Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

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Muskingum
geographical name river 120 miles (193 kilometers) E Ohio flowing SSE into Ohio River
muskmelon
noun Date: 1573 a usually sweet edible melon that is the fruit of an annual trailing or climbing Asian vine (Cucumis melo) of the gourd family: as a. any of various melons ...
Muskogean
or Muskhogean noun Date: 1891 a language family of southeastern United States that includes Muskogee
Muskogee
I. noun (plural Muskogee or Muskogees) Etymology: Creek ma•skó•ki, maskó•ki, a self-designation Date: 1775 1. a member of an American Indian people of Georgia and ...
Muskoka, Lake
geographical name lake Canada in SE Ontario E of Georgian Bay & N of Lake Simcoe area 54 square miles (140 square kilometers)
muskrat
noun (plural muskrat or muskrats) Etymology: probably by folk etymology from a word of Algonquian origin; akin to Massachusett musquash muskrat Date: 1607 an aquatic rodent ...
musky
adjective (muskier; -est) Date: 1613 having an odor of or resembling musk • muskiness noun
Muslim
noun Etymology: Arabic muslim, literally, one who submits (to God) Date: circa 1615 1. an adherent of Islam 2. Black Muslim • Muslim adjective
Muslim era
noun Date: 1948 Islamic era
muslin
noun Etymology: French mousseline, from Italian mussolina, from Arabic mawṣilī of Mosul, from al-Mawṣil Mosul, Iraq Date: 1609 a plain-woven sheer to coarse cotton fabric
musquash
noun Etymology: Massachusett Date: 1633 muskrat
muss
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1591 1. obsolete a. a game in which players scramble for small objects thrown to the ground b. scramble 2. slang a confused ...
Mussalman
noun see Mussulman
mussel
noun Etymology: Middle English muscle, from Old English muscelle, from Vulgar Latin *muscula, from Latin musculus muscle, mussel Date: before 12th century 1. a marine bivalve ...
Musselshell
geographical name river 300 miles (483 kilometers) central Montana flowing E & N into Missouri River
Musset
biographical name (Louis-Charles-) Alfred de 1810-1857 French poet
mussily
adverb see mussy
mussiness
noun see mussy
Mussolini
biographical name Benito 1883-1945 Il Duce Italian Fascist premier (1922-43)
Mussorgsky
biographical name Modest Petrovich 1839-1881 Russian composer
Mussulman
also Mussalman noun (plural Mussulmen or Mussulmans) Etymology: Turkish müslüman & Persian musulmān, modification of Arabic muslim Date: circa 1583 Muslim
mussy
adjective (mussier; -est) Date: circa 1859 characterized by clutter or muss ; messy • mussily adverb • mussiness noun
must
I. verb (present & past all persons must) Etymology: Middle English moste, from Old English mōste, past indicative & subjunctive of mōtan to be allowed to, have to; akin to ...
must-have
noun Date: 1980 something that is essential to have or obtain • must-have adjective
must-see
noun Date: 1946 something (as a film) that must or should be seen • must-see adjective
mustache
also moustache noun Etymology: Middle French moustache, from Old Italian mustaccio, from Middle Greek moustaki, diminutive of Greek mystak-, mystax upper lip, mustache Date: ...
mustached
adjective see mustache
mustachio
also moustachio noun (plural -chios) Etymology: Spanish & Italian; Spanish mostacho, from Italian mustaccio, from Old Italian Date: 1588 mustache; especially a large ...
mustachioed
adjective see mustachio
Mustafa Kemal
biographical name — see ataturk
mustang
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish mestengo, from Spanish, stray, from mesteño strayed, from mesta annual roundup of cattle that disposed of strays, from Medieval Latin ...
mustard
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French mustarde, from must must, from Latin mustum Date: 13th century 1. a. a pungent yellow powder of the seeds of any of ...
mustard gas
noun Date: 1917 an irritant vesicant oily liquid C4H8Cl2S used especially as a chemical weapon
mustard plaster
noun Date: 1810 a counterirritant and rubefacient plaster containing powdered mustard
mustardy
adjective see mustard
muster
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mustre, from Anglo-French mostre, monstre, from mustrer Date: 14th century 1. a representative specimen ; sample 2. a. an act of ...
muster out
transitive verb Date: 1834 to discharge from service
muster roll
noun Date: 1605 inventory, roster; specifically a register of the officers and men in a military unit or ship's company
musth
also must noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu mast intoxicated, from Persian Date: 1878 a periodic state of the bull elephant characterized especially by aggressive behavior and ...
mustily
adverb see musty
mustiness
noun see musty
mustn't
Date: 1741 must not
musty
adjective (mustier; -est) Etymology: 4must Date: 1530 1. a. impaired by damp or mildew ; moldy b. tasting of mold c. smelling of damp and decay ; fusty 2. a. ...
mutability
noun see mutable
mutable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin mutabilis, from mutare to change; akin to Old English mīthan to conceal, Sanskrit mināti he exchanges, deceives Date: 14th ...
mutably
adverb see mutable
mutagen
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary mutation + -gen Date: 1933 an agent (as a chemical or various radiations) that tends to increase the frequency or extent ...
mutagenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1948 the occurrence or induction of mutation
mutagenic
adjective see mutagen
mutagenically
adverb see mutagen
mutagenicity
noun Date: 1956 the capacity to induce mutations
Mutankiang
geographical name see Mudanjiang
mutant
adjective Etymology: Latin mutant-, mutans, present participle of mutare Date: 1903 of, relating to, or produced by mutation • mutant noun
mutase
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary mut- (from Latin mutare) + -ase Date: 1938 any of various enzymes that catalyze molecular rearrangements and especially ...
mutate
verb (mutated; mutating) Etymology: Latin mutatus, past participle of mutare Date: 1818 intransitive verb to undergo mutation transitive verb to cause to undergo ...
mutation
noun Date: 14th century 1. a significant and basic alteration ; change 2. umlaut 3. a. a relatively permanent change in hereditary material involving either a physical ...
mutational
adjective see mutation
mutationally
adverb see mutation
mutatis mutandis
adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin Date: 15th century 1. with the necessary changes having been made 2. with the respective differences having been ...
mutative
adjective see mutate
mutato nomine de te fabula narratur
foreign term Etymology: Latin with the name changed the story applies to you
mutchkin
noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots) muchekyn Date: 15th century a Scottish unit of liquid capacity equal to 0.90 pint (0.42 liter)
mute
I. adjective (muter; mutest) Etymology: Middle English muet, mut, from Anglo-French, from mu, mute, from Latin mutus, probably from mu, representation of a muttered sound Date: ...
mute swan
noun Date: 1785 a common white swan (Cygnus olor) that produces no loud notes, is native to Europe and western Asia, and has been introduced into parts of the United States
muted
adjective Date: 1855 1. a. being mute ; silent b. toned down ; low-key, subdued 2. provided with or produced or modified by the use of a mute • mutedly adverb
mutedly
adverb see muted
mutely
adverb see mute I
muteness
noun see mute I
mutilate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin mutilatus, past participle of mutilare, from mutilus truncated, maimed Date: 1534 1. to cut up or alter radically so as to ...
mutilation
noun see mutilate
mutilator
noun see mutilate
Mutina
geographical name — see Modena
mutine
intransitive verb (mutined; mutining) Etymology: Middle French (se) mutiner Date: 1555 obsolete rebel, mutiny
mutineer
noun Date: 1604 one that mutinies
mutinous
adjective Date: 1578 1. a. disposed to or being in a state of mutiny ; rebellious b. turbulent, unruly 2. of, relating to, or constituting mutiny • mutinously ...
mutinously
adverb see mutinous
mutinousness
noun see mutinous
mutiny
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: mutine to rebel, from Middle French (se) mutiner, from mutin mutinous, from meute revolt, from Vulgar Latin *movita, from feminine of movitus, ...
mutism
noun Etymology: French mutisme, from Latin mutus mute Date: 1824 the condition of being mute
Mutsu Bay
geographical name inlet N Japan in NE Honshu on Tsugaru Strait
Mutsuhito
biographical name 1852-1912 Meiji emperor of Japan (1867-1912)
mutt
noun Etymology: short for muttonhead dull-witted person Date: 1899 1. a stupid or insignificant person ; fool 2. a mongrel dog ; cur
mutter
verb Etymology: Middle English muteren, of imitative origin Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to utter sounds or words indistinctly or with a low voice and with the ...
mutterer
noun see mutter
mutton
noun Etymology: Middle English motoun, mutton, sheep, from Anglo-French mutun ram, sheep, mutton, of Celtic origin; akin to Old Irish molt wether Date: 13th century the ...
mutton snapper
noun see muttonfish
muttonchop whiskers
noun plural see muttonchops
muttonchops
noun plural Date: 1865 side-whiskers that are narrow at the temple and broad and round by the lower jaws — called also muttonchop whiskers
muttonfish
noun Etymology: from its flavor Date: 1735 a common snapper (Lutjanus analis) of the warmer parts of the western Atlantic that is usually olive green and sometimes nearly ...
muttony
adjective see mutton
Muttra
geographical name — see Mathura
mutual
adjective Etymology: Middle French mutuel, from Latin mutuus lent, borrowed, mutual, from mutare to change — more at mutable Date: 15th century 1. a. directed by each ...
mutual fund
noun Date: 1934 an open-end investment company that invests money of its shareholders in a usually diversified group of securities of other corporations
mutualism
noun Date: 1849 1. the doctrine or practice of mutual dependence as the condition of individual and social welfare 2. mutually beneficial association between different ...
mutualist
noun see mutualism
mutualistic
adjective see mutualism
mutuality
noun Date: circa 1586 1. the quality or state of being mutual 2. a sharing of sentiments ; intimacy
mutualization
noun see mutualize
mutualize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1812 to make mutual • mutualization noun
mutually
adverb see mutual
mutually exclusive
adjective Date: 1874 being related such that each excludes or precludes the other ; also incompatible
mutuel
noun Date: 1908 pari-mutuel
muumuu
noun Etymology: Hawaiian mu'umu'u, from mu'umu'u cut off Date: 1923 a loose often long dress having bright colors and patterns and adapted from the dresses originally ...
Muzak
trademark — used for recorded background music
muzhik
also moujik or mujik noun Etymology: Russian Date: 1568 a Russian peasant
Muzorewa
biographical name Abel Tendekayi 1925- prime minister of Zimbabwe Rhodesia (1979-80)
Muztag
or Ulugh Muztagh geographical name mountain 25,340 feet (7724 meters) W China in S Xinjiang Uygur; highest in Kunlun Mountains
muzzily
adverb see muzzy
muzziness
noun see muzzy
muzzle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mosel, from Middle French musel, from Old French *mus mouth of an animal, from Medieval Latin musus Date: 15th century 1. the projecting ...
muzzler
noun see muzzle II
muzzy
adjective (muzzier; -est) Etymology: perhaps blend of muddled and fuzzy Date: circa 1728 1. a. deficient in brightness ; dull, gloomy b. lacking in clarity and ...
mv
or mV abbreviation millivolt
MV
abbreviation 1. main verb 2. mean variation 3. motor vessel
mV
abbreviation see mv
MVD
abbreviation Etymology: Russian Ministerstvo vnutrennikh del Ministry of Internal Affairs
MVP
abbreviation most valuable player
mW
abbreviation milliwatt
MW
abbreviation megawatt
MWe
abbreviation megawatts electric
Mweru
geographical name lake 76 miles (122 kilometers) long on border between Democratic Republic of the Congo & Zambia SW of Lake Tanganyika
MX
noun Etymology: missile, experimental Date: 1976 a mobile ICBM having up to 10 independently targeted nuclear warheads
my
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mīn, from mīn, suppletive genitive of ic I; akin to Old English mē me Date: 12th century 1. of or relating to me ...
my eye
phrasal — used to express mild disagreement or sometimes surprise
my word
interjection Date: 1841 — used to express surprise or astonishment
my-
or myo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from mys mouse, muscle — more at mouse muscle ; muscle and
mya
abbreviation million years ago
myalgia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1860 pain in one or more muscles • myalgic adjective
myalgic
adjective see myalgia
Myanmar
or formerly Burma geographical name country SE Asia on Bay of Bengal; a federal republic capital Yangon area 261,789 square miles (680,651 square kilometers), population ...
myasthenia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1856 muscular debility; also myasthenia gravis • myasthenic adjective or noun
myasthenia gravis
noun Etymology: New Latin, literally, grave myasthenia Date: 1900 a disease characterized by progressive weakness and exhaustibility of voluntary muscles without atrophy or ...
myasthenic
adjective or noun see myasthenia
myc-
or myco- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek mykēt-, mykēs fungus; akin to Greek myxa nasal mucus fungus
Mycale
geographical name promontory W Turkey opposite Samos Island
mycelial
adjective see mycelium
mycelium
noun (plural mycelia) Etymology: New Latin, from myc- + Greek hēlos nail, wart, callus Date: 1836 the mass of interwoven filamentous hyphae that forms especially the ...
Mycenae
geographical name ancient city S Greece in NE Peloponnese
Mycenaean
also Mycenian adjective Date: 1598 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of Mycenae, its people, or the period (1400 to 1100 B.C.) of Mycenae's political ascendancy 2. ...
Mycenian
adjective see Mycenaean
mycetoma
noun (plural -mas; also mycetomata) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek mykēt-, mykēs Date: 1863 a condition marked by invasion of the deep subcutaneous tissues with fungi or ...
mycetomatous
adjective see mycetoma
mycetozoan
noun Etymology: New Latin Mycetozoa, order of protozoans, from Greek mykēt-, mykēs + New Latin -zoa Date: 1881 slime mold • mycetozoan adjective
myco-
combining form see myc-
mycobacterial
adjective see mycobacterium
mycobacterium
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1909 any of a genus (Mycobacterium) of nonmotile aerobic acid-fast bacteria that include numerous saprophytes and the pathogens causing ...
mycoflora
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1945 the fungi characteristic of a region or special environment
mycol
abbreviation mycology
mycological
adjective see mycology
mycologically
adverb see mycology
mycologist
noun see mycology
mycology
noun Etymology: New Latin mycologia, from myc- + Latin -logia -logy Date: 1836 1. a branch of biology dealing with fungi 2. fungal life • mycological adjective • ...
mycophagist
noun Etymology: mycophagy, from myc- + -phagy Date: 1861 one that eats fungi (as mushrooms) • mycophagy noun
mycophagous
adjective Date: circa 1909 feeding on fungi
mycophagy
noun see mycophagist
mycophile
noun Date: 1953 a devotee of mushrooms; especially one whose hobby is hunting wild edible mushrooms
mycoplasma
noun (plural -mas; also mycoplasmata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1955 any of a genus (Mycoplasma of the family Mycoplasmataceae) of pleomorphic gram-negative chiefly ...
mycoplasma-like organism
noun Date: 1968 phytoplasma
mycoplasmal
adjective see mycoplasma
mycorrhiza
noun (plural mycorrhizae; also -zas) Etymology: New Latin, from myc- + Greek rhiza root — more at root Date: 1895 the symbiotic association of the mycelium of a fungus ...
mycorrhizal
adjective see mycorrhiza
mycosis
noun (plural mycoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1876 infection with or disease caused by a fungus • mycotic adjective
mycotic
adjective see mycosis
mycotoxin
noun Date: 1962 a toxic substance produced by a fungus and especially a mold
mydriasis
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: circa 1775 excessive or prolonged dilatation of the pupil of the eye • mydriatic adjective or noun
mydriatic
adjective or noun see mydriasis
myel-
or myelo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from myelos, probably from myōn cluster of muscles, from mys mouse, muscle — more at mouse bone marrow ; spinal ...
myelencephalic
adjective see myelencephalon
myelencephalon
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1871 the posterior part of the developing vertebrate hindbrain or the corresponding part of the adult brain composed of the medulla oblongata ...
myelin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1873 a soft white somewhat fatty material that forms a thick myelin sheath about the protoplasmic core of a ...
myelin sheath
noun Date: 1896 a layer of myelin surrounding some nerve fibers — called also medullary sheath
myelinated
adjective Date: 1899 having a myelin sheath
myelinic
adjective see myelin
myelitis
noun (plural myelitides) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1835 inflammation of the spinal cord or of the bone marrow
myelo-
combining form see myel-
myeloblast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1904 a large mononuclear nongranular bone-marrow cell; especially one that is a precursor of a myelocyte • ...
myeloblastic
adjective see myeloblast
myelocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1891 a bone-marrow cell; especially a motile cell with cytoplasmic granules that gives rise to the granulocytes of ...
myelocytic
adjective see myelocyte
myelocytic leukemia
noun see myelogenous leukemia
myelofibrosis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1947 an anemic condition in which bone marrow becomes fibrotic and the liver and spleen usually exhibit a development of blood-cell ...
myelofibrotic
adjective see myelofibrosis
myelogenous
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1876 of, relating to, originating in, or produced by the bone marrow
myelogenous leukemia
noun Date: 1904 leukemia characterized by proliferation of myeloid tissue (as of the bone marrow and spleen) and an abnormal increase in the number of granulocytes, ...
myeloid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1857 of, relating to, or resembling bone marrow
myeloid leukemia
noun see myelogenous leukemia
myeloma
noun (plural -mas; also myelomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1857 a primary tumor of the bone marrow • myelomatous adjective
myelomatous
adjective see myeloma
myelopathic
adjective see myelopathy
myelopathy
noun (plural -thies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1891 a disease or disorder of the spinal cord or bone marrow • myelopathic adjective
myeloproliferative
adjective Date: 1951 of, relating to, or being a disorder (as leukemia) marked by excessive proliferation of bone marrow elements and especially blood cell precursors
myiasis
noun (plural myiases) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek myia fly — more at midge Date: 1837 infestation with fly maggots
Mykolayiv
or Nikolayev geographical name city & port S Ukraine
Mykonos
or Modern Greek Míkonos geographical name island Greece in the Aegean in NE Cyclades area 35 square miles (91 square kilometers)
Mylae
geographical name — see Milazzo
Mylar
trademark — used for a polyester film
Mymensingh
geographical name city N Bangladesh population 198,662
myna
noun see mynah
mynah
or myna noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu mainā hill mynah, from Sanskrit madana, a kind of bird Date: 1769 any of various Asian starlings (especially genera Acridotheres, ...
mynheer
noun Etymology: Dutch mijnheer, from mijn my + heer master, sir Date: 1652 a male Netherlander — used as a title equivalent to Mr.
myo-
— see my-
myoblast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1884 an undifferentiated cell capable of giving rise to muscle cells
myocardial
adjective see myocardium
myocardial infarction
noun Date: 1940 heart attack
myocarditis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1866 inflammation of the myocardium
myocardium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from my- + Greek kardia heart — more at heart Date: 1879 the middle muscular layer of the heart wall • myocardial adjective
myoclonic
adjective see myoclonus
myoclonus
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1883 irregular involuntary contraction of a muscle usually resulting from functional disorder of controlling motor neurons; also a condition ...
myoelectric
also myoelectrical adjective Date: circa 1919 of, relating to, or utilizing electricity generated by muscle
myoelectrical
adjective see myoelectric
myofibril
noun Etymology: New Latin myofibrilla, from my- + fibrilla fibril Date: 1898 any of the longitudinal parallel contractile elements of a muscle cell that are composed of ...
myofibrillar
adjective see myofibril
myofilament
noun Date: 1949 one of the individual filaments of actin or myosin that make up a myofibril
myogenic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1904 taking place or functioning in ordered rhythmic fashion because of the inherent properties of cardiac ...
myoglobin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1925 a red iron-containing protein pigment in muscles that is similar to hemoglobin
myoinositol
noun Date: 1951 a biologically active inositol that is a component of many phospholipids and occurs widely in plants, animals, and microorganisms
myology
noun Etymology: French or New Latin; French myologie, from New Latin myologia, from my- + Latin -logia -logy Date: 1649 the scientific study of muscles
myoma
noun (plural -mas; also myomata) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1875 a tumor consisting of muscle tissue • myomatous adjective
myomatous
adjective see myoma
myomectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 1886 surgical removal of a myoma or fibroid
myoneural
adjective Date: 1905 of, relating to, or connecting muscles and nerves
myopathic
adjective see myopathy
myopathy
noun (plural -thies) Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1849 a disorder of muscle tissue or muscles • myopathic adjective
myope
noun Etymology: French, from Late Latin myops myopic, from Greek myōps, from myein to be closed + ōps eye, face — more at eye Date: 1728 a myopic person
myopia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek myōpia, from myōp-, myōps Date: circa 1752 1. a condition in which the visual images come to a focus in front of the retina of the ...
myopic
adjective see myopia
myopically
adverb see myopia
myosin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary my- + 2-ose + 1-in Date: 1942 a fibrous globulin of muscle that can split ATP and that reacts with actin in muscle ...
myosis
variant of miosis
myositis
noun Etymology: New Latin, irregular from Greek mys muscle, mouse Date: circa 1819 soreness of voluntary muscle due to inflammation
myotic
variant of miotic
myotome
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1894 the portion of an embryonic somite from which skeletal musculature is produced
myotonia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1886 tonic spasm of one or more muscles; also a condition characterized by such spasms • myotonic adjective
myotonic
adjective see myotonia
myotonic dystrophy
noun Date: 1963 a muscular disorder that is characterized by dystrophic muscle weakness and myotonia affecting multiple bodily systems and that is caused by an abnormally ...
Myr
abbreviation million years
Myra
geographical name ancient city S Asia Minor on coast of Lycia
Myrdal
I. biographical name Alva 1902-1986 Swedish sociologist & diplomat II. biographical name (Karl) Gunnar 1898-1987 Swedish economist
myriad
I. noun Etymology: Greek myriad-, myrias, from myrioi countless, ten thousand Date: 1555 1. ten thousand 2. a great number Usage: Recent criticism of the use of ...
myriapod
also myriopod noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek myrioi + pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: 1826 any of a group (Myriapoda) of arthropods having the body made up of ...
myriopod
I. noun see myriapod II. adjective see myriapod
myristic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from New Latin Myristica, genus of trees Date: 1841 a crystalline fatty acid C14H28O2 occurring especially in the form of ...
myrmeco-
combining form Etymology: Greek myrmēko-, from myrmēk-, myrmēx — more at pismire ant
myrmecological
adjective see myrmecology
myrmecologist
noun see myrmecology
myrmecology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1902 the scientific study of ants • myrmecological adjective • myrmecologist noun
myrmecophile
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1898 an organism that habitually shares an ant nest
myrmecophilous
adjective Date: 1866 fond of, associated with, or benefited by ants
myrmidon
noun Etymology: Middle English Mirmydon, Latin Myrmidon-, Myrmido, from Greek Myrmidōn Date: 15th century 1. capitalized a member of a legendary Thessalian people who ...
Myron
biographical name flourished circa 480-440 B.C. Greek sculptor
myrrh
noun Etymology: Middle English myrre, from Old English, from Latin myrrha, from Greek, of Semitic origin; akin to Arabic murr myrrh Date: before 12th century a ...
myrtle
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English mirtille, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin myrtillus, from Latin myrtus, from Greek myrtos Date: 1562 1. a. ...
Myrtle Beach
geographical name city E South Carolina on the Atlantic population 22,759
Mys Dezhneva
geographical name see Dezhnev, Cape
myself
pronoun Date: before 12th century 1. that identical one that is I — used reflexively
Mysia
geographical name ancient country NW Asia Minor bordering on the Propontis • Mysian adjective or noun
Mysian
adjective or noun see Mysia
Mysore
geographical name 1. — see Karnataka 2. city S India in S Karnataka population 606,755
mystagogue
noun Etymology: Latin mystagogus, from Greek mystagōgos, from mystēs initiate (perhaps akin to Greek myein to be closed) + agein to lead — more at agent Date: circa 1550 ...
mystagogy
noun see mystagogue
mysterious
adjective Date: 1599 1. a. of, relating to, or constituting mystery b. exciting wonder, curiosity, or surprise while baffling efforts to comprehend or identify ; ...
mysteriously
adverb see mysterious
mysteriousness
noun see mysterious
mysterium tremendum
foreign term Etymology: Latin overwhelming mystery
mystery
I. noun (plural -teries) Etymology: Middle English mysterie, from Latin mysterium, from Greek mystērion, from mystēs initiate Date: 14th century 1. a. a religious truth ...

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