Слова на букву leni-micr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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Meghna
geographical name river Bangladesh, the lower course of the Surma
Megiddo
geographical name city of ancient Palestine N of Samaria
megillah
noun Etymology: Yiddish megile, from Hebrew mĕgillāh scroll, volume (used especially of the Book of Esther, read aloud at the Purim celebration) Date: 1943 slang a long ...
megilp
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1768 a gelatinous preparation commonly of linseed oil and mastic varnish that is used by artists as a vehicle for oil colors
MEGO
abbreviation my eyes glaze over
megohm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1867 one million ohms
megrim
noun Etymology: Middle English migreime, from Middle French migraine — more at migraine Date: 14th century 1. a. migraine b. vertigo, dizziness 2. a. fancy, ...
Meighen
biographical name Arthur 1874-1960 Canadian statesman; prime minister (1920-21; 1926)
Meiji
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Japanese, literally, enlightened rule Date: 1873 the period of the reign (1868-1912) of Emperor Mutsuhito of Japan
meikle
variant of mickle
meiny
noun (plural meinies) Etymology: Middle English meynie, from Anglo-French mesnee — more at menial Date: 13th century 1. archaic retinue, company 2. chiefly Scottish ...
meiosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek meiōsis diminution, from meioun to diminish, from meiōn less; akin to Sanskrit mīyate he diminishes Date: 1550 1. the presentation of ...
meiotic
adjective see meiosis
meiotically
adverb see meiosis
Meir
biographical name Golda 1898-1978 originally Goldie Mabovitch, later Goldie Myerson prime minister of Israel (1969-74)
Meissen
I. noun Etymology: Meissen, Saxony, Germany Date: 1863 a ceramic ware made at Meissen near Dresden; especially a European porcelain developed under the patronage of the king ...
Meissen china
noun see Meissen I
Meissen ware
noun see Meissen I
Meissonier
biographical name Jean-Louis-Ernest 1815-1891 French painter
meister
noun Etymology: Yiddish mayster & German Meister master, from Middle High German meister, from Old High German meistar, from Latin magister — more at master Date: 1979 one ...
Meistersinger
noun (plural Meistersinger or Meistersingers) Etymology: German, from Middle High German, from meister master + singer singer Date: 1844 a member of any of various German ...
Meitner
biographical name Lise 1878-1968 German physicist
meitnerium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Lise Meitner Date: 1992 a short-lived radioactive element produced artificially — see element table
Méjico
geographical name — see Mexico
MEK
abbreviation methyl ethyl ketone
Meknes
geographical name city N Morocco WSW of Fez; former capital of Morocco population 248,369
Mekong
geographical name river 2600 miles (4184 kilometers) SE Asia flowing from Qinghai (China) S & SE into South China Sea in S Vietnam
Melaka
or Malacca geographical name 1. state Malaysia on W coast of Peninsular Malaysia area 640 square miles (1648 square kilometers), population 504,502 2. city, its capital ...
melaleuca
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek melas black + leuka, feminine of leukos white — more at light Date: 1790 any of genus (Melaleuca) of Australian and East Indian trees ...
melamine
noun Etymology: German Melamin Date: circa 1835 1. a white crystalline organic base C3H6N6 with a high melting point that is used especially in melamine resins 2. a ...
melamine resin
noun Date: 1939 a thermosetting resin made from melamine and an aldehyde and used especially in molded or laminated products, adhesives, and coatings
melan-
or melano- combining form Etymology: Greek, from melan-, melas; perhaps akin to Lithuanian mėlynas blue, Sanskrit malina dirty 1. black ; dark 2. melanin
melancholia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, melancholy Date: 1607 a mental condition and especially a manic-depressive condition characterized by extreme depression, bodily ...
melancholiac
noun see melancholia
melancholic
adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or subject to melancholy ; depressed 2. of or relating to melancholia 3. tending to depress the spirits ; saddening • ...
melancholy
I. noun (plural -cholies) Etymology: Middle English malencolie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin melancholia, from Greek, from melan- + cholē bile — more at gall Date: ...
Melanchthon
biographical name Philipp 1497-1560 originally surname Schwartzerd German scholar & religious reformer
Melanesia
geographical name the islands in the Pacific NE of Australia & S of Micronesia including Bismarck Archipelago, the Solomons, Vanuatu, New Caledonia, & the Fijis
Melanesian
noun Date: 1845 1. a member of the dominant native group of Melanesia 2. a language group consisting of the Austronesian languages of Melanesia • Melanesian adjective
mélange
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from mesler, meler to mix — more at meddle Date: 1653 a mixture often of incongruous elements
melanic
I. adjective Date: 1826 1. melanotic 2. affected with, causing, or characterized by melanism II. noun Date: 1920 a melanic individual
melanin
noun Date: 1843 any of various black, dark brown, reddish-brown, or yellow pigments of animal or plant structures (as skin or hair)
melanism
noun Date: 1843 1. an increased amount of black or nearly black pigmentation (as of skin, feathers, or hair) of an individual or kind of organism — compare industrial ...
melanistic
adjective see melanism
melanite
noun Etymology: German Melanit, from melan- Date: circa 1807 a black andradite garnet • melanitic adjective
melanitic
adjective see melanite
melanization
noun see melanize
melanize
transitive verb (-nized; -nizing) Date: 1978 1. to convert into or infiltrate with melanin 2. to make dark or black • melanization noun
melano-
combining form see melan-
melanoblast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1901 a cell that is a precursor of a melanocyte or melanophore
melanocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 an epidermal cell that produces melanin
melanocyte-stimulating hormone
noun Date: 1953 any of several vertebrate hormones of the pituitary gland that darken the skin by stimulating melanin dispersion in pigment-containing cells
melanogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1909 the formation of melanin
melanoma
noun (plural -mas; also melanomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1838 1. a tumor containing dark pigment 2. a highly malignant tumor that starts in melanocytes of normal skin ...
melanophore
noun Date: 1903 a melanin-containing cell especially of fishes, amphibians, and reptiles
melanosome
noun Date: 1940 a melanin-producing granule in a melanocyte
melanotic
adjective Date: 1829 having or characterized by black pigmentation
melatonin
noun Etymology: Greek melas black + -tonin (as in serotonin) Date: 1958 a vertebrate hormone that is derived from serotonin, is secreted by the pineal gland especially in ...
Melba
biographical name Dame Nellie 1861-1931 originally Helen Porter Mitchell Australian soprano
melba toast
noun Etymology: Nellie Melba Date: 1925 very thin crisp toast
Melbourne
geographical name 1. city E Florida SSW of Cape Canaveral population 71,382 2. city & port SE Australia capital of Victoria on Port Phillip Bay metropolitan area population ...
Melbournian
noun see Melbourne
Melburnian
noun see Melbourne
Melchior
biographical name Lauritz Lebrecht Hommel 1890-1973 American (Danish-born) tenor
Melchite
or Melkite noun Etymology: New Latin Melchita, from Middle Greek Melchitēs, from Syriac malkāyā, from malkā king Date: 1615 1. an Eastern Christian chiefly of Syria and ...
Melchizedek
I. noun Etymology: Greek Melchisedek, from Hebrew Malkīṣedheq Date: 14th century a priest-king of Jerusalem who prepared a ritual meal for Abraham and received tithes from ...
meld
I. verb Etymology: German melden to announce, from Old High German meldōn; akin to Old English meldian to announce, Lithuanian malda prayer Date: 1887 transitive verb to ...
melee
also mêlée noun Etymology: French mêlée, from Old French meslee, from mesler to mix — more at meddle Date: circa 1648 a confused struggle; especially a hand-to-hand ...
mêlée
noun see melee
melic
adjective Etymology: Latin melicus, from Greek melikos, from melos song — more at melody Date: 1699 of or relating to song ; lyric; especially of or relating to Greek ...
Melilla
geographical name city & port NE Morocco on coast NE of Fez; a Spanish presidio population 56,497
melilot
noun Etymology: Middle English mellilot, from Old French melilot, from Latin melilotos, from Greek melilōtos, from meli honey + lōtos clover, lotus — more at mellifluous ...
meliorate
verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Late Latin melioratus, past participle of meliorare, from Latin melior better; akin to Latin multus much, Greek mala very Date: 1542 ...
melioration
noun see meliorate
meliorative
adjective see meliorate
meliorator
noun see meliorate
meliorism
noun Date: 1877 the belief that the world tends to improve and that humans can aid its betterment • meliorist adjective or noun • melioristic adjective
meliorist
adjective or noun see meliorism
melioristic
adjective see meliorism
melisma
noun (plural melismata) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, song, melody, from melizein to sing, from melos song Date: circa 1880 1. a group of notes or tones sung on one ...
melismatic
adjective see melisma
Melita
geographical name — see Malta
Melitene
geographical name — see Malatya
Melitopol
geographical name city S Ukraine near Sea of Azov population 177,000
Melkite
noun see Melchite
mell
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French mesler Date: 14th century mix
mellifluent
adjective Etymology: Late Latin mellifluent-, mellifluens, from Latin mell-, mel + fluent-, fluens, present participle of fluere Date: 1601 mellifluous • mellifluently ...
mellifluently
adverb see mellifluent
mellifluous
adjective Etymology: Middle English mellyfluous, from Late Latin mellifluus, from Latin mell-, mel honey + fluere to flow; akin to Gothic milith honey, Greek melit-, meli Date: ...
mellifluously
adverb see mellifluous
mellifluousness
noun see mellifluous
Mellon
biographical name Andrew William 1855-1937 American financier
mellophone
noun Etymology: 1mellow + -phone Date: 1913 a valved brass instrument similar in form and range to the French horn
mellotron
noun Etymology: from Mellotron, a trademark Date: 1963 an electronic keyboard instrument programmed to produce the tape-recorded sounds usually of orchestral instruments
mellow
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English melowe Date: 15th century 1. a. of a fruit tender and sweet because of ripeness b. of a wine well aged and pleasingly mild 2. ...
mellowly
adverb see mellow I
mellowness
noun see mellow I
melodeon
noun Etymology: German Melodion, from Melodie melody, ultimately from Late Latin melodia Date: 1844 a small reed organ in which a suction bellows draws air inward through ...
melodic
adjective see melody
melodically
adverb see melody
melodious
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having a pleasing melody 2. of, relating to, or producing melody • melodiously adverb • melodiousness noun
melodiously
adverb see melodious
melodiousness
noun see melodious
melodist
noun Date: 1789 1. singer 2. a composer of melodies
melodize
verb (-dized; -dizing) Date: 1662 intransitive verb to compose a melody transitive verb to make melodious ; set to melody • melodizer noun
melodizer
noun see melodize
melodrama
noun Etymology: modification of French mélodrame, from Greek melos song + French drame drama, from Late Latin drama Date: 1802 1. a. a work (as a movie or play) ...
melodramatic
adjective Date: 1808 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of melodrama 2. appealing to the emotions ; sensational Synonyms: see dramatic • melodramatically adverb
melodramatically
adverb see melodramatic
melodramatics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1879 melodramatic conduct or writing
melodramatise
British variant of melodramatize
melodramatist
noun see melodrama
melodramatization
noun see melodramatize
melodramatize
transitive verb Date: 1820 1. to make melodramatic 2. to make a melodrama of (as a novel) • melodramatization noun
melody
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Middle English melodie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin melodia, from Greek melōidia chanting, music, from melos limb, musical phrase, song ...
melon
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin melon-, melo, short for Latin melopepon-, melopepo, from Greek mēlopepōn, from ...
melon baller
noun Date: 1950 a spoonlike utensil with a sharp edge used especially for cutting ball-shaped pieces from the pulp of a fruit
Melos
geographical name — see milos
melphalan
noun Etymology: probably from methanol + phenylalanine Date: 1960 an antineoplastic drug C13H18Cl2N2O2
Melpomene
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Melpomenē Date: circa 1548 the Greek Muse of tragedy
Melrose
geographical name city E Massachusetts N of Boston population 27,134
Melrose Park
geographical name village NE Illinois W of Chicago population 23,171
melt
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English meltan; akin to Old Norse melta to digest, Greek meldein to melt — more at mollify Date: before 12th century intransitive ...
melt down
intransitive verb Date: 1956 to suffer a meltdown ; collapse
meltability
noun see melt I
meltable
adjective see melt I
meltdown
noun Date: 1956 1. the accidental melting of the core of a nuclear reactor 2. a rapid or disastrous decline or collapse 3. a breakdown of self-control (as from fatigue or ...
melter
noun see melt I
melting
adjective Date: 1565 tender, delicate
melting point
noun Date: 1823 the temperature at which a solid melts
melting pot
noun Date: 1887 1. a. a place where a variety of races, cultures, or individuals assimilate into a cohesive whole b. the population of such a place 2. a process of ...
melting-pot
adjective see melting pot
meltingly
adverb see melting
melton
noun Etymology: Melton Mowbray, town in England Date: circa 1858 a heavy smooth woolen fabric with short nap
meltwater
noun Date: 1923 water derived from the melting of ice and snow
Melville
biographical name Herman 1819-1891 American author • Melvillean adjective
Melville Island
geographical name island N Canada in Parry Islands area over 16,250 square miles (42,088 square kilometers)
Melville Peninsula
geographical name peninsula Canada in Nunavut between Foxe Basin & an arm of Gulf of Boothia
Melville, Lake
geographical name lake Canada in Newfoundland & Labrador in SE Labrador; the inner basin of Hamilton Inlet area 1133 square miles (2946 square kilometers)
Melvillean
adjective see Melville
mem
I. noun Etymology: Hebrew mēm, literally, water Date: circa 1567 the 13th letter of the Hebrew alphabet — see alphabet table II. abbreviation 1. member 2. memoir 3. ...
member
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English membre, from Anglo-French, from Latin membrum; akin to Gothic mimz flesh, Greek mēros thigh Date: 14th century 1. a ...
membered
adjective Date: 14th century made up of or divided into members
membership
noun Date: 1643 1. the state or status of being a member 2. the body of members 3. the relation between an element of a set or class and the set or class — compare ...
membrane
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin membrana skin, parchment, from membrum Date: 15th century 1. a thin soft pliable sheet or layer especially of animal or plant ...
membraned
adjective see membrane
membranous
adjective Date: 1597 1. of, relating to, or resembling membrane 2. thin, pliable, and often somewhat transparent 3. characterized or accompanied by the formation of a ...
membranous labyrinth
noun Date: 1840 the sensory structures of the inner ear
membranously
adverb see membranous
meme
noun Etymology: alteration of mimeme, from mim- (as in mimesis) + -eme Date: 1976 an idea, behavior, style, or usage that spreads from person to person within a culture
Memel
geographical name — see Klaipeda
memento
noun (plural -tos or -toes) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, remember, imperative of meminisse to remember; akin to Latin ment-, mens mind — more at mind Date: 1580 ...
memento mori
noun (plural memento mori) Etymology: Latin, remember that you must die Date: 1598 a reminder of mortality; especially death's-head
Memlinc
biographical name see Memling
Memling
or Memlinc biographical name Hans circa 1430-1494 Flemish painter
Memnon
noun Etymology: Greek Memnōn Date: 1567 an Ethiopian king slain by Achilles at a late stage of the Trojan War
memo
noun (plural memos) Date: 1705 memorandum
memoir
noun Etymology: Middle French memoire, from memoire memory, from Latin memoria Date: 1571 1. an official note or report ; memorandum 2. a. a narrative composed from ...
memoirist
noun see memoir
memorabilia
noun plural Etymology: Latin, from neuter plural of memorabilis Date: 1785 1. things that are remarkable and worthy of remembrance 2. things that stir recollection or are ...
memorability
noun Date: circa 1661 the quality or state of being easy to remember or worth remembering
memorable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin memorabilis, from memorare to remind, mention, from memor mindful Date: 15th century worth remembering ; notable • ...
memorableness
noun see memorable
memorably
adverb see memorable
memorandum
noun (plural -dums or memoranda) Etymology: Middle English, to be remembered, from Latin, neuter of memorandus, gerundive of memorare Date: 15th century 1. an informal ...
memorial
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin memorialis, from memoria memory Date: 14th century 1. serving to preserve remembrance ; commemorative 2. of or relating ...
Memorial Day
noun Date: 1868 1. May 30 formerly observed as a legal holiday in most states of the United States in remembrance of war dead 2. the last Monday in May observed as a legal ...
memorial park
noun Date: circa 1928 cemetery
memorialise
British variant of memorialize
memorialist
noun Date: 1706 1. a person who writes or signs a memorial 2. a person who writes a memoir
memorialization
noun see memorialize
memorialize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1798 1. to address or petition by a memorial 2. commemorate • memorialization noun
memorially
adverb see memorial I
memorise
British variant of memorize
memoriter
adjective Etymology: Latin, adverb, by memory, from memor Date: 1827 marked by emphasis on memorization
memorizable
adjective see memorize
memorization
noun see memorize
memorize
transitive verb (-rized; -rizing) Date: 1834 to commit to memory ; learn by heart • memorizable adjective • memorization noun • memorizer noun
memorizer
noun see memorize
memory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English memorie, from Anglo-French memoire, memorie, from Latin memoria, from memor mindful; akin to Old English gemimor well-known, Greek ...
memory lane
noun Date: 1903 an imaginary path through the nostalgically remembered past — usually used in such phrases as a walk down memory lane
memory trace
noun Date: 1901 engram
Memphian
adjective or noun see Memphis
Memphis
geographical name 1. city SW Tennessee on Mississippi River population 650,100 2. ancient city N Egypt on the Nile S of modern Cairo; once capital of Egypt • Memphian ...
Memphite
adjective or noun see Memphis
Memphremagog, Lake
geographical name lake 30 miles (48 kilometers) long on border between Canada & the United States in Quebec & Vermont
memsahib
noun Etymology: Hindi, from English ma'am + Hindi & Urdu sahib sahib Date: 1852 a white foreign woman of high social status living in India; especially the wife of a British ...
men
plural of man
men's room
noun Date: 1929 a room equipped with one or more sinks, toilets, and usually urinals for the use of men and boys
men-
or meno- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek mēn month — more at moon menstruation
menace
I. noun Etymology: Middle English manace, from Anglo-French manace, menace, from Latin minacia, from minac-, minax threatening, from minari to threaten — more at mount Date: ...
menacingly
adverb see menace II
menadione
noun Etymology: methyl + napthalene + di- + ketone Date: 1941 a yellow crystalline compound C11H8O2 with the biological activity of natural vitamin K
Menado
geographical name — see Manado
ménage
noun Etymology: French, from Old French mesnage dwelling, from Vulgar Latin *mansionaticum, from Latin mansion-, mansio mansion Date: 1698 a domestic establishment ; ...
ménage à trois
noun Etymology: French, literally, household for three Date: 1891 an arrangement in which three persons (as a married pair and the lover of one of the pair) share sexual ...
menagerie
noun Etymology: French ménagerie, from Middle French, management of a household or farm, from menage Date: 1676 1. a. a place where animals are kept and trained ...
Menai Strait
geographical name strait 14 miles (22 kilometers) long N Wales between Anglesey Island & mainland
Menander
biographical name 342-292 B.C. Greek dramatist
menarche
noun Etymology: New Latin, from men- + Greek archē beginning Date: circa 1900 the beginning of the menstrual function; especially the first menstrual period of an ...
menarcheal
adjective see menarche
Menchú
biographical name Rigoberta 1959- Guatemalan human rights activist
Mencius
biographical name — see Meng-tzu
Mencken
biographical name H(enry) L(ouis) 1880-1956 American editor • Menckenian adjective
Menckenian
adjective see Mencken
mend
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, short for amenden — more at amend Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. to free from faults or defects: as a. to improve in manners ...
mendable
adjective see mend I
mendacious
adjective Etymology: Latin mendac-, mendax — more at amend Date: 1616 given to or characterized by deception or falsehood or divergence from absolute truth Synonyms: see ...
mendaciously
adverb see mendacious
mendaciousness
noun see mendacious
mendacity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1646 1. the quality or state of being mendacious 2. lie
Mende
noun (plural Mende or Mendes) Date: 1732 1. a Mande language of southern Sierra Leone and eastern Liberia 2. a member of a people speaking Mende
Mendel
biographical name Gregor Johann 1822-1884 Austrian botanist • Mendelian adjective
Mendel's law
noun Etymology: Gregor Mendel Date: 1903 1. a principle in genetics: hereditary units occur in pairs that separate during gamete formation so that every gamete receives but ...
mendelevium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Dmitry Mendeleyev Date: 1955 a radioactive metallic element produced artificially — see element table
Mendeleyev
biographical name Dmitry Ivanovich 1834-1907 Russian chemist
Mendelian
adjective Date: 1902 of, relating to, or according with Mendel's laws or Mendelism • Mendelian noun
Mendelian factor
noun Date: 1918 gene
Mendelian inheritance
noun Date: circa 1910 inheritance of characters specifically transmitted by genes in accord with Mendel's law — called also particulate inheritance
Mendelism
noun Date: 1903 the principles or the operations of Mendel's laws; also Mendelian inheritance • Mendelist adjective or noun
Mendelist
adjective or noun see Mendelism
Mendelssohn
biographical name Moses 1729-1786 German philosopher
Mendelssohn-Bartholdy
biographical name (Jakob Ludwig) Felix 1809-1847 grandson of preceding German composer, pianist, & conductor • Mendelssohnian adjective
Mendelssohnian
adjective see Mendelssohn-Bartholdy
Mendenhall
geographical name glacier SE Alaska N of Juneau
mender
noun see mend I
Menderes
geographical name 1. (or ancient Maeander) river 240 miles (386 kilometers) W Turkey in Asia flowing SW & W into the Aegean 2. (or ancient Scamander) river 60 miles (96 ...
Mendès-France
biographical name Pierre 1907-1982 French statesman
mendicancy
noun Date: 1711 1. the condition of being a beggar 2. the practice of begging
mendicant
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin mendicant-, mendicans, present participle of mendicare to beg, from mendicus beggar — more at amend Date: 14th ...
mendicity
noun Etymology: Middle English mendicite, from Middle French mendicité, from Latin mendicitat-, mendicitas, from mendicus Date: 15th century mendicancy
Mendip
geographical name hills SW England in NE Somerset; highest Blackdown 1068 feet (326 meters)
Mendocino, Cape
geographical name headland NW California SSW of Eureka; extreme W point of California, at 124°8′W
Mendota, Lake
geographical name lake 6 miles (9.6 kilometers) long S Wisconsin NW of Madison
Mendoza
I. biographical name Antonio de circa 1490-1552 Spanish colonial governor II. geographical name city W Argentina SE of Aconcagua population 121,696
Menelaus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Menelaos Date: 13th century a king of Sparta, brother of Agamemnon, and husband of the abducted Helen of Troy
Menelik II
biographical name 1844-1913 emperor of Ethiopia (1889-1913)
Menem
biographical name Carlos Saúl 1930- president of Argentina (1989-99)
Menéndez de Avilés
biographical name Pedro 1519-1574 Spanish navigator & explorer
Menes
biographical name flourished circa 3100 B.C. king of Egypt
menfolk
or menfolks noun plural Date: 1749 1. men in general 2. the men of a family or community
menfolks
noun plural see menfolk
MEng
abbreviation master of engineering
Meng-tzu
biographical name circa 371-circa 289 B.C. originally Meng K'o L. Mencius Chinese philosopher
Mengs
biographical name Anton Raphael 1728-1779 German painter
menhaden
noun (plural -den; also -dens) Etymology: of Algonquian origin; akin to Narragansett munnawhatteaûg menhaden Date: 1765 a marine fish (Brevoortia tyrannus) of the herring ...
menhir
noun Etymology: French, from Breton, from men stone + hir long Date: 1840 a single upright rough monolith usually of prehistoric origin
menial
I. noun Date: 14th century a person doing menial work; specifically a domestic servant or retainer II. adjective Etymology: Middle English meynial, from Anglo-French ...
menially
adverb see menial II
Ménière's disease
noun Etymology: Prosper Ménière died 1862 French physician Date: 1871 a disorder of the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear that is marked by recurrent attacks of ...
Ménière's syndrome
noun see Ménière's disease
mening-
or meningo-; also meningi- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from mening-, meninx 1. meninges 2. meninges and
meningeal
adjective Date: 1797 of, relating to, or affecting the meninges
meninges
plural of meninx
meningi-
combining form see mening-
meningioma
noun (plural -mas; also meningiomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1922 a slow-growing encapsulated typically benign tumor arising from the meninges and often causing damage by ...
meningitic
adjective see meningitis
meningitis
noun (plural meningitides) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1824 1. inflammation of the meninges and especially of the pia mater and the arachnoid 2. a disease marked by ...
meningo-
combining form see mening-
meningococcal
adjective see meningococcus
meningococcic
adjective see meningococcus
meningococcus
noun (plural meningococci) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1893 the bacterium (Neisseria meningitidis) that causes cerebrospinal meningitis • meningococcal also ...
meningoencephalitic
adjective see meningoencephalitis
meningoencephalitis
noun (plural meningoencephalitides) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1860 inflammation of the brain and meninges • meningoencephalitic adjective
meninx
noun (plural meninges) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek mēning-, mēninx membrane Date: 1543 any of the three membranes that envelop the brain and spinal cord

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