Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

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micrograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1869 a graphic reproduction of the image of an object formed by a microscope • micrograph transitive verb
micrographic
adjective see micrographics
micrographically
adverb see micrographics
micrographics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1968 the industry concerned with the manufacture and sale of graphic material in microform; also the production of such ...
microgravity
noun Date: 1974 a condition in space in which only minuscule forces are experienced ; virtual absence of gravity; broadly a condition of weightlessness
microgroove
noun Date: 1948 a narrow continuous V-shaped spiral track that has closely spaced turns and that is used on long-playing records
microhabitat
noun Date: 1931 the microenvironment in which an organism lives
microimage
noun Date: 1950 an image (as on a microfilm) that is greatly reduced in size
microinch
noun Date: 1941 one millionth of an inch
microinject
transitive verb see microinjection
microinjection
noun Date: 1921 injection under the microscope; specifically injection by means of a micropipette into a tissue or a single cell • microinject transitive verb
microinstruction
noun Date: 1959 a computer instruction that activates the circuits necessary to perform a single machine operation usually as part of the execution of a machine-language ...
microlepidoptera
noun plural Etymology: New Latin Date: 1852 lepidopterous insects (as tortricids) that belong to families of minute or medium-sized moths • microlepidopterous adjective
microlepidopterous
adjective see microlepidoptera
microliter
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1890 a unit of capacity equal to one millionth of a liter — see metric system table
microlith
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1908 a tiny blade tool especially of the Mesolithic usually in a geometric shape (as that of a triangle) and often ...
microlithic
adjective see microlith
micromanage
verb Date: 1976 transitive verb to manage especially with excessive control or attention to details intransitive verb to direct or conduct the activities of a group or ...
micromanagement
noun see micromanage
micromanager
noun see micromanage
micromanipulation
noun Date: 1921 the technique or practice of manipulating cells or tissues (as by microdissection or microinjection)
micromanipulator
noun Date: 1921 an instrument for micromanipulation
micromere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 a small blastomere — see blastula illustration
micrometeorite
noun Date: 1949 1. a meteorite so small that it can pass through the earth's atmosphere without becoming intensely heated 2. a very small particle in interplanetary space ...
micrometeoritic
adjective see micrometeorite
micrometeoroid
noun Date: 1961 micrometeorite 2
micrometeorological
adjective see micrometeorology
micrometeorologist
noun see micrometeorology
micrometeorology
noun Date: 1930 meteorology that deals with small-scale weather systems ranging up to several kilometers in diameter and confined to the lower troposphere • ...
micrometer
I. noun Etymology: French micromètre, from micr- + -mètre -meter Date: 1670 1. an instrument used with a telescope or microscope for measuring minute distances 2. a ...
micromethod
noun Date: 1919 a method (as of microanalysis) that requires only very small quantities of material or that involves the use of the microscope
micromini
noun Date: 1966 a very short miniskirt
microminiature
adjective Date: 1958 1. microminiaturized 2. suitable for use with microminiaturized parts
microminiaturization
noun Date: 1955 the process of producing microminiaturized things
microminiaturized
adjective Date: 1959 reduced to or produced in a very small size and especially in a size smaller than one considered miniature
micromolar
adjective see micromole
micromole
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1936 one millionth of a mole • micromolar adjective
micromorphological
adjective see micromorphology
micromorphology
noun Date: 1879 microstructure • micromorphological adjective
micron
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek mikron, neuter of mikros small — more at micr- Date: 1885 micrometer II
Micronesia
geographical name the islands of the W Pacific E of the Philippines & N of Melanesia including the Caroline, Kiribati, Mariana, & Marshall groups
Micronesia, Federated States of
geographical name islands W Pacific in the Carolines comprising Kosrae, Pohnpei, Chuuk, & Yap; part of former Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands; internally self-governing ...
Micronesian
noun Date: 1847 1. a native or inhabitant of Micronesia 2. a group of Austronesian languages spoken in the Micronesian islands • Micronesian adjective
micronize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Etymology: micron Date: 1940 to pulverize especially into particles a few micrometers in diameter
micronucleus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1887 a minute nucleus; specifically one that is primarily concerned with reproductive and genetic functions in most ciliated protozoans
micronutrient
noun Date: 1939 1. trace element 2. an organic compound (as a vitamin) essential in minute amounts to the growth and health of an animal
microorganism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1880 an organism (as a bacterium or protozoan) of microscopic or ultramicroscopic size
micropaleontologic
adjective see micropaleontology
micropaleontological
adjective see micropaleontology
micropaleontologist
noun see micropaleontology
micropaleontology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1883 the study of microscopic fossils • micropaleontological also micropaleontologic adjective • ...
microparticle
noun Date: 1929 a very small particle; especially one that is microscopic in size
microphage
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1887 a small phagocyte
microphone
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1878 an instrument whereby sound waves are caused to generate or modulate an electric current usually for the ...
microphonic
adjective see microphone
microphonics
noun plural Date: 1929 noises in a loudspeaker caused by mechanical shock or vibration of the electronic components
microphotograph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1858 1. a small photograph that is normally magnified for viewing 2. photomicrograph • microphotograph ...
microphotographer
noun see microphotograph
microphotographic
adjective see microphotograph
microphotography
noun see microphotograph
microphotometer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1899 an instrument for measuring the amount of light transmitted or reflected by small areas or for measuring the ...
microphotometric
adjective see microphotometer
microphotometrically
adverb see microphotometer
microphotometry
noun see microphotometer
microphyll
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1908 1. a leaf (as of a club moss) with single unbranched veins and no demonstrable gap around the leaf trace 2. ...
microphyllous
adjective see microphyll
microphysical
adjective see microphysics
microphysically
adverb see microphysics
microphysics
noun Date: 1885 the physics of molecules, atoms, and elementary particles • microphysical adjective • microphysically adverb
micropipet
noun see micropipette
micropipette
or micropipet noun Date: 1918 1. a pipette for the measurement of minute volumes 2. a small and extremely fine-pointed pipette used in making microinjections
microplankton
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 microscopic plankton
micropore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 a very fine pore • microporosity noun • microporous adjective
microporosity
noun see micropore
microporous
adjective see micropore
microprism
noun Date: 1962 a usually circular area on the focusing screen of a camera that is made up of tiny prisms and that causes the image in the viewfinder to blur if the subject ...
microprobe
noun Date: 1944 a device for microanalysis that operates by exciting radiation in a minute area of material so that the composition may be determined from the emission ...
microprocessor
noun Date: 1969 a computer processor contained on an integrated-circuit chip; also such a processor with memory and associated circuits
microprogram
noun Date: 1953 a routine composed of microinstructions used in microprogramming
microprogramming
noun Date: 1953 the use of routines stored in memory rather than specialized circuits to control a device (as a computer)
microprojection
noun see microprojector
microprojector
noun Date: 1921 a projector utilizing a compound microscope for projecting on a screen a greatly enlarged image of a microscopic object • microprojection noun
micropublisher
noun see micropublishing
micropublishing
noun Date: 1959 publishing in microform • micropublisher noun
micropulsation
noun Date: 1949 a pulsation having a short period
micropuncture
noun Date: 1948 an extremely small puncture (as of a nephron); also an act of making a micropuncture
micropylar
adjective see micropyle
micropyle
noun Etymology: French, from micr- + Greek pylē gate Date: 1821 1. a minute opening in the integument of an ovule of a seed plant 2. a differentiated area of surface in an ...
microquake
noun Date: 1967 microearthquake
microradiograph
noun see microradiography
microradiographic
adjective see microradiography
microradiography
noun Date: 1913 radiography in which an X-ray photograph is prepared showing minute internal structure • microradiograph noun • microradiographic adjective
microsatellite
noun Date: 1989 any of numerous short segments of DNA that are distributed throughout the genome, that consist of repeated sequences of usually two to five nucleotides, and ...
microscale
noun Date: 1929 a very small scale
microscope
noun Etymology: New Latin microscopium, from micr- + -scopium -scope Date: 1651 1. an optical instrument consisting of a lens or combination of lenses for making enlarged ...
microscopic
also microscopical adjective Date: circa 1672 1. resembling a microscope especially in perception 2. a. invisible or indistinguishable without the use of a microscope ...
microscopical
adjective see microscopic
microscopically
adverb see microscopic
microscopist
noun see microscopy
microscopy
noun Date: circa 1665 the use of or investigation with a microscope • microscopist noun
microsecond
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1906 one millionth of a second
microseism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary micr- + Greek seismos earthquake — more at seismic Date: 1887 a feeble rhythmically and persistently recurring earth ...
microseismic
adjective see microseism
microseismicity
noun see microseism
microsensor
noun Date: 1962 a miniature sensor
microsomal
adjective see microsome
microsome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1885 1. any of various minute cellular structures (as a ribosome) 2. a particle in a particulate fraction that is ...
microspectrophotometer
noun Date: 1949 a spectrophotometer adapted to the examination of light transmitted by a very small specimen (as a single biological cell) • microspectrophotometric ...
microspectrophotometric
adjective see microspectrophotometer
microspectrophotometry
noun see microspectrophotometer
microsphere
noun Date: 1894 a minute sphere • microspherical adjective
microspherical
adjective see microsphere
microsporangiate
adjective see microsporangium
microsporangium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1862 a sporangium that develops only microspores • microsporangiate adjective
microspore
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1847 any of the spores in heterosporous plants that give rise to male gametophytes and are generally smaller than ...
microsporocyte
noun Date: 1906 a microspore mother cell
microsporogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1904 the formation and maturation of microspores
microsporophyll
noun Date: 1888 a sporophyll that develops only microsporangia
microsporous
adjective see microspore
microstate
noun Date: 1962 a nation that is extremely small in area and population
microstructural
adjective see microstructure
microstructure
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1881 the microscopic structure of a material (as a mineral or a biological cell) • microstructural adjective
microsurgery
noun Date: 1926 minute dissection or manipulation (as by a micromanipulator or laser beam) of living structures or tissue • microsurgical adjective
microsurgical
adjective see microsurgery
microswitch
noun Date: 1940 a very small switch that is sensitive to minute motions and is used especially in automatic devices
microtechnic
noun see microtechnique
microtechnique
also microtechnic noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 any of various methods of handling and preparing material for microscopic observation and ...
microtechnology
noun Date: 1970 technology on a small or microscopic scale
microtiter
noun Date: 1961 a titer determined by microanalytical titration — usually used attributively
microtome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1856 an instrument for cutting sections (as of biological tissues) for microscopic examination
microtonal
adjective see microtone
microtonality
noun see microtone
microtonally
adverb see microtone
microtone
noun Date: 1920 a musical interval smaller than a halftone • microtonal adjective • microtonality noun • microtonally adverb
microtubular
adjective see microtubule
microtubule
noun Date: 1961 any of the minute tubules in eukaryotic cytoplasm that are composed of the protein tubulin and form an important component of the cytoskeleton, mitotic ...
microvascular
adjective Date: 1959 of, relating to, or constituting the part of the circulatory system made up of minute vessels (as venules or capillaries) that average less than 0.3 ...
microvasculature
noun see microvascular
microvillar
adjective see microvillus
microvillous
adjective see microvillus
microvillus
noun (plural microvilli) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1953 a microscopic projection of a tissue, cell, or cell organelle; especially any of the fingerlike outward projections ...
microvolt
noun Date: 1868 one millionth of a volt
microwatt
noun Date: circa 1909 one millionth of a watt
microwavable
adjective see microwave II
microwave
I. noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1931 1. a comparatively short electromagnetic wave; especially one between about one millimeter and one meter in wavelength 2. ...
microwave oven
noun Date: 1955 an oven in which food is cooked by the heat produced by the absorption of microwave energy by water molecules in the food
microwaveable
adjective see microwave II
microworld
noun Date: 1923 a small universe; specifically the natural universe observed at the microscopic or submicroscopic level
micturate
intransitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin micturire to desire to urinate, from meiere to urinate; akin to Old English mīgan to urinate, Greek omeichein Date: ...
micturition
noun see micturate
mid
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English midde; akin to Old High German mitti middle, Latin medius, Greek mesos Date: before 12th century 1. being the part in ...
mid-ocean ridge
noun Date: 1961 an elevated region with a central valley on an ocean floor at the boundary between two diverging tectonic plates where new crust forms from upwelling magma
mid-rise
adjective Date: 1967 being approximately 5 to 10 stories high
midair
noun Date: 1605 a point or region in the air not immediately adjacent to the ground
Midas
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 1584 a legendary Phrygian king who is given the power of turning everything he touches to gold
Midas touch
noun Date: 1813 an uncanny ability for making money in every venture
midbrain
noun Date: 1864 the middle of the three primary divisions of the developing vertebrate brain or the corresponding part of the adult brain between the forebrain and hindbrain ...
midcourse
adjective Date: circa 1956 being or occurring in the middle part of a course (as of a spacecraft)
midday
noun Usage: often attributive Date: before 12th century the middle of the day
Middelburg
geographical name city SW Netherlands capital of Zeeland population 39,828
midden
noun Etymology: Middle English midding, Old Norse *mykdyngja, from myki dung + dyngja manure pile — more at dung Date: 14th century 1. dunghill 2. a. a refuse heap; ...
middle
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English middel, from Old English; akin to Old English midde Date: before 12th century 1. equally distant from the extremes ; medial, central ...
middle age
noun Date: 14th century the period of life from about 45 to about 64 • middle-aged adjective • middle-ager noun
Middle Ages
noun plural Date: 1616 the period of European history from about A.D. 500 to about 1500
Middle America
noun Date: 1841 1. the region of the western hemisphere including Mexico, Central America, often the West Indies, and sometimes Colombia and Venezuela 2. the midwestern ...
Middle American
noun see Middle America
middle C
noun Date: 1660 the note designated by the first ledger line below the treble staff and the first above the bass staff
middle class
noun Date: 1756 a class occupying a position between the upper class and the lower class; especially a fluid heterogeneous socioeconomic grouping composed principally of ...
Middle Congo
geographical name former French territory W central Africa — see Congo 3, French Equatorial Africa
middle distance
noun Date: 1803 1. a part of a pictorial representation or scene between the foreground and the background 2. any footrace distance usually from 800 to 1500 meters or from ...
Middle Dutch
noun Date: 1870 the Dutch language in use from about 1100 to about 1500 — see Indo-European languages table
middle ear
noun Date: 1808 a small membrane-lined cavity that is separated from the outer ear by the eardrum and that transmits sound waves from the eardrum to the partition between the ...
Middle East
geographical name the countries of SW Asia & N Africa — usually considered to include the countries extending from Libya on the W to Afghanistan on the E • Middle ...
Middle Eastern
adjective see Middle East
Middle Easterner
noun see Middle East
Middle English
noun Date: 1830 the English in use from the 12th to 15th centuries — see Indo-European languages table
middle finger
noun Date: before 12th century the midmost of the five digits of the hand
Middle French
noun Date: 1889 the French in use from the 14th to 16th centuries — see Indo-European languages table
middle game
noun Date: 1894 the middle phase of a board game; specifically the part of a chess game after the pieces have been developed when players attempt to gain and exploit ...
Middle Greek
noun Date: 1889 the Greek language used in the 7th to 15th centuries
middle ground
noun Date: 1801 1. a standpoint or area midway between extreme or opposing positions, options, or objectives 2. middle distance 1
Middle High German
noun Date: 1851 the High German in use from about 1100 to 1500 — see Indo-European languages table
Middle Irish
noun Date: 1952 the Irish in use between the 10th and 13th centuries — see Indo-European languages table
middle lamella
noun Date: circa 1886 a layer of pectinaceous intercellular material lying between the walls of adjacent plant cells — see cell illustration
Middle Low German
noun Date: circa 1889 the Low German in use from about 1100 to 1500 — see Indo-European languages table
middle management
noun Date: 1941 management personnel intermediate between operational supervisors and policy-making administrators • middle manager noun
middle manager
noun see middle management
middle name
noun Date: 1835 1. a name between one's first name and surname 2. a term that is particularly apt to denote a person's qualities or affinities
middle of nowhere
phrasal an extremely remote and isolated place
middle of the road
Date: 1891 a course of action or a standpoint midway between extremes
Middle Passage
noun Date: 1788 the forced voyage of enslaved Africans across the Atlantic Ocean to the Americas
Middle Persian
noun Date: 1890 any of the varieties of Persian in use from about 200 B.C. to about A.D. 1000
middle school
noun Date: 1945 a school usually including grades five to eight or six to eight • middle schooler noun
middle schooler
noun see middle school
Middle Scots
noun Date: 1902 the Scots language in use between the latter half of the 15th and the early decades of the 17th centuries
middle term
noun Date: 1605 the term of a syllogism that occurs in both premises
Middle Welsh
noun Date: circa 1922 the Welsh in use from about 1150 to 1500 — see Indo-European languages table
Middle West
geographical name see Midwest
Middle Western
adjective see Midwest
Middle Westerner
noun see Midwest
middle-aged
adjective see middle age
middle-ager
noun see middle age
middle-American
adjective see Middle America
middle-class
adjective Date: 1836 of or relating to the middle class; especially characterized by a high material standard of living, sexual morality, and respect for property • ...
middle-classness
noun see middle-class
middle-of-the-road
adjective Date: 1894 standing for or following a course of action midway between extremes; especially being neither liberal nor conservative in politics • ...
middle-of-the-roader
noun see middle-of-the-road
middle-of-the-roadism
noun see middle-of-the-road
middlebrow
noun Date: 1925 a person who is moderately but not highly cultivated • middlebrow adjective
middleman
noun Date: 1677 an intermediary or agent between two parties; especially a dealer, agent, or company intermediate between the producer of goods and the retailer or consumer
middler
noun Date: 1882 one belonging to an intermediate group, division, or class: as a. a student in the second-year class of a three-year program (as at a seminary or law ...
Middlesbrough
geographical name town N England on Tees River population 141,100
Middlesex
geographical name former county SE England, now absorbed in Greater London
Middleton
biographical name Thomas 1570?-1627 English dramatist
Middletown
geographical name 1. city central Connecticut S of Hartford population 43,167 2. city SE New York population 25,388 3. city SW Ohio SW of Dayton population 51,605 4. town ...
middleweight
noun Date: 1889 one of average weight; specifically a boxer in a weight division having a maximum limit of 160 pounds for professionals and 165 pounds for amateurs — ...
middling
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. of middle, medium, or moderate size, degree, or quality 2. mediocre, second-rate 3. of, relating to, or being a middle class • ...
middlingly
adverb see middling I
middorsal
adjective Date: 1879 of, relating to, or situated in the middle part or median line of the back
middy
noun (plural middies) Etymology: by shortening & alteration Date: 1818 1. midshipman 2. a loosely fitting blouse with a sailor collar worn by women and children
Mideastern
adjective see Middle East
midfield
noun Date: 15th century 1. the middle portion of a field; especially the portion of a playing field (as in football) that is midway between goals 2. the players on a team ...
midfielder
noun Date: 1938 a member of a midfield
Midgard
noun Etymology: Old Norse mithgarthr Date: 1841 the abode of human beings in Norse mythology
midge
noun Etymology: Middle English migge, from Old English mycg; akin to Old High German mucka midge, Greek myia fly, Latin musca Date: before 12th century a tiny dipteran fly ...
midget
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: midge Date: 1816 1. something (as an animal) much smaller than usual 2. sometimes offensive a very small person; specifically a ...
midgut
noun Date: 1875 the middle part of an alimentary canal
midi
noun Etymology: 1mid + -i (as in mini) Date: 1967 a dress, skirt, or coat that usually extends to the mid-calf
MIDI
noun Etymology: musical instrument digital interface Date: 1983 an electronic standard used for the transmission of digitally encoded music
Midi
geographical name the south of France
midi
noun Etymology: 1mid + -i (as in mini) Date: 1967 a dress, skirt, or coat that usually extends to the mid-calf
MIDI
noun Etymology: musical instrument digital interface Date: 1983 an electronic standard used for the transmission of digitally encoded music
Midi
geographical name the south of France
Midian
geographical name ancient region NW Arabia E of Gulf of Aqaba
Midianite
noun Etymology: Midian, son of Abraham Date: 1560 a member of an ancient northern Arabian people
midland
noun Date: 1555 1. the interior or central region of a country 2. capitalized a. the dialect of English spoken in the midland counties of England b. the dialect of ...
Midland
geographical name 1. city central Michigan NW of Saginaw population 41,685 2. city W Texas NE of Odessa population 94,996
Midlander
noun see midland
Midlands
geographical name the central counties of England — usually considered to comprise Bedfordshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Derbyshire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, ...
midlatitude
adjective see midlatitudes
midlatitudes
noun plural Date: 1872 latitudes of the temperate zones or from about 30 to 60 degrees north or south of the equator • midlatitude adjective
midlife
noun Date: 1807 middle age • midlife adjective
midlife crisis
noun Date: 1965 a period of emotional turmoil in middle age characterized especially by a strong desire for change
midline
noun Date: circa 1859 a median line; especially the median line or median plane of the body or some part of the body
Midlothian
geographical name administrative area of SE Scotland area 137 square miles (356 square kilometers)
midmost
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. being in or near the exact middle 2. most intimate ; innermost • midmost adverb or noun
Midn
abbreviation midshipman
midnight
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the middle of the night; specifically 12 o'clock at night 2. deep or extended darkness or gloom • midnight adjective • midnightly ...
midnight blue
noun Date: 1810 a deep blackish blue
midnight sun
noun Date: 1787 the sun above the horizon at midnight in the arctic or antarctic summer
midnightly
adverb or adjective see midnight
midpoint
noun Date: 14th century a point at or near the center or middle
midrash
noun (plural midrashim) Etymology: Hebrew midhrāsh exposition, explanation Date: 1613 1. a haggadic or halakic exposition of the underlying significance of a Bible text 2. ...
midrashic
adjective see midrash
midrib
noun Date: circa 1793 the central vein of a leaf
midriff
noun Etymology: Middle English midrif, from Old English midhrif, from midde mid + hrif belly; akin to Old High German href womb, and probably to Latin corpus body Date: before ...
midsagittal
adjective Date: 1898 median and sagittal
midsection
noun Date: 1890 a section midway between the extremes; especially midriff 2
midshipman
noun Date: 1662 a person in training for a naval commission; especially a student in a naval academy
midships
adverb Date: 1779 amidships
midsize
also midsized adjective Date: 1967 of intermediate size
midsized
adjective see midsize
midsole
noun Date: 1926 a layer (as of leather or rubber) between the insole and the outsole of a shoe
midst
noun Etymology: Middle English middest, alteration of middes, short for amiddes amid Date: 15th century 1. the interior or central part or point ; middle 2. a position of ...
midstream
noun Date: 1670 1. the middle of a stream 2. an intermediate stage in an act or process

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