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Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

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Mizoram
geographical name state NE India area 8142 square miles (21,169 square kilometers), population 689,756
mizuna
noun Etymology: Japanese, from mizu water + na greens Date: 1976 a Japanese mustard (Brassica rapa nipposinica syn. B. rapa japonica) having mild tasting deeply dissected ...
mizzen
I. noun also mizen Etymology: Middle English mesan, probably from Old Spanish mesana sail set amidships, from Catalan mitjana, from feminine of mitjan of the middle, from Latin ...
mizzenmast
noun Date: 15th century the mast aft or next aft of the mainmast in a ship
mizzle
I. intransitive verb (mizzled; mizzling) Etymology: Middle English misellen; akin to Dutch dialect mizzelen to drizzle, Middle Dutch mist fog, mist Date: 15th century to rain ...
mizzly
adjective see mizzle I
Mk
abbreviation Mark
MKS
abbreviation meter-kilogram-second
mkt
abbreviation market
mktg
abbreviation marketing
ml
abbreviation milliliter
mL
abbreviation 1. millilambert 2. milliliter
MLA
abbreviation 1. Member of the Legislative Assembly 2. Modern Language Association
MLB
abbreviation Major League Baseball
MLD
abbreviation minimum lethal dose
MLF
abbreviation multilateral force
Mlle
abbreviation Etymology: French mademoiselle
Mlles
abbreviation Etymology: French mesdemoiselles
MLS
abbreviation 1. Major League Soccer 2. master of library science
MLW
abbreviation mean low water
mm
abbreviation 1. measures 2. millimeter
MM
abbreviation Etymology: French messieurs
Mmabatho
geographical name town N Republic of South Africa near Botswana border; formerly capital of Bophuthatswana
Mme
abbreviation Etymology: French madame
Mmes
abbreviation Etymology: French mesdames
mmf
abbreviation magnetomotive force
MMPI
abbreviation Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory
MMR
abbreviation measles-mumps-rubella (vaccine)
Mn
symbol manganese
MN
abbreviation 1. magnetic north 2. Minnesota
MNC
abbreviation multinational company; multinational corporation
mnemonic
I. adjective Etymology: Greek mnēmonikos, from mnēmōn mindful, from mimnēskesthai to remember — more at mind Date: 1753 1. assisting or intended to assist memory; also ...
mnemonically
adverb see mnemonic I
mnemonics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: circa 1721 a technique of improving the memory
Mnemosyne
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Mnēmosynē Date: 1582 the Greek goddess of memory and mother of the Muses by Zeus
mo
abbreviation month
MO
I. noun Usage: often not capitalized Date: 1952 modus operandi II. abbreviation 1. mail order 2. medical officer 3. Missouri 4. money order
Mo
I. abbreviation 1. Missouri 2. Monday II. symbol molybdenum
Mo Ti
biographical name — see Mo-tzu
Mo-tzu
biographical name 470?-?391 B.C. originally Mo Ti L. Micius Chinese philosopher
moa
noun Etymology: Maori Date: 1842 any of various usually very large extinct flightless birds of New Zealand of a ratite order (Dinornithiformes) including one (Dinornis ...
Moab
geographical name region Jordan E of Dead Sea; in biblical times a kingdom between Edom & the country of the Amorites
Moabite
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin Moabita, Moabites, from Greek Mōabitēs, from Mōab Moab, ancient kingdom in Syria Date: 14th century a member of an ancient ...
Moabitish
adjective see Moabite
moan
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mone, from Old English *mān Date: 13th century 1. lamentation, complaint 2. a low prolonged sound of pain or of grief II. verb Date: ...
moaner
noun see moan II
moat
noun Etymology: Middle English mote, from Anglo-French mote, motte mound, moat Date: 14th century 1. a deep and wide trench around the rampart of a fortified place (as a ...
moated
adjective see moat
moatlike
adjective see moat
mob
I. noun Etymology: Latin mobile vulgus vacillating crowd Date: 1688 1. a large or disorderly crowd; especially one bent on riotous or destructive action 2. the lower ...
mobbish
adjective see mob I
mobcap
noun Etymology: mob woman's cap + cap Date: 1795 a woman's fancy indoor cap made with a high full crown and often tied under the chin
mobe pearl
or mobé pearl noun Usage: often capitalized M Etymology: alteration of mabe Date: 1955 mabe
mobé pearl
noun see mobe pearl
Mobile
geographical name 1. river 38 miles (61 kilometers) long SW Alabama formed by Alabama & Tombigbee rivers & flowing S into Mobile Bay (inlet of Gulf of Mexico) 2. city & ...
mobile
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English mobyll, from Anglo-French moble, from Latin mobilis, from movēre to move Date: 15th century 1. capable of moving or being moved ; ...
mobile home
noun Date: 1940 a dwelling structure built on a steel chassis and fitted with wheels that is intended to be hauled to a usually permanent site — compare motor home
mobilise
chiefly British variant of mobilize
mobility
noun see mobile I
mobilization
noun Date: 1799 1. the act of mobilizing 2. the state of being mobilized
mobilize
verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 1838 transitive verb 1. a. to put into movement or circulation b. to release (something stored in the organism) for bodily use 2. ...
Möbius strip
noun Etymology: August F. Möbius died 1868 German mathematician Date: 1904 a one-sided surface that is constructed from a rectangle by holding one end fixed, rotating the ...
mobled
adjective Etymology: past participle of moble to muffle, probably frequentative of mob to muffle, of unknown origin Date: circa 1601 being wrapped or muffled in or as if in a ...
mobocracy
noun Date: 1754 1. rule by the mob 2. the mob as a ruling class • mobocrat noun • mobocratic adjective
mobocrat
noun see mobocracy
mobocratic
adjective see mobocracy
mobster
noun Date: 1917 a member of a criminal gang
Mobutu Sese Seko
biographical name 1930-1997 originally Joseph-Désiré Mobutu president of Zaire (1965-97)
moc
noun Date: 1948 moccasin 1
Moca
geographical name city NW Puerto Rico population 39,697
Moçambique
geographical name — see Mozambique
Moçâmedes
geographical name — see Namibe
moccasin
noun Etymology: Virginia Algonquian mockasin Date: circa 1612 1. a. a soft leather heelless shoe or boot with the sole brought up the sides of the foot and over the toes ...
moccasin flower
noun Date: 1680 any of several lady's slippers (genus Cypripedium); especially a once common woodland orchid (C. acaule) of eastern North America with pink or white ...
mocha
noun Etymology: Mocha, Yemen Date: 1773 1. a. (1) a superior Arabian coffee consisting of small green or yellowish beans (2) a coffee of superior quality b. a ...
Mocha
or Arabic Al Mukhā geographical name town & port SW Yemen on the Red Sea
mock
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from moker Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to treat with contempt or ridicule ; deride 2. to disappoint the hopes of 3. defy, ...
mock orange
noun Date: 1731 1. any of a genus (Philadelphus) of ornamental shrubs of which several are widely grown for their showy white flowers and that is either placed in the ...
mock turtle soup
noun Date: 1783 a soup made of meat (as calf's head or veal), wine, and spices in imitation of green turtle soup
mock turtleneck
noun Date: 1966 1. a collar that is lower and usually looser than a turtleneck and is not turned over 2. a garment with a mock turtleneck
mock-epic
noun see mock-heroic II
mock-heroic
I. adjective Date: circa 1712 ridiculing or burlesquing heroic style, character, or action • mock-heroically adverb II. noun Date: 1728 a mock-heroic composition — ...
mock-heroically
adverb see mock-heroic I
mock-up
noun Date: 1920 1. a full-sized structural model built to scale chiefly for study, testing, or display 2. a working sample (as of a magazine) for reviewing format, layout, ...
mocker
noun see mock I
mockery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 15th century 1. insulting or contemptuous action or speech ; derision 2. a subject of laughter, derision, or sport 3. a. a counterfeit ...
mockingbird
noun Date: 1676 a common grayish North American bird (Mimus polyglottos) related to the thrashers that is remarkable for its exact imitations of the notes of other birds
mockingly
adverb see mock I
mockumentary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: blend of mock and documentary Date: 1984 a facetious or satirical work (as a film) presented in the style of a documentary
Moctezuma
biographical name see Montezuma II
mod
I. noun Etymology: probably from 2mod Date: 1960 one who wears mod clothes II. adjective Etymology: short for modern Date: 1964 1. of, relating to, or being the ...
mod con
noun Etymology: from mod. con., abbreviation for modern convenience Date: 1934 chiefly British a modern convenience — usually used in plural
modacrylic fiber
noun Etymology: modified acrylic Date: 1960 any of various synthetic textile fibers that are long-chain polymers composed of 35 to 85 percent by weight of acrylonitrile ...
modal
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin modalis, from Latin modus Date: 1569 1. of or relating to modality in logic 2. containing provisions as to the mode of procedure or the ...
modal auxiliary
noun Date: circa 1904 an auxiliary verb (as can, must, might, may) that is characteristically used with a verb of predication and expresses a modal modification and that in ...
modality
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1545 1. a. the quality or state of being modal b. a modal quality or attribute ; form 2. the classification of logical propositions according ...
modally
adverb see modal
Modder
geographical name river 180 miles (290 kilometers) Republic of South Africa in Free State; a tributary of the Vaal
mode
I. noun Etymology: Middle English moede, from Latin modus measure, manner, musical mode — more at mete Date: 14th century 1. a. an arrangement of the eight diatonic ...
model
I. noun Etymology: Middle French modelle, from Old Italian modello, from Vulgar Latin *modellus, from Latin modulus small measure, from modus Date: 1575 1. obsolete a set of ...
modeler
noun see model II
modeller
noun see model II
modem
I. noun Etymology: modulator + demodulator Date: circa 1952 a device that converts signals produced by one type of device (as a computer) to a form compatible with another ...
Modena
or ancient Mutina geographical name commune N Italy in Emilia SW of Venice population 176,857 • Modenese noun
Modenese
noun see Modena
moderate
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin moderatus, from past participle of moderare to moderate; akin to Latin modus measure Date: 15th century 1. a. avoiding ...
moderate breeze
noun Date: circa 1881 wind having a speed of about 13 to 18 miles (20 to 29 kilometers) per hour — see Beaufort scale table
moderate gale
noun Date: 1703 wind having a speed of 32 to 38 miles (51 to 61 kilometers) per hour — see Beaufort scale table
moderately
adverb see moderate I
moderateness
noun see moderate I
moderation
noun see moderate II
moderato
adverb or adjective Etymology: Italian, from Latin moderatus Date: circa 1724 moderate — used as a direction in music to indicate tempo
moderator
noun Date: circa 1560 1. one who arbitrates ; mediator 2. one who presides over an assembly, meeting, or discussion: as a. the presiding officer of a Presbyterian ...
moderatorship
noun see moderator
modern
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin modernus, from Latin modo just now, from modus measure — more at mete Date: 1585 1. a. of, relating to, or characteristic of the ...
Modern Greek
noun Date: 1699 Greek as used by the Greeks since the end of the medieval period
Modern Hebrew
noun Date: 1949 the Hebrew language in use in present-day Israel
modern pentathlon
noun Date: circa 1912 a composite contest in which all contestants compete in a 300-meter freestyle swim, a 4000-meter cross-country run, a 5000-meter 30-jump equestrian ...
moderne
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French, modern Date: 1955 art deco • moderne adjective
modernisation
British variant of modernization
modernise
British variant of modernize
modernism
noun Date: 1737 1. a practice, usage, or expression peculiar to modern times 2. often capitalized a tendency in theology to accommodate traditional religious teaching to ...
modernist
noun or adjective see modernism
modernistic
adjective see modernism
modernity
noun see modern I
modernization
noun Date: 1770 1. the act of modernizing ; the state of being modernized 2. something modernized ; a modernized version
modernize
verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1748 transitive verb to make modern (as in taste, style, or usage) intransitive verb to adopt modern ways • modernizer noun
modernizer
noun see modernize
modernly
adverb see modern I
modernness
noun see modern I
modest
adjective Etymology: Latin modestus moderate; akin to Latin modus measure Date: 1565 1. a. placing a moderate estimate on one's abilities or worth b. neither bold nor ...
modestly
adverb see modest
Modesto
geographical name city central California on the Tuolumne population 188,856
modesty
noun Date: 1531 1. freedom from conceit or vanity 2. propriety in dress, speech, or conduct
modicum
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, neuter of modicus moderate, from modus measure Date: 15th century a small portion ; a limited quantity
modifiability
noun see modify
modifiable
adjective see modify
modification
noun Date: 1603 1. the limiting of a statement ; qualification 2. mode I,6a 3. a. the making of a limited change in something; also the result of such a change b. a ...
modifier
noun Date: 1583 1. one that modifies 2. a word or phrase that makes specific the meaning of another word or phrase 3. a gene that modifies the effect of another
modify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English modifien, from Anglo-French modifier, from Latin modificare to measure, moderate, from modus Date: 14th century transitive verb ...
Modigliani
I. biographical name Amedeo 1884-1920 Italian painter II. biographical name Franco 1918- American (Italian-born) economist
modillion
noun Etymology: Italian modiglione Date: 1563 an ornamental block or bracket under the corona of the cornice (as in the Corinthian order)
modish
adjective Date: 1660 fashionable, stylish • modishly adverb • modishness noun
modishly
adverb see modish
modishness
noun see modish
modiste
noun Etymology: French, from mode style, mode Date: circa 1840 one who makes and sells fashionable dresses and hats for women
Modjeska
biographical name Helena 1840-1909 American (Polish-born) actress
Modred
noun Date: 13th century a knight of the Round Table and nephew of King Arthur
modulability
noun Date: 1928 the capability of being modulated
modular
adjective Date: 1798 1. of, relating to, or based on a module or a modulus 2. constructed with standardized units or dimensions for flexibility and variety in use • ...
modular arithmetic
noun Date: 1959 arithmetic that deals with whole numbers where the numbers are replaced by their remainders after division by a fixed number
modularity
noun see modular
modularized
adjective Date: 1959 1. containing or consisting of modules 2. produced in the form of modules
modularly
adverb see modular
modulate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin modulatus, past participle of modulari to play, sing, from modulus small measure, rhythm, diminutive of modus measure — more at mete ...
modulation
noun Date: 1501 1. an inflection of the tone or pitch of the voice; specifically the use of stress or pitch to convey meaning 2. a regulating according to measure or ...
modulator
noun see modulate
modulatory
adjective see modulate
module
noun Etymology: Latin modulus Date: circa 1628 1. a standard or unit of measurement 2. the size of some one part taken as a unit of measure by which the proportions of an ...
modulo
preposition Etymology: New Latin, ablative of modulus Date: 1897 with respect to a modulus of
modulus
noun (plural moduli) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, small measure Date: 1753 1. a. the factor by which a logarithm of a number to one base is multiplied to obtain the ...
modus operandi
noun (plural modi operandi) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1654 a method of procedure; especially a distinct pattern or method of operation that indicates or suggests the work ...
modus vivendi
noun (plural modi vivendi) Etymology: New Latin, manner of living Date: circa 1879 1. a feasible arrangement or practical compromise; especially one that bypasses ...
Moesia
geographical name ancient country & Roman province SE Europe in modern Serbia & Bulgaria S of the Danube from the Drina to the Black Sea
Mogadiscio
geographical name see Mogadishu
Mogadishu
or Mogadiscio geographical name city & port capital of Somalia on Indian Ocean population 349,245
Mogador
geographical name — see Essaouira
Mogen David
variant of Magen David
moggie
noun see moggy
moggy
also moggie noun (plural moggies) Etymology: probably from Moggy, from Mog, nickname from the name Margaret Date: circa 1911 British cat
moghul
I. noun see mogul I, 1 II. adjective see mogul I
Mogilev
geographical name — see Mahilyow
Mogollon
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Mogollon, mountain range and plateau in New Mexico Date: 1946 a prehistoric American Indian people inhabiting the mountains of ...
Mogollon Mountains
geographical name mountains SW New Mexico; highest peak Whitewater Baldy 10,895 feet (3320 meters)
mogul
I. noun Etymology: Persian Mughul, from Mongolian mongγol Mongol Date: 1588 1. (also moghul) (or mughal) capitalized an Indian Muslim of or descended from one of several ...
Mohacs
geographical name town S Hungary population 20,700
mohair
noun Etymology: modification of obsolete Italian mocaiarro, from Arabic mukhayyar, literally, choice Date: 1619 a fabric or yarn made wholly or in part of the long silky ...
Mohammad Reza Pahlavi
biographical name 1919-1980 shah of Iran (1941-79)
Mohammed
biographical name variant of Muhammad
Mohammedan
also Muhammadan adjective Date: 1681 of or relating to Muhammad or Islam • Mohammedan also Muhammadan noun • Mohammedanism also Muhammadanism noun
Mohammedanism
noun see Mohammedan
Mohave Desert
geographical name see Mojave Desert
Mohawk
I. noun (plural Mohawk or Mohawks) Etymology: of Algonquian origin; akin to Narragansett or Massachusett Mohowawog Mohawk, literally, cannibal Date: 1634 1. a member of an ...
Mohegan
or Mohican noun (plural Mohegan or Mohegans or Mohican or Mohicans) Etymology: of southern New England Algonquian origin; akin to Narragansett Monahiganeuck Mohegans Date: ...
mohel
noun (plural mohels; also mohalim or mohelim) Etymology: Hebrew mōhēl Date: 1650 a person who performs ritual Jewish circumcisions
Mohenjo Daro
geographical name prehistoric city Pakistan in Indus valley NE of modern Karachi
Mohican
variant of Mahican
Moho
noun Etymology: short for Mohorovicic discontinuity, from Andrija Mohorovičić died 1936 Yugoslavian geologist Date: 1952 the boundary layer between the earth's crust and ...
Mohock
noun Etymology: alteration of Mohawk Date: circa 1712 one of a gang of aristocratic ruffians who assaulted and otherwise maltreated people in London streets in the early ...
Mohockism
noun see Mohock
Mohorovicic discontinuity
noun Date: 1936 Moho
Mohs' scale
noun Etymology: Friedrich Mohs died 1839 German mineralogist Date: 1879 a scale of hardness for minerals that ranges from a value of 1 for talc to 10 for diamond
mohur
noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu muhr gold coin, seal, from Persian, from Middle Persian; akin to Sanskrit mudrā seal Date: 1690 a former gold coin of India and Persia equal to ...
Moi
biographical name Daniel arap 1924- president of Kenya (1978-2002)
moiety
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English moite, from Anglo-French meité, moité, from Late Latin medietat-, medietas, from Latin medius middle — more at mid Date: 15th ...
moil
I. verb Etymology: Middle English mollen, moillen, from Anglo-French moiller, from Vulgar Latin *molliare, from Latin mollis soft — more at mollify Date: 15th century ...
moiler
noun see moil I
moiling
adjective Date: 1603 1. a. requiring hard work b. industrious 2. violently agitated ; turbulent • moilingly adverb
moilingly
adverb see moiling
Moirai
noun plural Etymology: Greek, from plural of moira lot, fate; akin to Greek meros part — more at merit Date: 1892 fate 4
moire
noun Etymology: French, from English mohair Date: 1660 archaic a watered mohair
moiré
or moire noun Etymology: French moiré, from moiré like moire, from moire Date: 1818 1. a. an irregular wavy finish on a fabric b. a ripple pattern on a stamp 2. a ...
Moissan
biographical name Henri 1852-1907 French chemist
moist
adjective Etymology: Middle English moiste, from Anglo-French, perhaps from Vulgar Latin *muscidus, alteration of Latin mucidus slimy, from mucus nasal mucus Date: 14th ...
moisten
verb (moistened; moistening) Date: 1580 transitive verb to make moist intransitive verb to become moist • moistener noun
moistener
noun see moisten
moistly
adverb see moist
moistness
noun see moist
moisture
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from moiste Date: 14th century liquid diffused or condensed in relatively small quantity
moisturise
British variant of moisturize
moisturize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1945 to add moisture to • moisturizer noun
moisturizer
noun see moisturize
Mojave Desert
or Mohave Desert geographical name desert S California SE of S end of the Sierra Nevada
Moji
geographical name former city Japan in N Kyushu on Shimonoseki Strait — see Kitakyushu
mojo
noun (plural mojoes or mojos) Etymology: probably of African origin; akin to Fulani moco'o medicine man Date: 1926 a magic spell, hex, or charm; broadly magical power
moke
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1839 1. slang British donkey 2. slang Australian nag I
Mokpo
geographical name city & port SW South Korea on Yellow Sea SW of Kwangju population 236,085
MOL
abbreviation manned orbiting (or orbital) laboratory
mol
I. variant of mole V II. abbreviation molecular; molecule
mol wt
abbreviation molecular weight
molal
adjective Etymology: 5mole Date: 1905 of, relating to, or containing a mole of solute per 1000 grams of solvent • molality noun
molality
noun see molal
molar
I. noun Etymology: Middle English molares, plural, from Latin molaris, from molaris of a mill, from mola millstone — more at mill Date: 14th century a tooth with a rounded ...
molarity
noun see molar III
molasses
noun Etymology: modification of Portuguese melaço, from Late Latin mellaceum grape juice, from Latin mell-, mel honey — more at mellifluous Date: 1582 1. the thick dark to ...
Mold
geographical name town NE Wales SSW of Liverpool, England
mold
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English molde; akin to Old High German molta soil, Latin molere to grind — more at meal Date: before 12th century 1. crumbling ...
moldable
adjective see mold III
Moldavia
geographical name 1. region Europe in NE Romania & Moldova between the Carpathians & Transylvanian Alps on the W & the Dniester on the E 2. — see Moldova • Moldavian ...
Moldavian
adjective or noun see Moldavia
moldboard
noun Date: 1508 1. a curved iron plate attached above a plowshare to lift and turn the soil 2. the flat or curved blade (as of a bulldozer) that pushes material to one side ...
molder
intransitive verb (moldered; moldering) Etymology: frequentative of 5mold Date: 1531 to crumble into particles ; disintegrate, decay
moldiness
noun see moldy
molding
noun Date: 14th century 1. an object produced by molding 2. a. a decorative recessed or relieved surface b. a decorative plane or curved strip used for ornamentation ...
Moldova
geographical name country in E Moldavia region; formerly (as Moldavian Republic or Moldavia) a constituent republic of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; capital ...
Moldovan
noun or adjective see Moldova
moldy
adjective (moldier; -est) Date: 14th century 1. of, resembling, or covered with mold 2. a. being old and moldering ; crumbling b. antiquated, fusty • moldiness ...
mole
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English māl; akin to Old High German meil spot Date: 14th century a pigmented spot, mark, or small permanent protuberance on the ...
mole cricket
noun Date: 1714 any of a family (Gryllotalpidae) of widely distributed orthopteran insects that have broad front legs adapted for digging in moist soil and that feed largely ...
mole rat
noun Date: 1781 any of various burrowing Old World rodents (as of the families Bathyergidae and Muridae) that generally resemble moles in appearance and have large often ...
mole ruit sua
foreign term Etymology: Latin it collapses from its own bigness
molecular
adjective Date: 1823 1. of, relating to, consisting of, or produced by molecules 2. of or relating to individual or small components • molecularly adverb
molecular biologist
noun see molecular biology
molecular biology
noun Date: 1938 a branch of biology dealing with the ultimate physicochemical organization of living matter and especially with the molecular basis of inheritance and protein ...
molecular chaperone
noun Date: 1989 chaperone 3
molecular formula
noun Date: 1869 a chemical formula that gives the total number of atoms of each element in each molecule of a substance — compare structural formula
molecular genetics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1963 a branch of genetics dealing with the structure and activity of genetic material at the molecular level
molecular mass
noun Date: 1873 the mass of a molecule that is equal to the sum of the masses of all the atoms contained in the molecule
molecular orbital
noun Date: 1932 a solution of the Schrödinger equation that describes the probable location of an electron relative to the nuclei in a molecule and so indicates the nature of ...
molecular sieve
noun Date: 1869 a crystalline substance (as a zeolite) characterized by uniformly sized pores of molecular dimension that can adsorb small molecules and is used especially in ...
molecular weight
noun Date: 1869 the average mass of a molecule of a compound compared to 1/12 the mass of carbon 12 and calculated as the sum of the atomic weights of the constituent atoms
molecularly
adverb see molecular
molecule
noun Etymology: French molécule, from New Latin molecula, diminutive of Latin moles mass Date: 1794 1. the smallest particle of a substance that retains all the properties ...
molehill
noun Date: 15th century a little mound or ridge of earth pushed up by a mole
Molenbeek
or Molenbeek-Saint-Jean geographical name commune central Belgium in Brabant W of Brussels population 68,759
Molenbeek-Saint-Jean
geographical name see Molenbeek
moleskin
noun Date: 1668 1. the skin of the mole used as fur 2. a. a heavy durable cotton fabric with a short thick velvety nap on one side b. a garment made of moleskin — ...
molest
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French molester, from Latin molestare, from molestus burdensome, annoying; akin to Latin moles mass Date: 14th century 1. ...
molestation
noun see molest
molester
noun see molest
Moley
biographical name Raymond Charles 1886-1975 American journalist
Molière
biographical name 1622-1673 originally Jean-Baptiste Poquelin French actor & dramatist
Molina
I. biographical name Mario José 1943- American (Mexican-born) chemist II. biographical name Tirso de — see Tirso de Molina
moline
adjective Etymology: Anglo-French *moliné, from molin mill, from Late Latin molinum — more at mill Date: 1562 of a heraldic cross having the end of each arm forked and ...
Moline
geographical name city NW Illinois on Mississippi River population 43,768

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