jutland Peninsula & E of the Elbe; in 18th & 19th centuries divided into duchies of Mecklenburg-Schwerin & Mecklenburg-Strelitz , ...
Mecklenburg-West Pomerania
geographical name state of Germany bordering on Baltic Sea capital Schwerin area 9096 square miles (23,559 square kilometers), population 1,924,000
meclizine
noun Etymology: methyl + chlor- + -izine (alteration of azine) Date: 1954 a drug C25H27ClN2 used usually in the form of its hydrochloride to treat vertigo and nausea (as in ...
meconium
noun Etymology: Latin, literally, poppy juice, from Greek mēkōnion, from mēkōn poppy; akin to Old High German mago poppy Date: circa 1706 a dark greenish mass that ...
Med
abbreviation Mediterranean
MEd
abbreviation master of education
med
I. adjective Date: circa 1933 medical II. noun Date: 1942 medication 2 — usually used in plural III. abbreviation 1. medicine 2. medieval 3. medium
medaillon
noun see medallion 3
medaka
noun Etymology: Japanese Date: 1933 a small Japanese freshwater fish (Oryzias latipes) usually silvery brown in the wild but from pale yellow to deep red in aquarium strains
medal
I. noun Etymology: Middle French medaille, from Old Italian medaglia coin worth half a denarius, medal, from Vulgar Latin *medalis half, alteration of Late Latin medialis ...
Medal for Merit
Date: 1942 a United States decoration awarded to civilians for highly meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding services
Medal of Freedom
Date: 1945 a United States decoration awarded to civilians for meritorious achievement in any of various fields
Medal of Honor
Date: 1861 a United States military decoration awarded in the name of the Congress for conspicuous intrepidity at the risk of life in action with an enemy
medal play
noun Date: 1816 stroke play
medalist
or medallist noun Date: 1685 1. a designer, engraver, or maker of medals 2. a recipient of a medal as an award
medallic
adjective Date: 1702 of, relating to, or shown on a medal
medallion
noun Etymology: French médaillon, from Italian medaglione, augmentative of medaglia Date: 1658 1. a large medal 2. something resembling a large medal; especially a ...
medallist
noun see medalist
Medan
geographical name city Indonesia in NE Sumatra population 1,730,752
meddle
intransitive verb (meddled; meddling) Etymology: Middle English medlen, from Anglo-French mesler, medler, from Vulgar Latin *misculare, from Latin miscēre to mix — more at ...
meddler
noun see meddle
meddlesome
adjective Date: 1615 given to meddling Synonyms: see impertinent • meddlesomeness noun
meddlesomeness
noun see meddlesome
Mede
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Medus, from Greek Mēdos Date: 14th century a native or inhabitant of ancient Media in Persia
medfly
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: 1935 Mediterranean fruit fly
Medford
geographical name 1. city E Massachusetts N of Boston population 55,765 2. city SW Oregon population 63,154
Media
geographical name ancient country & province of Persian Empire SW Asia in NW modern Iran • Median adjective or noun
media
I. noun (plural mediae) Date: 1841 1. [Late Latin, from Latin, feminine of medius; from the voiced stops' being regarded as intermediate between the tenues and the aspirates] ...
Media Atropatene
geographical name — see Azerbaijan 1
media event
noun Date: 1972 a publicity event staged for coverage by the news media
mediacy
noun see mediate I
mediad
adverb Date: 1878 toward the median line or plane of a body or part
mediaeval
I. adjective see medieval I II. noun see medieval II
mediagenic
adjective Date: 1971 attractive or well-suited to the communications media
medial
adjective Etymology: Late Latin medialis, from Latin medius Date: 1570 1. mean, average 2. a. being or occurring in the middle b. extending toward the middle; ...
medially
adverb see medial
median
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mediane, from Late Latin mediana (vena) median (vein), from feminine of Latin medianus in the middle, central, from medius middle — more at ...
Median
adjective or noun see Media
median nerve
noun Date: 1807 a nerve that arises by two roots from the brachial plexus and passes down the middle of the front of the arm
medianly
adverb see median II
mediant
noun Etymology: Italian mediante, from Late Latin mediant-, medians, present participle of mediare to be in the middle Date: 1822 the third tone of a major or minor scale
mediastinal
adjective see mediastinum
mediastinum
noun (plural mediastina) Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin, neuter of mediastinus medial, from Latin medius Date: 1541 the space in the chest between the pleural sacs ...
mediate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin mediatus intermediate, from past participle of mediare Date: 15th century 1. occupying a middle position 2. a. ...
mediately
adverb see mediate I
mediation
noun Date: 14th century the act or process of mediating; especially intervention between conflicting parties to promote reconciliation, settlement, or compromise • ...
mediational
adjective see mediation
mediative
adjective see mediate II
mediator
noun Date: 14th century 1. one that mediates; especially one that mediates between parties at variance 2. a mediating agent in a physical, chemical, or biological process
mediatory
adjective see mediate II
mediatrix
noun Date: 15th century a woman who is a mediator
medic
I. noun Etymology: Middle English medike, from Latin medica, from Greek mēdikē, from feminine of mēdikos of Media, from Mēdia Media Date: 15th century any of a genus ...
medicable
adjective Date: circa 1616 curable, remediable
Medicaid
noun Etymology: medical aid Date: 1966 a program of medical aid designed for those unable to afford regular medical service and financed by the state and federal governments
medical
adjective Etymology: French or Late Latin; French médical, from Late Latin medicalis, from Latin medicus physician, from mederi to remedy, heal; akin to Avestan vī-mad- ...
medical examiner
noun Date: 1877 a public officer who conducts autopsies on bodies to find the cause of death
medicalization
noun see medicalize
medicalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1970 to view or treat as a medical concern, problem, or disorder • medicalization noun
medically
adverb see medical
medicament
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin medicamentum, from medicare Date: 15th century a substance used in therapy • medicamentous adjective
medicamentous
adjective see medicament
Medicare
noun Etymology: blend of medical and care Date: 1955 a government program of medical care especially for the aged
medicate
transitive verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin medicatus, past participle of medicare to heal, from medicus Date: circa 1623 1. to treat medicinally 2. to impregnate ...
medication
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of medicating 2. a medicinal substance ; medicament
Medici, de'
I. biographical name Catherine — see catherine de medicis II. biographical name Cosimo 1389-1464 the Elder Florentine financier & ruler III. biographical name Cosimo I ...
medicinable
adjective Date: 14th century medicinal
medicinal
adjective Date: 14th century 1. tending or used to cure disease or relieve pain 2. salutary • medicinal noun • medicinally adverb
medicinal leech
noun Date: 1804 a large European freshwater leech (Hirudo medicinalis) that is a source of hirudin, is sometimes used to drain blood (as from newly grafted tissue), and was ...
medicinally
adverb see medicinal
medicine
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin medicina, from feminine of medicinus of a physician, from medicus Date: 13th century 1. a. a substance or ...
medicine ball
noun Date: 1895 a heavy stuffed leather-covered ball used for conditioning exercises
Medicine Bow
geographical name river 120 miles (193 kilometers) S Wyoming flowing into North Platte River
Medicine Bow Mountains
geographical name mountains N Colorado & S Wyoming in the Rockies; highest Medicine Bow Peak (in Wyoming) 12,013 feet (3662 meters)
medicine dropper
noun Date: 1868 dropper 2
Medicine Hat
geographical name city Canada in SE Alberta population 51,249
medicine man
noun Date: 1801 a priestly healer or sorcerer especially among the American Indians ; shaman
medicine show
noun Date: 1903 a traveling show using entertainers to attract a crowd among which remedies or nostrums are sold
medico
noun (plural -cos) Etymology: Italian medico or Spanish médico, both from Latin medicus Date: 1689 physician 1; also a medical student
medicolegal
adjective Etymology: New Latin medicolegalis, from Latin medicus medical + -o- + legalis legal Date: 1835 of or relating to both medicine and law
medieval
I. adjective also mediaeval Etymology: New Latin medium aevum Middle Ages Date: 1827 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the Middle Ages 2. having a quality (as ...
Medieval Latin
noun Date: 1855 the Latin used especially for liturgical and literary purposes from the 7th to the 15th centuries inclusive
medievalism
noun Date: 1853 1. medieval quality, character, or state 2. devotion to the institutions, arts, and practices of the Middle Ages
medievalist
noun Date: 1855 1. a specialist in medieval history and culture 2. a connoisseur or devotee of medieval arts and culture
medievally
adverb see medieval I
medigap
noun Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Etymology: Medicare + gap Date: 1975 supplemental health insurance that covers costs (as of medical care or a hospital ...
medina
noun Etymology: Arabic madīna city Date: 1906 the non-European part of a northern African city
Medina
geographical name 1. city N Ohio WNW of Akron population 25,139 2. city W Saudi Arabia population 198,186
Medina-Sidonia
biographical name Duque de died 1619 Alonso Pérez de Guzmán Spanish admiral
medio tutissimus ibis
foreign term Etymology: Latin you will go most safely by the middle course
mediocre
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Latin mediocris, from medius middle + Old Latin ocris stony mountain; akin to Latin acer sharp — more at edge Date: circa 1586 of ...
mediocrity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1588 1. a. the quality or state of being mediocre b. moderate ability or value 2. a mediocre person
Mediolanum
geographical name — see Milan
meditate
verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin meditatus, past participle of meditari, frequentative of medēri to remedy — more at medical Date: 1560 intransitive verb 1. to ...
meditation
noun Date: 13th century 1. a discourse intended to express its author's reflections or to guide others in contemplation 2. the act or process of meditating
meditative
adjective Date: 1611 1. marked by or conducive to meditation 2. disposed or given to meditation • meditatively adverb • meditativeness noun
meditatively
adverb see meditative
meditativeness
noun see meditative
meditator
noun see meditate
Mediterranean
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. of, relating to, or characteristic of the Mediterranean Sea b. of, relating to, or characteristic of the peoples, lands, or cultures ...
Mediterranean flour moth
noun Date: 1895 a small largely gray and black nearly cosmopolitan pyralid moth (Anagasta kuehniella) whose larva destroys processed grain products
Mediterranean fruit fly
noun Date: 1899 a small widely distributed yellowish-brown dipteran fly (Ceratitis capitata) with a banded abdomen whose larva lives and feeds in ripening fruit — called ...
Mediterranean Sea
geographical name sea 2300 miles (3700 kilometers) long between Europe & Africa connecting with the Atlantic through Strait of Gibraltar & with Red Sea through Suez Canal
medium
I. noun (plural mediums or media) Etymology: Latin, from neuter of medius middle — more at mid Date: 1593 1. a. something in a middle position b. a middle condition ...
medium frequency
noun Date: 1920 a radio frequency between high frequency and low frequency — see radio frequency table
medium of exchange
Date: 1714 something commonly accepted in exchange for goods and services and recognized as representing a standard of value
mediumistic
adjective Date: 1860 of, relating to, or having the qualities of a spiritualistic medium
mediumship
noun Date: 1856 the capacity, function, or profession of a spiritualistic medium
medivac
variant of medevac
medlar
noun Etymology: Middle English medeler, from Anglo-French medler, from medle medlar fruit, from Latin mespilum, from Greek mespilon Date: 14th century a small deciduous ...
medley
I. noun (plural medleys) Etymology: Middle English medle, from Anglo-French medlee, from feminine of medlé, past participle of medler to mix — more at meddle Date: 14th ...
medley relay
noun Date: 1928 a relay race in swimming in which each member of a team uses a different stroke
Médoc
I. noun Etymology: French, from Médoc Date: 1783 a Bordeaux wine made in the Médoc district of France II. geographical name district SW France N of Bordeaux
medulla
noun (plural -las or medullae) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Date: 15th century 1. plural medullae a. bone marrow b. medulla oblongata 2. a. the inner or ...
medulla oblongata
noun (plural medulla oblongatas or medullae oblongatae) Etymology: New Latin, literally, oblong medulla Date: 1668 the part of the vertebrate brain that is continuous ...
medullary
adjective Date: 1830 1. of or relating to the pith of a plant 2. of or relating to a medulla and especially the medulla oblongata
medullary ray
noun Date: 1830 1. a primary tissue composed of radiating bands of parenchyma cells extending between the vascular bundles of herbaceous dicotyledonous stems and connecting ...
medullary sheath
noun Date: circa 1846 myelin sheath
medullated
adjective Date: 1867 1. myelinated 2. having a medulla — used of fibers other than nerve fibers
medulloblastoma
noun (plural -mas; also medulloblastomata) Etymology: New Latin, from medulla + -o- + blast- + -oma Date: 1925 a malignant tumor of the central nervous system arising in the ...
medusa
noun Date: 14th century 1. capitalized [Latin, from Greek Medousa] a mortal Gorgon who is slain when decapitated by Perseus 2. plural medusae [New Latin, from Latin] ...
medusan
adjective or noun see medusa
medusoid
adjective or noun see medusa
Medway
geographical name river 70 miles (113 kilometers) SE England in Kent flowing NE into Thames River
meed
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mēd; akin to Old High German miata reward, Greek misthos Date: before 12th century 1. archaic an earned reward or wage 2. ...
meek
adjective Etymology: Middle English, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse mjūkr gentle; akin to Welsh esmwyth soft Date: 13th century 1. enduring injury with patience ...
meekly
adverb see meek
meekness
noun see meek
Meer van Delft, van der
biographical name — see Jan Vermeer
meerkat
noun Etymology: Afrikaans, from Dutch, a kind of monkey, from Middle Dutch meercatte monkey, from meer sea + catte cat Date: 1801 any of several African mongooses; especially ...
meerschaum
noun Etymology: German, from Meer sea + Schaum foam Date: 1784 1. a fine light white clayey mineral that is a hydrous magnesium silicate found chiefly in Asia Minor and is ...
Meerut
geographical name city N India in NW Uttar Pradesh NE of Delhi population 753,778
meet
I. verb (met; meeting) Etymology: Middle English meten, from Old English mētan; akin to Old English gemōt assembly — more at moot Date: before 12th century transitive ...
meet and greet
noun Date: 1986 a reception at which a public figure (as a politician or rock star) socializes with press members and other guests
meet halfway
phrasal to compromise with
meet with
phrasal to be subjected to ; encounter
meeter
noun see meet I
meeting
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act or process of coming together: as a. an assembly for a common purpose (as worship) b. a session of horse or dog racing 2. a permanent ...
meeting of minds
Date: 1883 agreement, concord
meetinghouse
noun Date: 1632 a building used for public assembly and especially for Protestant worship
meetly
adverb see meet III
mefenamic acid
noun Etymology: dimethyl- + fen- (by shortening & alteration from phenyl) + aminobenzoic acid Date: 1962 a drug C15H15NO2 used as an anti-inflammatory agent
mefloquine
noun Etymology: meth- + fluor- + quinoline Date: 1974 an antimalarial drug C17H16F6N2O similar to quinine that is administered in the form of its hydrochloride
MEG
abbreviation magnetoencephalography
meg
I. noun Date: 1975 megabyte II. abbreviation megohm
meg-
combining form see mega-
mega
adjective Etymology: mega- Date: 1968 1. vast 2. of the highest level of rank, excellence, or importance
mega-
or meg- combining form Etymology: Greek, from megas large — more at much 1. a. great ; large b. greatly surpassing others of its kind 2. million (106)
megabar
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 a unit of pressure equal to one million bars
megabit
noun Date: 1956 one million bits
megabuck
noun Date: 1946 one million dollars; also an indeterminately large sum of money — usually used in plural
megabyte
noun Etymology: from the fact that 1,048,576 (220) is the power of 2 closest to one million Date: 1965 1024 kilobytes or 1,048,576 bytes; also one million bytes
megacity
noun Date: 1967 megalopolis 1
megacorporation
noun Date: 1971 a huge and powerful corporation
megacycle
noun Date: 1926 one million cycles; especially megahertz
megadeal
noun Date: 1978 a business deal involving a lot of money
megadeath
noun Date: 1953 one million deaths — usually used as a unit in reference to nuclear warfare
megadose
noun Date: 1971 a large dose (as of a vitamin)
megafauna
noun Date: 1927 1. animals (as bears, bison, or mammoths) of particularly large size 2. fauna consisting of individuals large enough to be visible to the naked eye • ...
megafaunal
adjective see megafauna
megagamete
noun Date: 1891 macrogamete
megagametophyte
noun Date: 1915 the female gametophyte produced by a megaspore
megahertz
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1941 a unit of frequency equal to one million hertz — abbreviation MHz
megahit
noun Date: 1977 something (as a motion picture) that is extremely successful
megakaryocyte
noun Date: 1890 a large cell that has a lobulated nucleus, is found especially in the bone marrow, and is the source of blood platelets • megakaryocytic adjective
megakaryocytic
adjective see megakaryocyte
megal-
or megalo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from megal-, megas — more at much large ; of giant size ; grandiose
megalith
noun Date: 1853 a very large usually rough stone used in prehistoric cultures as a monument or building block • megalithic adjective
megalithic
adjective see megalith
megalo-
combining form see megal-
megaloblast
noun Date: 1890 a large erythroblast that appears in the blood especially in pernicious anemia • megaloblastic adjective
megaloblastic
adjective see megaloblast
megalomania
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1887 1. a mania for great or grandiose performance 2. a delusional mental disorder that is marked by feelings of personal omnipotence and ...
megalomaniac
adjective or noun see megalomania
megalomaniacal
adjective see megalomania
megalomaniacally
adverb see megalomania
megalomanic
adjective see megalomania
megalopolis
noun Date: circa 1828 1. a very large city 2. a thickly populated region centering in a metropolis or embracing several metropolises • megalopolitan noun or adjective
megalopolitan
noun or adjective see megalopolis
megamerger
noun Date: 1980 a merger of megacorporations
megaparsec
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1920 a unit of measure for distances in intergalactic space equal to one million parsecs
megaphone
I. noun Date: 1878 a cone-shaped device used to intensify or direct the voice • megaphonic adjective II. verb Date: 1901 transitive verb to transmit or address through ...
megaphonic
adjective see megaphone I
megapixel
noun Date: 1983 one million pixels
megaplex
noun Date: 1986 a large multiplex typically housing 16 or more movie theaters
megaproject
noun Date: 1976 a major project or undertaking (as in business or construction)
Megara
geographical name city & port Greece on Saronic Gulf W of Athens population 17,294; chief town of ancient Megaris (district between Saronic Gulf & Gulf of Corinth) • ...
Megarian
adjective Date: 1603 of or relating to a Socratic school of philosophy founded by Euclid of Megara and noted for its subtle attention to logic • Megarian noun
Megaric
adjective Date: 1656 Megarian • Megaric noun
megascopic
adjective Etymology: mega- + -scopic (as in microscopic) Date: 1879 1. macroscopic 1 2. based on or relating to observations made with the unaided eye • megascopically ...
megascopically
adverb see megascopic
megasporangium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1886 a sporangium that develops only megaspores
megaspore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1857 a spore in heterosporous plants giving rise to female gametophytes and usually larger than a microspore • ...
megasporic
adjective see megaspore
megasporogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1909 the formation and maturation of a megaspore
megasporophyll
noun Date: circa 1899 a sporophyll that develops only megasporangia
megastar
noun Date: 1975 superstar • megastardom noun
megastardom
noun see megastar
megaton
noun Date: 1952 an explosive force equivalent to that of one million tons of TNT
megatonnage
noun Date: 1955 the destructive capability especially of a collection of nuclear weapons that is expressed in megatons
megavitamin
adjective Date: 1968 relating to or consisting of very large doses of vitamins
megavitamins
noun plural Date: 1974 a large quantity of vitamins
megawatt
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1900 one million watts
Meghalaya
geographical name state NE India capital Shillong area 8665 square miles (22,442 square kilometers), population 1,774,778

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