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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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lode
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lād course, support; akin to Old English līthan to go — more at lead Date: before 12th century 1. dialect England ...
loden
noun Etymology: German, from Old High German lodo coarse cloth; akin to Old English lotha mantle Date: 1911 1. a thick woolen cloth used for outer clothing 2. a variable ...
lodestar
also loadstar noun Etymology: Middle English lode sterre, from lode course, from Old English lād Date: 14th century 1. archaic a star that leads or guides; especially North ...
lodestone
noun Etymology: obsolete lode course, from Middle English Date: circa 1515 1. magnetite possessing polarity 2. something that strongly attracts
Lodge
I. biographical name Henry Cabot 1850-1924 American statesman & author II. biographical name Henry Cabot 1902-1985 grandson of preceding American politician & diplomat III. ...
lodge
I. verb (lodged; lodging) Date: 13th century transitive verb 1. a. (1) to provide temporary quarters for (2) to rent lodgings to b. to establish or settle ...
lodgement
noun see lodgment
lodgepole pine
noun Date: 1859 any of several pines of western North America with needles in pairs and short ovoid usually asymmetric cones: as a. a small chiefly coastal pine (Pinus ...
lodger
noun Date: 1596 roomer
lodging
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. a place to live ; dwelling b. lodgment 3b 2. a. (1) sleeping accommodations (2) a temporary place to stay b. a room in ...
lodging house
noun Date: 1765 rooming house
lodgment
or lodgement noun Date: 1598 1. a. a lodging place ; shelter b. accommodations, lodgings 2. a. the act, fact, or manner of lodging b. a placing, depositing, ...
Lodi
geographical name 1. city central California SSE of Sacramento population 56,999 2. borough NE New Jersey SE of Paterson population 23,971 3. commune N Italy in Lombardy SE ...
lodicule
noun Etymology: Latin lodicula, diminutive of lodic-, lodix cover Date: 1864 one of usually two delicate membranous hyaline scales at the base of the ovary of a grass that by ...
Lodz
or German Litzmannstadt geographical name city central Poland WSW of Warsaw population 851,690
Loeb
biographical name Jacques 1859-1924 American (German-born) physiologist
loess
noun Etymology: German Löss Date: 1833 an unstratified usually buff to yellowish brown loamy deposit found in North America, Europe, and Asia and believed to be chiefly ...
loessial
adjective see loess
Loewe
biographical name Frederick 1901-1988 American (Austrian-born) composer
Loewi
biographical name Otto 1873-1961 American (German-born) pharmacologist
Löffler
biographical name Friedrich August Johannes 1852-1915 German bacteriologist
Lofoten
geographical name island group Norway off NW coast SW of Vesterålen area 475 square miles (1235 square kilometers)
loft
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, air, sky, from Old Norse lopt; akin to Old High German luft air Date: 13th century 1. an upper room or floor ; attic 2. ...
loftily
adverb see lofty
loftiness
noun see lofty
loftlike
adjective see loft I
lofty
adjective (loftier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. a. elevated in character and spirit ; noble b. elevated in status ; superior 2. having a haughty overbearing manner ; ...
log
I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English logge Date: 14th century 1. a usually bulky piece or length of a cut or fallen tree; especially a length of a ...
log in
intransitive verb Date: 1962 log on • log-in noun
log on
intransitive verb Date: 1977 to establish communication and initiate interaction with a time-shared computer or network — often used with to • log-on noun
log-
or logo- combining form Etymology: Greek, from logos — more at legend word ; thought ; speech ; discourse
log-in
noun see log in
log-on
noun see log on
Logan
geographical name city N Utah population 42,670
Logan, Mount
geographical name mountain 19,524 feet (5951 meters) Canada in SW Yukon Territory; highest in St. Elias & Coast ranges & in Canada & 2d highest in North America
loganberry
noun Etymology: James H. Logan died 1928 American lawyer + English berry Date: 1893 a red-fruited upright-growing dewberry (Rubus loganobaccus) usually regarded as a hybrid ...
logaoedic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin logaoedicus, from Late Greek logaoidikos, from Greek log- + aeidein to sing; from the resemblance of such rhythm to prose — more at ode Date: ...
logarithm
noun Etymology: New Latin logarithmus, from log- + Greek arithmos number — more at arithmetic Date: circa 1616 the exponent that indicates the power to which a base number ...
logarithmic
adjective see logarithm
logarithmic function
noun Date: 1836 a function (as y = loga x or y = ln x) that is the inverse of an exponential function (as y = ax or y = ex) so that the independent variable appears in a ...
logarithmically
adverb see logarithm
loge
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, a shelter — more at lodge Date: 1749 1. a. a small compartment ; booth b. a box in a theater 2. a. a small partitioned ...
loggats
noun plural but singular or plural in construction see loggets
logged
adjective Date: circa 1820 1. heavy, sluggish 2. sodden especially with water
logger
noun Date: 1732 one engaged in logging
loggerhead
noun Etymology: probably from English dialect logger block of wood + English head Date: 1588 1. chiefly dialect a. blockhead b. head; especially a disproportionately ...
loggerhead shrike
noun Date: 1811 a large-headed gray shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) of North America with a black mask around the eyes
loggets
or loggats noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: probably from 1log + -et Date: 1581 a game formerly played in England in which participants throw ...
loggia
noun (plural loggias; also loggie) Etymology: Italian, from Old French loge lodge Date: 1742 a roofed open gallery especially at an upper story overlooking an open court
loggy
adjective see logy
logic
noun Etymology: Middle English logik, from Anglo-French, from Latin logica, from Greek logikē, from feminine of logikos of reason, from logos reason — more at legend Date: ...
logic bomb
noun Date: 1978 a computer program often hidden within another seemingly innocuous program that is designed to perform usually malicious actions (as deleting files) when ...
logical
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. (1) of, relating to, involving, or being in accordance with logic (2) skilled in logic b. formally true or valid ; analytic, ...
logical empiricism
noun see logical positivism
logical positivism
noun Date: 1931 a 20th century philosophical movement that holds characteristically that all meaningful statements are either analytic or conclusively verifiable or at least ...
logical positivist
noun see logical positivism
logicality
noun see logical
logically
adverb see logical
logicalness
noun see logical
logician
noun see logic
logion
noun (plural logia or logions) Etymology: Greek, diminutive of logos Date: 1864 saying; especially a saying attributed to Jesus
logistic
I. adjective or logistical Date: 1918 1. a. of or relating to symbolic logic b. of or relating to the philosophical attempt to reduce mathematics to logic 2. of or ...
logistic curve
noun Date: 1928 an S-shaped curve that represents an exponential function and is used in mathematical models of growth processes
logistical
adjective see logistic I
logistically
adverb see logistic I
logistician
noun Date: 1932 a specialist in logistics
logistics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: French logistique art of calculating, logistics, from Greek logistikē art of calculating, from feminine of ...
logjam
noun Date: 1885 1. a jumble of logs jammed together in a watercourse 2. a. deadlock, impasse b. blockage c. jam, crowd • logjam transitive verb
lognormal
adjective Date: 1945 relating to or being a normal distribution that is the distribution of the logarithm of a random variable; also relating to or being such a random ...
lognormality
noun see lognormal
lognormally
adverb see lognormal
logo
noun (plural logos) Date: 1937 1. logotype 2. an identifying statement ; motto
Logo
noun Etymology: modification of Greek logos word Date: 1972 a computer programming language that employs simple English commands and is used especially for introducing school ...
logo-
— see log-
logocentric
adjective see logocentrism
logocentrism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1968 1. a philosophy holding that all forms of thought are based on an external point of reference which is held to ...
logogram
noun Date: 1840 a letter, symbol, or sign used to represent an entire word • logogrammatic adjective
logogrammatic
adjective see logogram
logograph
noun Date: circa 1888 logogram
logographic
adjective Date: 1801 of, relating to, or marked by the use of logographs ; consisting of logographs • logographically adverb
logographically
adverb see logographic
logogriph
noun Etymology: log- + Greek griphos reed basket, riddle — more at crib Date: circa 1598 a word puzzle (as an anagram)
logomachy
noun (plural -chies) Etymology: Greek logomachia, from log- + machesthai to fight Date: 1569 1. a dispute over or about words 2. a controversy marked by verbiage
logorrhea
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1892 excessive and often incoherent talkativeness or wordiness • logorrheic adjective
logorrheic
adjective see logorrhea
Logos
noun (plural Logoi) Etymology: Greek, speech, word, reason — more at legend Date: 1587 1. the divine wisdom manifest in the creation, government, and redemption of the ...
logotype
noun Date: circa 1816 1. a single piece of type or a single plate faced with a term (as the name of a newspaper or a trademark) 2. an identifying symbol (as for use in ...
logroll
verb Etymology: back-formation from logrolling Date: 1835 intransitive verb to take part in logrolling transitive verb to promote passage of by logrolling • ...
logroller
noun see logroll
logrolling
noun Date: 1812 1. [from a former American custom of neighbors assisting one another in rolling logs into a pile for burning] the exchanging of assistance or favors; ...
Logroño
geographical name commune capital of La Rioja province, Spain, on the Ebro population 121,066
logwood
noun Date: 1581 1. a. a leguminous tree (Haematoxylon campechianum) of Mexico and the West Indies b. the very hard brown or brownish-red heartwood of logwood 2. a ...
logy
also loggy adjective (logier; -est) Etymology: perhaps from Dutch log heavy; akin to Middle Low German luggich lazy Date: 1847 marked by sluggishness and lack of vitality ; ...
Lohengrin
noun Etymology: German Date: 1850 a son of Parsifal and knight of the Holy Grail in Germanic legend
loin
noun Etymology: Middle English loyne, from Anglo-French loigne, from Vulgar Latin *lumbea, from Latin lumbus; akin to Old English lendenu loins, Old Church Slavic lędviję ...
loincloth
noun Date: 1859 a cloth worn about the loins often as the sole article of clothing in warm climates
Loire
geographical name river 634 miles (1020 kilometers) central France flowing from the Massif Central NW & W into Bay of Biscay
loiter
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. to delay an activity with idle stops and pauses ; dawdle 2. a. to remain in an area for no obvious ...
loiterer
noun see loiter
Loíza
geographical name city Puerto Rico population 32,537
Loki
noun Etymology: Old Norse Date: 1844 a Norse god who contrives evil and mischief for his fellow gods
Lolita
noun Etymology: from Lolita, character in the novel Lolita (1955) by Vladimir Nabokov Date: 1959 a precociously seductive girl
loll
I. verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to hang loosely or laxly ; droop 2. to act or move in a lax, lazy, or indolent manner ; lounge ...
Lolland
geographical name island Denmark in the Baltic S of Sjælland area 477 square miles (1240 square kilometers), population 73,564
lollapalooza
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1896 one that is extraordinarily impressive; also an outstanding example
Lollard
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle Dutch lollaert, from lollen to mutter Date: 14th century one of the followers of Wycliffe who traveled in the 14th and 15th ...
Lollardism
noun see Lollard
Lollardy
noun see Lollard
loller
noun see loll I
lollipop
or lollypop noun Etymology: perhaps from English dialect lolly tongue + 2pop Date: 1784 1. a piece of hard candy on the end of a stick 2. British a round stop sign on a ...
lollop
intransitive verb Etymology: 1loll + -op (as in gallop) Date: 1745 1. dialect England loll 2. to proceed with a bounding or bobbing motion
lolly
noun (plural lollies) Etymology: short for lollipop Date: 1854 1. British a piece of candy; especially hard candy 2. British money
lollygag
also lallygag intransitive verb (-gagged; -gagging) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1868 fool around 1 ; dawdle
lollypop
noun see lollipop
Lomami
geographical name river about 800 miles (1285 kilometers) central Democratic Republic of the Congo flowing N into Congo River
Lomas
or Lomas de Zamora geographical name city E Argentina SW of Buenos Aires population 572,769
Lomas de Zamora
geographical name see Lomas
Lomax
biographical name John Avery 1867-1948 and his son Alan 1915-2002 American folklorists
Lombard
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Lumbarde, from Anglo-French lombart, from Old Italian lombardo, from Latin Langobardus Date: 14th century 1. a. a member of a Germanic ...
Lombardia
geographical name see Lombardy
Lombardian
adjective see Lombard I
Lombardic
adjective see Lombard I
Lombardy
or Italian Lombardia geographical name region N Italy chiefly N of the Po capital Milan population 8,911,995
Lombardy poplar
noun Etymology: Lombardy, Italy Date: 1766 a poplar of a staminate variety (Populus nigra italica) of a European poplar having a columnar shape and strongly ascending ...
Lomblen
geographical name island Indonesia in the Lesser Sundas E of Flores area 468 square miles (1217 square kilometers)
Lombok
geographical name island Indonesia in the Lesser Sundas E of Bali; chief town Mataram area 1825 square miles (4745 square kilometers), population 1,300,234
Lombroso
biographical name Cesare 1836-1909 Italian physician & psychiatrist
Lomé
geographical name city & port capital of Togo population 229,400
loment
noun Etymology: New Latin lomentum, from Latin, wash made from bean meal, from lavere to wash — more at lye Date: circa 1830 a dry indehiscent fruit (as of tick trefoil) ...
Lomond, Ben
geographical name mountain 3192 feet (973 meters) S central Scotland on E side of Loch Lomond
Lomond, Loch
geographical name lake 24 miles (39 kilometers) long S central Scotland; largest in Scotland
Lompoc
geographical name city SW California W of Santa Barbara population 41,103
Lond
abbreviation London
London
I. biographical name John Griffith 1876-1916 Jack London American writer II. geographical name 1. city Canada in SE Ontario on Thames River population 336,539 2. city & ...
London broil
noun Etymology: London, England Date: 1934 a boneless cut of beef (as from the shoulder or flank) usually served sliced diagonally across the grain
London plane
noun Date: 1860 a large pollution-resistant plane (Platanus acerifolia) often planted as a street tree that is a hybrid between an Eurasian plane (P. orientalis) and the ...
London plane tree
noun see London plane
Londonderry
geographical name 1. town SE New Hampshire NE of Nashua population 23,236 2. — see Derry 3. traditional county N Northern Ireland
Londoner
noun see London II
lone
adjective Etymology: Middle English, short for alone Date: 14th century 1. a. having no company ; solitary b. preferring solitude 2. only, sole 3. situated by ...
lone ranger
noun Usage: often capitalized L&R Etymology: Lone Ranger, hero of an American radio and television western Date: 1969 one who acts alone and without consultation or the ...
lone star tick
noun Date: 1896 an ixodid tick (Amblyomma americanum) of the southern, central, and eastern United States that attacks mammals and birds, is a vector of several diseases (as ...
lone wolf
noun Date: 1909 a person who prefers to work, act, or live alone • lone-wolf adjective
lone-wolf
adjective see lone wolf
loneliness
noun see lonely
lonely
adjective (lonelier; -est) Date: circa 1598 1. a. being without company ; lone b. cut off from others ; solitary 2. not frequented by human beings ; desolate 3. sad ...
lonely hearts
adjective Date: 1949 of or relating to lonely persons who are seeking companions or spouses
loneness
noun see lone
loner
noun Date: 1947 one that avoids others; especially individualist
lonesome
I. adjective Date: 1647 1. a. sad or dejected as a result of lack of companionship or separation from others
lonesomely
adverb see lonesome I
lonesomeness
noun see lonesome I
Long
I. biographical name Crawford Williamson 1815-1878 American surgeon II. biographical name Huey Pierce 1893-1935 American politician III. biographical name Stephen ...
long
I. adjective (longer; longest) Etymology: Middle English long, lang, from Old English; akin to Old High German lang long, Latin longus Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
long ago
noun Date: 1851 the distant past
long ball
noun Date: 1938 home run
Long Beach
geographical name 1. city & port SW California SE of Los Angeles population 461,522 2. city SE New York on island S of Long Island population 35,462
long bone
noun Date: circa 1860 any of the elongated bones supporting a vertebrate limb and consisting of an essentially cylindrical shaft that contains bone marrow and ends in enlarged ...
Long Branch
geographical name city E central New Jersey on the Atlantic population 31,340
long distance
noun Date: 1904 1. communication by long-distance telephone 2. a telephone operator or exchange that gives long-distance connections
long division
noun Date: 1827 arithmetical division in which the several steps involved in the division are indicated in detail
long face
noun Date: 1786 a facial expression of sadness or melancholy
long green
noun Date: circa 1891 slang money
long haul
noun Date: 1936 1. a long distance 2. a considerable period of time; especially long run • long-haul adjective
long horse
noun Date: circa 1934 vaulting horse
long hundredweight
noun Date: circa 1934 British hundredweight 2
long in the tooth
phrasal past one's best days ; old
Long Island
geographical name island 118 miles (190 kilometers) long SE New York S of Connecticut area 1723 square miles (4462 square kilometers) • Long Islander noun
Long Island City
geographical name section of New York City in NW Queens
Long Island Sound
geographical name inlet of the Atlantic between Connecticut & Long Island
Long Islander
noun see Long Island
long johns
noun plural Date: 1943 long underwear
long jump
noun Date: 1882 a track-and-field event in which a jump for distance is made usually from a running start • long jumper noun
long jumper
noun see long jump
long measure
noun see long meter
long meter
noun Date: 1718 a quatrain in iambic tetrameter in which the second and fourth lines and often the first and third lines rhyme — called also long measure
long run
noun Date: 1627 a relatively long period of time — usually used in the phrase in the long run • long-run adjective
long shot
noun Date: 1867 1. a venture involving great risk but promising a great reward if successful; also a venture unlikely to succeed 2. an entry (as in a horse race) given ...
long since
adverb Date: 14th century 1. long ago 2. for a long time
long suit
noun Date: circa 1876 1. a holding of more than the average number of cards in a suit 2. strong suit, forte
Long Tom
noun Etymology: from the name Tom Date: 1832 1. a large land gun having a long range 2. a trough for washing gold-bearing earth
long ton
noun Date: 1829 — see weight table
long view
noun Date: 1912 an approach to a problem or situation that emphasizes long-range factors
Long Xuyen
geographical name city S Vietnam in SW Cochin China on S side of Mekong Delta population 128,817
long-ago
adjective Date: circa 1834 of or relating to the past
long-chain
adjective Date: 1930 having a relatively long chain of atoms and especially carbon atoms in the molecule
long-day
adjective Date: 1920 responding to or relating to a long photoperiod — used especially of a plant; compare day-neutral, short-day
long-distance
I. adjective Date: 1884 1. of or relating to telephone communication with a distant point especially outside a specified area 2. a. situated a long distance away b. ...
long-drawn
adjective see long-drawn-out
long-drawn-out
or long-drawn adjective Date: 1632 extended to a great length
long-haired
adjective see longhair
long-haul
adjective see long haul
long-horned beetle
noun Date: 1840 any of a family (Cerambycidae syn. Longicornia) of beetles usually distinguished by their very long antennae — called also longhorn beetle
long-horned grasshopper
noun Date: 1893 any of various grasshoppers (family Tettigoniidae) distinguished by their very long antennae
long-leaved pine
noun Date: 1765 longleaf pine
long-liner
noun Date: 1909 one that fishes with a longline; also a fishing vessel used in long-lining
long-lining
noun Date: 1877 fishing with a longline
long-lived
adjective Date: 14th century 1. having a long life ; characterized by long life 2. lasting a long time ; enduring
long-playing
adjective Date: 1929 designed to be played at 33 1/3 revolutions per minute — used of a microgroove record
long-range
adjective Date: 1854 1. relating to or fit for long distances 2. involving or taking into account a long period of time
long-run
adjective see long run
long-sighted
adjective Date: circa 1790 chiefly British farsighted • long-sightedness noun, chiefly British
long-sightedness
noun see long-sighted
long-standing
adjective Date: 1814 of long duration
long-suffering
adjective Date: 1535 patiently enduring lasting offense or hardship • long-suffering noun • long-sufferingly adverb
long-sufferingly
adverb see long-suffering
long-tailed duck
noun Date: 1766 old-squaw
long-term
adjective Date: 1904 1. occurring over or involving a relatively long period of time 2. a. of, relating to, or constituting a financial operation or obligation based on ...
long-term potentiation
noun Date: 1984 a long-lasting strengthening of the response of a postsynaptic nerve cell to stimulation across the synapse that occurs with repeated stimulation and is ...
long-winded
adjective Date: 1589 1. tediously long in speaking or writing 2. not easily subject to loss of breath • long-windedly adverb • long-windedness noun
long-windedly
adverb see long-winded
long-windedness
noun see long-winded
longan
noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) lóngyaˇn, literally, dragon's eye Date: 1732 1. a pulpy fruit related to the lychee and produced by a southeast Asian evergreen tree ...
longanimity
noun Etymology: Middle English longanymyte, from Late Latin longanimitat-, longanimitas, from longanimis patient, from Latin longus long + animus soul — more at animate ...
longboat
noun Date: 15th century a large oared boat usually carried by a merchant sailing ship
longbow
noun Date: 14th century a hand-drawn wooden bow held vertically and used especially by medieval English archers
longbowman
noun Date: 1925 an archer who uses a longbow
longcase clock
noun Date: 1884 grandfather clock
longer
noun see long IV
longeron
noun Etymology: French Date: 1912 a fore-and-aft framing member of an airplane fuselage
longevity
noun Etymology: Late Latin longaevitas, from Latin longaevus long-lived, from longus long + aevum age — more at aye Date: 1615 1. a. a long duration of individual life ...
longevous
adjective Date: 1680 long-lived
Longfellow
biographical name Henry Wadsworth 1807-1882 American poet
Longford
geographical name 1. county E central Ireland in Leinster area 403 square miles (1048 square kilometers), population 30,296 2. town, its capital population 6393
longhair
noun Date: 1920 1. an impractical intellectual 2. a person of artistic gifts or interests; especially a lover of classical music 3. a person with long hair; especially ...
longhand
noun Date: 1666 handwriting: as a. characters or words written out fully by hand b. cursive writing
longheaded
adjective Date: circa 1700 1. having unusual foresight 2. dolichocephalic • longheadedness noun
longheadedness
noun see longheaded
longhorn
noun Date: 1834 1. a. any of the long-horned cattle of Spanish derivation formerly common in southwestern United States b. Texas longhorn 2 2. a firm-textured usually ...
longhorn beetle
noun see long-horned beetle
longhouse
noun Date: 1643 a long communal dwelling of some North American Indians (as the Iroquois)
longicorn
adjective Etymology: ultimately from Latin longus long + cornu horn — more at horn Date: circa 1848 1. of, relating to, or being long-horned beetles 2. having long ...
longing
noun Date: before 12th century a strong desire especially for something unattainable ; craving • longingly adverb
longingly
adverb see longing
Longinus
biographical name 1st century A.D. Greek critic
longish
adjective Date: 1611 somewhat long ; moderately long
longitude
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin longitudin-, longitudo, from longus Date: 14th century 1. a. angular distance measured on a great circle of reference from the ...
longitudinal
adjective Date: 15th century 1. placed or running lengthwise 2. of or relating to length or the lengthwise dimension 3. involving the repeated observation or examination ...
longitudinal wave
noun Date: circa 1931 a wave (as a sound wave) in which the particles of the medium vibrate in the direction of the line of advance of the wave
longitudinally
adverb see longitudinal
longleaf pine
noun Date: 1796 a tall timber pine (Pinus palustris) of the southeastern United States with long needles in bundles of three and long cones; also its tough coarse-grained ...
longline
noun Date: 1876 a heavy fishing line that may be many miles long and that has baited hooks in series
Longmont
geographical name city N Colorado N of Denver population 71,093
longneck
noun Date: 1978 beer served in a bottle that has a long neck
longness
noun see long I
Longobard
noun (plural Longobards; also Longobardi) Etymology: Middle English Longobardes, plural, from Latin Langobardi, Longobardi Date: 14th century Lombard 1a • Longobardic ...
Longobardic
adjective see Longobard
Longs Peak
geographical name mountain 14,255 feet (4345 meters) N central Colorado in Front Range in Rocky Mountain National Park
longship
noun Date: 1568 a long sail and oar ship used by the Vikings
longshoreman
noun Etymology: longshore, short for alongshore Date: 1811 a person who loads and unloads ships at a seaport
longshoring
noun Date: 1926 the act or occupation of working as a longshoreman
longsome
adjective Date: before 12th century tediously long • longsomely adverb • longsomeness noun
longsomely
adverb see longsome
longsomeness
noun see longsome
longspur
noun Date: 1831 any of several long-clawed finches (especially genus Calcarius) of the arctic regions and the Great Plains of North America
Longstreet
biographical name James 1821-1904 American Confederate general
longtime
adjective Date: 1584 having been so for a long time ; long-standing
Longueuil
geographical name town Canada in S Quebec E of Montreal population 128,016
longueur
noun (plural longueurs) Etymology: French, literally, length Date: 1791 a dull and tedious portion (as of a book) — usually used in plural
Longview
geographical name 1. city NE Texas population 73,344 2. city SW Washington on Columbia River population 34,660
Lönnrot
biographical name Elias 1802-1884 Finnish folklorist
Lonsdale
biographical name Frederick 1881-1954 British dramatist
loo
I. noun Etymology: short for obsolete English lanterloo, from French lanturelu twaddle Date: 1675 1. an old card game in which the winner of each trick or a majority of ...
looby
noun (plural loobies) Etymology: Middle English loby Date: 14th century an awkward clumsy fellow ; lubber

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