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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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lovelily
adverb see lovely I
low-country
adjective see low country
low-density lipoprotein
noun Date: 1951 LDL
low-down
adjective Date: 1850 1. contemptible, base 2. deeply emotional
low-end
adjective Date: 1926 of, relating to, or being the lowest priced merchandise in a manufacturer's line; broadly inexpensive
low-grade
adjective Date: 1878 1. of inferior grade or quality 2. being near that extreme of a specified range which is lowest, least intense, least serious, or least competent
low-key
also low-keyed adjective Date: 1907 1. having or producing dark tones only with little contrast 2. of low intensity ; restrained
low-keyed
adjective see low-key
low-level
adjective Date: 1881 1. occurring, done, or placed at a low level 2. being of low importance or rank 3. being or relating to nuclear waste containing low concentrations of ...
low-life
adjective see lowlife
low-lying
adjective Date: 1856 1. rising relatively little above the base of measurement 2. lying below the normal level, surface, or the base of measurement or mean elevation
low-minded
adjective Date: circa 1746 inclined to vulgar or unworthy things • low-mindedly adverb • low-mindedness noun
low-mindedly
adverb see low-minded
low-mindedness
noun see low-minded
low-pressure
adjective Date: 1827 1. having, exerting, or operating under a relatively small pressure 2. easygoing
low-rent
adjective Date: 1957 low in character, cost, or prestige
low-rise
adjective Date: 1957 1. having few stories and not equipped with elevators 2. of, relating to, or characterized by low-rise buildings
low-slung
adjective Date: 1931 relatively low to the ground or floor
low-spirited
adjective Date: 1693 dejected, depressed • low-spiritedly adverb • low-spiritedness noun
low-spiritedly
adverb see low-spirited
low-spiritedness
noun see low-spirited
low-tech
adjective Date: 1981 technologically simple or unsophisticated
lowball
transitive verb Date: 1957 1. to give (a customer) a deceptively low price or cost estimate 2. to give a markedly or unfairly low offer • lowball noun
lowborn
adjective Date: 13th century born in a low condition or rank
lowboy
noun Date: circa 1891 a chest or side table about three feet (one meter) high with drawers and usually with cabriole legs
lowbred
adjective Date: circa 1605 rude, vulgar
lowbrow
adjective Date: 1913 of, relating to, or suitable for a person with little taste or intellectual interest • lowbrow noun
lowdown
noun Date: 1915 the inside facts ; dope
lowe
I. noun see low V II. verb see low VI
Lowell
I. biographical name Amy 1874-1925 American poet & critic II. biographical name James Russell 1819-1891 American poet, essayist, & dramatist III. biographical name Percival ...
lower
I. intransitive verb also lour Etymology: Middle English louren; akin to Middle High German lūren to lie in wait Date: 13th century 1. to look sullen ; frown 2. to be or ...
Lower 48
geographical name the continental states of the United States excluding Alaska
Lower Canada
geographical name the province of Canada 1791-1841 corresponding to modern Quebec — see Upper Canada
lower class
noun Date: 1637 a social class occupying a position below the middle class and having the lowest status in a society
lower criticism
noun Date: 1885 criticism concerned with the recovery of original texts especially of Scripture through collation of extant manuscripts — compare higher criticism
lower fungus
noun Date: 1900 a fungus with hyphae absent or rudimentary and nonseptate
Lower Klamath Lake
geographical name lake N California on Oregon border SSE of Upper Klamath Lake (in Oregon)
Lower Peninsula
geographical name S part of Michigan, S of Straits of Mackinac
Lower Saxony
or German Niedersachsen geographical name state of Germany & formerly of West Germany bordering on North Sea capital Hannover area 18,305 square miles (47,410 square ...
lower the boom
phrasal to deal a crushing blow or punishment
lower-class
adjective Date: 1890 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the lower class 2. being an inferior or low-ranking specimen of its kind
lowercase
I. adjective Etymology: from the compositor's practice of keeping such types in the lower of a pair of type cases Date: 1683 of a letter having as its typical form a f g or ...
lowering
adjective Date: 15th century dark and threatening ; gloomy
lowermost
adjective Date: 1547 lowest
lowery
also loury adjective Date: 15th century gloomy, lowering
Lowes
biographical name John Livingston 1867-1945 American educator
lowest common denominator
noun Date: 1854 1. least common denominator 2. something of small intellectual content designed to appeal to a lowbrow audience; also such an audience
lowest common multiple
noun Date: 1873 least common multiple
lowest terms
noun plural Date: circa 1675 the form of a fraction in which the numerator and denominator have no factor in common except 1
Lowestoft
geographical name port E England in East Suffolk on North Sea population 55,231
lowland
I. noun Date: 15th century low or level country II. adjective Date: 1508 1. capitalized of or relating to the Lowlands of Scotland 2. of or relating to a lowland
lowland gorilla
noun Date: 1942 either of two gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla or G. gorilla graueri) that inhabit lowland rainforests of west central Africa
lowlander
noun Date: 1692 1. capitalized an inhabitant of the Lowlands of Scotland 2. a native or inhabitant of a lowland region
Lowlands
geographical name the central & E part of Scotland lying between the Highlands & the Southern Uplands
lowlife
noun (plural lowlifes; also lowlives) Date: 1911 1. a person of low social status 2. a person of low moral character • low-life adjective
lowlight
noun Date: 1941 a particularly bad or unpleasant event, detail, or part
lowlihead
noun Etymology: Middle English lowliheed, from lowly + -hed -hood; akin to Middle English -hod -hood Date: 15th century archaic lowly state
lowliness
noun see lowly II
lowly
I. adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a humble or meek manner 2. in a low position, manner, or degree 3. not loudly II. adjective (lowlier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. ...
lown
adjective Etymology: Middle English (Scots) lowne Date: 15th century dialect calm, quiet
Lowndes
biographical name William Thomas 1798-1843 English bibliographer
lowness
noun see low III
lowrider
noun Date: circa 1972 a customized car with a chassis that has been lowered so that it narrowly clears the ground
Lowry
biographical name (Clarence) Malcolm 1909-1957 British writer
lox
I. noun Etymology: liquid oxygen Date: 1923 liquid oxygen II. noun (plural lox or loxes) Etymology: Yiddish laks, from Middle High German lahs salmon, from Old High German; ...
loxodrome
noun Etymology: back-formation from loxodromic of a rhumb line, from French loxodromique, from Greek loxos oblique + dromos course — more at dromedary Date: 1880 rhumb line
loyal
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Old French leial, leel, from Latin legalis legal Date: 1531 1. unswerving in allegiance: as a. faithful in allegiance to one's ...
loyalist
noun Date: 1647 one who is or remains loyal especially to a political cause, party, government, or sovereign
loyally
adverb see loyal
loyalty
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: alteration of Middle English leawte, lewte, from Anglo-French lealté, leauté, from leal, leial loyal Date: 15th century the quality or state ...
Loyalty Islands
geographical name islands SW Pacific E of New Caledonia; a dependency of New Caledonia area about 755 square miles (1955 square kilometers), population 17,912
Loyang
geographical name see Luoyang
Loyola
biographical name Saint Ignatius — see Ignatius of Loyola
lozenge
noun Etymology: Middle English losenge, from Anglo-French Date: 14th century 1. a figure with four equal sides and two acute and two obtuse angles ; diamond 2. something ...
LP
I. noun Etymology: long-playing Date: 1948 a microgroove phonograph record designed to be played at 33 1/3 revolutions per minute II. abbreviation low pressure
LPG
abbreviation liquefied petroleum gas
LPGA
abbreviation Ladies Professional Golf Association
LPN
noun Date: 1948 licensed practical nurse
Lr
symbol lawrencium
LR
abbreviation 1. living room 2. lower right
LRT
abbreviation light-rail transit
LRV
abbreviation light-rail vehicle
LS
abbreviation 1. left side 2. letter signed 3. library science 4. [Latin locus sigilli] place of the seal
LSD
noun Etymology: German Lysergsäure-Diäthylamid lysergic acid diethylamide Date: 1950 a semisynthetic illicit organic compound C20H25N3O derived from ergot that induces ...
LSI
abbreviation large-scale integrated circuit; large-scale integration
LSM
abbreviation letter-sorting machine
LSO
abbreviation landing signal officer
LSS
abbreviation 1. lifesaving service; lifesaving station 2. life-support system
LST
abbreviation 1. landing ship, tank 2. local sidereal time
lt
abbreviation light
Lt
abbreviation lieutenant
LT
abbreviation long ton
Lt Col
abbreviation lieutenant colonel
Lt Gen
abbreviation see LTG
lt gov
abbreviation lieutenant governor
LTC
abbreviation 1. lieutenant colonel 2. long-term care
ltd
abbreviation limited
LTG
or Lt Gen abbreviation lieutenant general
LTh
abbreviation licentiate in theology
LTJG
abbreviation lieutenant junior grade
LTL
abbreviation less than truckload
LTP
abbreviation long-term potentiation
ltr
abbreviation 1. letter 2. lighter
LTS
abbreviation launch telemetry station; launch tracking system
Lu
symbol lutetium
Lu Hsün
biographical name 1881-1936 pseudonym of Chou Shu-Jen Chinese writer
Lu-ta
geographical name — see Dalian
Lualaba
geographical name river 400 miles (640 kilometers) SE Democratic Republic of the Congo flowing N to join the Luapula (outlet of Lake Bangweulu) forming Congo River
Luanda
geographical name city & port capital of Angola population 1,544,400
Luang Prabang
geographical name see Louangphrabang
Luangue
geographical name — see Loange
luau
noun Etymology: Hawaiian lū'au Date: 1853 a Hawaiian feast
Lubavitcher
noun Etymology: Yiddish lyubavitsher, from Lyubavitsh, town in Belarus Date: 1954 a member of a Hasidic sect founded by Schneour Zalman of Lyady in the late 18th century • ...
lubber
noun Etymology: Middle English lobre, lobur Date: 14th century 1. a big clumsy fellow 2. a clumsy seaman • lubberliness noun • lubberly adjective or adverb
lubber line
noun Date: 1858 a fixed line on the compass of a ship or airplane that is aligned with the longitudinal axis of the vehicle
lubber's hole
noun Date: circa 1784 a hole in a square-rigger's top near the mast through which one may go farther aloft without going over the rim by the futtock shrouds
lubberliness
noun see lubber
lubberly
adjective or adverb see lubber
Lubbock
I. biographical name Sir John 1834-1913 1st Baron Avebury son of Sir J.W. English financier & author II. biographical name Sir John William 1803-1865 English astronomer & ...
lube
noun Etymology: short for lubricating oil Date: 1926 1. lubricant 2. an application of a lubricant ; lubrication
Lübeck
geographical name city & port N Germany NE of Hamburg population 215,999
Lublin
geographical name city E Poland SE of Warsaw population 349,672
lubric
adjective Etymology: Middle French lubrique, from Medieval Latin lubricus Date: 15th century archaic lubricious • lubrical adjective
lubrical
adjective see lubric
lubricant
noun Date: circa 1828 1. a substance (as grease) capable of reducing friction, heat, and wear when introduced as a film between solid surfaces 2. something that lessens or ...
lubricate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Latin lubricatus, past participle of lubricare, from lubricus slippery — more at sleeve Date: circa 1623 transitive verb 1. to make ...
lubrication
noun see lubricate
lubricative
adjective see lubricate
lubricator
noun see lubricate
lubricious
or lubricous adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin lubricus, from Latin, slippery, easily led astray Date: 1535 1. marked by wantonness ; lecherous; also salacious 2. [Latin ...
lubriciously
adverb see lubricious
lubricity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century the property or state of being lubricious; also the capacity for reducing friction
lubricous
adjective see lubricious
Lubumbashi
or formerly Elisabethville geographical name city SE Democratic Republic of the Congo in SE Shaba population 739,082
Lucan
I. adjective or Lukan Etymology: Late Latin lucanus, from Lucas Luke, from Greek Loukas Date: 1890 of or relating to Luke or the Gospel ascribed to him II. biographical name ...
Lucania
geographical name — see Basilicata
Lucania, Mount
geographical name mountain 17,147 feet (5226 meters) Canada in SW Yukon Territory in St. Elias Range N of Mt. Logan
lucarne
noun Etymology: French Date: circa 1825 dormer
Lucas
I. biographical name George Walton, Jr. 1944- American filmmaker II. biographical name Robert Emerson, Jr. 1937- American economist
Lucayan
noun see Lucayo
Lucayo
also Lucayan noun Date: 1929 a member of an Arawakan people of the Bahamas
Lucca
geographical name commune central Italy in Tuscany NW of Florence population 86,188
Luce
I. biographical name Clare 1903-1987 née Boothe wife of H.R. American dramatist, politician, & diplomat II. biographical name Henry Robinson 1898-1967 American editor & ...
lucency
noun Date: 1656 the quality or state of being lucent
lucent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin lucent-, lucens, present participle of lucēre to shine — more at light Date: 15th century 1. glowing with light ; luminous ...
lucently
adverb see lucent
lucern
noun Etymology: probably modification of German lüchsern of a lynx, from Luchs lynx Date: circa 1533 obsolete lynx
lucerne
also lucern noun Etymology: French luzerne, from Occitan luserno Date: 1626 chiefly British alfalfa
Lucerne
or German Luzern geographical name 1. canton central Switzerland area 577 square miles (1494 square kilometers), population 316,210 2. commune, its capital, on Lake of ...
Lucerne, Lake of
or German Vierwaldstätter See geographical name lake 24 miles (39 kilometers) long central Switzerland area 44 square miles (114 square kilometers)
Luchow
geographical name — see Hefei
lucid
adjective Etymology: Latin lucidus, from lucēre Date: 1591 1. a. suffused with light ; luminous b. translucent 2. having full use of one's faculties ; sane 3. ...
lucidity
noun Date: 1810 1. clearness of thought or style 2. a presumed capacity to perceive the truth directly and instantaneously ; clairvoyance
lucidly
adverb see lucid
lucidness
noun see lucid
Lucifer
noun Etymology: Middle English, the morning star, a fallen rebel archangel, the Devil, from Old English, from Latin, the morning star, from lucifer light-bearing, from luc-, lux ...
luciferase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from luciferin Date: 1888 an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of luciferin
Luciferian
adjective see Lucifer
luciferin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Latin lucifer light-bearing Date: 1888 any of various organic substances in luminescent organisms (as fireflies) ...
luciferous
adjective Etymology: Latin lucifer Date: 1648 bringing light or insight ; illuminating
Lucina
noun Etymology: Latin, Roman goddess of childbirth Date: 1615 archaic midwife
Lucite
trademark — used for an acrylic resin or plastic consisting essentially of polymerized methyl methacrylate
luck
I. noun Etymology: Middle English lucke, from Middle Dutch luc; akin to Middle High German gelücke luck Date: 15th century 1. a. a force that brings good fortune or ...
luckily
adverb Date: 1530 1. in a lucky manner 2. fortunately 2 Usage: see hopefully
luckiness
noun see lucky
luckless
adjective see luck I
Lucknow
geographical name city N India ESE of Delhi capital of Uttar Pradesh population 1,619,115
lucky
adjective (luckier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. having good luck 2. happening by chance ; fortuitous 3. producing or resulting in good by chance ; favorable 4. seeming ...
lucky dip
noun Date: 1925 British grab bag
lucrative
adjective Etymology: Middle English lucratif, from Middle French, from Latin lucrativus, from lucratus, past participle of lucrari to gain, from lucrum Date: 15th century ...
lucratively
adverb see lucrative
lucrativeness
noun see lucrative
lucre
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin lucrum; probably akin to Old English lēan reward, Old High German lōn, Greek apolauein to enjoy Date: 14th ...
Lucretian
adjective see Lucretius
Lucretius
biographical name circa 96-circa 55 B.C. Titus Lucretius Carus Roman poet & philosopher • Lucretian adjective
lucubration
noun Etymology: Latin lucubration-, lucubratio study by night, work produced at night, from lucubrare to work by lamplight; akin to Latin luc-, lux Date: 1595 laborious or ...
luculent
adjective Etymology: Latin luculentus, from luc-, lux light Date: circa 1548 clear in thought or expression ; lucid • luculently adverb
luculently
adverb see luculent
Lucullan
also Lucullian adjective Etymology: Latin lucullanus of Licinius Lucullus; from his reputation for luxurious banquets Date: 1861 lavish, luxurious
Lucullian
adjective see Lucullan
Lucullus
biographical name Lucius Licinius circa 117-58(or 56) B.C. Roman general & epicure
Lüda
geographical name — see Dalian
Luda
geographical name see Dalian
Luddite
noun Etymology: perhaps from Ned Ludd, 18th century Leicestershire workman who destroyed a knitting frame Date: 1811 one of a group of early 19th century English workmen ...
lude
noun Etymology: short for Quaalude, a proprietary name for methaqualone Date: 1973 a pill of methaqualone — usually used in plural
Ludendorff
biographical name Erich Friedrich Wilhelm 1865-1937 German general
Lüderitz
geographical name town & port SW Namibia population 6000
Ludhiana
geographical name city NW India in Punjab SE of Amritsar population 1,042,740
ludic
adjective Etymology: French ludique, from Latin ludus Date: 1940 of, relating to, or characterized by play ; playful
ludicrous
adjective Etymology: Latin ludicrus, from ludus play, sport; perhaps akin to Greek loidoros abusive Date: 1712 1. amusing or laughable through obvious absurdity, incongruity, ...
ludicrously
adverb see ludicrous
ludicrousness
noun see ludicrous
Ludwigsburg
geographical name city SW Germany in Baden-Württemberg N of Stuttgart population 83,913
Ludwigshafen am Rhein
geographical name city SW Germany on the Rhine opposite Mannheim population 165,368
lues
noun (plural lues) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, plague; akin to Greek lyein to loosen, destroy — more at lose Date: 1634 syphilis • luetic adjective
luetic
adjective see lues
luff
I. noun Etymology: Middle English lof spar holding out the windward tack of a sail, weather side of a ship, from Anglo-French Date: 14th century 1. the act of sailing a ship ...
luffa
variant of loofah
Lufkin
geographical name city E Texas NNE of Houston population 32,709
luftmensch
noun (plural luftmenschen) Etymology: Yiddish luftmentsh, from luft air + mentsh human being Date: 1907 an impractical contemplative person having no definite business or ...
lug
I. verb (lugged; lugging) Etymology: Middle English luggen to pull by the hair or ear, drag, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Norwegian lugga to pull by the hair Date: ...
lug nut
noun see lug III
Luganda
noun Date: 1889 the Bantu language of the Ganda people
Lugano
geographical name commune S Switzerland in Ticino canton on Lake Lugano population 26,530
Lugano, Lake
geographical name lake on border between Switzerland & Italy E of Lake Maggiore area 19 square miles (49 square kilometers)
Lugansk
geographical name see Luhans'k
Lugdunum
geographical name see Lyon II
luge
noun Etymology: French Date: 1905 a small sled that is ridden in a supine position and used especially in competition; also the competition itself • luge intransitive ...
luger
noun see luge
luggage
noun Date: 1595 something that is lugged; especially suitcases for a traveler's belongings ; baggage
lugger
noun Etymology: lugsail Date: 1757 a small fishing or coasting boat that carries one or more lugsails
Lugo
geographical name 1. province NW Spain in NE Galicia on Bay of Biscay area 3785 square miles (9803 square kilometers), population 384,365 2. commune, its capital population ...
lugsail
noun Etymology: perhaps from 3lug Date: 1677 a 4-sided sail bent to an obliquely hanging yard that is hoisted and lowered with the sail
lugubrious
adjective Etymology: Latin lugubris, from lugēre to mourn; akin to Greek lygros mournful Date: 1585 1. mournful; especially exaggeratedly or affectedly mournful 2. ...
lugubriously
adverb see lugubrious
lugubriousness
noun see lugubrious
lugworm
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1802 any of a genus (Arenicola) of marine polychaete worms that have a row of tufted gills along each side of the back and are used for ...
Luhans'k
or Lugansk or 1935-58 & 1970-89 Voroshilovgrad geographical name city E Ukraine in Donets Basin population 504,000
Luichow
geographical name — see Leizhou
Luigi Amedeo
biographical name 1873-1933 Duca D'Abruzzi & Prince of Savoy-Aosta Italian explorer & naval officer
Luik
geographical name — see liege
Lukan
variant of Lucan
Luke
noun Etymology: Latin Lucas, from Greek Loukas Date: before 12th century 1. a Gentile physician and companion of the apostle Paul traditionally identified as the author of ...
lukewarm
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from luke lukewarm + warm; probably akin to Old High German lāo lukewarm — more at lee Date: 14th century 1. moderately warm ; tepid ...
lukewarmly
adverb see lukewarm
lukewarmness
noun see lukewarm
Luleå
geographical name city & port N Sweden near head of Gulf of Bothnia population 68,924
Luleburgaz
geographical name city central Turkey in Europe
lull
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English; probably of imitative origin Date: 14th century 1. to cause to sleep or rest ; soothe 2. to cause to relax vigilance II. ...
lullaby
I. noun (plural -bies) Etymology: obsolete English lulla, interjection used to lull a child (from Middle English) + bye, interjection used to lull a child, from Middle English ...
Lully
I. biographical name Jean-Baptiste 1632-1687 French (Italian-born) composer II. biographical name Raymond — see Ramon Llull
lulu
noun Etymology: probably from Lulu, nickname from Louise Date: 1886 slang one that is remarkable or wonderful
Luluabourg
geographical name — see Kananga
lum
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1628 chiefly Scottish chimney
luma
or louma noun (plural luma) Etymology: Armenian luma, lumay, literally, small coin, mite, from Syriac lūmā Date: 1999 — see dram at money table
lumbago
noun Etymology: Latin, from lumbus Date: circa 1693 acute or chronic pain (as that caused by muscle strain) in the lower back
lumbar
adjective Etymology: New Latin lumbaris, from Latin lumbus loin — more at loin Date: circa 1656 of, relating to, or constituting the loins or the vertebrae between the ...
lumbar puncture
noun Date: 1895 puncture of the subarachnoid space in the lumbar region of the spinal cord to withdraw cerebrospinal fluid or inject anesthetic drugs
lumber
I. intransitive verb (lumbered; lumbering) Etymology: Middle English lomeren Date: 14th century 1. to move ponderously 2. rumble II. noun Etymology: perhaps from Lombard; ...
lumber room
noun Date: 1741 storeroom 1
lumberer
noun see lumber III
lumberjack
noun Date: 1831 logger
lumberman
noun Date: 1761 a person who is engaged in or oversees the business of cutting, processing, and marketing lumber
lumberyard
noun Date: 1753 a yard where a stock of lumber is kept for sale
lumbosacral
adjective Date: 1840 relating to the lumbar and sacral regions or parts
lumen
noun (plural lumens; also lumina) Etymology: New Latin lumin-, lumen, from Latin, light, air shaft, opening Date: 1873 1. the cavity of a tubular organ or part 2. the ...
lumenal
adjective see lumen
lumin-
or lumini- combining form Etymology: Middle English lumin-, from Latin lumin-, lumen light
luminaire
noun Etymology: French, lamp, lighting Date: 1921 a complete lighting unit
luminal
adjective see lumen
luminance
noun Date: 1867 1. the quality or state of being luminous 2. the luminous intensity of a surface in a given direction per unit of projected area
luminaria
noun (plural -narias) Etymology: Spanish, decorative light, from Late Latin Date: 1949 a traditional Mexican Christmas lantern originally consisting of a candle set in sand ...
luminary
noun (plural -naries) Etymology: Middle English luminarye, from Anglo-French & Late Latin; Anglo-French luminaire light, luminary, from Late Latin luminaria, plural of luminare ...
luminesce
intransitive verb (-nesced; -nescing) Etymology: back-formation from luminescent Date: 1896 to exhibit luminescence
luminescence
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary lumin- + -escence Date: 1889 the low-temperature emission of light (as by a chemical or physiological process); also ...
luminescent
adjective see luminescence
lumini-
combining form see lumin-
luminiferous
adjective Date: 1801 transmitting, producing, or yielding light
luminism
noun Usage: often capitalized Date: circa 1974 a theory or practice of realist landscape and seascape painting developed in the United States in the mid-19th century and ...
luminist
noun or adjective see luminism
luminosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1634 1. a. the quality or state of being luminous b. something luminous 2. a. the relative quantity of light b. relative brightness of ...
luminous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin luminosus, from lumin-, lumen Date: 15th century 1. a. emitting or reflecting usually steady, suffused, or glowing light ...
luminous energy
noun Date: 1898 energy transferred in the form of visible radiation
luminous flux
noun Date: 1911 radiant flux in the visible-wavelength range usually expressed in lumens instead of watts

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