Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
blackening
noun Date: circa 1909 blacking
Blackett
biographical name Patrick Maynard Stuart 1897-1974 British physicist
blackface
noun Date: 1869 makeup applied to a performer playing a black person especially in a minstrel show; also a performer wearing such makeup
blackfish
noun Date: 1754 1. any of numerous dark-colored fishes: as a. tautog b. a small bony fish (Dallia pectoralis of the family Umbridae) of Alaska and Siberia that is used ...
blackfly
noun (plural -flies or -fly) Date: 1608 any of various small dark-colored insects; especially any of a family (Simuliidae and especially genus Simulium) of bloodsucking ...
Blackfoot
noun (plural Blackfeet or Blackfoot) Date: 1790 1. a member of an American Indian people of Montana, Alberta, and Saskatchewan 2. the Algonquian language of the Blackfeet
blackguard
I. noun Date: 1535 1. obsolete the kitchen servants of a household 2. a. a rude or unscrupulous person b. a person who uses foul or abusive language • ...
blackguardism
noun see blackguard I
blackguardly
adjective or adverb see blackguard I
blackhander
noun see black hand
blackhead
noun Date: circa 1837 1. a small plug of sebum blocking the duct of a sebaceous gland especially on the face 2. a destructive disease of turkeys and related birds caused by a ...
blackheart
noun Date: 1909 a plant disease in which the central tissues blacken
blacking
noun Date: 1571 a substance (as a paste or polish) that is applied to an object to make it black
blackish
adjective see black I
blackjack
I. noun Date: 1591 1. [black + jack (vessel)] a tankard for beer or ale usually of tar-coated leather 2. sphalerite 3. a hand weapon typically consisting of a piece of ...
blackjack oak
noun see blackjack I
blackland
noun Date: 1803 1. a heavy sticky black soil such as that covering large areas in Texas 2. plural a region of blackland
blacklead
noun Date: 1580 chiefly British graphite 1
blackleg
noun Date: circa 1722 1. a usually fatal toxemia especially of young cattle caused by a soil bacterium (Clostridium chauvoei) 2. a cheating gambler ; swindler 3. chiefly ...
blacklight trap
noun Date: 1961 a trap for insects that uses a form of black light perceptible to particular insects as an attractant
blacklist
I. noun Date: circa 1619 a list of persons who are disapproved of or are to be punished or boycotted II. transitive verb Date: 1718 to put on a blacklist • blacklister ...
blacklister
noun see blacklist II
blackly
adverb see black I
blackmail
noun Etymology: black + 1mail Date: 1552 1. a tribute anciently exacted on the Scottish border by plundering chiefs in exchange for immunity from pillage 2. a. extortion ...
blackmailer
noun see blackmail
Blackmore
biographical name Richard Doddridge 1825-1900 English novelist
Blackmun
biographical name Harry Andrew 1908-1999 American jurist
blackness
noun see black I
blackout
noun Date: 1913 1. a. a turning off of the stage lighting to separate scenes in a play or end a play or skit; also a skit that ends with a blackout b. a period of ...
blackpoll
noun Date: 1783 a North American warbler (Dendroica striata) with the male having a black cap when in breeding plumage
Blackpool
geographical name town NW England in Lancashire on Irish Sea population 144,500
Blacksburg
geographical name city W Virginia W of Roanoke population 39,573
Blackshirt
noun Date: 1922 a member of a fascist organization having a black shirt as a distinctive part of its uniform; especially a member of the Italian Fascist party
blacksmith
noun Etymology: from a distinction between black metal (iron) and white metal (tin) Date: 15th century a smith who forges iron • blacksmithing noun
blacksmithing
noun see blacksmith
blacksnake
noun Date: 1634 1. any of several snakes that are largely black or very dark in color: as a. a black racer (Coluber constrictor constrictor) b. a rat snake (Elaphe ...
Blackstone
biographical name Sir William 1723-1780 English jurist
blackstrap molasses
noun Etymology: blackstrap cheap wine, mixture of rum and molasses Date: 1880 a thick dark molasses obtained from successive processing of raw sugar
blacktail
noun Date: 1805 black-tailed deer
blackthorn
noun Date: 14th century a European spiny plum (Prunus spinosa) with hard wood and small white flowers
blacktop
noun Date: 1931 a bituminous material used especially for surfacing roads; also a surface paved with blacktop • blacktop transitive verb
Blackwall hitch
noun Etymology: Blackwall, shipyard in London, England Date: circa 1862 a hitch knot for securing a rope to a hook — see knot illustration
blackwater
noun Date: 1800 any of several diseases (as blackwater fever) characterized by dark-colored urine
blackwater fever
noun Date: 1884 a febrile complication of repeated malarial attacks that is characterized especially by extensive kidney damage and urine discolored by heme from blood
Blackwell
biographical name Elizabeth 1821-1910 American physician
blackwood
noun Date: 1631 any of several hardwood trees (as Acacia melanoxylon and Dalbergia latifolia of the legume family) or their dark-colored wood
Blackwood
biographical name William 1776-1834 Scottish publisher
bladder
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English blǣdre; akin to Old High German blātara bladder, Old English blāwan to blow Date: before 12th century 1. a. a membranous ...
bladder campion
noun Date: 1783 an Old World campion (Silene vulgaris syn. S. cucubalus) with an inflated calyx introduced into temperate North America
bladder worm
noun Date: 1858 a bladderlike larval tapeworm (as a cysticercus)
bladder wrack
noun Date: 1810 a common rockweed (Fucus vesiculosus) used in preparing kelp and as a manure
bladderlike
adjective see bladder
bladdernut
noun Date: 1578 any of a genus (Staphylea of the family Staphyleaceae, the bladdernut family) of ornamental shrubs or small trees with panicles of small white flowers followed ...
bladderwort
noun Date: circa 1815 any of a genus (Utricularia of the family Lentibulariaceae, the bladderwort family) of chiefly aquatic plants with leaves usually having insect-trapping ...
blade
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English blæd; akin to Old High German blat leaf, Latin folium, Greek phyllon, Old English blōwan to blossom — more at blow Date: ...
bladed
adjective Date: 1578 having blades — often used in combination
bladelike
adjective see blade I
blader
noun see blade II
blae
adjective Etymology: Middle English bla, blo, from Old Norse blār; akin to Old High German blāo blue — more at blue Date: 13th century chiefly Scottish dark blue or ...
blaeberry
noun Date: 15th century chiefly Scottish bilberry
Blaenau Gwent
geographical name administrative area of SE Wales area 42 square miles (109 square kilometers)
Blagoveshchensk
geographical name city Russia in Asia on the Amur population 214,000
blah
I. noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1918 1. (also blah-blah) silly or pretentious chatter or nonsense 2. plural [perhaps influenced in meaning by blasé] a feeling of ...
blah-blah
noun see blah I, 1
blain
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English blegen; akin to Middle Low German bleine blain, Old English blāwan to blow Date: before 12th century an inflammatory ...
Blaine
I. biographical name James Gillespie 1830-1893 American statesman II. geographical name city E Minnesota N of St. Paul population 44,942
Blainville
geographical name town Canada in S Quebec population 36,029
Blair
biographical name Tony 1953- Anthony Charles Lynton Blair British prime minister (1997- )
Blake
I. biographical name Eugene Carson 1906-1985 American clergyman II. biographical name Robert 1599-1657 English admiral III. biographical name William 1757-1827 English ...
Blakean
adjective see Blake III
blamable
adjective Date: 14th century deserving blame ; reprehensible Synonyms: see blameworthy • blamably adverb
blamably
adverb see blamable
blame
I. transitive verb (blamed; blaming) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French blamer, blasmer, from Late Latin blasphemare to blaspheme, from Greek blasphēmein Date: 13th ...
blameful
adjective Date: 14th century blamable • blamefully adverb
blamefully
adverb see blameful
blameless
adjective see blame II
blamelessly
adverb see blame II
blamelessness
noun see blame II
blamer
noun see blame I
blameworthiness
noun see blameworthy
blameworthy
adjective Date: 14th century being at fault ; deserving blame • blameworthiness noun Synonyms: blameworthy, blamable, guilty, culpable mean deserving reproach or ...
Blanc
biographical name Melvin Jerome 1908-1989 Mel American actor
blanc de chine
noun Usage: often capitalized C Etymology: French, literally, white of China Date: 1888 white Chinese porcelain usually used for making figurines
Blanc, Cape
geographical name 1. cape N Tunisia; northernmost point of Africa, at 37°14′N 2. promontory NW Africa on the Atlantic in Mauritania at SW tip of Río de Oro
Blanc, Mont
geographical name — see Mont Blanc
Blanca Peak
geographical name mountain 14,345 feet (4372 meters) S Colorado; highest in Sangre de Cristo Mountains
blanch
verb Etymology: Middle English blaunchen, from Anglo-French blanchir, from blanc, adjective, white — more at blank Date: 15th century transitive verb to take the color out ...
blancher
noun see blanch
blancmange
noun Etymology: Middle English blancmanger, from Anglo-French *blanc manger, literally, white food Date: 14th century a usually sweetened and flavored dessert made from ...
Blanco, Cape
geographical name cape SW Oregon
bland
adjective Etymology: Latin blandus Date: 1565 1. a. smooth and soothing in manner or quality b. exhibiting no personal concern or embarrassment ; unperturbed 2. ...
blandish
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French blandiss-, stem of blandir, from Latin blandiri, from blandus mild, flattering Date: 14th century transitive verb to coax ...
blandisher
noun see blandish
blandishment
noun Date: circa 1553 something that tends to coax or cajole ; allurement — often used in plural
blandly
adverb see bland
blandness
noun see bland
blank
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French blanc colorless, white, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German blanch white; probably akin to Latin flagrare to ...
blank check
noun Date: 1866 1. complete freedom of action or control ; carte blanche 2. a signed check with the amount unspecified
blank slate
noun Date: 1980 tabula rasa
blank verse
noun Date: 1588 unrhymed verse; specifically unrhymed iambic pentameter verse
blanket
I. noun Etymology: Middle English white woolen cloth, bed covering, from Anglo-French blankete, from blanc white — more at blank Date: 14th century 1. a. a large usually ...
blanket chest
noun Date: 1938 a piece of furniture with a hinged lid, a deep well, and usually one or two drawers underneath
blanket stitch
noun Date: 1880 a buttonhole stitch with spaces of variable width used on materials too thick to hem • blanket-stitch transitive verb
blanket-stitch
transitive verb see blanket stitch
blanketflower
noun Date: 1879 gaillardia
blanketlike
adjective see blanket I
blankly
adverb see blank I
blankness
noun see blank I
blanquette
noun Etymology: French, from Occitan blanqueto, from blanc white, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German blanch white — more at blank Date: 1727 a stew of light meat ...
Blantyre
geographical name city S Malawi population 333,120
blare
I. verb (blared; blaring) Etymology: Middle English bleren; akin to Middle Dutch blēren to shout Date: 15th century intransitive verb to sound loud and strident ...
blarney
noun Etymology: Blarney stone, a stone in Blarney Castle, near Cork, Ireland, held to bestow skill in flattery on those who kiss it Date: 1784 1. skillful flattery ; ...
Blarney
geographical name town SW Ireland in central County Cork population 1952
Blasco Ibáñez
biographical name Vicente 1867-1928 Spanish novelist
blasé
also blase adjective Etymology: French Date: 1819 1. apathetic to pleasure or excitement as a result of excessive indulgence or enjoyment ; world-weary 2. sophisticated, ...
blase
adjective see blasé
blaspheme
verb (blasphemed; blaspheming) Etymology: Middle English blasfemen, from Late Latin blasphemare — more at blame Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to speak of or ...
blasphemer
noun see blaspheme
blasphemous
adjective Date: 15th century impiously irreverent ; profane • blasphemously adverb • blasphemousness noun
blasphemously
adverb see blasphemous
blasphemousness
noun see blasphemous
blasphemy
noun (plural -mies) Date: 13th century 1. a. the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence for God b. the act of claiming the attributes of deity 2. ...
blast
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English blǣst; akin to Old High German blāst blast, blāsan to blow, Old English blāwan — more at blow Date: before 12th ...
blast from the past
phrasal a striking reminder of an earlier time ; something that excites nostalgia
blast furnace
noun Date: 1706 a furnace in which combustion is forced by a current of air under pressure; especially one for the reduction of iron ore
blast off
intransitive verb Date: 1951 take off 2d — used especially of rocket-propelled missiles and vehicles
blast-
or blasto- combining form Etymology: German, from Greek, from blastos bud ; budding ; germ
blasted
adjective Date: 1540 1. damaged by or as if by an explosive, lightning, wind, or supernatural force 2. damned, detestable 3. slang intoxicated from drugs or alcohol
blastema
noun (plural -mas or blastemata) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek blastēma offshoot, from blastanein Date: circa 1823 a mass of undifferentiated cells capable of growth and ...
blastemal
adjective see blastema
blastematic
adjective see blastema
blaster
noun see blast II
blastie
noun Etymology: Scots blast to wither, from 2blast Date: 1787 Scottish an ugly little creature
blasting cap
noun Date: 1888 a small explosive device that is combined with a fuse to detonate a larger explosive
blastment
noun Date: 1602 archaic a blighting influence
blasto-
combining form see blast-
blastocoel
or blastocoele noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 the fluid-filled cavity of a blastula — see blastula illustration • blastocoelic adjective
blastocoele
noun see blastocoel
blastocoelic
adjective see blastocoel
blastocyst
noun Date: circa 1881 the modified blastula of a placental mammal having an outer layer composed of the trophoblast
blastoderm
noun Etymology: German, from blast- + -derm Date: circa 1843 a blastodisc after completion of cleavage and formation of the blastocoel
blastodermic vesicle
noun Date: circa 1860 blastocyst
blastodisc
noun Date: circa 1881 the embryo-forming portion of an egg with discoidal cleavage usually appearing as a small disc on the upper surface of the yolk mass — see egg ...
blastoff
noun Date: 1951 a blasting off (as of a rocket)
blastomere
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 one of the cells that are produced during cleavage of a zygote and that form the morula
blastomycosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Blastomyces, fungus genus, from blast- + Greek mykēs fungus; akin to Greek myxa mucus — more at mucus Date: circa 1900 any of several fungal ...
blastopore
noun Date: 1880 the opening of the archenteron • blastoporic adjective
blastoporic
adjective see blastopore
blastospore
noun Etymology: blast- + spore Date: circa 1927 a fungal spore produced by budding
blastula
noun (plural -las or blastulae) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek blastos bud — more at -blast Date: 1879 an early metazoan embryo typically having the form of a hollow ...
blastulation
noun see blastula
blat
verb (blatted; blatting) Etymology: perhaps alteration of bleat Date: 1846 intransitive verb 1. to cry like a calf or sheep ; bleat 2. a. to make a raucous noise ...
blatancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1610 1. the quality or state of being blatant 2. something that is blatant
blatant
adjective Etymology: perhaps from Latin blatire to chatter Date: 1596 1. noisy especially in a vulgar or offensive manner ; clamorous 2. completely obvious, conspicuous, or ...
blatantly
adverb see blatant
blather
I. intransitive verb (blathered; blathering) Etymology: Old Norse blathra; akin to Middle High German blōdern to chatter Date: 1524 to talk foolishly at length — often ...
blatherer
noun see blather I
blatherskite
noun Etymology: Scots, alteration of blather skate, from blather, blether blather + skate a contemptible person Date: circa 1650 1. a person who blathers a lot 2. nonsense, ...
blatter
intransitive verb Etymology: perhaps from Latin blaterare to chatter Date: circa 1555 dialect to talk noisily and fast
Blavatsky
biographical name Helena Petrovna 1831-1891 née Hahn Russian traveler & theosophist
blaw
verb (blawed; blawn; blawing) Etymology: Middle English (northern dialect) blawen, from Old English blāwan Date: before 12th century chiefly Scottish blow
blaxploitation
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: blend of blax- (alteration of blacks) and exploitation Date: 1972 the exploitation of blacks by producers of black-oriented films
blaze
I. noun Etymology: Middle English blase, from Old English blæse torch; probably akin to Old English bǣl fire — more at bald Date: before 12th century 1. a. an ...
blaze orange
noun Date: 1959 a very bright orange used in clothing especially by hunters for visibility
blazer
noun Date: 15th century 1. one that blazes 2. a sports jacket often with notched collar and patch pockets • blazered adjective
blazered
adjective see blazer
blazing
adjective Date: 1567 of outstanding power, speed, heat, or intensity • blazingly adverb
blazing star
noun Date: 15th century 1. archaic comet 2. any of various plants having conspicuous flower clusters or star-shaped flowers: as a. any of a genus (Liatris) of North ...
blazingly
adverb see blazing
blazon
I. noun Etymology: Middle English blason, from Anglo-French Date: 14th century 1. a. armorial bearings ; coat of arms b. the proper description or representation of ...
blazoner
noun see blazon II
blazoning
noun see blazon II
blazonry
noun (plural -ries) Date: 1622 1. a. blazon 1b b. blazon 1a 2. a dazzling display
bld
abbreviation 1. blond 2. blood
bldg
abbreviation building
bldr
abbreviation builder
bleach
I. verb Etymology: Middle English blechen, from Old English blǣcean; akin to Old English blāc pale; probably akin to Latin flagrare to burn — more at black Date: before ...
bleachable
adjective see bleach I
bleacher
noun Date: 1550 1. one that bleaches or is used in bleaching 2. a usually uncovered stand of tiered planks providing seating for spectators — usually used in plural • ...
bleacherite
noun see bleacher
bleaching powder
noun Date: circa 1830 a white powder consisting chiefly of calcium hydroxide, calcium chloride, and calcium hypochlorite and used as a bleach, disinfectant, or deodorant
bleak
adjective Etymology: Middle English bleke pale; probably akin to Old English blāc Date: 1574 1. exposed and barren and often windswept 2. cold, raw 3. a. lacking in ...
bleakly
adverb see bleak
bleakness
noun see bleak
blear
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English bleren, probably from Old English *blerian; akin to Low German bleer-oged bleary-eyed Date: 14th century 1. to make (the eyes) ...
blear-eyed
adjective Date: 14th century bleary-eyed
blearily
adverb see bleary
bleariness
noun see bleary
bleary
adjective Date: 14th century 1. of the eyes or vision dull or dimmed especially from fatigue or sleep 2. poorly outlined or defined ; dim 3. very tired • blearily ...
bleary-eyed
adjective Date: circa 1927 having the eyes dimmed and watery (as from fatigue, drink, or emotion)
bleat
I. verb Etymology: Middle English bleten, from Old English blǣtan; akin to Latin flēre to weep, Old English bellan to roar — more at bellow Date: before 12th century ...
bleater
noun see bleat I
bleb
noun Etymology: perhaps alteration of blob Date: 1607 1. a small blister 2. bubble; also a small particle 3. something resembling a bleb; especially a vesicular ...
blebbing
noun see bleb
blebby
adjective see bleb
bleed
I. verb (bled; bleeding) Etymology: Middle English bleden, from Old English blēdan, from blōd blood Date: before 12th century intransitive verb 1. a. to emit or lose ...
bleed white
phrasal to drain of blood or resources
bleeder
noun Date: 1803 1. one that bleeds; especially hemophiliac 2. British rotter; also bloke
bleeding
adjective or adverb Date: 1858 chiefly British bloody — used as an intensive
bleeding heart
noun Date: 1691 1. a garden plant (Dicentra spectabilis) of the fumitory family with racemes of usually deep pink or white drooping heart-shaped flowers; broadly any of ...
bleep
I. noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1953 1. a short high-pitched sound (as from electronic equipment) 2. — used in place of an obscene or vulgar expletive II. transitive ...
blemish
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English blemisshen, to damage, injure, sully, from Anglo-French blemiss-, stem of blemir, blesmir, from Old French, literally, to make pale ...
blench
I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, to deceive, blench, from Old English blencan to deceive; akin to Old Norse blekkja to impose on Date: 13th century to draw ...
blend
I. verb (blended; also blent; blending) Etymology: Middle English, probably from Old Norse blend-, present stem of blanda to mix; akin to Old English blandan to mix, Lithuanian ...
blende
noun Etymology: German, from blenden to deceive, literally, to blind, from Old High German blenten; akin to Old English blind Date: circa 1753 sphalerite
blended family
noun Date: 1975 a family that includes children of a previous marriage of one spouse or both
blended whiskey
noun Date: 1940 whiskey blended from two or more straight whiskeys or from whiskey and neutral spirits
blender
noun Date: circa 1611 one that blends; especially an electric appliance for grinding or mixing
blending inheritance
noun Date: 1922 the expression in offspring of phenotypic characters (as pink flower color from red and white parents) intermediate between those of the parents; also ...
Blenheim
or Blindheim geographical name village S Germany in Bavaria NNW of Augsburg population 1619
blenny
noun (plural blennies) Etymology: Latin blennius, a sea fish, from Greek blennos Date: 1769 any of numerous usually small and elongated marine fishes (especially families ...
blephar-
or blepharo- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek, from blepharon 1. eyelid 2. cilium ; flagellum
blepharo-
combining form see blephar-
blepharoplast
noun Date: 1897 a basal body especially of a flagellated cell
blepharoplasty
noun Date: 1842 plastic surgery on the eyelid especially to remove fatty or excess tissue
blepharospasm
noun Date: 1872 spasmodic winking of the eyelids due to contraction of the muscle encircling the orbit
Blériot
biographical name Louis 1872-1936 French engineer & pioneer aviator
blesbok
noun Etymology: Afrikaans, from bles blaze + bok male antelope Date: 1824 a South African antelope (Damaliscus dorcas syn. D. pygargus) having a large white patch down the ...
bless
transitive verb (blessed; also blest; blessing) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English blētsian, from blōd blood; from the use of blood in consecration Date: before 12th ...
blessed
also blest adjective Date: before 12th century 1. a. held in reverence ; venerated b. honored in worship ; hallowed c. beatific 2. of or enjoying happiness; ...
Blessed Sacrament
noun Date: 15th century the Communion elements; specifically the consecrated host
blessedly
adverb see blessed
blessedness
noun see blessed
blessing
noun Date: before 12th century 1. a. the act or words of one that blesses b. approval, encouragement 2. a thing conducive to happiness or welfare 3. grace said at a ...
blest
adjective see blessed
blether
Usage: chiefly British variant of blather
BLEVE
abbreviation boiling liquid expanding vapor explosion
blew
past of blow
Blida
geographical name city N Algeria SW of Algiers population 170,182
Bligh
biographical name William 1754-1817 English naval officer
blight
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1578 1. a. a disease or injury of plants marked by the formation of lesions, withering, and death of parts (as leaves and tubers) ...
blighter
noun Date: 1822 1. one that blights 2. chiefly British a. a disliked or contemptible person b. fellow, guy
Blighty
noun Etymology: modification of Hindi & Urdu bilātī foreign, English, alteration of vilāyatī, from vilāyat province, realm, country beyond India, from Persian, dominion, ...
blimp
noun Etymology: imitative; perhaps from the sound made by striking the gas bag with the thumb Date: 1916 1. an airship that maintains its form by pressure from contained gas ...
blimpish
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1938 of, relating to, or suggesting a Colonel Blimp • blimpishly adverb • blimpishness noun
blimpishly
adverb see blimpish
blimpishness
noun see blimpish
blin
noun (plural blini or blinis) Etymology: Russian Date: 1888 a thin often buckwheat pancake usually filled (as with sour cream) and folded
blind
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English; akin to Old High German blint blind, Old English blandan to mix — more at blend Date: before 12th century 1. a. ...
blind alley
noun Date: 1583 a fruitless or mistaken course or direction
blind date
noun Date: 1925 1. a date between two persons who have not previously met 2. either participant in a blind date
blind gut
noun Date: 15th century a digestive cavity open at only one end; especially the cecum of the large intestine
blind pig
noun Date: 1886 blind tiger
blind side
noun Date: 1606 1. the side away from which one is looking 2. the side on which one that is blind in one eye cannot see
blind spot
noun Date: 1872 1. a. the small circular area at the back of the retina where the optic nerve enters the eyeball and which is devoid of rods and cones and is not sensitive ...
blind tiger
noun Date: 1857 a place that sells intoxicants illegally
blind trust
noun Date: 1969 an arrangement in which the financial holdings of a person in an influential position (as a government official) are placed in the control of a fiduciary in ...
blinder
noun Date: 1809 1. either of two flaps on a horse's bridle to keep it from seeing objects at its sides 2. plural a limitation or obstruction to sight or discernment
blindfish
noun Date: 1843 any of several small fishes with vestigial functionless eyes found usually in the waters of caves
blindfold
I. transitive verb Etymology: alteration of Middle English blindfellen, blindfelden to strike blind, blindfold, from blind + fellen to fell Date: 1533 1. to cover the eyes of ...
Blindheim
geographical name see Blenheim
blindingly
adverb see blind II
blindly
adverb see blind I
blindman's bluff
noun see blindman's buff
blindman's buff
noun Date: 1599 a group game in which a blindfolded player tries to catch and identify another player — called also blindman's bluff
blindness
noun see blind I
blindside
transitive verb Date: 1968 1. to hit unexpectedly from or as if from the blind side 2. to surprise unpleasantly
blindworm
noun Date: 15th century slowworm
blink
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, to open one's eyes Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. obsolete to look glancingly ; peep b. to look with half-shut eyes ...
blinker
I. noun Date: 1636 1. one that blinks; especially a light that flashes off and on (as for the directing of traffic or the coded signaling of messages) 2. a. blinder 1 ...
blinkered
adjective Date: 1867 1. limited in scope or understanding ; narrow-minded 2. fitted with blinders
blintz
noun see blintze
blintze
or blintz noun Etymology: Yiddish blintse, of Slavic origin; akin to Ukrainian mlynets', diminutive of mlyn pancake Date: 1903 a thin usually wheat-flour pancake folded to ...
blip
I. noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1945 1. a trace on a display screen (as an oscilloscope); especially a spot on a radar screen 2. a short crisp sound 3. an ...

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.047 c;