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meso-
— see mes-
Mesoamerica
geographical name region of S North America that was occupied during pre-Columbian times by peoples (as the Olmecs, Mayans, and Aztecs) with shared cultural features • ...
Mesoamerican
adjective see Mesoamerica
mesocarp
noun Date: 1829 the middle layer of a pericarp — see endocarp illustration
mesocyclone
noun Date: 1963 a rapidly rotating air mass within a thunderstorm that often gives rise to a tornado
mesoderm
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1873 the middle of the three primary germ layers of an embryo that is the source of many bodily tissues and ...
mesodermal
adjective see mesoderm
mesoglea
also mesogloea noun Etymology: New Latin, from mes- + Late Greek gloia, glia glue — more at clay Date: 1886 a gelatinous substance between the endoderm and ectoderm of ...
mesogloea
noun see mesoglea
Mesolithic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1866 of, relating to, or being a transitional period of the Stone Age between the Paleolithic and the ...
mesomere
noun Date: circa 1900 a blastomere of medium size; also an intermediate part of the mesoderm
mesomorph
noun Etymology: mesoderm + -morph Date: 1940 a mesomorphic body or person
mesomorphic
adjective Etymology: mesoderm + -morphic; from the predominance in such types of structures developed from the mesoderm Date: 1940 1. of or relating to the component in W. H. ...
mesomorphy
noun see mesomorphic
meson
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary mes- + 2-on Date: 1939 any of a group of fundamental particles (as the pion and kaon) made up of a quark and an antiquark ...
mesonephric
adjective see mesonephros
mesonephros
noun (plural mesonephroi) Etymology: New Latin, from mes- + Greek nephros kidney — more at nephritis Date: 1887 either member of the second and midmost of the three paired ...
mesonic
adjective see meson
mesopause
noun Etymology: mesosphere + pause Date: 1950 the upper boundary of the mesosphere where the temperature of the atmosphere reaches its lowest point
mesopelagic
adjective Date: 1947 of or relating to oceanic depths from about 600 feet to 3000 feet (200 to 1000 meters)
mesophyll
noun Etymology: New Latin mesophyllum, from mes- + Greek phyllon leaf — more at blade Date: 1848 the parenchyma between the epidermal layers of a foliage leaf • ...
mesophyllic
adjective see mesophyll
mesophyllous
adjective see mesophyll
mesophyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1896 a plant that grows under medium conditions of moisture • mesophytic adjective
mesophytic
adjective see mesophyte
Mesopotamia
geographical name 1. region SW Asia between the Tigris & the Euphrates extending from the mountains of E Asia Minor to the Persian Gulf 2. the entire Tigris-Euphrates valley ...
Mesopotamian
adjective or noun see Mesopotamia
mesoscale
adjective Date: 1956 of intermediate size; especially of or relating to a meteorological phenomenon approximately 10 to 1000 kilometers in horizontal extent
mesosome
noun Date: 1960 an organelle of bacteria that appears as an invagination of the plasma membrane and functions either in DNA replication and cell division or excretion of ...
mesosphere
noun Date: 1950 the part of the earth's atmosphere between the stratosphere and the thermosphere in which temperature decreases with altitude to the atmosphere's absolute ...
mesospheric
adjective see mesosphere
mesothelial
adjective see mesothelium
mesothelioma
noun (plural -mas; also mesotheliomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1899 a usually malignant tumor derived from mesothelial tissue (as that lining the peritoneum or ...
mesothelium
noun (plural mesothelia) Etymology: New Latin, from mes- + epithelium Date: 1886 epithelium derived from mesoderm that lines the body cavity of a vertebrate embryo and gives ...
mesothoracic
adjective Date: 1839 of or relating to the mesothorax
mesothorax
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1826 the middle of the three segments of the thorax of an insect — see insect illustration
mesotrophic
adjective Date: 1911 of a body of water having a moderate amount of dissolved nutrients — compare eutrophic, oligotrophic
Mesozoic
adjective Date: 1840 of, relating to, or being an era of geological history comprising the interval between the Permian and the Tertiary or the corresponding system of rocks ...
mesquite
noun Etymology: American Spanish, from Nahuatl mizquitl Date: 1759 any of several spiny leguminous trees or shrubs (genus Prosopis and especially P. glandulosa) chiefly of ...
Mesquite
geographical name city NE Texas E of Dallas population 124,523
mess
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mes, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin missus course at a meal, from missus, past participle of mittere to put, from Latin, to send — more ...
mess around
intransitive verb Date: 1918 1. to waste time ; dawdle, idle 2. a. associate
mess hall
noun Date: 1843 a hall or building (as on an army post) in which mess is served
mess jacket
noun Date: 1878 a fitted waist-length man's jacket worn especially as part of a dress uniform
mess kit
noun Date: 1855 a compact kit of nested cooking and eating utensils for use by soldiers and campers
mess over
transitive verb Date: 1963 slang to treat harshly or unfairly ; abuse
message
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin missaticum, from Latin missus, past participle of mittere Date: 14th century 1. a communication in ...
message board
noun Date: 1973 bulletin board 2
Messala
biographical name (or Mes.sal.la) Corvinus Marcus Valerius circa 64 b.c.-a.d. 8 Roman general & statesman
Messalina
biographical name Valeria circa A.D. 22-48 3d wife of Emperor Claudius
messaline
noun Etymology: French Date: circa 1890 a soft lightweight silk dress fabric with a satin weave
messan
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots), from Scottish Gaelic measan Date: 15th century chiefly Scottish lapdog 1
Messana
geographical name see Messina
messeigneurs
plural of monseigneur
Messene
or Modern Greek Messíni geographical name town S Greece in SW Peloponnese; ancient capital of Messenia
messenger
noun Etymology: Middle English messangere, from Anglo-French messager, messanger, from message Date: 14th century 1. one who bears a message or does an errand: as a. ...
messenger RNA
noun Date: 1961 an RNA produced by transcription that carries the code for a particular protein from the nuclear DNA to a ribosome in the cytoplasm and acts as a template ...
Messenia
geographical name region S Greece in SW Peloponnese bordering on Ionian Sea
Messenia, Gulf of
geographical name inlet of the Mediterranean S Greece on S coast of Peloponnese
Messerschmitt
biographical name Willy 1898-1978 German aircraft designer & manufacturer
messiah
noun Etymology: Hebrew māshīaḥ & Aramaic mĕshīḥā, literally, anointed Date: 1560 1. capitalized a. the expected king and deliverer of the Jews b. Jesus 1 2. ...
messiahship
noun see messiah
messianic
adjective Etymology: probably from French messianique, from messianisme Date: circa 1834 1. of or relating to a messiah 2. marked by idealism and an aggressive crusading ...
messianism
noun Etymology: French messianisme, from messie messiah + -anisme (as in christianisme Christianity) Date: 1867 1. belief in a messiah as the savior of humankind 2. ...
Messias
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Late Latin, from Greek, from Aramaic mĕshīḥā Date: before 12th century messiah 1
Messier
biographical name Charles 1730-1817 French astronomer
messieurs
plural of monsieur
messily
adverb see messy
Messina
or ancient Messana or Zancle geographical name city & port Italy in NE Sicily population 272,461
Messina, Strait of
geographical name channel between S mainland part of Italy & NE Sicily
messiness
noun see messy
Messíni
geographical name see Messene
messmate
noun Date: 1664 a person with whom one regularly takes mess (as on a ship)
Messrs.
plural of Mr.
messuage
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin messuagium Date: 14th century premise 3b
messy
adjective (messier; -est) Date: 1843 1. marked by confusion, disorder, or dirt ; untidy 2. lacking neatness or precision ; careless, slovenly 3. extremely unpleasant ...
Messys
biographical name see Massys
Mesta
or Greek Néstos geographical name river 150 miles (240 kilometers) SW Bulgaria & NE Greece flowing from W end of Rhodope Mountains SE into the Aegean
mestiza
noun Etymology: Spanish, feminine of mestizo Date: circa 1589 a woman who is a mestizo
mestizo
noun (plural -zos) Etymology: Spanish, from mestizo, adjective, mixed, from Late Latin mixticius, from Latin mixtus, past participle of miscēre to mix — more at mix Date: ...
mestranol
noun Etymology: meth- + estrogen + pregnane (C21H36) + 1-ol Date: 1962 a synthetic estrogen C21H26O2 used in oral contraceptives
Meštrović
biographical name Ivan 1883-1962 American (Yugoslavian-born) sculptor
met
I. past and past participle of meet II. abbreviation 1. meteorological; meteorology 2. metropolitan
met-
prefix see meta-
Meta
geographical name river over 620 miles (998 kilometers) NE Colombia flowing into the Orinoco on Venezuela-Colombia boundary
meta-
or met- prefix Etymology: New Latin & Medieval Latin, from Latin or Greek; Latin, from Greek, among, with, after, from meta among, with, after; akin to Old English mid, mith ...
meta-analysis
noun Date: 1976 a quantitative statistical analysis of several separate but similar experiments or studies in order to test the pooled data for statistical significance
metabolic
adjective Date: 1841 of, relating to, or based on metabolism • metabolically adverb
metabolically
adverb see metabolic
metabolism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek metabolē change, from metaballein to change, from meta- + ballein to throw — more at devil Date: 1878 1. ...
metabolite
noun Date: 1877 1. a product of metabolism 2. a substance essential to the metabolism of a particular organism or to a particular metabolic process
metabolizable
adjective see metabolize
metabolize
verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 1877 transitive verb to subject to metabolism intransitive verb to perform metabolism • metabolizable adjective
metacarpal
I. adjective Date: 1739 of, relating to, or being the metacarpus or a metacarpal II. noun Date: 1831 a bone of the part of the hand or forefoot between the carpus and the ...
metacarpus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1676 the part of the hand or forefoot that contains the metacarpals
metacenter
noun Etymology: French métacentre, from méta- meta- + centre center Date: 1765 the point of intersection of the vertical through the center of buoyancy of a floating body ...
metacentric
adjective Date: 1798 1. of or relating to a metacenter 2. having the centromere medially situated so that the two chromosomal arms are of roughly equal length • ...
metacercaria
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1925 a tailless encysted late larva of a digenetic trematode that is usually the form which is infective for the definitive host • ...
metacercarial
adjective see metacercaria
metachromatic
adjective Date: 1876 1. staining or characterized by staining in a different color or shade from what is typical 2. having the capacity to stain different elements of a ...
metacognition
noun Date: 1977 awareness or analysis of one's own learning or thinking processes
metaethical
adjective see metaethics
metaethics
noun plural but usually singular in construction Date: 1938 the study of the meanings of ethical terms, the nature of ethical judgments, and the types of ethical arguments ...
metafiction
noun Date: 1960 fiction which refers to or takes as its subject fictional writing and its conventions • metafictional adjective • metafictionist noun
metafictional
adjective see metafiction
metafictionist
noun see metafiction
metagalactic
adjective see metagalaxy
metagalaxy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1930 the entire system of galaxies ; universe • metagalactic adjective
metagenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1849 alternation of generations in animals; especially regular alternation of a sexual and an asexual generation • metagenetic adjective
metagenetic
adjective see metagenesis
Metairie
geographical name population center SE Louisiana population 146,136
metal
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin metallum mine, metal, from Greek metallon Date: 14th century 1. any of various ...
metalanguage
noun Date: 1936 a language used to talk about language
metaldehyde
noun Etymology: probably from meta- + aldehyde Date: 1841 a crystalline compound (CH3CH0)4 that is a polymer of acetaldehyde and is used as a lure and poison for snails and ...
metalhead
noun Date: 1982 a fan or performer of heavy metal music
metalinguistic
adjective Date: 1941 of or relating to a metalanguage or to metalinguistics
metalinguistics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1949 a branch of linguistics that deals with the relation between language and other cultural factors in a society
metalize
transitive verb see metallize
metall-
or metallo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Latin metallum metal
metallic
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. of, relating to, or being a metal b. made of or containing a metal c. having properties of a metal 2. yielding metal 3. ...
metallically
adverb see metallic
metalliferous
adjective Etymology: Latin metallifer, from metallum + -fer -ferous Date: circa 1656 yielding or containing metal
metallization
noun see metallize
metallize
also metalize transitive verb (metallized; also metalized; metallizing; also metalizing) Date: 1594 to coat, treat, or combine with a metal • metallization noun
metallo-
combining form see metall-
metallographer
noun see metallography
metallographic
adjective see metallography
metallographically
adverb see metallography
metallography
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1871 a study of the structure of metals especially with the microscope • metallographer noun • metallographic ...
metalloid
I. noun Date: 1813 1. an element intermediate in properties between the typical metals and nonmetals 2. a nonmetal that can combine with a metal to form an alloy II. ...
metalloidal
adjective see metalloid II
metallophone
noun Date: circa 1883 a percussion musical instrument consisting of a series of metal bars of varying pitch struck with hammers
metallurgical
adjective see metallurgy
metallurgically
adverb see metallurgy
metallurgist
noun see metallurgy
metallurgy
noun Etymology: New Latin metallurgia, from metall- + -urgia -urgy Date: 1665 the science and technology of metals • metallurgical adjective • metallurgically adverb ...
metalmark
noun Date: 1889 any of a family (Riodinidae) of small or medium-sized usually brightly colored chiefly tropical butterflies that often have metallic coloration on the wings
metalsmith
noun Date: 14th century a person skilled in metalworking
metalware
noun Date: 1791 ware made of metal; especially metal utensils for household use
metalwork
noun Date: circa 1845 the product of metalworking; especially a metal object of artistic merit • metalworker noun
metalworker
noun see metalwork
metalworking
noun Date: 1855 the act or process of shaping things out of metal
metamathematical
adjective see metamathematics
metamathematics
noun plural but usually singular in construction Date: circa 1890 a field of study concerned with the formal structure and properties (as the consistency and completeness of ...
metamere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1876 any of a linear series of primitively similar segments into which the body of a higher invertebrate or ...
metameric
adjective see metamere
metamerically
adverb see metamere
metamerism
noun Date: 1833 the condition of having or the stage of evolutionary development characterized by a body made up of metameres
metamorphic
adjective Date: 1816 1. of or relating to metamorphosis 2. of a rock of, relating to, or produced by metamorphism • metamorphically adverb
metamorphically
adverb see metamorphic
metamorphism
noun Date: 1845 a change in the constitution of rock; specifically a pronounced change effected by pressure, heat, and water that results in a more compact and more highly ...
metamorphose
verb (-phosed; -phosing) Etymology: probably from Middle French metamorphoser, from metamorphose metamorphosis, from Latin metamorphosis Date: 1576 transitive verb 1. a. ...
metamorphosis
noun (plural metamorphoses) Etymology: Latin, from Greek metamorphōsis, from metamorphoun to transform, from meta- + morphē form Date: 1533 1. a. change of physical ...
metanalysis
noun Date: 1914 a reanalysis of the division between sounds or words resulting in different constituents (as in the development of an apron from a napron)
metanephric
adjective see metanephros
metanephros
noun (plural metanephroi) Etymology: New Latin, from meta- + Greek nephros kidney — more at nephritis Date: 1884 either member of the final and most caudal pair of the ...
metaphase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 the stage of mitosis and meiosis in which the chromosomes become arranged in the equatorial plane of the ...
metaphase plate
noun Date: 1937 a section in the equatorial plane of the metaphase spindle having the chromosomes oriented upon it
metaphor
noun Etymology: Middle English methaphor, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French metaphore, from Latin metaphora, from Greek, from metapherein to transfer, from meta- + ...
metaphoric
adjective see metaphor
metaphorical
adjective see metaphor
metaphorically
adverb see metaphor
metaphosphate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1833 a salt or ester of a metaphosphoric acid
metaphosphoric acid
noun Date: 1833 a glassy solid acid HPO3 or (HPO3)n formed by heating orthophosphoric acid
metaphrase
noun Date: 1609 a literal translation
metaphysic
noun Etymology: Middle English metaphesyk, from Medieval Latin metaphysica Date: 14th century 1. a. metaphysics b. a particular system of metaphysics 2. the system of ...
metaphysical
adjective Date: 15th century 1. of or relating to metaphysics 2. a. of or relating to the transcendent or to a reality beyond what is perceptible to the senses b. ...
Metaphysical
noun Date: 1887 a metaphysical poet of the 17th century
metaphysically
adverb see metaphysical
metaphysician
noun Date: 15th century a student of or specialist in metaphysics
metaphysics
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: Medieval Latin Metaphysica, title of Aristotle's treatise on the subject, from Greek (ta) meta (ta) physika, literally, the ...
metaplasia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1883 1. transformation of one tissue into another 2. abnormal replacement of cells of one type by cells of another • metaplastic ...
metaplastic
adjective see metaplasia
metapsychological
adjective see metapsychology
metapsychology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1868 speculative psychology concerned with postulating the structure (as the ego and id) and processes (as ...
metasequoia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1948 any of a genus (Metasequoia) of deciduous coniferous trees of the bald cypress family comprising one extant and various fossil forms ...
metasomatic
adjective see metasomatism
metasomatism
noun Etymology: metasomatic from German metasomatisch, from Greek meta- + sōmat-, sōma body Date: 1886 metamorphism that involves changes in the chemical composition as ...
metastability
noun see metastable
metastable
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1897 having or characterized by only a slight margin of stability • metastability noun • metastably ...
metastably
adverb see metastable
metastasis
noun (plural metastases) Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin, transition, from Greek, from methistanai to change, from meta- + histanai to set — more at stand Date: 1663 ...
metastasize
intransitive verb (-sized; -sizing) Date: 1907 to spread or grow by or as if by metastasis
metastatic
adjective see metastasis
metastatically
adverb see metastasis
metatarsal
I. adjective Date: 1703 of, relating to, or being the part of the human foot or of the hind foot in quadrupeds between the tarsus and the phalanges that in humans comprises ...
metatarsus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1676 the metatarsal part of a human foot or of a hind foot in quadrupeds
metate
noun Etymology: Spanish, from Nahuatl metatl Date: 1625 a stone with a concave upper surface used as the lower millstone for grinding grains and especially Indian corn
metathesis
noun (plural metatheses) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from metatithenai to transpose, from meta- + tithenai to place — more at do Date: circa 1538 a change of place ...
metathetic
adjective see metathesis
metathetical
adjective see metathesis
metathetically
adverb see metathesis
metathoracic
adjective see metathorax
metathorax
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1817 the posterior segment of the thorax of an insect — see insect illustration • metathoracic adjective
Metauro
or ancient Metaurus geographical name river 70 miles (113 kilometers) E central Italy flowing E into the Adriatic
Metaurus
geographical name see Metauro
Metaxas
biographical name Ioannis 1871-1941 Greek general & dictator
metaxylem
noun Date: 1902 the part of the primary xylem that differentiates after the protoxylem and that is distinguished typically by broader tracheids and vessels with pitted or ...
metazoal
adjective Etymology: New Latin Metazoa Date: 1928 of or relating to the metazoans
metazoan
noun Etymology: New Latin Metazoa, from meta- + -zoa Date: 1879 any of a group (Metazoa) that comprises all animals having the body composed of cells differentiated into ...
Metchnikoff
biographical name Élie 1845-1916 originally Ilya Ilich Mechnikov French (Russian-born) zoologist & bacteriologist
mete
I. transitive verb (meted; meting) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English metan; akin to Old High German mezzan to measure, Latin modus measure, Greek medesthai to be ...
metempsychosis
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek metempsychōsis, from metempsychousthai to undergo metempsychosis, from meta- + empsychos animate, from en- + psychē soul — more at ...
metencephalic
adjective see metencephalon
metencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1867 the anterior segment of the developing vertebrate hindbrain or the corresponding part of the adult brain composed of the cerebellum and ...
meteor
noun Etymology: Middle English metheour, from Middle French meteore, from Medieval Latin meteorum, from Greek meteōron, from neuter of meteōros high in air, from meta- + ...
meteoric
adjective Date: 1785 1. a. of or relating to a meteor b. resembling a meteor in speed or in sudden and temporary brilliance 2. of, relating to, or derived from the ...
meteorically
adverb see meteoric
meteorite
noun Date: 1824 a meteor that reaches the surface of the earth without being completely vaporized • meteoritic also meteoritical adjective
meteoritic
adjective see meteorite
meteoritical
adjective see meteorite
meteoriticist
noun see meteoritics
meteoritics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1915 a science that deals with meteors • meteoriticist noun
meteoroid
noun Date: 1865 1. a meteor particle itself without relation to the phenomena it produces when entering the earth's atmosphere 2. a meteor in orbit around the sun • ...
meteoroidal
adjective see meteoroid
meteorologic
adjective see meteorology
meteorological
adjective see meteorology
meteorologically
adverb see meteorology
meteorologist
noun see meteorology
meteorology
noun Etymology: French or Greek; French météorologie, from Middle French, from Greek meteōrologia, from meteōron + -logia -logy Date: 1620 1. a science that deals with ...
meter
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English mēter, from Latin metrum, from Greek metron measure, meter; Anglo-French metre, from Latin ...
meter maid
noun Date: 1957 a woman assigned by a police or traffic department to write tickets for parking violations
meter-kilogram-second
adjective Date: 1888 of, relating to, or being a system of units using the meter, kilogram, and second as its base units — abbreviation mks
meterstick
noun Date: 1931 a measuring stick one meter long that is marked off in centimeters and usually millimeters
metestrus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1923 the period of regression that follows estrus
metformin
noun Etymology: methyl + -formin (as in phenformin, an earlier antidiabetic drug) Date: 1961 a drug C4C11N5 used in the form of its hydrochloride to treat type 2 diabetes
meth
noun Date: 1966 methamphetamine
meth-
or metho- combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from methyl methyl
methacrylate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1865 1. a salt or ester of methacrylic acid 2. an acrylic resin or plastic made from a derivative of methacrylic ...
methacrylic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1865 an acid C4H6O2 used especially in making acrylic resins or plastics
methadon
noun see methadone
methadone
also methadon noun Etymology: methyl + amino + diphenyl + -one Date: 1947 a synthetic addictive narcotic drug C21H27NO used especially in the form of its hydrochloride for ...
methamphetamine
noun Date: 1949 an amine C10H15N used medically in the form of its crystalline hydrochloride especially in the treatment of obesity and often used illicitly as a stimulant ...
methanation
noun Date: 1926 the production of methane especially from carbon monoxide and hydrogen
methane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1867 a colorless odorless flammable gaseous hydrocarbon CH4 that is a product of decomposition of organic matter and ...
methanol
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1894 a light volatile flammable poisonous liquid alcohol CH3OH used especially as a solvent, antifreeze, or ...
methaqualone
noun Etymology: meth- + -a- (of unknown origin) + quinoline + azole + -one Date: 1961 a sedative and hypnotic nonbarbiturate drug C16H14N2O that is habit-forming — compare ...
methedrine
noun Etymology: from Methedrine, a trademark Date: 1939 methamphetamine
metheglin
noun Etymology: Welsh meddyglyn Date: 15th century mead I
methemoglobin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1870 a soluble brown crystalline basic blood pigment that differs from hemoglobin in containing ferric iron and in ...
methemoglobinemia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1888 the presence of methemoglobin in the blood
methenamine
noun Etymology: methene (methylene) + amine Date: 1926 hexamethylenetetramine especially when used in the form of an organic salt to treat urinary tract infections
methicillin
noun Etymology: meth- + penicillin Date: 1961 a semisynthetic penicillin C17H19N2O6NaS used especially in the form of its sodium salt against beta-lactamase-producing ...
methinks
verb impersonal (past methought) Etymology: Middle English me thinketh, from Old English mē thincth, from mē (dative of ic I) + thincth seems, from thyncan to seem — more at ...
methionine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from methyl + thion- + 2-ine Date: 1928 a crystalline sulfur-containing essential amino acid C5H11NO2S that occurs in the ...
metho-
combining form see meth-
method
noun Etymology: Middle English, prescribed treatment, from Latin methodus, from Greek methodos, from meta- + hodos way Date: 15th century 1. a procedure or process for ...
method of fluxions
Date: circa 1719 differential calculus
methodic
adjective see methodical
methodical
also methodic adjective Date: 1570 1. arranged, characterized by, or performed with method or order 2. habitually proceeding according to method ; systematic • ...
methodically
adverb see methodical
methodicalness
noun see methodical
methodise
British variant of methodize
methodism
noun Date: 1739 1. capitalized a. the doctrines and practice of Methodists b. the Methodist churches 2. methodical procedure
methodist
noun Date: 1593 1. a person devoted to or laying great stress on method 2. capitalized a member of one of the denominations deriving from the Wesleyan revival in the Church ...
methodistic
adjective see methodist
methodize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1586 to reduce to method ; systematize Synonyms: see order
methodological
adjective Date: 1849 of or relating to method or methodology • methodologically adverb
methodologically
adverb see methodological
methodologist
noun Date: 1865 a student of methodology
methodology
noun (plural -gies) Etymology: New Latin methodologia, from Latin methodus + -logia -logy Date: 1800 1. a body of methods, rules, and postulates employed by a discipline ; a ...
methotrexate
noun Etymology: meth- + -trexate, of unknown origin Date: 1955 a toxic folic acid analog C20H22N8O5 that is used to treat certain cancers, severe psoriasis, and rheumatoid ...
methoxychlor
noun Etymology: meth- + oxy- + chlor- Date: 1947 relatively nontoxic organochlorine insecticide C16H15Cl3O2
methoxyflurane
noun Etymology: meth- + oxy- + fluor- + ethane Date: 1962 a potent nonexplosive inhalational general anesthetic C3H4Cl2F2O administered as a vapor
Methuen
geographical name town NE Massachusetts population 43,789

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