Слова на букву leni-micr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву leni-micr (6389)

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luminous paint
noun Date: 1884 a paint containing a phosphor (as zinc sulfide activated with copper) and so able to glow in the dark
luminously
adverb see luminous
luminousness
noun see luminous
lummox
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1825 a clumsy person
lump
I. noun Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century 1. a piece or mass of indefinite size and shape 2. a. aggregate, totality b. majority 3. protuberance; ...
lump in one's throat
phrasal a constriction of the throat caused by emotion
lumpectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1972 excision of a breast tumor with a limited amount of associated tissue
lumpen
I. adjective Etymology: German Lumpenproletariat degraded section of the proletariat, from Lump contemptible person (from Lumpen rags) + Proletariat Date: 1936 1. of or ...
lumper
noun Date: circa 1785 1. a laborer who handles freight or cargo 2. one who classifies organisms into large often variable taxonomic groups based on major characters — ...
lumpfish
noun Etymology: obsolete English lump lumpfish (probably from Dutch lomp blenny, loach) + English fish Date: circa 1620 a northern Atlantic usually greenish fish (Cyclopterus ...
lumpily
adverb see lumpy
lumpiness
noun see lumpy
lumpish
adjective Date: 1528 1. dull, sluggish 2. obsolete low in spirits 3. heavy, awkward 4. lumpy 1a 5. tediously slow or dull ; boring; also lumpy 3 • lumpishly ...
lumpishly
adverb see lumpish
lumpishness
noun see lumpish
lumpy
adjective (lumpier; -est) Date: circa 1706 1. a. filled or covered with lumps b. characterized by choppy waves 2. having a heavy clumsy appearance 3. uneven and ...
lumpy jaw
noun Date: 1890 actinomycosis; especially actinomycosis of the head in cattle
Lumumba
biographical name Patrice (Hemery) 1925-1961 Zaire politician
luna moth
noun Etymology: New Latin luna (specific epithet of Actias luna), from Latin, moon Date: 1869 a large mostly pale green American saturniid moth (Actias luna) with long tails ...
lunacy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: lunatic Date: 1541 1. a. insanity b. intermittent insanity once believed to be related to phases of the moon 2. wild foolishness ; ...
lunar
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin lunaris, from luna moon; akin to Latin lucēre to shine — more at light Date: 15th century 1. crescent, lunate 2. a. ...
lunar caustic
noun Etymology: obsolete luna silver, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, moon Date: 1751 silver nitrate especially when fused and molded into sticks for use as a caustic
lunar eclipse
noun Date: 1667 an eclipse in which the full moon passes partially or wholly through the umbra of the earth's shadow
lunar excursion module
noun see lunar module
lunar module
noun Date: 1967 a space vehicle module designed to carry astronauts from the command module to the surface of the moon and back — called also lunar excursion module
lunate
adjective Etymology: Latin lunatus, past participle of lunare to bend in a crescent, from luna Date: circa 1777 shaped like a crescent
lunatic
adjective Etymology: Middle English lunatik, from Anglo-French or Late Latin; Anglo-French lunatic, from Late Latin lunaticus, from Latin luna; from the belief that lunacy ...
lunatic fringe
noun Date: 1913 the members of a usually political or social movement espousing extreme, eccentric, or fanatical views
lunation
noun Etymology: Middle English lunacioun, from Anglo-French lunaison, from Medieval Latin lunation-, lunatio, from Latin luna Date: 14th century the period of time averaging ...
lunch
I. noun Etymology: probably short for luncheon Date: 1812 1. a usually light meal; especially one taken in the middle of the day 2. the food prepared for a lunch II. verb ...
lunch counter
noun Date: 1869 1. a long counter at which lunches are sold 2. luncheonette
lunch-bucket
adjective Date: 1956 of, relating to, or possessing working-class values ; blue-collar
luncheon
noun Etymology: perhaps alteration of nuncheon light snack, alteration of Middle English nonshench midday refreshment, from non noon + schench drink Date: circa 1652 lunch; ...
luncheonette
noun Date: 1913 a small restaurant serving light lunches
luncher
noun see lunch II
lunchroom
noun Date: 1830 1. luncheonette 2. a room (as in a school) where lunches supplied on the premises or brought from home may be eaten
lunchtime
noun Date: 1859 the time at which lunch is usually eaten ; noon
Lund
geographical name city SW Sweden NE of Malmö population 92,027
Lundy Island
geographical name island SW England at mouth of Bristol Channel off coast of Devon area 2 square miles (5.2 square kilometers)
lune
noun Etymology: Latin luna moon — more at lunar Date: circa 1704 the part of a plane surface bounded by two intersecting arcs or of a spherical surface bounded by two ...
Lüneburg
geographical name city N Germany SE of Hamburg & NE of Lüneburg Heath (or German Lüneburger Heide) (tract of moorland about 55 miles or 88 kilometers long) population 62,944
Lünen
geographical name city W Germany S of Münster population 88,443
Lunenburg
geographical name municipal district Canada in S Nova Scotia population 25,570
lunes
noun plural Etymology: French, plural of lune crazy whim, from Middle French, moon, crazy whim, from Latin luna Date: 1601 fits of lunacy
lunette
noun Etymology: French, from Old French lunete small object shaped like the moon, from lune moon Date: circa 1639 1. something that has the shape of a crescent or half-moon: ...
Lunéville
geographical name city NE France on the Meurthe SE of Nancy population 22,393
lung
noun Etymology: Middle English lunge, from Old English lungen; akin to Old High German lungun lung, līhti light in weight — more at light Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
lunge
I. noun Etymology: modification of French allonge extension, reach, from Old French alonge, from alongier to lengthen, from Vulgar Latin *allongare, from Latin ad- ad- + Late ...
lunged
adjective Date: 1693 1. having lungs ; pulmonate 2. having a lung or lungs of a specified kind or number — used in combination
lunger
I. noun Date: 1842 one that lunges II. noun Date: 1893 a person suffering from a chronic disease of the lungs; especially one who is tubercular
lungfish
noun Date: 1883 any of an order (Dipnoi) of bony fishes that breathe by a modified swim bladder as well as gills
lungful
noun see lung
Lungki
geographical name — see Zhangzhou
lungworm
noun Date: 1882 any of various nematodes that infest the lungs and air passages of mammals
lungwort
noun Date: before 12th century any of several plants (as a mullein) formerly used in the treatment of respiratory disorders; especially a European herb (Pulmonaria ...
lunisolar
adjective Etymology: Latin luna moon + English -i- + solar Date: 1691 relating or attributed to the moon and the sun
lunker
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1867 something large of its kind — used especially of a game fish
lunkhead
noun Etymology: probably alteration of lump + head Date: 1868 a stupid person ; dolt • lunkheaded adjective
lunkheaded
adjective see lunkhead
Lunt
biographical name Alfred 1893-1977 husband of Lynn Fontanne American actor
lunule
noun Etymology: New Latin lunula, from Latin, crescent-shaped ornament, from diminutive of luna moon Date: 1828 a crescent-shaped body part or marking (as the whitish mark ...
Luoyang
or Loyang geographical name city E China in N Henan in the Huang basin population 759,752
lupanar
noun Etymology: Latin, from lupa prostitute, literally, she-wolf, feminine of lupus Date: 1864 bordello
Lupercalia
noun Etymology: Latin, plural, from Lupercus, god of flocks Date: circa 1580 an ancient Roman festival celebrated February 15 to ensure fertility for the people, fields, and ...
Lupercalian
adjective see Lupercalia
lupin
noun see lupine I
lupine
I. noun also lupin Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin lupinus, lupinum, from lupinus, adjective Date: 14th century any of a genus (Lupinus) of ...
lupus
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Latin, wolf Date: 14th century any of several diseases characterized by skin lesions; especially systemic lupus ...
lupus erythematosus
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, erythematous lupus Date: 1860 a disorder characterized by skin inflammation; especially systemic lupus erythematosus
Luray Caverns
geographical name caverns N Virginia in Blue Ridge Mountains
lurch
I. verb Etymology: Middle English lorchen, probably alteration of lurken to lurk Date: 15th century intransitive verb dialect chiefly England to loiter about a place ...
lurcher
noun Etymology: 1lurch Date: 1528 1. archaic a petty thief ; pilferer 2. British a crossbred dog; especially one that resembles a greyhound 3. archaic one who lurks; ...
lurdane
noun Etymology: Middle English lurdan, from Anglo-French *lurdin, from lurd dull, stupid, from Latin luridus lurid Date: 14th century archaic a lazy stupid person • ...
lure
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French lure, leure, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German luoder bait; perhaps akin to Old English lathian to invite, Old ...
Lurex
trademark — used for metallic yarn or thread
lurid
adjective Etymology: Latin luridus pale yellow, sallow Date: 1603 1. a. causing horror or revulsion ; gruesome b. melodramatic, sensational; also shocking 2. a. ...
luridly
adverb see lurid
luridness
noun see lurid
lurk
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English; akin to Middle High German lūren to lie in wait — more at lower Date: 14th century 1. a. to lie in wait in a place of ...
lurker
noun see lurk
Lusaka
geographical name city capital of Zambia population 982,362
Lusatia
or German Lausitz geographical name region E Germany NW of Silesia E of the Elbe
luscious
adjective Etymology: Middle English lucius, perhaps alteration of licius, short for delicious Date: 15th century 1. a. having a delicious taste or smell ; sweet b. ...
lusciously
adverb see luscious
lusciousness
noun see luscious
lush
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English lusch soft, tender Date: 1610 1. a. growing vigorously especially with luxuriant foliage b. lavishly productive: as (1) ...
lushly
adverb see lush I
lushness
noun see lush I
Lüshun
or Port Arthur geographical name port NE China in S Liaoning at tip of Liaodong Peninsula; part of greater Dalian
Lusitania
geographical name — see Portugal • Lusitanian adjective or noun
Lusitanian
adjective or noun see Lusitania
Luso-
combining form Etymology: Portuguese, from lusitano Portuguese, from Latin Lusitanus of Lusitania (ancient region corresponding approximately to modern Portugal) Portuguese ...
lust
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German lust pleasure and perhaps to Latin lascivus wanton Date: before 12th century 1. obsolete a. ...
luster
I. noun or lustre Etymology: Middle English lustre, from Latin lustrum Date: 14th century a period of five years ; lustrum 2 II. noun or lustre Etymology: Middle French ...
lusterless
adjective see luster II
lusterware
noun Date: 1825 pottery with an iridescent metallic sheen in the glaze
lustful
adjective Date: 14th century excited by lust ; lecherous • lustfully adverb • lustfulness noun
lustfully
adverb see lustful
lustfulness
noun see lustful
lustihood
noun Date: 1599 1. vigor of body or spirit ; robustness 2. sexual inclination or capacity
lustily
adverb see lusty
lustiness
noun see lusty
lustral
adjective Etymology: Latin lustralis, from lustrum Date: 1533 purificatory
lustrate
transitive verb (lustrated; lustrating) Etymology: Latin lustratus, past participle of lustrare Date: 1653 to purify ceremonially • lustration noun
lustration
noun see lustrate
lustre
I. noun see luster I II. noun see luster II III. verb see luster III
lustring
I. noun Etymology: modification of Italian lustrino Date: 1697 archaic lutestring II. noun Etymology: lustring, gerund of 3luster Date: circa 1889 a finishing process ...
lustrous
adjective Date: 1601 1. reflecting light evenly and efficiently without glitter or sparkle 2. radiant in character or reputation ; illustrious Synonyms: see bright • ...
lustrously
adverb see lustrous
lustrousness
noun see lustrous
lustrum
noun (plural lustrums or lustra) Etymology: Latin Date: 1590 1. a period of five years 2. a. a purification of the whole Roman people made in ancient times after the ...
lusty
adjective (lustier; -est) Date: 13th century 1. archaic merry, joyous 2. lustful 3. a. full of strength and vitality ; healthy, vigorous b. hearty, robust ...
lusus naturae
foreign term Etymology: Latin freak of nature
lutanist
noun see lutenist
lute
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French lut, from Old Occitan laut, from Arabic al-‘ūd, literally, the wood Date: 13th century a stringed instrument having ...
lute-
or luteo- combining form Etymology: New Latin (corpus) luteum corpus luteum
luteal
adjective Date: 1920 of, relating to, or involving the corpus luteum or its formation
lutefisk
noun Etymology: Norwegian, from lute to wash in lye solution + fisk fish Date: 1924 dried codfish that has been soaked in a water and lye solution before cooking
lutein
noun Date: 1869 an orange xanthophyll C40H56O2 occurring in plants, animal fat, egg yolk, and the corpus luteum
luteinization
noun Date: 1929 the process of forming corpora lutea • luteinize verb
luteinize
verb see luteinization
luteinizing hormone
noun Date: 1931 a hormone secreted by the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland that in the female stimulates ovulation and the development of corpora lutea and in the male the ...
luteinizing hormone-releasing factor
noun Date: 1964 gonadotropin-releasing hormone
luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone
noun Date: 1970 gonadotropin-releasing hormone
lutenist
or lutanist noun Etymology: Medieval Latin lutanista, from lutana lute, probably from Middle French lut lute Date: 1600 a lute player
luteo-
combining form see lute-
luteotrophic
adjective see luteotropic
luteotrophic hormone
noun see luteotropic hormone
luteotrophin
noun see luteotropin
luteotropic
or luteotrophic adjective Date: 1941 acting on the corpora lutea
luteotropic hormone
or luteotrophic hormone noun Date: 1949 prolactin
luteotropin
or luteotrophin noun Date: 1941 prolactin
luteous
adjective Etymology: Latin luteus yellow, from lutum, a plant (Reseda luteola) used for dyeing yellow Date: 1657 yellow tinged with green or brown
lutestring
noun Etymology: by folk etymology from Italian lustrino glossy fabric, from lustro luster Date: 1661 a plain glossy silk formerly much used for women's dresses and ribbons
Lutetia
geographical name — see Paris 2
lutetium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Lutetia, ancient name of Paris Date: 1907 a metallic element of the rare-earth group — see element table
Luther
biographical name Martin 1483-1546 German Reformation leader
Lutheran
I. noun Date: 1521 a member of a Lutheran church II. adjective Date: 1530 1. of or relating to religious doctrines (as justification by faith alone) developed by Martin ...
Lutheranism
noun see Lutheran II
luthier
noun Etymology: French, from luth lute (from Middle French lut) Date: 1879 one who makes stringed musical instruments (as violins or guitars)
Luthuli
biographical name Albert John 1898-1967 South African reformer
Luton
geographical name town SE central England in SE Bedfordshire population 167,300
Luttelton
biographical name see Littleton I
lutz
noun Etymology: probably irregular from Gustave Lussi died 1993 American (Swiss-born) figure skating coach Date: 1938 a backward figure-skating jump with a takeoff from the ...
Lützen
geographical name town E Germany in Saxony SW of Leipzig
Luwian
noun Etymology: Luwi, an ancient people of the southern coast of Asia Minor Date: 1924 an Anatolian language of the Indo-European language family — see Indo-European ...
lux
noun (plural lux or luxes) Etymology: Latin, light — more at light Date: 1889 a unit of illumination equal to the direct illumination on a surface that is everywhere one ...
luxation
noun Etymology: Late Latin luxation-, luxatio, from Latin luxare to dislocate, from luxus dislocated — more at lock Date: 1552 dislocation of an anatomical part (as a bone ...
luxe
adjective Etymology: French, from Latin luxus — more at luxury Date: 1888 luxurious, sumptuous • luxe noun
Luxembourg
or Luxemburg geographical name 1. province SE Belgium capital Arlon area 1706 square miles (4418 square kilometers), population 232,813 2. country W Europe between Belgium, ...
Luxembourger
noun see Luxembourg
Luxembourgian
adjective see Luxembourg
Luxemburg
biographical name Rosa 1870-1919 German socialist leader
Luxemburger
noun see Luxembourg
Luxemburgian
adjective see Luxembourg
Luxor
geographical name city S Egypt on the Nile on S part of site of ancient Thebes population 142,000
luxuriance
noun Date: 1654 the quality or state of being luxuriant
luxuriant
adjective Date: circa 1540 1. a. yielding abundantly ; fertile, fruitful b. characterized by abundant growth ; lush 2. abundantly and often extravagantly rich and ...
luxuriantly
adverb see luxuriant
luxuriate
intransitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin luxuriatus, past participle of luxuriare, from luxuria Date: 1604 1. a. to grow profusely ; thrive b. to develop ...
luxurious
adjective Date: 14th century 1. lecherous 2. marked by or given to self-indulgence 3. of, relating to, or marked by luxury 4. of the finest and richest kind ...
luxuriously
adverb see luxurious
luxuriousness
noun see luxurious
luxury
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English luxurie, from Anglo-French luxorie, from Latin luxuria rankness, luxury, excess; akin to Latin luxus luxury, excess Date: 14th ...
luxury box
noun Date: 1980 skybox
Luzern
geographical name see Lucerne
Luzon
geographical name island N Philippines chief island of the group area 41,765 square miles (108,171 square kilometers), population 23,900,796
lv
abbreviation leave
LVT
abbreviation landing vehicle, tracked
LW
abbreviation low water
lwei
noun (plural lwei; also lweis) Etymology: probably from Lwei (Lué), name of several rivers in Angola Date: circa 1977 — see kwanza at money table
LWM
abbreviation low-water mark
Lwów
geographical name see L'viv
LWV
abbreviation League of Women Voters
lx
abbreviation lux
ly-
or lyo- combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek lyein to loosen, dissolve — more at lose 1. degrading ; reduction 2. dispersed state ; ...
Lyallpur
geographical name — see Faisalabad
lyam-hound
or lyme-hound noun Etymology: obsolete lyam leash Date: 1527 archaic bloodhound
lyart
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French liart Date: 14th century chiefly Scottish streaked with gray ; gray
lyase
noun Date: 1961 an enzyme (as a decarboxylase) that forms double bonds by removing groups from a substrate other than by hydrolysis or that adds groups to double bonds
Lyautey
biographical name Louis-Hubert-Gonzalve 1854-1934 French soldier & colonial administrator
Lycabettus
or Greek Lykabettos geographical name mountain 909 feet (277 meters) in NE part of Athens, Greece
lycanthropic
adjective see lycanthropy
lycanthropy
noun Etymology: New Latin lycanthropia, from Greek lykanthrōpia, from lykanthrōpos werewolf, from lykos wolf + anthrōpos human being — more at wolf Date: 1594 1. a ...
Lycaonia
geographical name ancient region & Roman province SE central Asia Minor N of Cilicia
lycée
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, lyceum, from Latin Lyceum Date: 1865 a French public secondary school that prepares students for the university
lyceum
noun Etymology: Latin Lyceum, gymnasium near Athens where Aristotle taught, from Greek Lykeion, from neuter of lykeios, epithet of Apollo Date: 1786 1. a hall for public ...
lych-gate
also lich-gate noun Etymology: Middle English lycheyate, from lich body, corpse (from Old English līc) + gate, yate gate Date: 15th century a roofed gate in a churchyard ...
lychee
or litchi; also lichee noun Etymology: Chinese (Beijing) lìzhī Date: 1588 1. the oval fruit of a Chinese tree (Litchi chinensis) of the soapberry family having a hard scaly ...
lychee nut
noun see lychee
lychnis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, a red flower, from Greek; akin to Greek lychnos lamp, Latin lux light — more at light Date: 1601 any of a genus (Lychnis) of ...
Lycia
geographical name ancient region & Roman province SW Asia Minor on coast SE of Caria
Lycian
noun Date: 1583 1. a native or inhabitant of Lycia 2. an Anatolian language of the Indo-European language family — see Indo-European languages table • Lycian adjective
lycopene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary lycop- (from New Latin Lycopersicon, genus of herbs) + -ene Date: circa 1929 a carotenoid pigment C40H56 that is the red ...
lycopod
noun Etymology: New Latin Lycopodium Date: 1861 lycopodium 1; broadly club moss
lycopodium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek lykos wolf + podion, diminutive of pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: circa 1706 1. any of a large genus (Lycopodium) of erect or ...
Lycra
trademark — used for a spandex synthetic fiber
Lycurgus
biographical name 9th century B.C. Spartan lawgiver
lyddite
noun Etymology: Lydd, England Date: 1888 a high explosive composed chiefly of picric acid
Lydgate
biographical name John circa 1370-circa 1450 English poet
Lydia
geographical name ancient country W Asia Minor bordering on the Aegean capital Sardis
Lydian
noun Date: 15th century 1. a native or inhabitant of Lydia 2. an Anatolian language of the Indo-European language family — see Indo-European languages table • Lydian ...
lye
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English lēag; akin to Old High German louga lye, Latin lavare, lavere to wash, Greek louein Date: before 12th century 1. a strong ...
Lyell
biographical name Sir Charles 1797-1875 British geologist
lygus bug
noun Etymology: New Latin Lygus Date: 1936 any of various small sucking bugs (genus Lygus) including some pests of cultivated plants
lying
I. present part of lie II. adjective Etymology: Middle English leghynge, present participle of lien to lie Date: 14th century marked by or containing falsehoods ; false
lying-in
noun (plural lyings-in or lying-ins) Date: 15th century the state attending and consequent to childbirth ; confinement
Lykabettos
geographical name see Lycabettus
Lyly
biographical name John 1554?-1606 English author
Lyme
noun see Lyme disease
Lyme disease
noun Etymology: Lyme, Connecticut, where it was first reported Date: 1979 an acute inflammatory disease that is caused by a spirochete (Borrelia burgdorferi) transmitted by ...
lyme-hound
noun see lyam-hound
lymph
noun Etymology: Latin lympha, water goddess, water, perhaps modification of Greek nymphē nymph — more at nuptial Date: circa 1673 1. archaic the sap of plants 2. [New ...
lymph gland
noun Date: circa 1858 lymph node
lymph node
noun Date: 1892 any of the rounded masses of lymphoid tissue that are surrounded by a capsule of connective tissue, are distributed along the lymphatic vessels, and contain ...
lymph system
noun see lymphatic system
lymph vessel
noun see lymphatic II
lymph-
or lympho- combining form Etymology: New Latin lympha lymph ; lymphatic tissue
lymphadenitis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from lymphaden lymph gland, from lymph- + Greek adēn gland — more at aden- Date: 1860 inflammation of lymph nodes
lymphadenopathy
noun (plural -thies) Date: 1920 abnormal enlargement of the lymph nodes
lymphangiogram
noun see lymphangiography
lymphangiographic
adjective see lymphangiography
lymphangiography
noun Date: circa 1941 X-ray depiction of lymph vessels and nodes after use of a radiopaque material — called also lymphography • lymphangiogram noun • ...
lymphatic
I. adjective Date: 1649 1. a. of, relating to, or produced by lymph, lymphoid tissue, or lymphocytes b. conveying lymph 2. lacking physical or mental energy ; ...
lymphatic leukemia
noun see lymphocytic leukemia
lymphatic system
noun Date: 1830 the part of the circulatory system that is concerned especially with scavenging fluids and proteins which have escaped from cells and tissues and returning ...
lymphatically
adverb see lymphatic I
lymphedema
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1889 edema due to faulty lymphatic drainage
lympho-
combining form see lymph-
lymphoblast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 a lymphocyte that has enlarged following stimulation by an antigen, has the capacity to recognize the ...
lymphoblastic
adjective see lymphoblast
lymphocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1890 any of the colorless weakly motile cells originating from stem cells and differentiating in lymphoid tissue ...
lymphocytic
adjective see lymphocyte
lymphocytic choriomeningitis
noun Etymology: New Latin choriomeningitis cerebral meningitis, from chorio- of a membrane resembling the chorion Date: 1934 an acute disease that is caused by an arenavirus ...
lymphocytic leukemia
noun Date: 1956 leukemia of either of two types marked by an abnormal increase in the number of white blood cells (as lymphocytes) which accumulate especially in bone marrow, ...
lymphocytosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from International Scientific Vocabulary lymphocyte Date: 1896 an increase in the number of lymphocytes in the blood usually associated with ...
lymphogram
noun see lymphography
lymphogranuloma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1924 lymphogranuloma venereum
lymphogranuloma inguinale
noun Etymology: New Latin, inguinal lymphogranuloma Date: 1932 lymphogranuloma venereum
lymphogranuloma venereum
noun Etymology: New Latin, venereal lymphogranuloma Date: 1938 a contagious venereal disease caused by various strains of a chlamydia (Chlamydia trachomatis) that is marked ...
lymphogranulomatosis
noun (plural lymphogranulomatoses) Etymology: New Latin lymphogranulomat-, lymphogranuloma + -osis Date: 1911 the development of benign or malignant nodular swellings of ...
lymphographic
adjective see lymphography
lymphography
noun Date: circa 1935 lymphangiography • lymphogram noun • lymphographic adjective
lymphoid
adjective Date: 1867 1. of, relating to, or being tissue (as of the lymph nodes or thymus) containing lymphocytes 2. of, relating to, or resembling lymph
lymphokine
noun Etymology: lymph- + -kine, from Greek kinein to move about — more at -kinesis Date: 1969 any of various substances (as interleukin-2) of low molecular weight that are ...
lymphoma
noun (plural -mas; also lymphomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1873 a usually malignant tumor of lymphoid tissue • lymphomatous adjective
lymphomatosis
noun (plural lymphomatoses) Etymology: New Latin lymphomat-, lymphoma + -osis Date: circa 1900 the presence of multiple lymphomas in the body
lymphomatous
adjective see lymphoma
lymphosarcoma
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1874 a malignant lymphoma that tends to metastasize freely
lynch
transitive verb Etymology: lynch law Date: 1836 to put to death (as by hanging) by mob action without legal sanction • lyncher noun
lynch law
noun Etymology: William Lynch died 1820 American vigilante Date: 1811 the punishment of presumed crimes or offenses usually by death without due process of law
Lynchburg
geographical name city S central Virginia on James River population 65,269
lyncher
noun see lynch
lynchpin
variant of linchpin
Lynd
biographical name Robert Staughton 1892-1970 & his wife Helen née Merrell 1896-1982 American sociologists
Lynn
geographical name 1. city NE Massachusetts NE of Boston population 89,050 2. (or Lynn Regis) — see King's Lynn
Lynn Canal
geographical name narrow inlet of the Pacific 80 miles (129 kilometers) long SE Alaska extending N from Juneau
Lynn Regis
I. geographical name see King's Lynn II. geographical name see Lynn 2
Lynnwood
geographical name city W Washington N of Seattle population 33,847
Lynwood
geographical name city SW California S of Los Angeles population 69,845
lynx
noun (plural lynx or lynxes) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek; akin to Old English lox lynx and probably to Greek leukos white — more at light Date: 14th ...
lynx-eyed
adjective Date: 1597 sharp-sighted
lyo-
— see ly-
Lyon
I. biographical name Mary 1797-1849 American educator II. geographical name or Lyons or ancient Lugdunum city SE central France at confluence of the Saône & the Rhône ...
Lyonais
geographical name see Lyonnais

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