Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
Nyiragongo
geographical name volcano about 11,400 feet (3475 meters) E Democratic Republic of the Congo in Virunga Mountains NE of Lake Kivu
Nyíregyháza
geographical name city NE Hungary population 120,600
nylon
noun Etymology: coined word Date: 1938 1. any of numerous strong tough elastic synthetic polyamide materials that are fashioned into fibers, filaments, bristles, or sheets ...
nymph
noun Etymology: Middle English nimphe, from Middle French, from Latin nympha bride, nymph, from Greek nymphē — more at nuptial Date: 14th century 1. any of the minor ...
nymphal
adjective see nymph
nymphalid
noun Etymology: New Latin Nymphalidae, ultimately from Latin nympha nymph Date: 1897 any of a family (Nymphalidae) of butterflies (as a mourning cloak or fritillary) with the ...
nymphet
also nymphette noun Date: 1955 a sexually precocious girl barely in her teens; also a sexually attractive young woman
nymphette
noun see nymphet
nympho
noun (plural nymphos) Etymology: short for nymphomaniac Date: circa 1910 a person affected by nymphomania ; nymphomaniac
nympholepsy
noun Etymology: nympholept, from Greek nympholēptos frenzied, literally, caught by nymphs, from nymphē + lambanein to seize — more at latch Date: 1775 1. a demonic ...
nympholept
noun see nympholepsy
nympholeptic
adjective see nympholepsy
nymphomania
noun Etymology: New Latin, from nymphae inner lips of the vulva (from Latin, plural of nympha) + Late Latin mania mania Date: 1775 excessive sexual desire by a female • ...
nymphomaniac
noun or adjective see nymphomania
nymphomaniacal
adjective see nymphomania
Nynorsk
noun Etymology: Norwegian, literally, new Norwegian Date: 1931 a literary form of Norwegian based on the spoken dialects of Norway — compare bokmal
Nysa
or German Neisse geographical name river 120 miles (193 kilometers) SW Poland flowing NE into the Oder
nystagmic
adjective see nystagmus
nystagmus
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek nystagmos drowsiness, from nystazein to doze; probably akin to Lithuanian snusti to doze Date: 1867 a rapid involuntary oscillation of ...
nystatin
noun Etymology: New York State (where it was developed) + 1-in Date: 1952 an antifungal antibiotic that is derived from a soil actinomycete (Streptomyces noursei) and is used ...
NZ
abbreviation New Zealand
O
I. variant of oh II. noun Date: 1929 the one of the four ABO blood groups characterized by the absence of antigens designated by the letters A and B and by the presence of ...
o
I. noun (plural o's or os) Usage: often capitalized, often attributive Date: before 12th century 1. a. the 15th letter of the English alphabet b. a graphic ...
O altitudo
foreign term Etymology: Latin O (the) height ; feeling of spiritual exaltation
O level
noun Date: 1949 1. the lowest of three levels of standardized British examinations in a secondary school subject; also successful completion of an O-level examination in a ...
o tempora! o mores!
foreign term Etymology: Latin oh the times! oh the manners!
o'
also o preposition Etymology: Middle English o, o-, contraction of on & of Date: 13th century 1. chiefly dialect on 2. of
O'Boyle
biographical name Patrick Aloysius 1896-1987 American cardinal
O'Brian
biographical name Patrick 1914-2000 originally Richard Patrick Russ British novelist
O'Casey
biographical name Sean 1880-1964 originally John Casey Irish dramatist
o'clock
adverb Etymology: contraction of of the clock Date: 1535 1. according to the clock
O'Connell
I. biographical name Daniel 1775-1847 Irish nationalist II. biographical name William Henry 1859-1944 American cardinal
O'Connor
I. biographical name (Mary) Flannery 1925-1964 American writer II. biographical name Frank 1903-1966 pseudonym of Michael John O'Donovan Irish author III. biographical name ...
o'er
I. adverb Date: 1592 over II. preposition Date: 1593 over
O'Fallon
geographical name city E Missouri WNW of St. Louis population 46,169
O'Faoláin
biographical name Seán 1900-1991 Irish author
O'Flaherty
biographical name Liam 1896-1984 Irish novelist
O'Hara
biographical name John Henry 1905-1970 American author
O'Higgins
biographical name Bernardo 1778-1842 Liberator of Chile Chilean soldier & statesman
O'Keeffe
biographical name Georgia 1887-1986 American painter
O'Kelly
I. biographical name Seán Thomas 1883-1966 Irish journalist; president of Republic of Ireland (1945-59) II. biographical name Seumas 1881-1918 Irish writer
O'Neill
I. biographical name Eugene Gladstone 1888-1953 American dramatist II. biographical name Paul Henry 1935- United States secretary of treasury (2001-02)
O'odham
noun (plural O'odhams or O'odham) Etymology: O'odham ʔóʔdham people Date: 1985 1. a. Tohono O'odham b. a member of either the Pima or Tohono O'odham peoples 2. the ...
o-
I. combining form or oo- Etymology: Greek ōi-, ōio-, from ōion — more at egg egg ; specifically ovum II. abbreviation orth- or ortho-
O-ring
noun Date: 1946 a ring (as of synthetic rubber) used as a gasket
o/a
abbreviation on or about
oaf
noun (plural oafs) Etymology: alteration of auf, alfe goblin's child, probably from Middle English alven, elven elf, fairy, from Old English elfen nymphs; akin to Old English ...
oafish
adjective see oaf
oafishly
adverb see oaf
oafishness
noun see oaf
Oahe Reservoir
geographical name reservoir about 225 miles (362 kilometers) long N South Dakota & S North Dakota formed in Missouri River by Oahe Dam
Oahu
geographical name island Hawaii; site of Honolulu area 589 square miles (1531 square kilometers)
oak
noun (plural oaks or oak) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English ook, from Old English āc; akin to Old High German eih oak and perhaps to Greek aigilōps, a kind ...
oak apple
noun Date: 15th century a large round gall produced on oak leaves and twigs by a gall wasp (especially Amphibolips confluenta)
Oak Creek
geographical name city SE Wisconsin population 28,456
Oak Forest
geographical name village NE Illinois S of Chicago population 28,051
Oak Lawn
geographical name village NE Illinois SW of Chicago population 55,245
Oak Park
geographical name 1. village NE Illinois W of Chicago population 52,524 2. city SE Michigan N of Detroit population 29,793
Oak Ridge
geographical name city E Tennessee W of Knoxville population 27,387
oak wilt
noun Date: 1942 a destructive disease of oak trees that is caused by a fungus (Ceratocystis fagacearum) and is characterized by wilting, discoloration, and defoliation
oak-leaf cluster
noun Date: 1918 a bronze or silver cluster of oak leaves and acorns added to various military decorations to signify a second or subsequent award of the basic decoration
Oakdale
geographical name city E Minnesota ENE of St. Paul population 26,653
oaken
adjective see oak
Oakham
geographical name town E central England in E Leicestershire; capital of former county of Rutlandshire population 7996
Oakland
geographical name city & port W California on San Francisco Bay opposite San Francisco population 399,484
Oakland Park
geographical name city SE Florida N of Fort Lauderdale population 30,966
Oakley
geographical name city California NE of Oakland population 25,619
oakmoss
noun Date: 1921 any of several lichens (as Evernia prunastri) that grow on oak trees and yield a resin used in perfumery
oakum
noun Etymology: Middle English okum, from Old English ācumba tow, from ā- (separative & perfective prefix) + -cumba (akin to Old English camb comb) — more at abide Date: ...
Oakville
geographical name town Canada in SE Ontario SW of Toronto population 144,738
oar
I. noun Etymology: Middle English oor, from Old English ār; akin to Old Norse ār oar Date: before 12th century 1. a long pole with a broad blade at one end used for ...
oared
adjective see oar I
oarfish
noun Date: 1860 a marine bony fish (Regalecus glesne) of subtropical waters with a narrow soft body from 20 to 30 feet (6 to 9 meters) long, a red dorsal fin running the ...
oarlock
noun Date: before 12th century a usually U-shaped device for holding an oar in place
oarsman
noun Date: 1701 one who rows especially in a racing crew • oarsmanship noun
oarsmanship
noun see oarsman
oarswoman
noun Date: 1882 a woman who is an oarsman
OAS
abbreviation Organization of American States
OASDI
abbreviation Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance
oasis
noun (plural oases) Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek Date: 1613 1. a fertile or green area in an arid region (as a desert) 2. something that provides refuge, relief, or ...
oast
noun Etymology: Middle English ost, from Old English āst; akin to Middle Dutch eest kiln, Latin aestus heat, aestas summer — more at edify Date: before 12th century a ...
oasthouse
noun see oast
oat
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English ote, from Old English āte Date: before 12th century 1. a. any of several grasses (genus Avena); especially a ...
oat cell
noun Date: 1903 any of the small round or oval cells with a high ratio of nuclear protoplasm to cytoplasm that resemble oat grains and are characteristic of a small-cell lung ...
oat grass
noun Date: 1578 wild oat 1a; broadly any of several grasses resembling the oat
oatcake
noun Date: 14th century a thin flat oatmeal cake
oaten
adjective Date: 14th century of or relating to oats, oat straw, or oatmeal
oater
noun Date: 1946 western 2
Oates
I. biographical name Joyce Carol 1938- American writer II. biographical name Titus 1649-1705 British fabricator of the Popish Plot
oath
noun (plural oaths) Etymology: Middle English ooth, from Old English āth; akin to Old High German eid oath, Middle Irish oeth Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) a ...
oatmeal
noun Date: 14th century 1. a. meal made from oats b. rolled oats 2. porridge made from ground or rolled oats
OAU
abbreviation Organization of African Unity
Oaxaca
geographical name 1. state SE Mexico bordering on the Pacific area 36,820 square miles (95,364 square kilometers), population 3,019,560 2. city, its capital population ...
Oaxacan
adjective see Oaxaca
ob
abbreviation 1. [Latin obiit] he died; she died 2. observation
Ob
or Obad abbreviation Obadiah
OB
abbreviation obstetric; obstetrician; obstetrics
Ob'
geographical name river over 2250 miles (3620 kilometers) W Russia in Asia flowing NW & N into Gulf of Ob' (inlet of Arctic Ocean 500 miles or 800 kilometers long)
ob-
prefix Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, in the way, against, toward, from ob in the way of, on account of; akin to Old Church Slavic o, ob on, around inversely
ob-gyn
noun (plural ob-gyns) Etymology: obstetrician gynecologist Date: circa 1960 a physician who specializes in obstetrics and gynecology
Obad
abbreviation see Ob
Obadiah
noun Etymology: Hebrew ‘Õbhadhyāh Date: 1587 1. a Hebrew prophet 2. a prophetic book of canonical Jewish and Christian Scripture — see bible table
obbligato
I. adjective Etymology: Italian, obligatory, from past participle of obbligare to oblige, from Latin obligare — more at oblige Date: 1794 not to be omitted ; obligatory — ...
obcordate
adjective Date: circa 1775 heart-shaped with the notch apical
obduracy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1597 the quality or state of being obdurate
obdurate
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin obduratus, past participle of obdurare to harden, from ob- against + durus hard — more at during Date: 15th century 1. a. ...
obdurately
adverb see obdurate
obdurateness
noun see obdurate
OBE
abbreviation 1. officer of the Order of the British Empire 2. out-of-body experience
obeah
also obi noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: of African origin; akin to Ibo díbìà folk healer Date: circa 1711 a system of belief among blacks chiefly of the British ...
obedience
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. an act or instance of obeying b. the quality or state of being obedient 2. a sphere of jurisdiction; especially an ecclesiastical or ...
obedient
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin oboedient-, oboediens, from present participle of oboedire to obey Date: 13th century submissive to the ...
obediently
adverb see obedient
obeisance
noun Etymology: Middle English obeisaunce obedience, obeisance, from Anglo-French obeisance, from obeissant, present participle of obeir to obey Date: 14th century 1. a ...
obeisant
adjective see obeisance
obeisantly
adverb see obeisance
obelia
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1868 any of a genus (Obelia) of small colonial marine hydroids with colonies branched like trees
obelisk
noun Etymology: Middle French obelisque, from Latin obeliscus, from Greek obeliskos, from diminutive of obelos Date: 1569 1. an upright 4-sided usually monolithic pillar that ...
obelize
transitive verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: circa 1656 to designate or annotate with an obelus
obelus
noun (plural obeli) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Greek obelos spit, pointed pillar, obelus Date: 14th century 1. a symbol - or ÷ used in ancient ...
Oberammergau
geographical name town S Germany in Bavaria SSW of Munich population 4906
Oberhausen
geographical name city W Germany in the Ruhr WNW of Essen population 224,559
Oberland
geographical name — see Berner Alpen
Oberon
noun Etymology: Middle French, from Old French Auberon Date: circa 1533 the king of the fairies in medieval folklore
obese
adjective Etymology: Latin obesus, from ob- against + esus, past participle of edere to eat — more at ob-, eat Date: 1651 having excessive body fat
obesity
noun Date: circa 1611 a condition characterized by the excessive accumulation and storage of fat in the body
obey
verb (obeyed; obeying) Etymology: Middle English obeien, from Anglo-French obeir, from Latin oboedire, from ob- toward + -oedire (akin to audire to hear) — more at ob-, ...
obeyer
noun see obey
obfuscate
verb (-cated; -cating) Etymology: Late Latin obfuscatus, past participle of obfuscare, from Latin ob- in the way + fuscus dark brown — more at ob-, dusk Date: 1577 ...
obfuscation
noun see obfuscate
obfuscatory
adjective see obfuscate
obi
noun Etymology: Japanese Date: 1876 a broad sash worn especially with a Japanese kimono
Obie
noun Etymology: O.B., abbreviation for off Broadway Date: 1965 an award presented annually by a professional organization for notable achievement in plays performed ...
obiit
foreign term Etymology: Latin he or she died
obit
noun Etymology: Middle English death, service marking the anniversary of a death, from Anglo-French, from Latin obitus death, from obire to go to meet, die, from ob- in the way ...
obiter dictum
noun (plural obiter dicta) Etymology: Late Latin, literally, something said in passing Date: 1812 1. an incidental and collateral opinion that is uttered by a judge but is ...
obituarist
noun see obituary
obituary
noun (plural -aries) Etymology: Medieval Latin obituarium, from Latin obitus death Date: 1738 a notice of a person's death usually with a short biographical account • ...
obj
abbreviation object; objective
object
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin objectum, from Latin, neuter of objectus, past participle of obicere to throw in the way, present, hinder, from ob- in ...
object ball
noun Date: 1856 the ball first struck by the cue ball in pool or billiards; also a ball hit by the cue ball
object code
noun Date: 1961 a computer program after translation from source code usually into machine language by a compiler
object language
noun Date: 1937 target language
object lesson
noun Date: 1831 something that serves as a practical example of a principle or abstract idea
object-oriented
adjective Date: 1981 relating to, used in, or implemented by object-oriented programming
object-oriented programming
noun Date: 1981 computer programming in which programming objects are used to form additional objects and are arranged into hierarchies and in which a single object member (as ...
objectification
noun see objectify
objectify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: circa 1837 1. to treat as an object or cause to have objective reality 2. to give expression to (as an abstract notion, feeling, or ...
objection
noun Date: 14th century 1. an act of objecting 2. a. a reason or argument presented in opposition b. a feeling or expression of disapproval
objectionable
adjective Date: 1781 undesirable, offensive • objectionableness noun • objectionably adverb
objectionableness
noun see objectionable
objectionably
adverb see objectionable
objective
I. adjective Date: 1647 1. a. relating to or existing as an object of thought without consideration of independent existence — used chiefly in medieval philosophy b. ...
objective complement
noun Date: 1870 a noun, adjective, or pronoun used in the predicate as complement to a verb and as qualifier of its direct object (as chairman in “we elected him chairman”)
objective correlative
noun Date: 1919 something (as a situation or chain of events) that symbolizes or objectifies a particular emotion and that may be used in creative writing to evoke a desired ...
objectively
adverb see objective I
objectiveness
noun see objective I
objectivism
noun Date: 1854 1. any of various theories asserting the validity of objective phenomena over subjective experience; especially realism 2a 2. an ethical theory that moral ...
objectivist
adjective or noun see objectivism
objectivistic
adjective see objectivism
objectivity
noun see objective I
objectless
adjective see object I
objectlessness
noun see object I
objector
noun see object II
objet
noun see objet d'art
objet d'art
noun (plural objets d'art) Etymology: French, literally, art object Date: 1865 1. an article of some artistic value 2. curio — called also objet
objet trouvé
noun (plural objets trouvés) Etymology: French, literally, found object Date: 1937 a natural or discarded object found by chance and held to have aesthetic value
objurgate
transitive verb see objurgation
objurgation
noun Etymology: Middle English objurgacyon, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French objurgation, from Latin objurgation-, objurgatio, from objurgare to scold, blame, from ob- ...
objurgatory
adjective see objurgation
obl
abbreviation 1. oblique 2. oblong
oblanceolate
adjective Date: 1839 inversely lanceolate — see leaf illustration
oblast
noun (plural oblasts; also oblasti) Etymology: Russian oblast' Date: circa 1886 a political subdivision of Imperial Russia or a republic of the Union of Soviet Socialist ...
oblate
I. adjective Etymology: probably from New Latin oblatus, from ob- + -latus (as in prolatus prolate) Date: 1705 flattened or depressed at the poles • oblateness noun II. ...
obligate
I. transitive verb (-gated; -gating) Etymology: Latin obligatus, past participle of obligare Date: 1533 1. to bind legally or morally ; constrain 2. to commit (as funds) to ...
obligately
adverb see obligate II
obligation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of obligating oneself to a course of action (as by a promise or vow) 2. a. something (as a formal contract, a promise, or the ...
obligatorily
adverb see obligatory
obligatory
adjective Date: 15th century 1. binding in law or conscience 2. relating to or enforcing an obligation 3. mandatory, required ; also so commonplace as to be a ...
oblige
verb (obliged; obliging) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French obliger, from Latin obligare, literally, to bind to, from ob- toward + ligare to bind — more at ligature ...
obligee
noun Date: 1574 one to whom another is obligated (as by a contract); specifically one who is protected by a surety bond
obliger
noun see oblige
obliging
adjective Date: 1632 willing to do favors ; helpful Synonyms: see amiable • obligingly adverb • obligingness noun
obligingly
adverb see obliging
obligingness
noun see obliging
obligor
noun Date: 1541 one who is bound by a legal obligation
oblique angle
noun Date: 1688 an acute or obtuse angle
oblique case
noun Date: 1530 a grammatical case other than the nominative or vocative
obliquely
adverb see oblique I
obliqueness
noun see oblique I
obliquity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. deviation from moral rectitude or sound thinking 2. a. deviation from parallelism or perpendicularity; also the amount of such ...
obliterate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin oblitteratus, past participle of oblitterare, from ob- ob- + littera letter Date: 1600 1. a. to remove utterly from ...
obliteration
noun see obliterate
obliterative
adjective Date: circa 1812 inducing or characterized by obliteration: as a. causing or accompanied by closure or collapse of a lumen b. tending to make inconspicuous
obliterator
noun see obliterate
oblivion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin oblivion-, oblivio, from oblivisci to forget, perhaps from ob- in the way + levis smooth — more at ob-, levigate ...
oblivious
adjective Date: 15th century 1. lacking remembrance, memory, or mindful attention 2. lacking active conscious knowledge or awareness — usually used with of or to • ...
obliviously
adverb see oblivious
obliviousness
noun see oblivious
oblong
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French oblonge, from Latin oblongus, from ob- toward + longus long — more at long Date: 15th century deviating from a ...
obloquy
noun (plural -quies) Etymology: Middle English obloquie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin obloquium, from obloqui to speak against, from ob- against + loqui to speak Date: ...
obnoxious
adjective Etymology: Latin obnoxius, from ob in the way of, exposed to + noxa harm — more at noxious Date: 1597 1. archaic exposed to something unpleasant or harmful — ...
obnoxiously
adverb see obnoxious
obnoxiousness
noun see obnoxious
obnubilate
transitive verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin obnubilatus, past participle of obnubilare, from ob- in the way + nubilare to be cloudy, from nubilus cloudy, from nubes cloud ...
obnubilation
noun see obnubilate
OBO
abbreviation or best offer
oboe
noun Etymology: Italian, from French hautbois — more at hautbois Date: 1794 a double-reed woodwind instrument having a conical tube, a brilliant penetrating tone, and a ...
oboist
noun see oboe
obol
noun Etymology: Latin obolus, from Greek obolos, obelos, literally, spit Date: circa 1670 an ancient Greek coin or weight equal to 1/6 drachma
obovate
adjective Date: 1785 ovate with the narrower end basal — see leaf illustration
obovoid
adjective Date: 1819 ovoid with the broad end toward the apex
Obrenović
biographical name Alexander I — see alexander
obscene
adjective Etymology: Middle French, from Latin obscenus, obscaenus Date: 1593 1. disgusting to the senses ; repulsive 2. a. abhorrent to morality or virtue; ...
obscenely
adverb see obscene
obscenity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1589 1. the quality or state of being obscene 2. something (as an utterance or act) that is obscene
obscurant
or obscurantic adjective Date: 1878 tending to make obscure • obscurant noun
obscurantic
adjective see obscurant
obscurantism
noun Date: 1834 1. opposition to the spread of knowledge ; a policy of withholding knowledge from the general public 2. a. a style (as in literature or art) characterized ...
obscurantist
noun or adjective see obscurantism
obscuration
noun see obscure II
obscure
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French oscur, obscur, from Latin obscurus Date: 15th century 1. a. dark, dim b. shrouded in or hidden by darkness ...
obscurely
adverb see obscure I
obscureness
noun see obscure I
obscurity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 14th century 1. one that is obscure 2. the quality or state of being obscure
obscurum per obscurius
foreign term Etymology: Latin (explaining) the obscure by means of the more obscure
obsequious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, compliant, from Latin obsequiosus, from obsequium compliance, from obsequi to comply, from ob- toward + sequi to follow — more at ob-, ...
obsequiously
adverb see obsequious
obsequiousness
noun see obsequious
obsequy
noun (plural -quies) Etymology: Middle English obsequie, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin obsequiae (plural), alteration of Latin exsequiae, from exsequi to follow out, ...
observability
noun see observable
observable
adjective Date: 1609 1. noteworthy 2. capable of being observed ; discernible • observability noun • observable noun • observably adverb
observably
adverb see observable
observance
noun Date: 13th century 1. a. a customary practice, rite, or ceremony b. a rule governing members of a religious order 2. an act or instance of following a custom, ...
observant
I. adjective Date: 1602 1. a. paying strict attention ; watchful b. keen, perceptive 2. careful in observing (as rites, laws, or customs) ; mindful • ...
observantly
adverb see observant I
observation
I. noun Etymology: Middle French, from Latin observation-, observatio, from observare Date: 1535 1. a. an act or instance of observing a custom, rule, or law b. ...
observational
adjective see observation I
observationally
adverb see observation I
observatory
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: probably from New Latin observatorium, from Latin observare Date: 1676 1. a building or place given over to or equipped for observation of ...
observe
verb (observed; observing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French observer, from Latin observare to guard, watch, observe, from ob- in the way, toward + servare to keep ...
observer
noun Date: circa 1550 one that observes: as a. a representative sent to observe but not participate officially in an activity (as a meeting or war) b. an expert analyst ...
observingly
adverb see observe
obsess
verb Etymology: Latin obsessus, past participle of obsidēre to frequent, besiege, from ob- against + sedēre to sit — more at ob-, sit Date: 1531 transitive verb to ...
obsession
noun Date: 1680 1. a persistent disturbing preoccupation with an often unreasonable idea or feeling; broadly compelling motivation 2. something that causes an obsession ...
obsessional
adjective see obsession
obsessionally
adverb see obsession
obsessive
adjective Date: 1901 1. a. tending to cause obsession b. excessive often to an unreasonable degree 2. of, relating to, or characterized by obsession ; deriving from ...
obsessive-compulsive
adjective Date: 1927 relating to, characterized by, or affected with recurring obsessions and compulsions especially as symptoms of a neurotic state • ...
obsessively
adverb see obsessive
obsessiveness
noun see obsessive
obsidian
noun Etymology: New Latin obsidianus, from Latin obsidianus lapis, false manuscript reading for obsianus lapis, literally, stone of Obsius, from Obsius, its supposed ...
obsolesce
verb (-lesced; -lescing) Etymology: Latin obsolescere Date: 1873 intransitive verb to be or become obsolescent transitive verb to make obsolescent
obsolescence
noun Date: circa 1828 the process of becoming obsolete or the condition of being nearly obsolete
obsolescent
adjective Date: 1755 going out of use ; becoming obsolete • obsolescently adverb
obsolescently
adverb see obsolescent
obsolete
I. adjective Etymology: Latin obsoletus, from past participle of obsolescere to grow old, become disused, perhaps from ob- toward + solēre to be accustomed Date: 1579 1. ...
obsoletely
adverb see obsolete I
obsoleteness
noun see obsolete I
obstacle
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin obstaculum, from obstare to stand in front of, from ob- in the way + stare to stand — more at ob-, stand Date: ...
obstacle course
noun Date: 1943 a military training course filled with obstacles (as hurdles, fences, walls, and ditches) that must be negotiated; broadly a series of obstacles that must be ...
obstetric
or obstetrical adjective Etymology: modification of Latin obstetricius, from obstetric-, obstetrix midwife, from obstare Date: 1742 of, relating to, or associated with ...
obstetrical
adjective see obstetric
obstetrically
adverb see obstetric

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.052 c;