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Molise
geographical name region central Italy between the Apennines & the Adriatic S of Abruzzi capital Campobasso population 335,348 — see Abruzzi
moll
noun Etymology: probably from Moll, nickname for Mary Date: 1557 1. prostitute 2. a. doll 2 b. a gangster's girlfriend
mollie
noun see molly
mollification
noun see mollify
mollify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle English mollifien, from Middle French mollifier, from Late Latin mollificare, from Latin mollis soft; akin to Greek amaldynein to soften, ...
mollusc
noun see mollusk
molluscan
adjective see mollusk
molluscicidal
adjective see molluscicide
molluscicide
noun Etymology: New Latin Mollusca + English -i- + -cide Date: circa 1947 an agent for destroying mollusks (as snails) • molluscicidal adjective
mollusk
or mollusc noun Etymology: French mollusque, from New Latin Mollusca, from Latin, neuter plural of molluscus thin-shelled (of a nut), from mollis Date: 1783 any of a large ...
molluskan
adjective see mollusk
molly
also mollie noun (plural mollies) Etymology: by shortening from New Latin Mollienisia, former genus name, from Comte François N. Mollien died 1850 French statesman Date: circa ...
mollycoddle
I. noun Etymology: Molly, nickname for Mary Date: 1833 a pampered or effeminate man or boy II. transitive verb (-coddled; mollycoddling) Date: 1864 to treat with an ...
mollycoddler
noun see mollycoddle II
Molnár
biographical name Ferenc 1878-1952 Hungarian author
Moloch
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek, from Hebrew Mōlekh Date: 14th century a Semitic god to whom children were sacrificed
Molokai
geographical name island central Hawaii area 259 square miles (673 square kilometers)
Molopo
geographical name river 600 miles (966 kilometers) S Africa flowing W along border between Botswana & Republic of South Africa & thence S into Orange River; now usually dry
Molotov
I. biographical name Vyacheslav Mikhaylovich 1890-1986 originally surname Skryabin Soviet statesman II. geographical name — see Perm'
Molotov cocktail
noun Etymology: Vyacheslav M. Molotov Date: 1940 a crude bomb made of a bottle filled with a flammable liquid (as gasoline) and usually fitted with a wick (as a saturated ...
molt
I. verb Etymology: alteration of Middle English mouten, from Old English -mūtian to change, from Latin mutare — more at mutable Date: 15th century intransitive verb to ...
molten
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from past participle of melten to melt Date: 14th century 1. obsolete made by melting and casting 2. fused or liquefied by heat ; ...
molter
noun see molt I
Moltke
biographical name Helmuth Karl Bernhard 1800-1891 Graf von Moltke Prussian field marshal
molto
adverb Etymology: Italian, from Latin multum, from neuter of multus much Date: circa 1801 much, very — used in music directions
Molucca
adjective see Moluccas
Moluccan
adjective see Moluccas
Moluccas
or Indonesian Maluku geographical name islands Indonesia in Malay Archipelago between Sulawesi & New Guinea area 32,307 square miles (83,675 square kilometers), population ...
moly
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek mōly Date: 1567 a mythical herb with a black root, white blossoms, and magical powers
molybdate
noun Date: 1794 a salt of molybdenum containing the group MoO4 or Mo2O7
molybdenite
noun Etymology: New Latin molybdena Date: 1837 a metallic gray usually foliated mineral consisting of molybdenum disulfide that is a major ore of molybdenum
molybdenum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from molybdena, a lead ore, molybdenite, molybdenum, from Latin molybdaena galena, from Greek molybdaina, from molybdos lead Date: 1814 a metallic ...
molybdenum disulfide
noun Date: circa 1931 a compound MoS2 used especially as a lubricant in grease
mom
noun Etymology: short for momma Date: circa 1894 mother 1a
MOM
abbreviation middle of month
mom-and-pop
adjective Date: 1951 1. being or relating to a small owner-operated business 2. small-scale
Mombasa
geographical name 1. island Kenya on coast N of Pemba 2. city & port on Mombasa Island & adjacent mainland population 341,148
mome
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1553 archaic blockhead, fool
moment
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin momentum movement, particle sufficient to turn the scales, moment, from movēre to move Date: 14th century 1. ...
moment of inertia
Date: 1830 a measure of the resistance of a body to angular acceleration about a given axis that is equal to the sum of the products of each element of mass in the body and ...
moment of truth
Date: 1932 1. the final sword thrust in a bullfight 2. a moment of crisis on whose outcome much or everything depends
momentarily
adverb Date: circa 1666 1. for a moment 2. archaic instantly 3. at any moment ; in a moment
momentariness
noun see momentary
momentary
adjective Date: 15th century 1. a. continuing only a moment ; fleeting b. having a very brief life 2. operative or recurring at every moment Synonyms: see transient ...
momently
adverb Date: 1676 1. from moment to moment 2. at any moment 3. for a moment
momentous
adjective Date: 1656 important, consequential • momentously adverb • momentousness noun
momentously
adverb see momentous
momentousness
noun see momentous
momentum
noun (plural momenta or momentums) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, movement Date: 1610 1. a property of a moving body that the body has by virtue of its mass and motion ...
momma
variant of mama
Mommsen
biographical name Theodor 1817-1903 German scholar & historian
mommy
noun (plural mommies) Etymology: alteration of mammy Date: 1899 mother 1a
mommy track
noun Date: 1989 a career path that allows a mother flexible or reduced work hours but tends to slow or block advancement
Momus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Mōmos Date: 1561 the Greek god of censure and mockery
Mon
I. noun (plural Mon or Mons) Date: 1798 1. a member of the dominant native people of Pegu division, Myanmar (Burma) 2. the Mon-Khmer language of the Mon people II. ...
mon
I. dialect chiefly British variant of man II. abbreviation monetary
mon-
or mono- combining form Etymology: Greek, from monos alone, single — more at monk 1. one ; single ; alone 2. a. containing one (usually specified) atom, radical, or ...
Mon-Khmer
noun Date: 1887 a language family containing Mon, Khmer, and a number of other languages of southeast Asia
Mona
geographical name 1. — see Anglesey 1 2. (or Monapia) — see man (Isle of)
Mona Passage
geographical name strait West Indies between Hispaniola & Puerto Rico connecting the Caribbean & the Atlantic
Monacan
adjective or noun see Monaco
monachal
adjective Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin monachalis, from monachus monk — more at monk Date: 1587 monastic • monachism noun
monachism
noun see monachal
Monaco
geographical name 1. country S Europe on the Mediterranean coast of France; a principality area 368 acres (147 hectares), population 30,500 2. commune, its capital • ...
monad
noun Etymology: Late Latin monad-, monas, from Greek, from monos Date: 1615 1. a. unit, one b. atom 1 c. an elementary individual substance which reflects the order ...
monadelphous
adjective Date: 1806 of stamens united by the filaments into one group usually forming a tube around the gynoecium
monadic
adjective see monad
monadism
noun see monad
monadnock
noun Etymology: Mt. Monadnock, New Hampshire Date: 1893 inselberg
Monadnock, Mount
geographical name mountain 3165 feet (965 meters) SW New Hampshire
Monaghan
geographical name 1. county NE Ireland (republic) in Ulster area 498 square miles (1290 square kilometers), population 51,293 2. town, its capital population 5754
monandry
noun (plural -dries) Etymology: mon- + -andry (as in polyandry) Date: 1855 a marriage form or custom in which a woman has only one husband at a time
Monapia
I. geographical name see Man, Isle of II. geographical name see Mona 2
monarch
noun Etymology: Late Latin monarcha, from Greek monarchos, from mon- + -archos -arch Date: 15th century 1. a person who reigns over a kingdom or empire: as a. a sovereign ...
monarch butterfly
noun Date: 1890 a large migratory American butterfly (Danaus plexippus) that has orange-brown wings with black veins and borders and a larva that feeds on milkweed
monarchal
adjective see monarch
monarchial
adjective see monarch
Monarchian
noun Date: 1765 an adherent of one of two anti-Trinitarian groups of the second and third centuries A.D. teaching that God is one person as well as one being • ...
Monarchianism
noun see Monarchian
monarchic
adjective see monarchical
monarchical
also monarchic adjective Date: 1793 of, relating to, suggestive of, or characteristic of a monarch or monarchy • monarchically adverb
monarchically
adverb see monarchical
monarchism
noun Date: 1838 monarchical government or principles • monarchist noun or adjective
monarchist
noun or adjective see monarchism
monarchy
noun (plural -chies) Date: 14th century 1. undivided rule or absolute sovereignty by a single person 2. a nation or state having a monarchical government 3. a government ...
monarda
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Nicolás Monardes died 1588 Spanish botanist Date: 1789 any of a genus (Monarda) of coarse annual or perennial North American mints with a ...
monastery
noun (plural -teries) Etymology: Middle English monasterie, from Late Latin monasterium, from Late Greek monastērion, from Greek, hermit's cell, from monazein to live alone, ...
monastic
adjective Date: circa 1563 1. of or relating to monasteries or to monks or nuns 2. resembling (as in seclusion or ascetic simplicity) life in a monastery • monastic noun ...
monastically
adverb see monastic
monasticism
noun see monastic
Monastir
geographical name — see Bitola
monatomic
adjective Date: 1848 consisting of one atom; especially having but one atom in the molecule
monaural
adjective Date: 1931 monophonic 2 • monaurally adverb
monaurally
adverb see monaural
monazite
noun Etymology: German Monazit, from Greek monazein Date: 1836 a yellow to red or brown mineral that is a phosphate of thorium and various rare earth elements and occurs ...
Mönchengladbach
or formerly München-Gladbach geographical name city W Germany W of Düsseldorf population 262,581
Monck
or Monk biographical name George 1608-1670 1st Duke of Albemarle English general
Moncton
geographical name city Canada in E New Brunswick population 61,046
Mondale
biographical name Walter Frederick 1928- American politician; vice president of the United States (1977-81)
Monday
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mōnandæg; akin to Old High German mānatag Monday; akin to Old English mōna moon and to Old English dæg day Date: before ...
Monday-morning quarterback
noun Etymology: from a fan's usually critical rehashing of the weekend football game strategy Date: 1932 one who second-guesses • Monday-morning quarterbacking noun
Monday-morning quarterbacking
noun see Monday-morning quarterback
Mondays
adverb see Monday
monde
foreign term Etymology: French world ; fashionable world ; society
Mondrian
biographical name Piet 1872-1944 Pieter Cornelis Mondriaan Dutch painter
monecious
variant of monoecious
Monegasque
adjective or noun see Monaco
moneran
noun Etymology: New Latin Monera, kingdom comprising prokaryotes, ultimately from Greek monērēs single, from monos Date: 1876 prokaryote • moneran adjective
monestrous
adjective Date: 1900 experiencing estrus once each year or breeding season
Monet
biographical name Claude 1840-1926 French painter
monetarily
adverb see monetary
monetarism
noun Date: 1969 a theory in economics that stable economic growth can be assured only by control of the rate of increase of the money supply to match the capacity for growth ...
monetarist
noun or adjective see monetarism
monetary
adjective Etymology: Late Latin monetarius of a mint, of money, from Latin moneta Date: 1810 of or relating to money or to the mechanisms by which it is supplied to and ...
monetary aggregate
noun Date: 1979 one of the formal categories of money (as cash and demand deposits or bank credits) in a national economy that is used as a measure in predictions of economic ...
monetary unit
noun Date: 1810 the standard unit of value of a currency
monetization
noun see monetize
monetize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Etymology: Latin moneta Date: circa 1879 1. to coin into money; also to establish as legal tender 2. to purchase (public or private debt) ...
money
I. noun (plural moneys or monies) Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English moneye, from Anglo-French moneie, from Latin moneta mint, money — more at mint Date: ...
money changer
noun Date: 15th century 1. one whose business is the exchanging of kinds or denominations of currency 2. a device for holding and dispensing sorted change
money market
noun Date: 1950 the trade in short-term negotiable instruments (as certificates of deposit or United States Treasury securities)
money of account
Date: 1691 a denominator of value or basis of exchange which is used in keeping accounts and for which there may or may not be an equivalent coin or denomination of paper money
money order
noun Date: 1802 an order issued by a post office, bank, or telegraph office for payment of a specified sum of money usually at any branch of the organization
money plant
noun Date: 1866 honesty 3; especially a biennial herb (Lunaria annua) grown especially for its ornamental seed pods that are silvery white when dried
money supply
noun Date: 1878 the total amount of money available in an economy for spending as calculated by any of various methods (as by adding total currency to funds available in ...
money-back
adjective Date: 1922 providing that the purchaser is entitled to a refund if the product is unsatisfactory
money-grubber
noun Date: 1840 a person bent on accumulating money • moneygrubbing adjective or noun
money-spinner
noun Date: 1859 chiefly British moneymaker • money-spinning adjective or noun, chiefly British
money-spinning
adjective or noun see money-spinner
moneybags
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1596 1. wealth 2. a wealthy person
moneyed
also monied adjective Date: 15th century 1. having money ; wealthy 2. consisting in or derived from money
moneyer
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French moneour, from moneer to mint, from moneie Date: 15th century an authorized coiner of money ; minter
moneygrubbing
adjective or noun see money-grubber
moneylender
noun Date: 1673 one whose business is lending money; specifically pawnbroker
moneymaker
noun Date: 1834 1. one that accumulates wealth 2. one (as a plan or product) that produces profit • moneymaking adjective or noun
moneymaking
adjective or noun see moneymaker
moneyman
noun Date: circa 1585 financier
moneywort
noun Date: 1578 a trailing perennial herb (Lysimachia nummularia) of the primrose family with rounded opposite leaves and solitary yellow flowers in their axils
monger
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mongere, from Old English mangere, from Latin mangon-, mango, of Greek origin; akin to Greek manganon charm, philter Date: before 12th ...
mongo
noun (plural mongo) Etymology: Mongolian möngö Date: 1935 — see tugrik at money table
Mongol
noun Etymology: Mongolian mongγol Date: circa 1662 1. a member of any of a group of traditionally pastoral peoples of Mongolia 2. Mongolian 1 3. a person of Mongoloid ...
Mongolia
geographical name 1. region E Asia E of Altai Mountains; includes Gobi Desert 2. (or Outer Mongolia) country E Asia comprising major portion of Mongolia region; a republic ...
Mongolian
I. adjective Date: 1706 1. of, relating to, or constituting Mongolia, the Mongolian People's Republic, the Mongols, or Mongolian 2. Mongoloid 2 II. noun Date: 1846 1. ...
Mongolian gerbil
noun Date: 1948 a gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) of Mongolia and northern China that has an external resemblance to a rat, has a high capacity for temperature regulation, and ...
Mongolic
adjective Date: 1834 Mongoloid 1
mongolism
noun Date: 1900 sometimes offensive Down syndrome
Mongoloid
adjective Date: 1868 1. of, constituting, or characteristic of a race of humankind native to Asia and classified according to physical features (as the presence of an ...
mongoose
noun (plural mongooses; also mongeese) Etymology: Hindi & Marathi mãgūs, from Prakrit maṁgūsa Date: 1698 any of numerous carnivorous mammals (family Herpestidae) that ...
mongrel
noun Etymology: Middle English, probably from mong mixture, short for ymong, from Old English gemong crowd — more at among Date: 15th century 1. an individual resulting ...
mongrelization
noun see mongrel
mongrelize
transitive verb see mongrel
Monhegan
geographical name island Maine E of Portland
monicker
noun see moniker
monied
variant of moneyed
monies
plural of money
moniker
also monicker noun Etymology: probably from Shelta (language of Irish itinerants) mŭnnik, modification of Irish ainm Date: 1851 name, nickname
moniliasis
noun (plural moniliases) Etymology: New Latin, from Monilia, genus of fungi, from Latin monile necklace Date: 1920 candidiasis
moniliform
adjective Etymology: Latin monile necklace — more at mane Date: circa 1803 jointed or constricted at regular intervals so as to resemble a string of beads
monish
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English monesen, alteration of monesten, from Anglo-French monester, from Vulgar Latin *monestare, from Latin monēre to warn Date: 14th ...
monism
noun Etymology: German Monismus, from mon- + -ismus -ism Date: 1862 1. a. a view that there is only one kind of ultimate substance b. the view that reality is one ...
monist
noun see monism
monistic
adjective see monism
monition
noun Etymology: Middle English monicioun, from Anglo-French monicion, from Latin monition-, monitio, from monēre Date: 14th century 1. warning, caution 2. an intimation of ...
monitor
I. noun Etymology: Latin, one that warns, overseer, from monēre to warn — more at mind Date: 1546 1. a. a student appointed to assist a teacher b. one that warns or ...
monitor lizard
noun Date: 1856 any of various large tropical carnivorous lizards (genus Varanus of the family Varanidae) of Australia, Asia, and Africa
monitorial
adjective see monitor I
monitorship
noun see monitor I
monitory
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin monitorius, from monēre Date: 15th century giving admonition ; warning II. noun (plural -ries) Date: 15th century a ...
Moniz
biographical name Antonio Egas — see Egas Moniz
Monk
biographical name Thelonious Sphere 1920-1982 American jazz musician
monk
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English munuc, from Late Latin monachus, from Late Greek monachos, from Greek, adjective, single, from monos single, alone Date: ...
monk parakeet
noun Date: circa 1925 a South American green and gray parakeet (Myiopsitta monachus) that is kept as a cage bird and has become established in several wild breeding ...
monk seal
noun Date: 1841 any of a genus (Monachus) of hair seals of Hawaii, the Mediterranean Sea, and formerly the Caribbean Sea
monk's cloth
noun Date: circa 1847 a coarse heavy fabric in basket weave made originally of worsted and used for monk's habits but now chiefly of cotton or linen and used for draperies
monkery
noun (plural -eries) Date: circa 1536 1. monastic life or practice ; monasticism 2. a monastic house ; monastery
monkey
I. noun (plural monkeys) Etymology: probably of Low German origin; akin to Moneke, name of an ape, probably of Romance origin; akin to Old Spanish mona monkey Date: circa 1530 ...
monkey bars
noun plural Date: 1955 a three-dimensional framework of horizontal and vertical bars from which children can hang and swing
monkey business
noun Date: 1883 shenanigan 2
monkey jacket
noun Date: circa 1822 mess jacket
monkey puzzle
noun Date: 1866 a tall araucaria (Araucaria araucana) that is native to Chile and western Argentina but widely grown elsewhere — called also monkey puzzle tree
monkey puzzle tree
noun see monkey puzzle
monkey wrench
noun Date: circa 1807 1. a wrench with one fixed and one adjustable jaw at right angles to a straight handle 2. something that disrupts
monkeypod
noun Date: 1888 1. an ornamental tropical leguminous tree (Samanea saman syn. Albizia saman) that has bipinnate leaves, globose clusters of flowers with crimson stamens, ...
monkeyshine
noun Date: circa 1832 prank — usually used in plural
monkfish
noun Date: 1666 either of two goosefishes (Lophius americanus of America and L. piscatorius of Europe) used for food
monkhood
noun Date: before 12th century 1. the character, condition, or profession of a monk ; monasticism 2. monks as a class
monkish
adjective Date: 1546 1. of, relating to, or resembling a monk; also resembling that of a monk 2. inclined to disciplinary self-denial
monkshood
noun Date: 1578 any of a genus (Aconitum) of usually bluish flowered poisonous herbs of the buttercup family; especially a poisonous Eurasian herb (A. napellus) often ...
Monmouth
I. biographical name Duke of 1649-1685 James Scott, son of Charles II of England English rebel & claimant to the throne II. geographical name or Monmouthshire administrative ...
Monmouthshire
geographical name see Monmouth II
Monnet
biographical name Jean (-Omer-Marie-Gabriel) 1888-1979 French economist & diplomat
mono
I. noun (plural monos) Etymology: 2mono Date: 1959 monophonic reproduction II. adjective Date: 1961 monophonic 2 III. noun Date: 1962 infectious mononucleosis
Mono Lake
geographical name saline lake 14 miles (22 kilometers) long E California
mono-
— see mon-
monoamine
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1951 an amine RNH2 that has one organic substituent attached to the nitrogen atom; especially one (as serotonin) ...
monoamine oxidase
noun Date: 1951 an enzyme that deaminates monoamines oxidatively and that functions in the nervous system by breaking down monoamine neurotransmitters
monoaminergic
adjective Date: 1966 liberating or involving monoamines (as serotonin or norepinephrine) in neural transmission
monobasic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1842 of an acid having only one replaceable hydrogen atom
Monocacy
geographical name river 60 miles (96 kilometers) S Pennsylvania & N Maryland flowing S into the Potomac
monocarboxylic
adjective Date: 1892 containing one carboxyl group
monocarpic
adjective Etymology: probably from New Latin *monocarpicus, from mon- + -carpicus -carpic Date: 1849 bearing fruit but once and then dying
monochasial
adjective see monochasium
monochasium
noun (plural monochasia) Etymology: New Latin, from mon- + -chasium (as in dichasium) Date: circa 1890 a cymose inflorescence that produces only one main axis • ...
monochord
noun Etymology: Middle English monocorde, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin monochordum, from Greek monochordon, from mon- + chordē string — more at yarn Date: 15th ...
monochromat
noun Etymology: mon- + Greek chrōmat-, chrōma Date: 1902 a completely color-blind individual
monochromatic
adjective Etymology: Latin monochromatos, from Greek monochrōmatos, from mon- + chrōmat-, chrōma color Date: 1822 1. a. having or consisting of one color or hue b. ...
monochromatically
adverb see monochromatic
monochromaticity
noun see monochromatic
monochromatism
noun Date: circa 1930 complete color blindness in which all colors appear as shades of gray
monochromator
noun Etymology: monochromatic + illuminator Date: 1909 a device for isolating a narrow portion of a spectrum
monochrome
I. noun Etymology: Medieval Latin monochroma, from Latin, feminine of monochromos of one color, from Greek monochrōmos, from mon- + -chrōmos -chrome Date: 1662 a painting, ...
monochromic
adjective see monochrome I
monochromist
noun see monochrome I
monocle
noun Etymology: French, from Late Latin monoculus having one eye, from Latin mon- + oculus eye — more at eye Date: circa 1858 an eyeglass for one eye • monocled adjective
monocled
adjective see monocle
monocline
noun Date: 1879 an oblique geologic fold
monoclinic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1864 of, relating to, or constituting a system of crystallization characterized by three unequal axes ...
monoclonal
adjective Date: 1914 produced by, being, or composed of cells derived from a single cell • monoclonal noun
monocoque
noun Etymology: French, from mon- + coque shell, probably from Latin coccum kermes — more at cocoon Date: 1913 1. a type of construction (as of a fuselage) in which the ...
monocot
noun Date: 1890 monocotyledon
monocotyledon
noun Etymology: ultimately from New Latin mon- + cotyledon cotyledon Date: circa 1727 any of a class or subclass (Liliopsida or Monocotyledoneae) of chiefly herbaceous ...
monocotyledonous
adjective see monocotyledon
monocracy
noun Date: 1651 government by a single person • monocrat noun • monocratic adjective
monocrat
noun see monocracy
monocratic
adjective see monocracy
monocrystal
noun Date: 1926 a single crystal • monocrystal adjective • monocrystalline adjective
monocrystalline
adjective see monocrystal
monocular
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin monoculus having one eye Date: 1640 1. of, involving, or affecting a single eye 2. suitable for use with only one eye • monocularly ...
monocularly
adverb see monocular I
monocultural
adjective see monoculture
monoculture
noun Date: 1915 1. the cultivation or growth of a single crop or organism especially on agricultural or forest land 2. a crop or a population of a single kind of organism ...
monocyclic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1910 containing one ring in the molecular structure
monocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1913 a large white blood cell with finely granulated chromatin dispersed throughout the nucleus that is ...
monocytic
adjective see monocyte
monodic
adjective see monody
monodical
adjective see monody
monodisperse
adjective Etymology: mon- + disperse, adjective, from disperse, verb Date: 1925 characterized by particles of uniform size in a dispersed phase
monodist
noun Date: 1751 a writer, singer, or composer of monody
monodrama
noun Date: 1793 a drama acted or designed to be acted by a single person • monodramatic adjective
monodramatic
adjective see monodrama
monody
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Medieval Latin monodia, from Greek monōidia, from monōidos singing alone, from mon- + aeidein to sing — more at ode Date: circa 1623 1. an ...
monoecious
also monecious adjective Etymology: ultimately from Greek mon- + oikos house — more at vicinity Date: 1761 1. having pistillate and staminate flowers on the same plant 2. ...
monoecism
noun Date: circa 1875 the condition of being monoecious
monoester
noun Date: 1927 an ester (as of a dibasic acid) that contains only one ester group
monofilament
noun Date: 1940 a single untwisted synthetic filament (as of nylon)
monogamic
adjective see monogamy
monogamist
noun Date: 1651 one who practices or upholds monogamy
monogamous
adjective see monogamy
monogamously
adverb see monogamy
monogamy
noun Etymology: French monogamie, from Late Latin monogamia, from Greek, from monogamos monogamous, from mon- + gamos marriage, from gamein to marry Date: 1612 1. archaic the ...
monogastric
adjective Date: 1814 having a stomach with only a single compartment
monogenean
noun Etymology: New Latin Monogenea, group name Date: 1899 a monogenetic flatworm • monogenean adjective
monogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1859 origin of diverse individuals or kinds (as of language) by descent from a single ancestral individual or kind
monogenetic
adjective Date: 1873 1. relating to or involving monogenesis 2. of, relating to, or being any of a class (Monogenea) of flatworms that ordinarily live as ectoparasites on a ...
monogenic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1939 of, relating to, or controlled by a single gene and especially by either of an allelic pair • ...
monogenically
adverb see monogenic
monogerm
adjective Etymology: mon- + germinate Date: 1950 producing or being a fruit that gives rise to a single plant
monoglot
adjective Etymology: mono- + -glot (as in polyglot) Date: 1830 monolingual • monoglot noun
monoglyceride
noun Date: 1860 any of various esters of glycerol in which only one of the three hydroxyl groups is esterified and which are often used as emulsifiers
monogram
I. noun Etymology: Late Latin monogramma, from Greek mon- + gramma letter — more at gram Date: circa 1696 a sign of identity usually formed of the combined initials of a ...
monogrammatic
adjective see monogram I
monogrammer
noun see monogram II
monograph
I. noun Date: 1821 a learned treatise on a small area of learning; also a written account of a single thing • monographic adjective II. transitive verb Date: 1856 to ...
monographic
adjective see monograph I
monogynous
adjective Date: circa 1890 of, relating to, or living in monogyny

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