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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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meniscus
noun (plural menisci; also meniscuses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek mēniskos, from diminutive of mēnē moon, crescent — more at moon Date: 1685 1. a crescent or ...
Menlo Park
geographical name city W California SE of San Francisco population 30,785
Menninger
biographical name Karl Augustus 1893-1990 American psychiatrist
Menno Simons
biographical name 1469-1561 Dutch religious reformer
Mennonite
noun Etymology: German Mennonit, from Menno Simons Date: 1565 a member of any of various Protestant groups derived from the Anabaptist movement in Holland and characterized ...
meno mosso
adverb Etymology: Italian Date: circa 1854 less rapid — used as a direction in music
meno-
— see men-
Menominee
geographical name river 125 miles (201 kilometers) NE Wisconsin flowing SE on Michigan-Wisconsin border into Green Bay
Menominee Range
geographical name iron-rich mountain range NE Wisconsin & NW Michigan in Upper Peninsula
Menomonee Falls
geographical name village SE Wisconsin population 32,647
menopausal
adjective see menopause
menopause
noun Etymology: French ménopause, from méno- men- + pause stop, pause Date: 1872 the natural cessation of menstruation that usually occurs between the ages of 45 and 55; ...
menorah
noun Etymology: Hebrew mĕnōrāh candlestick Date: 1886 a candelabra with seven or nine lights that is used in Jewish worship
Menorca
geographical name — see Minorca
menorrhagia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1779 abnormally profuse menstrual flow
Menotti
biographical name Gian Carlo 1911- American (Italian-born) composer
mens rea
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, guilty mind Date: 1861 criminal intent
mens sana in corpore sano
foreign term Etymology: Latin a sound mind in a sound body
mensal
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin mensalis, from Latin mensa table Date: 15th century of, relating to, or done at the table
mensch
noun Etymology: Yiddish mentsh human being, from Middle High German mensch, from Old High German mennisco; akin to Old English man human being, man Date: 1856 a person of ...
menschy
adjective see mensch
mense
noun Etymology: Middle English menske honor, from Old Norse mennska humanity; akin to Old English man Date: circa 1500 chiefly Scottish propriety • menseless adjective, ...
menseless
adjective see mense
menses
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: Latin, literally, months, plural of mensis month — more at moon Date: 1597 the menstrual flow
Menshevik
noun (plural Mensheviks or Mensheviki) Etymology: Russian men'shevik, from men'she less; from their forming the minority group of the party Date: 1907 a member of a wing of ...
Menshevism
noun see Menshevik
Menshevist
noun or adjective see Menshevik
menstrual
adjective Date: 14th century of or relating to menstruation • menstrually adverb
menstrual cycle
noun Date: 1912 the complete cycle of physiological changes from the beginning of one menstrual period to the beginning of the next
menstrually
adverb see menstrual
menstruate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin menstruatus, past participle of menstruari, from Latin menstrua menses, from neuter plural of menstruus monthly, from ...
menstruation
noun Date: circa 1754 a discharging of blood, secretions, and tissue debris from the uterus that recurs in nonpregnant breeding-age primate females at approximately monthly ...
menstruum
noun (plural -struums or menstrua) Etymology: Medieval Latin, literally, menses, alteration of Latin menstrua Date: 1559 a substance that dissolves a solid or holds it in ...
mensurability
noun see mensurable
mensurable
adjective Etymology: Late Latin mensurabilis, from mensurare to measure, from Latin mensura measure — more at measure Date: 1604 1. capable of being measured ; measurable ...
mensural
adjective Etymology: Late Latin mensuralis measurable, from Latin mensura Date: circa 1580 1. of, relating to, or being polyphonic music originating in the 13th century with ...
mensuration
noun Date: 1571 1. the act of measuring ; measurement 2. geometry applied to the computation of lengths, areas, or volumes from given dimensions or angles
menswear
noun Date: 1854 clothing for men
mental
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin mentalis, from Latin ment-, mens mind — more at mind Date: 15th century 1. a. of or relating to the mind; ...
mental age
noun Date: 1910 a measure used in psychological testing that expresses an individual's mental attainment in terms of the number of years it takes an average child to reach ...
mental deficiency
noun Date: 1856 mental retardation
mental retardation
noun Date: 1914 subaverage intellectual ability equivalent to or less than an IQ of 70 that is accompanied by significant deficits in abilities (as in communication or ...
mentalism
noun see mentalistic
mentalist
noun Date: 1925 mind reader
mentalistic
adjective Date: 1882 1. of or relating to any school of psychology or psychiatry that in contrast to behaviorism values subjective data (as those gained by introspection) in ...
mentalité
foreign term Etymology: French outlook ; set of thought processes, values, and beliefs shared by members of a community
mentality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1691 1. mental power or capacity ; intelligence 2. mode or way of thought ; outlook
mentally
adverb see mental I
mentally retarded
adjective see mental retardation
mentation
noun Etymology: Latin ment-, mens + English -ation Date: 1850 mental activity
mentee
noun Etymology: mentor + -ee Date: 1965 one who is being mentored ; protege
menthol
noun Etymology: German, ultimately from Latin mentha mint Date: 1876 1. a crystalline alcohol C10H20O that occurs especially in mint oils and has the odor and cooling ...
mentholated
adjective Date: 1922 containing or impregnated with menthol
mention
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mencioun, from Anglo-French mencion, from Latin mention-, mentio; akin to Latin meminisse to remember, ment-, mens mind Date: 14th century 1. ...
mentionable
adjective see mention II
mentioner
noun see mention II
Menton
or Italian Mentone geographical name city SE France on the Mediterranean ENE of Nice population 29,474
Mentone
geographical name see Menton
Mentor
geographical name city NE Ohio NE of Cleveland population 50,278
mentor
I. noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Mentōr Date: 1616 1. capitalized a friend of Odysseus entrusted with the education of Odysseus' son Telemachus 2. a. a trusted ...
mentorship
noun see mentor I
mentum
noun (plural menta) Etymology: Latin, chin — more at mouth Date: 1826 a median plate of the labium of an insect
menu
noun (plural menus) Etymology: French, from menu small, detailed, from Old French — more at minuet Date: 1837 1. a. a list of the dishes that may be ordered (as in a ...
menu-driven
adjective Date: 1977 relating to or being a computer program in which options are offered to the user via menus
Menuhin
biographical name Yehudi 1916-1999 American violinist
Menzel Bourguiba
or formerly Ferryville geographical name city N Tunisia on Lake Bizerte population 42,111
Menzies
biographical name Sir Robert Gordon 1894-1978 Australian statesman; prime minister (1939-41; 1949-66)
meow
also miaow noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1582 1. the cry of a cat 2. a spiteful or malicious remark • meow intransitive verb
MEP
abbreviation member of the European Parliament
meperidine
noun Etymology: methyl + piperidine Date: 1947 a synthetic narcotic drug C15H21NO2 used in the form of its hydrochloride as an analgesic, sedative, and antispasmodic
Mephistophelean
adjective see Mephistopheles
Mephistopheles
noun Etymology: German Date: circa 1590 a chief devil in the Faust legend • Mephistophelian or Mephistophelean adjective
Mephistophelian
adjective see Mephistopheles
mephitic
adjective Date: circa 1623 of, relating to, or resembling mephitis ; foul-smelling
mephitis
noun Etymology: Latin Date: 1683 a noxious, pestilential, or foul exhalation from the earth; also stench
meprobamate
noun Etymology: methyl + propyl + dicarbamate Date: 1955 a bitter carbamate C9H18N2O4 used as a tranquilizer
mer
abbreviation meridian
Merano
geographical name commune N Italy in Trentino-Alto Adige NW of Bolzano population 32,600
merbromin
noun Etymology: mercuric + brom- + fluorescein Date: 1941 a green crystalline mercurial compound C20H8Br2HgNa2O6 used as a topical antiseptic and germicide in the form of ...
merc
noun Date: 1967 mercenary
Mercalli scale
noun Etymology: Giuseppe Mercalli died 1914 Italian priest and geologist Date: 1921 a scale of earthquake intensity ranging from I for an earthquake detected only by ...
mercantile
adjective Etymology: French, from Italian, from mercante merchant, from Latin mercant-, mercans, from present participle of mercari to trade — more at market Date: 1642 1. ...
mercantilism
noun Date: 1838 1. the theory or practice of mercantile pursuits ; commercialism 2. an economic system developing during the decay of feudalism to unify and increase the ...
mercantilist
noun or adjective see mercantilism
mercantilistic
adjective see mercantilism
mercaptan
noun Etymology: German, from Danish, from Medieval Latin mercurium captans, literally, seizing mercury Date: 1835 thiol 1
mercaptopurine
noun Etymology: mercaptan + -o- + purine Date: circa 1952 an antimetabolite C5H4N4S that interferes especially with the metabolism of purine bases and the biosynthesis of ...
Mercator
I. adjective Date: 1758 of, relating to, or drawn on the Mercator projection II. biographical name Gerardus 1512-1594 Gerhard Kremer Flemish cartographer
Mercator projection
noun Etymology: Gerardus Mercator Date: circa 1881 a conformal map projection of which the meridians are usually drawn parallel to each other and the parallels of latitude ...
Merced
geographical name 1. river 150 miles (241 kilometers) central California flowing W through Yosemite Valley into the San Joaquin 2. city central California in San Joaquin ...
mercenarily
adverb see mercenary II
mercenariness
noun see mercenary II
mercenary
I. noun (plural -naries) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin mercenarius, irregular from merced-, merces wages — more at mercy Date: 14th century one that serves merely ...
mercer
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from merz merchandise, from Latin merc-, merx Date: 13th century British a dealer in usually expensive fabrics
mercerise
British variant of mercerize
mercerization
noun see mercerize
mercerize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Etymology: John Mercer died 1866 English calico printer Date: 1852 to give (as cotton yarn) luster, strength, and receptiveness to dyes by ...
mercery
noun (plural -ceries) Date: 14th century British a mercer's wares, shop, or occupation
merch
noun Date: 1982 merchandise 2
merchandise
I. noun Etymology: Middle English marchaundise, from Anglo-French marchandise, from marcheant Date: 13th century 1. archaic the occupation of a merchant ; trade 2. the ...
merchandiser
noun see merchandise II
merchandising
also merchandizing noun Date: 1917 sales promotion as a comprehensive function including market research, development of new products, coordination of manufacture and ...
merchandize
verb see merchandise II
merchandizing
noun see merchandising
merchant
I. noun Etymology: Middle English marchant, from Anglo-French, from Vulgar Latin *mercatant-, mercatans, from present participle of mercatare to trade, frequentative of Latin ...
merchant bank
noun Date: 1904 chiefly British a bank that specializes in bankers' acceptances and in underwriting or syndicating equity or bond issues • merchant banker noun • ...
merchant banker
noun see merchant bank
merchant banking
noun see merchant bank
merchant marine
noun Date: 1839 1. the privately or publicly owned commercial ships of a nation 2. the personnel of a merchant marine; specifically a member of a merchant marine • ...
merchant mariner
noun see merchant marine
merchant ship
noun Date: 15th century merchantman 2
merchantability
noun see merchantable
merchantable
adjective Date: 15th century of commercially acceptable quality ; salable • merchantability noun
merchantman
noun Date: 15th century 1. archaic merchant 2. a ship used in commerce
Mercia
geographical name ancient Anglian kingdom central England; one of kingdoms in Anglo-Saxon heptarchy
Mercian
noun Date: 1513 1. a native or inhabitant of Mercia 2. the Old English dialect of Mercia • Mercian adjective
Mercier
biographical name Désiré-Joseph 1851-1926 Belgian cardinal & philosopher
merciful
adjective Date: 14th century full of mercy ; compassionate ; also providing relief • mercifulness noun
mercifully
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a merciful manner 2. fortunately 2
mercifulness
noun see merciful
merciless
adjective Date: 14th century having or showing no mercy ; pitiless • mercilessly adverb • mercilessness noun
mercilessly
adverb see merciless
mercilessness
noun see merciless
mercurial
I. adjective Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or born under the planet Mercury 2. having qualities of eloquence, ingenuity, or thievishness attributed to the god ...
mercurially
adverb see mercurial I
mercurialness
noun see mercurial I
mercuric
adjective Date: circa 1828 of, relating to, or containing mercury; especially containing mercury with a valence of two
mercuric chloride
noun Date: 1869 a heavy crystalline poisonous compound HgCl2 used as a disinfectant and fungicide and in photography
Mercurochrome
trademark — used for merbromin
mercurous
adjective Date: 1858 of, relating to, or containing mercury; especially containing mercury with a valence of one
mercurous chloride
noun Date: 1859 calomel
mercury
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Latin Mercurius, Roman god and the planet Date: 14th century 1. a. capitalized a Roman god of commerce, eloquence, travel, cunning, and ...
mercury chloride
noun Date: circa 1885 a chloride of mercury: as a. calomel b. mercuric chloride
mercury lamp
noun see mercury-vapor lamp
mercury-vapor lamp
noun Date: 1904 an electric lamp in which the discharge takes place through mercury vapor — called also mercury lamp
mercy
noun (plural mercies) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French merci, from Medieval Latin merced-, merces, from Latin, price paid, wages, from merc-, merx merchandise Date: ...
mercy killing
noun Date: 1935 euthanasia
merde
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, from Latin merda; perhaps akin to Lithuanian smirdėti to stink Date: 1907 sometimes vulgar crap II,1a, 2
mere
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English — more at marine Date: before 12th century chiefly British an expanse of standing water ; lake, pool II. noun ...
Meredith
I. biographical name George 1828-1909 English novelist & poet II. biographical name Owen — see E. R. Bulwer-Lytton
merely
adverb see mere III
merengue
noun Etymology: American Spanish Date: 1936 a ballroom dance of Haitian and Dominican origin in 2/4 time in which one foot is dragged on every step; also the music for a ...
meretricious
adjective Etymology: Latin meretricius, from meretric-, meretrix prostitute, from merēre to earn — more at merit Date: 1626 1. of or relating to a prostitute ; having the ...
meretriciously
adverb see meretricious
meretriciousness
noun see meretricious
merganser
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin mergus, a waterfowl (from mergere) + anser goose — more at goose Date: 1668 any of various fish-eating diving ducks (especially genus ...
merge
verb (merged; merging) Etymology: Latin mergere; akin to Sanskrit majjati he dives Date: 1636 transitive verb 1. archaic to plunge or engulf in something ; immerse 2. to ...
mergence
noun see merge
Mergenthaler
biographical name Ottmar 1854-1899 American (German-born) inventor
Mergentheim
or Bad Mergentheim geographical name town S Germany in Baden-Württemberg NNE of Stuttgart
merger
noun Etymology: merge + -er (as in waiver) Date: 1728 1. law the absorption of an estate, a contract, or an interest in another, of a minor offense in a greater, or of a ...
Meriç
geographical name — see Maritsa
Mérida
geographical name 1. city SE Mexico capital of Yucatán population 557,340 2. city W Venezuela S of Lake Maracaibo population 167,992
Meriden
geographical name city S central Connecticut S of Hartford population 58,244
meridian
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French meridien, from meridien of noon, from Latin meridianus, from meridies noon, south, irregular from medius mid + dies day — ...
Meridian
geographical name 1. city SW Idaho W of Boise population 34,919 2. city E central Mississippi population 39,968
meridional
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French meridionel, from Late Latin meridionalis, from Latin meridies Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or situated in ...
meridionally
adverb see meridional I
Mérimée
biographical name Prosper 1803-1870 French writer
Merín
geographical name — see mirim (Lake)
meringue
noun Etymology: French Date: 1706 1. a dessert topping consisting of a baked mixture of stiffly beaten egg whites and sugar 2. a shell made of meringue and filled with ...
merino
noun (plural -nos) Etymology: Spanish Date: 1804 1. any of a breed of fine-wooled white sheep originating in Spain and producing a heavy fleece of exceptional quality 2. a ...
Merioneth
or Merionethshire geographical name former county NW Wales capital Dolgellau
Merionethshire
geographical name see Merioneth
meristem
noun Etymology: Greek meristos divided (from merizein to divide, from meros) + English -em (as in system) Date: 1872 a formative plant tissue usually made up of small cells ...
meristematic
adjective see meristem
meristematically
adverb see meristem
meristic
adjective Etymology: Greek meristos Date: 1894 1. segmental 2. involving modification in number or in geometrical relation of body parts • meristically adverb
meristically
adverb see meristic
merit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French merite, from Latin meritum, from neuter of meritus, past participle of merēre to deserve, earn; akin to Greek meiresthai to ...
merit system
noun Date: 1879 a system by which appointments and promotions in the civil service are based on competence rather than political favoritism
meritless
adjective see merit I
meritocracy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: 1merit + -o- + -cracy Date: 1958 1. a system in which the talented are chosen and moved ahead on the basis of their achievement 2. ...
meritocrat
noun Date: 1960 chiefly British a person who advances through a meritocratic system
meritocratic
adjective see meritocracy
meritorious
adjective Date: 15th century deserving of honor or esteem • meritoriously adverb • meritoriousness noun
meritoriously
adverb see meritorious
meritoriousness
noun see meritorious
merl
noun see merle I
merle
I. noun also merl Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin merulus; akin to Old English ōsle blackbird, Old High German amsla Date: 15th century blackbird ...
merlin
noun Etymology: Middle English merlioun, from Anglo-French merilun, alteration of esmerilun, augmentative of Old French esmeril, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German ...
Merlin
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin Merlinus, from Middle Welsh Myrddin Date: 13th century a prophet and magician in Arthurian legend
merlon
noun Etymology: French, from Italian merlone, augmentative of merlo battlement, from Medieval Latin merulus, from Latin, merle Date: circa 1704 any of the solid intervals ...
merlot
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French Date: circa 1941 a dry red wine made from a widely grown grape originally used in the Bordeaux region of France for blending; ...
mermaid
noun Etymology: Middle English mermayde, from mere sea (from Old English) + mayde maid — more at marine Date: 14th century a fabled marine creature with the head and upper ...
merman
noun Date: 1601 a fabled marine creature with the head and upper body of a man and the tail of a fish
mero-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek, from meros part — more at merit part ; partial
meroblastic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1870 characterized by incomplete cleavage as a result of the presence of a mass of yolk material — compare ...
meroblastically
adverb see meroblastic
merocrine
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from mero- + Greek krinein to separate — more at certain Date: circa 1905 producing a secretion that is discharged ...
Meroë
geographical name ancient city NE Africa on the Nile; site in N central Sudan • Meroite noun • Meroitic adjective
Meroë, Isle of
geographical name ancient region E Sudan between the Nile & Blue Nile rivers & the Atbara
Meroite
noun see Meroë
Meroitic
adjective see Meroë
meromorphic
adjective Date: circa 1890 relating to or being a function of a complex variable that is analytic everywhere in a region except for singularities at each of which infinity is ...
meromyosin
noun Date: 1952 either of two structural subunits of myosin that are obtained especially by tryptic digestion
Merovingian
adjective Etymology: French mérovingien, from Medieval Latin Merovingi Merovingians, from Merovaeus Merowig died 458 Frankish founder of the dynasty Date: 1687 of or ...
merozoite
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from mero- + zo- + -ite Date: 1900 a sporozoan trophozoite produced by schizogony that is capable of initiating a new ...
Merrifield
biographical name Robert Bruce 1921- American biochemist
Merrill
biographical name James Ingram 1926-1995 American poet
Merrillville
geographical name town NW Indiana population 30,560
merrily
adverb see merry
Merrimack
geographical name 1. river 110 miles (177 kilometers) S New Hampshire & NE Massachusetts flowing S & NE into the Atlantic 2. town S New Hampshire population 25,119
merriment
noun Date: 1574 1. lighthearted gaiety or fun-making ; hilarity 2. a lively celebration or party ; festivity
merriness
noun see merry
Merritt Island
geographical name island 40 miles (64 kilometers) long E Florida W of Canaveral Peninsula between Indian & Banana rivers
merry
adjective (merrier; -est) Etymology: Middle English mery, from Old English myrge, merge; akin to Old High German murg short — more at brief Date: before 12th century 1. ...
merry widow
noun Usage: often capitalized M&W Etymology: The Merry Widow, operetta (1905) by Franz Lehár Date: 1952 a strapless corset or bustier usually having garters attached
merry-andrew
noun Usage: often capitalized M&A Etymology: merry + Andrew, proper name Date: 1677 a person who clowns publicly
merry-go-round
noun Date: 1729 1. an amusement park ride with seats often in the form of animals (as horses) revolving about a fixed center 2. a cycle of activity that is complex, ...
merrymaker
noun Date: 1797 reveler
merrymaking
noun Date: 1618 1. gay or festive activity ; conviviality 2. a convivial occasion ; festivity
merrythought
noun Date: 1607 chiefly British wishbone
Mersey
geographical name river 70 miles (113 kilometers) NW England flowing NW & W into Irish Sea through a large estuary
Merseyside
geographical name metropolitan county NW England capital Liverpool area 261 square miles (676 square kilometers), population 1,376,800
Mersin
geographical name city & port S Turkey on the Mediterranean WSW of Adana population 422,357
Merthiolate
trademark — used for thimerosal
Merthyr Tydfil
geographical name 1. administrative area of S Wales area 43 square miles (111 square kilometers) 2. town S Wales NNW of Cardiff population 59,300
Merton
I. biographical name Robert C. 1944- American economist II. biographical name Thomas 1915-1968 American religious & author III. geographical name borough of SW Greater ...
Meru, Mount
geographical name mountain 14,979 feet (4566 meters) NE Tanzania
mes-
or meso- combining form Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from mesos — more at mid 1. mid ; in the middle 2. intermediate (as in size or type)
mesa
noun Etymology: Spanish, literally, table, from Latin mensa Date: 1840 an isolated relatively flat-topped natural elevation usually more extensive than a butte and less ...
Mesa
geographical name city SW central Arizona E of Phoenix population 396,375
Mesa Verde National Park
geographical name reservation SW Colorado containing prehistoric cliff dwellings
Mesabi Range
geographical name range of hills NE Minnesota NW of Duluth containing large deposits of iron
mésalliance
noun (plural mésalliances) Etymology: French, from més- mis- + alliance Date: 1782 a marriage with a person of inferior social position
mesarch
adjective Date: 1891 having metaxylem developed both internal and external to the protoxylem
mescal
noun Etymology: American Spanish mezcal, mescal, from Nahuatl mexcalli liquor made from the maguey plant Date: 1887 1. peyote 2 2. a. a usually colorless Mexican liquor ...
mescal button
noun Date: 1887 peyote button
Mescalero
noun (plural Mescalero or Mescaleros) Etymology: American Spanish, from mezcal, mescal maguey, mescal liquor Date: 1831 a member of an Apache people of Texas and New Mexico
mescaline
noun Date: 1896 a hallucinatory crystalline alkaloid C11H17NO3 that is the chief active principle in peyote buttons
mesclun
noun Etymology: French, from Occitan, literally, mixture, from mescla to mix, from Old Occitan mesclar, from Vulgar Latin *misculare — more at meddle Date: 1976 a mixture ...
mesdames
plural of madam or of madame or of Mrs.
mesdemoiselles
plural of mademoiselle
meseems
verb impersonal (past meseemed) Date: 15th century archaic it seems to me
mesembryanthemum
noun Etymology: New Latin, irregular from Greek mesēmbria midday (from mes- + hēmera day) + anthemon flower, from anthos — more at anthology Date: 1753 any of a genus ...
mesencephalic
adjective see mesencephalon
mesencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1846 midbrain • mesencephalic adjective
mesenchymal
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1886 of, resembling, or being mesenchyme
mesenchyme
noun Etymology: German Mesenchym, from mes- + New Latin -enchyma Date: 1888 loosely organized undifferentiated mostly mesodermal cells that give rise to such structures as ...
mesenteric
adjective see mesentery
mesenteron
noun (plural mesentera) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1877 the part of the alimentary canal that is developed from the archenteron and is lined with hypoblast
mesentery
noun (plural -teries) Etymology: Middle English mesenterie, from Medieval Latin mesenterion, from Greek, from mes- + enteron intestine — more at inter- Date: 15th century 1. ...
Meseta
geographical name the central plateau of Spain
mesh
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, probably from Middle Dutch maesche; akin to Old High German masca mesh, Lithuanian mazgos knot Date: 14th century 1. one of the openings ...
meshed
adjective see mesh I
meshuga
or meshugge; also meshugah or meshuggah adjective Etymology: Yiddish meshuge, from Hebrew mĕshuggā‘ Date: 1885 crazy, foolish
meshugah
adjective see meshuga
meshuggah
adjective see meshuga
meshugge
adjective see meshuga
meshuggener
noun Etymology: Yiddish meshugener, from meshuge Date: 1900 a foolish or crazy person
meshwork
noun Date: 1830 network 2
mesial
adjective Date: 1803 1. middle, median 2. of, relating to, or being the surface of a tooth that is next to the tooth in front of it or that is closest to the middle of the ...
mesially
adverb see mesial
mesic
I. adjective Etymology: mes- + -ic Date: 1926 characterized by, relating to, or requiring a moderate amount of moisture — compare hydric, xeric II. adjective Etymology: ...
Mesmer
biographical name Franz or Friedrich Anton 1734-1815 German physician
mesmeric
adjective Date: 1829 1. of, relating to, or induced by mesmerism 2. fascinating, irresistible • mesmerically adverb
mesmerically
adverb see mesmeric
mesmerise
British variant of mesmerize
mesmerism
noun Etymology: F. A. Mesmer Date: 1784 1. hypnotic induction held to involve animal magnetism; broadly hypnotism 2. hypnotic appeal • mesmerist noun
mesmerist
noun see mesmerism
mesmerize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1829 1. to subject to mesmerism; also hypnotize 2. spellbind • mesmerizer noun
mesmerizer
noun see mesmerize
mesne
adjective Etymology: Anglo-French mesne, meiene — more at mean Date: circa 1558 intermediate, intervening — used in law
mesne lord
noun Date: 1611 a feudal lord who holds land as tenant of a superior (as a king) but who is lord to his own tenant

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