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Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

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nightclothes
noun plural Date: 1602 garments for wear in bed
nightclub
I. noun Date: 1894 a place of entertainment open at night usually serving food and liquor and providing music and space for dancing and often having a floor show II. ...
nightclubber
noun see nightclub II
nightdress
noun Date: circa 1714 1. nightgown 2. nightclothes
nightfall
noun Date: 1700 the close of the day ; dusk
nightglow
noun Date: 1951 airglow seen during the night
nightgown
noun Date: 14th century 1. archaic dressing gown 2. a loose garment for wear in bed
nighthawk
noun Date: 1611 1. a. any of a genus (Chordeiles) of American nightjars related to the whip-poor-will b. a common European nightjar (Caprimulgus europaeus) 2. a ...
nightie
or nighty noun (plural nighties) Etymology: nightgown + -ie Date: 1871 a nightgown for a woman or child
nightingale
noun Etymology: Middle English, alteration of Old English nihtegale, from niht + galan to sing — more at yell Date: 13th century an Old World thrush (Luscinia megarhynchos ...
Nightingale
biographical name Florence 1820-1910 English nurse & philanthropist
nightjar
noun Etymology: from its harsh sound Date: 1630 any of a family (Caprimulgidae) of medium-sized long-winged crepuscular or nocturnal birds (as the whip-poor-wills and ...
nightless
adjective see night I
nightlife
noun Date: 1852 the activity of or entertainment provided for pleasure-seekers at night (as in nightclubs); also establishments providing nightlife
nightlong
I. adjective Date: 1612 lasting the whole night II. adverb Date: 1870 through the whole night
nightly
I. adjective Date: before 12th century 1. happening, done, or used by night or every night 2. of or relating to the night or every night II. adverb Date: 15th century ...
nightmare
noun Etymology: Middle English, from 1night + 1mare Date: 14th century 1. an evil spirit formerly thought to oppress people during sleep 2. a frightening dream that usually ...
nightmarish
adjective see nightmare
nightmarishly
adverb see nightmare
nights
adverb Date: before 12th century in the nighttime repeatedly ; on any night
nightscope
noun Date: 1972 an optical device usually using infrared radiation that enables a person to see objects in the dark better
nightshade
noun Date: before 12th century 1. any of a genus (Solanum of the family Solanaceae, the nightshade family) of herbs, shrubs, and trees having alternate leaves, cymose flowers, ...
nightshirt
noun Date: 1857 a nightgown resembling a shirt
nightside
noun Date: 1848 the side of a celestial body (as the earth, the moon, or a planet) not in daylight
nightspot
noun Date: 1933 nightclub
nightstand
noun Date: 1892 night table
nightstick
noun Date: 1887 a police officer's club
nighttime
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 14th century the time from dusk to dawn
nightwalker
noun Date: 15th century 1. a person who roams about at night especially with criminal intent 2. prostitute, streetwalker
nighty
noun see nightie
NIH
abbreviation 1. National Institutes of Health 2. not invented here
nihilism
noun Etymology: German Nihilismus, from Latin nihil nothing — more at nil Date: circa 1817 1. a. a viewpoint that traditional values and beliefs are unfounded and that ...
nihilist
noun or adjective see nihilism
nihilistic
adjective see nihilism
Nihon
geographical name see Japan
Niigata
geographical name city & port Japan in N Honshu on Sea of Japan population 486,087
Niihau
geographical name island Hawaii WSW of Kauai area 72 square miles (187 square kilometers)
Nijinska
biographical name Bronisława 1891-1972 sister of following Russian (Polish-born) dancer & choreographer
Nijinsky
biographical name Vaslav Fomich 1890-1950 Russian dancer
Nijmegen
geographical name commune E Netherlands in Gelderland on the Waal S of Arnhem population 146,344
Nikaria
geographical name — see Ikaria
Nike
noun Etymology: Greek Nikē Date: 1850 the Greek goddess of victory
Nikolay Nikolayevich
biographical name see Nicholas III
Nikolayev
geographical name — see Mykolayiv
Nikopol
geographical name city E central Ukraine on the Dnieper population 159,000
nil
noun Etymology: Latin, nothing, contraction of nihil, from Old Latin nihilum, from ne- not + hilum trifle — more at no Date: 1833 nothing, zero • nil adjective
nil admirari
foreign term Etymology: Latin to be excited by nothing ; equanimity
nil desperandum
foreign term Etymology: Latin never despair
nil sine numine
foreign term Etymology: Latin nothing without the divine will — motto of Colorado
Nile
geographical name river 4160 miles (6693 kilometers) E Africa flowing from Lake Victoria in Uganda N into the Mediterranean in Egypt; in various sections called specifically: ...
nile green
noun Usage: often capitalized N Etymology: Nile River, Africa Date: 1871 a pale yellow green
Nile perch
noun Date: 1926 a large predaceous food fish (Lates niloticus) of the rivers and lakes of northern and central Africa that may exceed 200 pounds (91 kilograms) in weight
Niles
geographical name village NE Illinois NW of Chicago population 30,068
nilgai
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu nīlgāy Date: 1882 a large bluish-gray antelope (Boselaphus tragocamelus) of India and eastern Pakistan with the male having short horns, a ...
Nilgiri Hills
geographical name hills S India in W Tamil Nadu; highest point Mt. Dodabetta 8640 feet (2633 meters)
nill
verb Etymology: Middle English nilen, from Old English nyllan, from ne not + wyllan to wish — more at no, will Date: before 12th century intransitive verb archaic to be ...
Nilotic
adjective Etymology: Latin Niloticus, from Greek Neilōtēs, from Neilos Nile Date: 1653 1. of or relating to the Nile or the peoples of the Nile basin 2. of, relating to, ...
nilpotent
adjective Etymology: Latin nil nothing + potent-, potens having power — more at potent Date: 1870 equal to zero when raised to some power
Nilsson
biographical name Birgit 1918- Swedish soprano
nim
I. verb (nimmed; nimming) Etymology: earlier nim to take, from Middle English nimen, from Old English niman Date: 12th century transitive verb archaic steal, filch ...
nimble
adjective (nimbler; nimblest) Etymology: Middle English nimel, from Old English numol holding much, from niman to take; akin to Old High German neman to take, Greek nemein to ...
nimbleness
noun see nimble
nimbly
adverb see nimble
nimbostratus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin nimbus + New Latin stratus stratus Date: circa 1909 a low dark layer of gray cloud usually producing light continuous rain or snow — ...
nimbus
noun (plural nimbi or nimbuses) Etymology: Latin, rainstorm, cloud; probably akin to Latin nebula cloud — more at nebula Date: 1616 1. a. a luminous vapor, cloud, or ...
NIMBY
noun Etymology: not in my backyard Date: 1980 opposition to the locating of something considered undesirable (as a prison or incinerator) in one's neighborhood • NIMBYism ...
NIMBYism
noun see NIMBY
Nîmes
geographical name city S France NE of Montpellier population 133,607
NIMH
abbreviation National Institute of Mental Health
nimiety
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Late Latin nimietas, from Latin nimius too much, adjective, from nimis, adverb Date: circa 1564 excess, redundancy
niminy-piminy
adjective Etymology: probably alteration of namby-pamby Date: 1786 affectedly refined ; finicky
Nimitz
biographical name Chester William 1885-1966 American admiral
Nimrod
noun Etymology: Hebrew Nimrōdh Date: 15th century 1. a descendant of Ham represented in Genesis as a mighty hunter and a king of Shinar 2. not capitalized hunter 3. not ...
Nimrud
geographical name — see Calah
Nin
biographical name Anaïs 1903-1977 American (French-born) author
nincompoop
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1676 fool, simpleton • nincompoopery noun
nincompoopery
noun see nincompoop
nine
noun Etymology: Middle English, from nyne, adjective, from Old English nigon; akin to Old High German niun nine, Latin novem, Greek ennea Date: before 12th century 1. — see ...
nine day wonder
noun see nine days' wonder
nine days' wonder
noun Date: 1594 something or someone that creates a short-lived sensation — called also nine day wonder
nine-to-fiver
noun Date: 1959 one who works at a job with regular daytime hours
ninefold
adjective Date: before 12th century 1. being nine times as great or as many 2. having nine units or members • ninefold adverb
ninepin
noun Date: circa 1580 1. plural but singular in construction a bowling game resembling tenpins played without the headpin or having the nine pins in a diamond-shaped ...
nineteen
noun Etymology: Middle English nynetene, adjective, from Old English nigontēne, from nigon + -tīene (akin to Old English tīen ten) — more at ten Date: before 12th century ...
nineteenth
adjective or noun see nineteen
ninetieth
adjective or noun see ninety
ninety
noun (plural nineties) Etymology: Middle English ninety, adjective, from Old English nigontig, short for hundnigontig, from hundnigontig, noun, group of 90, from hund-, ...
Nineveh
or Latin Ninus geographical name ancient city capital of Assyria; ruins in Iraq on the Tigris opposite Mosul
Ning-po
geographical name see Ningbo
Ningbo
or Ning-po or formerly Ninghsien geographical name city E China in N Zhejiang ESE of Hangzhou population 552,540
Ninghsia
geographical name see Yinchuan
Ninghsia, Ningsia
geographical name — see Yinchuan
Ninghsien
geographical name see Ningbo
Ningsia
geographical name see Yinchuan
Ningsia Hui
geographical name see Ningxia Huizu
Ningxia Huizu
or Ningsia Hui geographical name region N China; formerly a province capital Yinchuan area 30,039 square miles (78,101 square kilometers), population 4,655,451
ninhydrin
noun Etymology: from Ninhydrin, a trademark Date: 1913 a poisonous crystalline oxidizing agent C9H6O4 used especially as an analytical reagent
ninja
noun (plural ninja; also ninjas) Etymology: Japanese, from nin- persevere, conceal, move stealthily + -ja person Date: 1964 a person trained in ancient Japanese martial arts ...
ninny
noun (plural ninnies) Etymology: perhaps by shortening & alteration from an innocent Date: 1593 fool, simpleton
ninnyhammer
noun Date: 1592 ninny
ninon
noun Etymology: probably from French Ninon, nickname for Anne Date: 1911 a smooth sheer fabric
ninth
noun (plural ninths) Date: 13th century 1. — see number table 2. a. a musical interval embracing an octave and a second b. the tone at this interval c. a chord ...
ninth cranial nerve
noun Date: circa 1961 glossopharyngeal nerve
Ninus
geographical name see Nineveh
niobate
noun Etymology: New Latin niobium + English 1-ate Date: 1845 a salt containing an anionic grouping of niobium and oxygen
Niobe
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Niobē Date: 14th century a daughter of Tantalus and wife of Amphion who while weeping for her slain children is turned into a stone from ...
niobium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin Niobe; from its occurrence in tantalite Date: 1845 a lustrous light gray ductile metallic element that resembles tantalum chemically ...
Niobrara
geographical name river 431 miles (694 kilometers) E Wyoming & N Nebraska flowing E into Missouri River
Niort
geographical name city W France ENE of La Rochelle population 58,660
nip
I. verb (nipped; nipping) Etymology: Middle English nippen; akin to Middle Dutch nipen to pinch, Old Norse hnippa to prod Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. a. to ...
nip and tuck
adjective or adverb Date: 1832 being so close that the lead or advantage shifts rapidly from one opponent to another
nip-up
noun Date: 1938 a spring from a supine position to a standing position
nipa
noun Etymology: probably from Italian, from Malay nipah nipa palm Date: 1779 thatch made of leaves of the nipa palm
nipa palm
noun Date: 1779 a southeast Asian palm (Nipa fruticans) growing chiefly along rivers and estuaries and having a short underground trunk and large erect pinnate leaves
Nipigon, Lake
geographical name lake Canada in W Ontario N of Lake Superior area 1870 square miles (4862 square kilometers)
Nipissing, Lake
geographical name lake Canada in SE Ontario NE of Georgian Bay area over 320 square miles (829 square kilometers)
nipper
noun Date: 1541 1. any of various devices (as pincers) for nipping — usually used in plural 2. a. chiefly British a boy employed as a helper (as of a carter or hawker) ...
nippily
adverb see nippy
nippiness
noun see nippy
nipping
adjective Date: 1547 sharp, chilling • nippingly adverb
nippingly
adverb see nipping
nipple
noun Etymology: earlier neble, nible, probably diminutive of neb, nib Date: circa 1530 1. the protuberance of a mammary gland upon which in the female the lactiferous ducts ...
nippled
adjective see nipple
Nippon
geographical name — see japan
Nipponese
adjective Etymology: Nippon, Japan Date: 1859 Japanese • Nipponese noun
Nippur
geographical name ancient city of Sumer SSE of Babylon
nippy
adjective (nippier; -est) Date: 1575 1. marked by a tendency to nip 2. brisk, quick, or nimble in movement ; snappy 3. pungent, sharp 4. chilly, chilling • ...
nirvana
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Sanskrit nirvāṇa, literally, act of extinguishing, from nis- out + vāti it blows — more at wind Date: 1801 1. the final ...
nirvanic
adjective see nirvana
Nis
or Nish geographical name city E Serbia and Montenegro in E Serbia population 247,898
Nisan
noun Etymology: Hebrew Nīsān Date: 14th century the seventh month of the civil year or the first month of the ecclesiastical year in the Jewish calendar — see month table
nisei
noun (plural nisei) Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Japanese, literally, second generation, from ni second + sei generation Date: 1929 a son or daughter of Japanese ...
Nish
geographical name see Nis
Nishinomiya
geographical name city Japan in W Honshu on Osaka Bay E of Kobe population 426,919
nisi
adjective Etymology: Latin, unless, from ne- not + si if Date: circa 1836 taking effect at a specified time unless previously modified or avoided by cause shown, further ...
Nissen hut
noun Etymology: Peter N. Nissen died 1930 British mining engineer Date: 1917 a prefabricated shelter with a semicircular arching roof of corrugated iron sheeting and a ...
NIST
abbreviation National Institute of Standards and Technology
nisus
noun (plural nisus) Etymology: Latin, from niti to lean, rely, strive; akin to Latin nictare to wink — more at connive Date: 1699 a mental or physical effort to attain an ...
NIT
abbreviation National Invitational Tournament
nit
I. noun Etymology: Middle English nite, from Old English hnitu; akin to Old High German hniz nit, Greek konid-, konis Date: before 12th century 1. the egg of a louse or other ...
nit-picking
noun Etymology: 1nit Date: 1956 minute and usually unjustified criticism
nite
variant of night
niter
noun Etymology: Middle English nitre natron, from Middle French, from Latin nitrum, from Greek nitron, from Egyptian n{tuline}ry Date: 1667 1. potassium nitrate 2. archaic ...
niterie
noun see nitery
Niterói
or formerly Nictheroy geographical name city SE Brazil on Guanabara Bay opposite Rio de Janeiro population 416,123
nitery
also niterie noun (plural niteries) Etymology: nite + -ery (as in eatery); niterie from nite + French -erie -ery Date: circa 1934 nightclub
nitid
adjective Etymology: Latin nitidus — more at neat Date: 1619 bright, lustrous
nitinol
noun Etymology: nickel + titanium + -nol (from Naval Ordnance Laboratory, where it was created) Date: 1968 a nonmagnetic alloy of titanium and nickel that after being ...
nitpick
verb Etymology: back-formation from nit-picking Date: 1966 intransitive verb to engage in nit-picking transitive verb to criticize by nit-picking • nitpick noun • ...
nitpicker
noun see nitpick
nitpicky
adjective see nitpick
nitr-
or nitro- combining form Etymology: niter 1. nitrogen 2. (usually nitro-) containing the monovalent group NO2
Nitra
geographical name city W Slovakia population 89,888
nitrate
noun Etymology: French, from nitrique Date: 1788 1. a salt or ester of nitric acid 2. sodium nitrate or potassium nitrate used as a fertilizer
nitrate of soda
Date: 1841 sodium nitrate used as a fertilizer
nitration
noun Date: 1887 the process of adding a nitro group to an organic compound • nitrate transitive verb • nitrator noun
nitrator
noun see nitration
nitre
chiefly British variant of niter
nitric acid
noun Etymology: French nitrique, from nitre niter, from Middle French Date: 1788 a corrosive liquid inorganic acid HNO3 used especially as an oxidizing agent, in nitrations, ...
nitric oxide
noun Date: 1807 a colorless poisonous gas NO formed by oxidation of nitrogen or ammonia that is present in the atmosphere and also in mammals where it is synthesized from ...
nitride
I. noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1850 a binary compound of nitrogen with a more electropositive element II. transitive verb (nitrided; nitriding) ...
nitrification
noun Date: 1827 the oxidation (as by bacteria) of ammonium salts to nitrites and the further oxidation of nitrites to nitrates
nitrifier
noun Date: 1903 any of the nitrifying bacteria
nitrifying
adjective Etymology: French nitrifier to convert into nitrite, from nitr- Date: 1827 active in or relating to nitrification
nitrifying bacteria
noun plural Date: 1925 bacteria of a family (Nitrobacteraceae) comprising gram-negative bacteria commonly found in the soil and obtaining energy through the process of ...
nitrile
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary nitr- + -il, -ile (from Latin -ilis 1-ile) Date: 1848 an organic cyanide containing the group CN which on hydrolysis ...
nitrite
noun Date: 1788 a salt or ester of nitrous acid
nitro
I. adjective Etymology: nitr- Date: 1881 containing or being the monovalent group NO2 united through nitrogen II. noun (plural nitros) Date: 1903 any of various nitrated ...
nitro-
combining form see nitr-
nitrobenzene
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1868 a poisonous yellow oily liquid C6H5NO2 with an almond odor that is used especially in chemical synthesis (as of ...
nitrocellulose
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1882 any of several nitric-acid esters of cellulose used especially for making explosives, plastics, and varnishes
nitrofuran
noun Date: 1930 any of several nitro derivatives of furan used as bacteria-inhibiting agents
nitrogen
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: French nitrogène, from nitre niter + -gène -gen Date: 1794 a colorless tasteless odorless element that as a diatomic gas is ...
nitrogen balance
noun Date: 1944 the difference between nitrogen intake and nitrogen loss in the body or the soil
nitrogen cycle
noun Date: 1908 a continuous series of natural processes by which nitrogen passes successively from air to soil to organisms and back to air or soil involving principally ...
nitrogen dioxide
noun Date: 1869 a toxic reddish brown gas NO2 that is a strong oxidizing agent, is produced by combustion (as of fossil fuels), and is an atmospheric pollutant (as in smog)
nitrogen fixation
noun Date: 1895 the metabolic assimilation of atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia by soil microorganisms and especially rhizobia
nitrogen mustard
noun Date: 1943 any of various toxic blistering compounds analogous to mustard gas but containing nitrogen instead of sulfur
nitrogen narcosis
noun Date: 1937 a state of euphoria and confusion similar to that of alcohol intoxication which occurs when nitrogen in normal air enters the bloodstream at increased pressure ...
nitrogen oxide
noun Date: 1869 any of several oxides of nitrogen most of which are produced in combustion and are considered to be atmospheric pollutants: as a. nitric oxide b. ...
nitrogen tetroxide
noun Date: 1869 a colorless toxic gas N2O4 that is a dimer of nitrogen dioxide and that in liquid form is used as an oxidizer in rocket engines
nitrogen-fixer
noun Date: 1912 any of various soil microorganisms that are involved in nitrogen fixation
nitrogen-fixing
adjective Date: 1899 capable of nitrogen fixation
nitrogenase
noun Date: 1934 an enzyme of various nitrogen-fixing bacteria that catalyzes the reduction of molecular nitrogen to ammonia
nitrogenous
adjective see nitrogen
nitroglycerin
or nitroglycerine noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1857 an oily explosive poisonous liquid C3H5N3O9 used chiefly in making dynamite and in medicine ...
nitroglycerine
noun see nitroglycerin
nitromethane
noun Date: 1872 a liquid nitroparaffin CH3NO2 that is used as an industrial solvent, in chemical synthesis, and as a fuel for rockets and high-performance engines
nitroparaffin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1892 any of various nitro derivatives of alkanes
nitros-
or nitroso- combining form Etymology: New Latin nitrosus nitrous containing the group NO
nitrosamine
noun Date: 1878 any of various organic compounds which are characterized by the grouping NNO and some of which are powerful carcinogens
nitroso-
combining form see nitros-
nitrous
adjective Etymology: New Latin nitrosus, from Latin, full of natron, from nitrum natron — more at niter Date: 1601 archaic of, relating to, or containing niter
nitrous acid
noun Date: 1788 an unstable acid HNO2 known only in solution or in the form of its salts or esters
nitrous oxide
noun Date: 1798 a colorless gas N2O that when inhaled produces loss of sensibility to pain preceded by exhilaration and sometimes laughter, that is used especially as an ...
Nitti
biographical name Francesco Saverio 1868-1953 Italian economist & politician
nitty-gritty
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1956 what is essential and basic ; specific practical details • nitty-gritty adjective
nitwit
noun Etymology: probably from German dialect nit not + English wit Date: circa 1922 a scatterbrained or stupid person
NIU
abbreviation network interface unit
Niuafo'ou
geographical name island SW central Pacific in the N Tongas population 763
Niue
geographical name island S central Pacific; a self-governing territory of New Zealand area 100 square miles (260 square kilometers), population 2244 • Niuean noun
Niuean
noun see Niue
Nivelles
geographical name commune central Belgium population 23,217
Nivernais
geographical name region & former province central France E of the upper Loire capital Nevers
nix
I. noun Etymology: German nichts nothing Date: 1789 nothing II. transitive verb Date: circa 1903 veto, reject III. adverb Date: 1902 no — used to express ...
nixie
noun Etymology: German Nixe female nix, from Old High German nichessa, feminine of nihhus nix Date: 1816 nix IV
Nixon
biographical name Richard Milhous 1913-1994 American politician; 37th president of the United States (1969-74) • Nixonesque or Nixonian adjective
Nixonesque
adjective see Nixon
Nixonian
adjective see Nixon
nizam
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu nizām, order, governor, ultimately from Arabic niḍhām Date: 1768 one of a line of sovereigns of Hyderabad, India, reigning from 1713 to 1950 ...
nizamate
noun see nizam
Nizhni Novgorod
geographical name see Nizhniy Novgorod
Nizhni Tagil
geographical name see Nizhniy Tagil
Nizhniy Novgorod
or Nizhni Novgorod or 1932-89 Gorki geographical name city central Russia in Europe at confluence of Oka & Volga rivers population 1,433,000
Nizhniy Tagil
or Nizhni Tagil geographical name city W Russia in Asia on E slope of the Urals population 437,000
NJ
abbreviation New Jersey
NK cell
noun Date: 1979 natural killer cell
Nkrumah
biographical name Kwame 1909-1972 prime minister (1952-60) & 1st president (1960-66) of Ghana
NKVD
abbreviation Etymology: Russian Narodnyĭ komissariat vnutrennikh del People's Commissariat of Internal Affairs
NL
abbreviation 1. National League 2. Newfoundland and Labrador
NLCS
abbreviation National League Championship Series
NLF
abbreviation National Liberation Front
NLRB
abbreviation National Labor Relations Board
nm
abbreviation 1. nanometer 2. nautical mile
NM
abbreviation New Mexico
NMDA
noun Etymology: N-methyl-D-aspartate Date: 1986 a synthetic amino acid C5H9NO4 that binds selectively to a subset of glutamate receptors on neurons where the binding of ...
NMHA
abbreviation National Mental Health Association
NMI
abbreviation no middle initial
NMR
abbreviation nuclear magnetic resonance
NNE
abbreviation north-northeast
NNW
abbreviation north-northwest
No
I. variant of Noh II. symbol nobelium
no
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English, from Old English nā, from ne not + ā always; akin to Old Norse & Old High German ne not, Latin ne-, Greek nē- — more at aye Date: ...
no contest
noun Date: 1952 nolo contendere
no dice
phrasal 1. of no avail ; no use ; futile 2. no I,3
no doubt
phrasal doubtless I
no end
phrasal exceedingly
no fair
phrasal something that is not according to the rules
no go
phrasal to no avail ; useless
no less
phrasal —used to emphasize that something is regarded as impressive or surprising
no matter
phrasal without regard to ; irrespective of
no matter what
phrasal regardless of the costs, consequences, or results
no one
pronoun Date: before 12th century no person ; nobody
no sweat
phrasal slang with little or no difficulty ; easily; also easy — often used interjectionally
no thanks to
phrasal not as a result of any benefit conferred by
no way
adverb see noway 2
No, Lake
geographical name lake S central Sudan where Bahr el Jebel & Bahr el Ghazal join to form the White Nile area 40 square miles (104 square kilometers)
no-account
adjective Date: 1845 1. of no importance ; trifling 2. not amounting to anything ; shiftless • no-account noun
no-brainer
noun Date: 1973 something that requires a minimum of thought
no-fault
adjective Date: 1967 1. of, relating to, or being a motor vehicle insurance plan under which someone involved in an accident is compensated usually up to a stipulated limit ...
no-frills
adjective Date: 1960 offering or providing only the essentials ; not fancy, elaborate, or luxurious
no-go
adjective Date: 1971 being an area into which entry is forbidden or dangerous
no-good
I. adjective Date: 1908 having no worth, virtue, use, or chance of success II. noun Date: 1924 a no-good person or thing
no-goodnik
noun Date: 1936 no-good, lowlife
no-hit
I. adjective Date: 1900 of, relating to, or being a baseball game or a part of a game in which a pitcher allows the opposition no base hits II. transitive verb Date: 1967 ...
no-hitter
noun Date: 1947 a no-hit game in baseball
no-holds-barred
adjective Date: 1961 free of restrictions or hampering conventions
no-hoper
noun Date: circa 1943 chiefly British one that has no chance of success
no-load
adjective Date: 1963 charging no sales commission • no-load noun
no-man's-land
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. an area of unowned, unclaimed, or uninhabited land b. an unoccupied area between opposing armies c. an area not suitable or used for ...
no-name
adjective Date: 1942 having a name that is not readily recognized by the public • no-name noun
no-no
noun (plural no-no's or no-nos) Date: circa 1942 1. something unacceptable or forbidden 2. no-hitter
no-nonsense
adjective Date: 1855 tolerating no nonsense ; serious, businesslike
no-par
or no-par-value adjective Date: 1922 having no nominal value
no-par-value
adjective see no-par

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