Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

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monogyny
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1876 the state or custom of having only one wife at a time
monohull
noun Date: 1967 a vessel (as a sailboat) with a single hull — compare multihull • monohulled adjective
monohulled
adjective see monohull
monohybrid
noun Date: 1903 an individual or strain heterozygous for one specified gene • monohybrid adjective
monohydric
adjective Date: 1869 monohydroxy
monohydroxy
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary monohydroxy-, from mon- + hydroxy- Date: circa 1934 containing one hydroxyl group in the molecule
monolayer
noun Date: 1926 a single continuous layer or film that is one cell, molecule, or atom in thickness
monolingual
adjective Date: 1926 having or using only one language • monolingual noun
monolith
noun Etymology: French monolithe, from monolithe consisting of a single stone, from Latin monolithus, from Greek monolithos, from mon- + lithos stone Date: 1844 1. a single ...
monolithic
adjective Date: 1825 1. a. of, relating to, or resembling a monolith ; huge, massive b. (1) formed from a single crystal (2) produced in or on a monolithic ...
monolithically
adverb see monolithic
monolog
noun see monologue
monologist
noun see monologue
monologue
also monolog noun Etymology: Middle French monologue, from mon- + -logue Date: 1549 1. a. soliloquy 2 b. a dramatic sketch performed by one actor c. the routine of a ...
monologuist
noun see monologue
monomania
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1823 1. mental illness especially when limited in expression to one idea or area of thought 2. excessive concentration on a single object or ...
monomaniac
noun or adjective see monomania
monomaniacal
adjective see monomania
monomaniacally
adverb see monomania
monomer
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1914 a chemical compound that can undergo polymerization • monomeric adjective
monomeric
adjective see monomer
monometallic
adjective Date: 1861 1. of or relating to monometallism 2. consisting of or employing one metal
monometallism
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary mon- + -metallism (as in bimetallism) Date: 1879 the adoption of one metal only in a currency • monometallist noun
monometallist
noun see monometallism
monometer
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek monometros, from mon- + metron measure — more at measure Date: circa 1846 a line of verse consisting of a single metrical foot or ...
monomial
noun Etymology: blend of mon- and -nomial (as in binomial) Date: circa 1706 1. a mathematical expression consisting of a single term 2. a taxonomic name consisting of a ...
monomolecular
adjective Date: 1917 being only one molecule thick • monomolecularly adverb
monomolecularly
adverb see monomolecular
monomorphemic
adjective Date: 1936 consisting of only one morpheme
monomorphic
adjective Date: circa 1879 having but a single form, structural pattern, or genotype • monomorphism noun
monomorphism
noun see monomorphic
Monongahela
geographical name river 128 miles (206 kilometers) N West Virginia & SW Pennsylvania flowing N to unite with Allegheny River at Pittsburgh forming Ohio River
mononuclear
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1886 having only one nucleus • mononuclear noun
mononuclear phagocyte system
noun Date: 1983 a system of cells comprising all free and fixed phagocytes together with their ancestral cells including monocytes and their precursors in the bone marrow — ...
mononucleate
adjective see mononucleated
mononucleated
also mononucleate adjective Date: 1890 mononuclear
mononucleosis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from International Scientific Vocabulary mononuclear + New Latin -osis Date: 1920 an abnormal increase of mononuclear white blood cells in the ...
mononucleotide
noun Date: 1908 a nucleotide that is derived from one molecule each of a nitrogenous base, a sugar, and a phosphoric acid
monophagous
adjective Date: circa 1868 feeding on or utilizing a single kind of food; especially feeding on a single kind of plant or animal • monophagy noun
monophagy
noun see monophagous
monophonic
adjective Date: circa 1864 1. having a single unaccompanied melodic line 2. of or relating to sound transmission, recording, or reproduction involving a single transmission ...
monophonically
adverb see monophonic
monophony
noun Date: circa 1890 monophonic music
monophthong
noun Etymology: Late Greek monophthongos single vowel, from Greek mon- + phthongos sound Date: 1616 a vowel sound that throughout its duration has a single constant ...
monophthongal
adjective see monophthong
monophyletic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1874 of or relating to a single stock; specifically developed from a single common ancestral form • ...
monophyly
noun see monophyletic
Monophysite
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin Monophysita, from Middle Greek Monophysitēs, from Greek mon- + physis nature — more at physics Date: 1698 one holding the doctrine that ...
Monophysitic
adjective see Monophysite
Monophysitism
noun see Monophysite
monoplane
noun Date: 1907 an airplane with only one main supporting surface
monoploid
I. adjective Date: 1928 1. haploid 2. having or being the basic haploid number of chromosomes in a polyploid series of organisms II. noun Etymology: International ...
monopod
noun Etymology: mon- + -pod (as in tripod) Date: 1970 a one-legged support (as for a camera)
monopodial
adjective Etymology: New Latin monopodium main axis, from mon- + -podium Date: 1876 growing upward with a single main stem or axis that produces leaves and flowers
monopole
noun Date: 1937 1. a single positive or negative electric charge; also a hypothetical north or south magnetic pole existing alone 2. a radio antenna consisting of a single ...
monopolise
British variant of monopolize
monopolist
noun Date: 1601 a person who monopolizes • monopolistic adjective • monopolistically adverb
monopolistic
adjective see monopolist
monopolistically
adverb see monopolist
monopolization
noun see monopolize
monopolize
transitive verb (-lized; -lizing) Date: 1611 to get a monopoly of ; assume complete possession or control of • monopolization noun • monopolizer noun
monopolizer
noun see monopolize
monopoly
noun (plural -lies) Etymology: Latin monopolium, from Greek monopōlion, from mon- + pōlein to sell Date: 1534 1. exclusive ownership through legal privilege, command of ...
monopropellant
noun Date: circa 1945 a rocket propellant containing both the fuel and the oxidizer in a single substance
monopsonistic
adjective see monopsony
monopsony
noun (plural -nies) Etymology: mon- + -opsony (as in oligopsony) Date: 1933 an oligopsony limited to one buyer • monopsonistic adjective
monorail
noun Date: 1897 a single rail serving as a track for a wheeled vehicle; also a vehicle traveling on such a track
monorchid
noun Etymology: irregular from Greek monorchis, from mon- + orchis testicle — more at orchis Date: 1874 an individual who has only one testis or only one descended into ...
monorchidism
noun see monorchid
monorhyme
noun Date: 1731 a strophe or poem in which all the lines have the same end rhyme • monorhymed adjective
monorhymed
adjective see monorhyme
monosaccharide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1896 a sugar that is not decomposable into simpler sugars by hydrolysis, is classed as either an aldose or ketose, ...
monosodium glutamate
noun Date: 1929 a crystalline sodium salt C5H8NO4Na derived from glutamic acid and used to enhance the flavor of food — abbreviation MSG
monosome
noun Date: circa 1909 1. a chromosome lacking a synaptic mate; especially an unpaired X chromosome 2. a single ribosome
monosomic
adjective Date: 1926 having one less than the diploid number of chromosomes • monosomic noun • monosomy noun
monosomy
noun see monosomic
monospecific
adjective Date: 1947 specific for a single antigen or receptor site on an antigen • monospecificity noun
monospecificity
noun see monospecific
monosyllabic
adjective Etymology: probably from French monosyllabique, from monosyllabe Date: 1766 1. consisting of one syllable or of monosyllables 2. using or speaking only ...
monosyllabically
adverb see monosyllabic
monosyllabicity
noun see monosyllabic
monosyllable
noun Etymology: modification of Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French monosyllabe, from Late Latin monosyllabon, from Greek, from neuter of monosyllabos having one ...
monosynaptic
adjective Date: 1942 having or involving a single neural synapse • monosynaptically adverb
monosynaptically
adverb see monosynaptic
monoterpene
noun Date: circa 1959 any of a class of terpenes C10H16 containing two isoprene units per molecule; also a derivative of a monoterpene
monotheism
noun Date: 1660 the doctrine or belief that there is but one God • monotheist noun • monotheistic also monotheistical adjective • monotheistically adverb
monotheist
noun see monotheism
monotheistic
adjective see monotheism
monotheistical
adjective see monotheism
monotheistically
adverb see monotheism
monotone
I. noun Etymology: Greek monotonos monotonous Date: 1644 1. a succession of syllables, words, or sentences in one unvaried key or pitch 2. a single unvaried musical tone ...
monotonic
adjective Date: 1797 1. characterized by the use of or uttered in a monotone 2. having the property either of never increasing or of never decreasing as the values of the ...
monotonically
adverb see monotonic
monotonicity
noun see monotonic
monotonous
adjective Etymology: Greek monotonos, from mon- + tonos tone Date: 1776 1. uttered or sounded in one unvarying tone ; marked by a sameness of pitch and intensity 2. ...
monotonously
adverb see monotonous
monotonousness
noun see monotonous
monotony
noun Date: 1706 1. tedious sameness 2. sameness of tone or sound
monotreme
noun Etymology: New Latin Monotremata, from Greek mon- + trēmat-, trēma hole — more at trematode Date: 1835 any of an order (Monotremata) of egg-laying mammals comprising ...
monotype
noun Date: 1882 an impression on paper of a design painted usually with the finger or a brush on a surface (as glass)
Monotype
trademark — used for a keyboard typesetting machine that casts and sets type in separate characters
monotypic
adjective Etymology: mon- + type + -ic Date: circa 1859 including a single representative — used especially of a genus with only one species
monounsaturate
noun see monounsaturated
monounsaturated
adjective Date: circa 1939 containing one double or triple bond per molecule — used especially of an oil, fat, or fatty acid; compare polyunsaturated • monounsaturate ...
monovalent
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1869 1. having a valence of one 2. having specific immunologic activity against a single antigen, ...
monovular
adjective Date: 1929 monozygotic
monoxide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1868 an oxide containing one atom of oxygen in a molecule
monozygotic
adjective Date: 1916 derived from a single egg
Monroe
I. biographical name James 1758-1831 5th president of United States (1817-25) II. biographical name Marilyn 1926-1962 originally Norma Jean Mortenson American actress III. ...
Monroe Doctrine
noun Etymology: James Monroe Date: 1853 a statement of United States foreign policy expressing opposition to extension of European control or influence in the western ...
Monroeville
geographical name borough SW Pennsylvania E of Pittsburgh population 29,349
Monrovia
geographical name 1. city SW California E of Pasadena population 36,929 2. city & port capital of Liberia on the Atlantic population 243,243
Mons
or Flemish Bergen geographical name commune SW Belgium capital of Hainaut population 92,300
mons pubis
noun (plural montes pubis) Etymology: New Latin, pubic eminence Date: circa 1903 a rounded eminence of fatty tissue on the pubic symphysis especially of the human female
mons veneris
noun (plural montes veneris) Etymology: New Latin, literally, eminence of Venus or of venery Date: 1621 mons pubis
monseigneur
noun (plural messeigneurs) Etymology: French, literally, my lord Date: 1602 a French dignitary (as a prince or prelate) — used as a title preceding a title of office or rank
monsieur
noun (plural messieurs) Etymology: Middle French, literally, my lord Date: 1512 a Frenchman of high rank or station — used as a title equivalent to Mister and prefixed to ...
monsignor
noun (plural monsignors or monsignori) Etymology: Italian monsignore, from French monseigneur Date: 1607 a Roman Catholic prelate having a dignity or titular distinction (as ...
monsignorial
adjective see monsignor
monsoon
noun Etymology: obsolete Dutch monssoen, from Portuguese monção, from Arabic mawsim time, season Date: 1584 1. a periodic wind especially in the Indian Ocean and southern ...
monsoonal
adjective see monsoon
monster
I. noun Etymology: Middle English monstre, from Anglo-French, from Latin monstrum omen, monster, from monēre to warn — more at mind Date: 14th century 1. a. an animal ...
monstrance
noun Etymology: Middle English mustraunce, monstrans demonstration, monstrance, from Anglo-French mustrance show, sign, from Medieval Latin monstrantia, from Latin monstrare to ...
monstrosity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 15th century 1. a. a malformation of a plant or animal b. something deviating from the normal ; freak 2. the quality or state of being ...
monstrous
I. adjective Date: 15th century 1. obsolete strange, unnatural 2. having extraordinary often overwhelming size ; gigantic 3. a. having the qualities or appearance of a ...
monstrously
adverb see monstrous I
monstrousness
noun see monstrous I
Mont Blanc
geographical name mountain peak 15,771 feet (4807 meters) on border of France, Italy, and Switzerland in Savoy Alps; highest of the Alps
Mont Blanc Tunnel
geographical name tunnel 7 1/2 miles (12 kilometers) long France & Italy under Mont Blanc
Mont Cervin
geographical name see Matterhorn
Mont-Royal
or Mount Royal geographical name height 769 feet (234 meters) in Montreal, Quebec
Mont-Saint-Michel
geographical name small island NW France in Gulf of St.-Malo
montadale
noun Etymology: Montana state + dale Date: 1949 any of an American breed of white-faced hornless sheep noted for heavy fleece and good meat conformation
montage
I. noun Etymology: French, from monter to mount Date: 1929 1. the production of a rapid succession of images in a motion picture to illustrate an association of ideas 2. ...
Montagna
biographical name Bartolommeo circa 1450-1523 Italian painter
montagnard
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French, mountaineer, from montagne mountain, from Old French montaigne Date: 1842 a member of any of various peoples inhabiting the ...
Montagu
biographical name Lady Mary Wortley 1689-1762 English letter writer & poet
Montague
noun Date: 1592 the family of Romeo in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet
Montaigne
biographical name Michel (Eyquem) de 1533-1592 French essayist
Montale
biographical name Eugenio 1896-1981 Italian poet
montan wax
noun Etymology: Latin montanus of a mountain Date: 1908 a hard brittle mineral wax obtained usually from lignites by extraction and used especially in polishes, carbon paper, ...
Montana
geographical name state NW United States capital Helena area 147,046 square miles (380,849 square kilometers), population 902,195 • Montanan adjective or noun
Montanan
adjective or noun see Montana
montane
adjective Etymology: Latin montanus of a mountain — more at mountain Date: 1863 1. of, relating to, growing in, or being the biogeographic zone of relatively moist cool ...
montani semper liberi
foreign term Etymology: Latin mountaineers are always free — motto of West Virginia
Montanism
noun see Montanist
Montanist
noun Etymology: Montanus, 2d century A.D. Phrygian schismatic Date: 1577 an adherent of a Christian sect arising in the late second century and stressing apocalyptic ...
Montauban
geographical name city SW France on the Tarn N of Toulouse population 53,278
Montauk Point
geographical name headland SE New York at E tip of Long Island
Montcalm de Saint-Véran
biographical name Marquis de 1712-1759 Louis-Joseph de Montcalm-Grozon French field marshal
Montclair
geographical name city SW California E of Los Angeles population 33,049
monte
noun Etymology: Spanish, bank, mountain, heap, from Italian, from Latin mont-, mons mountain Date: 1824 1. a card game in which players select any two of four cards turned ...
Monte Albán
geographical name ruined city of the Zapotecs S Mexico in Oaxaca state SW of Oaxaca
monte bank
noun see monte
Monte Carlo
I. adjective Etymology: Monte Carlo, Monaco, famous for its gambling casino Date: 1949 of, relating to, or involving the use of random sampling techniques and often the use ...
Montebello
geographical name city SW California population 62,150
Montego Bay
geographical name city & port NW Jamaica on Montego Bay (inlet of the Caribbean) population 83,446
monteith
noun Etymology: Monteith, 17th century Scottish eccentric who wore a cloak with a scalloped hem Date: 1683 a large silver punch bowl with scalloped rim
Montenegrin
adjective or noun see Montenegro
Montenegro
geographical name federated republic S Serbia and Montenegro on the Adriatic; formerly a federated republic of Yugoslavia and earlier a kingdom (capital Cetinje) capital ...
Monterey
geographical name city W California on peninsula at S end of Monterey Bay (inlet of the Pacific) population 29,674
Monterey cypress
noun Etymology: Monterey, California Date: 1873 a California cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa) that is endemic to the Monterey and Carmel seacoast and is often planted for ...
Monterey Jack
noun Etymology: David Jack or Jacks died 1907 California landowner Date: 1940 a semisoft whole-milk cheese with high moisture content
Monterey Park
geographical name city SW California E of Los Angeles population 60,051
Monterey pine
noun Date: 1834 a pine (Pinus radiata) native to coastal California but widely grown especially in the southern hemisphere for its wood
montero
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: Spanish, hunter, from monte mountain Date: 1611 a round hunter's cap with ear flaps
Monterrey
geographical name city NE Mexico capital of Nuevo León population 1,064,197
Montespan
biographical name Marquise de 1641-1707 née (Françoise-Athénaïs) Rochechouart de Mortemart mistress of Louis XIV
Montesquieu
biographical name Baron de La Brède et de 1689-1755 Charles-Louis de Secondat French lawyer & politician philosopher
Montessori
biographical name Maria 1870-1952 Italian physician & educator
Monteux
biographical name Pierre 1875-1964 American (French-born) conductor
Monteverde
biographical name see Monteverdi
Monteverdi
or Monteverde biographical name Claudio 1567-1643 Italian composer
Montevideo
geographical name city & port capital of Uruguay on N shore of Río de la Plata population 1,260,753
Montezuma Castle National Monument
geographical name reservation central Arizona containing prehistoric cliff dwellings
Montezuma II
or Moctezuma biographical name 1466-1520 last Aztec emperor of Mexico (1502-20)
Montezuma's revenge
noun Etymology: Montezuma II Date: 1961 traveler's diarrhea especially when contracted in Mexico
Montfort
I. biographical name Simon de 1165?-1218 Simon IV de Montfort l'Amaury French soldier II. biographical name Simon de circa 1208-1265 Earl of Leicester; son of preceding ...
Montgolfier
biographical name Joseph-Michel 1740-1810 & his brother Jacques-Étienne 1745-1799 French inventors & balloonists
Montgomery
I. biographical name Bernard Law 1887-1976 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein British field marshal II. biographical name Lucy Maud 1874-1942 Canadian novelist III. ...
Montgomeryshire
geographical name see Montgomery III, 2
month
noun (plural months) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mōnath; akin to Old High German mānōd month, Old English mōna moon Date: before 12th century 1. a measure ...
month's mind
noun Date: 15th century a Roman Catholic requiem mass held a month after a person's death
monthlong
adjective Date: 1843 lasting a month
monthly
I. adverb Date: circa 1534 once a month ; by the month II. adjective Date: 1572 1. a. of or relating to a month b. payable or reckoned by the month 2. lasting a ...
Monthly Meeting
noun Date: circa 1772 a district unit of an organization of Friends
Montmartre
geographical name section of Paris, France, on a hill in N central part of the city
Montmorency
I. noun Etymology: French, from Montmorency, France Date: 1924 a cherry that is grown commercially for its bright red sour fruit; also the fruit II. biographical name Anne ...
Montmorency Falls
geographical name waterfall over 270 feet (82 meters) Canada in S Quebec NE of Quebec (city) in Montmorency River (60 miles or 96 kilometers flowing S into St. Lawrence ...
montmorillonite
noun Etymology: French, from Montmorillon, commune in western France Date: 1854 a soft clayey water-absorbent mineral that is a hydrous aluminum silicate • ...
montmorillonitic
adjective see montmorillonite
Montparnasse
geographical name section of Paris, France, in S central part of the city • Montparnassian adjective
Montparnassian
adjective see Montparnasse
Montpelier
geographical name city N central Vermont, its capital population 8035
Montpellier
geographical name city S France WNW of Marseille population 210,866
Montrachet
noun Etymology: French, from Montrachet, vineyard in Burgundy, France Date: 1833 1. a dry white burgundy wine 2. a soft goat cheese from the Burgundy region of France
Montreal
or Montréal geographical name city & port Canada in S Quebec on Montreal Island (32 miles or 51 kilometers long, in St. Lawrence River) population 1,039,534 • Montrealer ...
Montréal
geographical name see Montreal
Montreal North
or Montréal-Nord geographical name town Canada in S Quebec on Montreal Island population 83,600
Montréal-Nord
geographical name see Montreal North
Montrealer
noun see Montreal
Montreuil
or Montreuil-sous-Bois geographical name commune N France, E suburb of Paris population 95,038
Montreuil-sous-Bois
geographical name see Montreuil
Montrose
biographical name 1st Marquess of 1612-1650 James Graham Scottish Royalist
Montserrat
geographical name island British West Indies in the Leewards SW of Antigua capital Plymouth area 40 square miles (104 square kilometers), population 12,100 • Montserratian ...
Montserratian
noun see Montserrat
monument
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin monumentum, literally, memorial, from monēre to remind — more at mind Date: 13th century 1. obsolete a burial ...
Monument Valley
geographical name region NE Arizona & SE Utah containing red sandstone buttes, mesas, & arches
monumental
adjective Date: 1604 1. of or relating to a monument 2. serving as or resembling a monument ; massive; also highly significant ; outstanding 3. very great • ...
monumentality
noun see monumental
monumentalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1857 to record or memorialize lastingly by a monument
monumentally
adverb see monumental
monumentum aere perennius
foreign term Etymology: Latin a monument more lasting than bronze — used of an immortal work of art or literature
monuron
noun Etymology: mon- + urea + 1-on Date: circa 1957 a persistent herbicide C9H11ClN2O used especially to control broad-leaved weeds
Monza
geographical name commune N Italy in Lombardy SE of Milan population 121,151
monzonite
noun Etymology: French, from Mt. Monzoni, Italy Date: 1895 a granular igneous rock composed of plagioclase and orthoclase in about equal quantities usually together with ...
moo
intransitive verb Etymology: imitative Date: 1549 to make the throat noise of a cow • moo noun
mooch
verb Etymology: probably from French dialect muchier to hide, lurk Date: 1851 intransitive verb 1. to wander aimlessly ; amble; also sneak 2. beg, sponge transitive ...
moocher
noun see mooch
mood
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mōd; akin to Old High German muot mood Date: before 12th century 1. a conscious state of mind or predominant emotion ; ...
mood disorder
noun Date: 1969 any of several psychological disorders (as major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder) characterized by abnormalities of emotional state — called also ...
moodily
adverb see moody
moodiness
noun see moody
moody
adjective (moodier; -est) Date: 1593 1. subject to depression ; gloomy 2. subject to moods ; temperamental 3. expressive of a mood • moodily adverb • moodiness noun
Moody
biographical name Dwight Lyman 1837-1899 American evangelist
moola
or moolah noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1939 slang money
moolah
noun see moola
moon
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mone, from Old English mōna; akin to Old High German māno moon, Latin mensis month, Greek mēn month, mēnē moon Date: before 12th century ...
moon blindness
noun Date: circa 1720 a recurrent inflammation of the eye of the horse
moon shell
noun Date: 1936 moon snail
moon shot
noun Date: 1958 1. a spacecraft mission to the moon 2. a hit or thrown ball with a very high trajectory
moon snail
noun Date: circa 1932 any of a cosmopolitan family (Naticidae) of carnivorous marine snails having smooth globular shells
moon suit
noun Date: 1980 a sealed garment worn especially for protection from hazardous material (as toxic waste or infectious disease)
moon-eyed
adjective Date: 1790 having the eyes wide open
moonbeam
noun Date: 1590 a ray of light from the moon
mooncalf
noun Date: 1614 a foolish or absentminded person ; simpleton
moondust
noun Date: circa 1959 fine dry particles of the moon's soil
mooneye
noun Date: 1842 a silvery North American freshwater bony fish (Hiodon tergisus of the family Hiodontidae)
moonfaced
adjective Date: 1619 having a round face
moonfish
noun (plural moonfish or moonfishes) Date: 1646 any of various compressed often short deep-bodied silvery or yellowish marine fishes: as a. opah b. platy
moonflower
noun Date: circa 1909 a tropical American morning glory (Ipomoea alba syn. Calonyction aculeatum) with fragrant flowers; also any of several related plants
Moonie
noun Etymology: Sun Myung Moon b1920 Korean evangelist Date: 1974 a member of the Unification Church founded by Sun Myung Moon
moonish
adjective Date: 15th century influenced by the moon; also capricious • moonishly adverb
moonishly
adverb see moonish
moonless
adjective Date: 1508 lacking the light of the moon
moonlet
noun Date: 1832 a small natural or artificial satellite
moonlight
I. noun Date: 14th century the light of the moon II. intransitive verb (moonlighted; moonlighting) Etymology: back-formation from moonlighter Date: 1957 to hold a second ...
moonlighter
noun see moonlight II
moonlike
adjective see moon I
moonlit
adjective Date: circa 1827 lighted by the moon
moonquake
noun Date: 1946 a seismic event on the moon
moonrise
noun Date: 1728 1. the rising of the moon above the horizon 2. the time of the moon's rising
moonroof
noun Date: 1973 a glass sunroof
moonscape
noun Date: 1916 the surface of the moon as seen or as depicted; also a landscape resembling this surface
moonseed
noun Date: 1739 a twining plant (Menispermum canadense of the family Menispermaceae, the moonseed family) of eastern North America that has crescent-shaped seeds and black ...
moonset
noun Date: 1845 1. the descent of the moon below the horizon 2. the time of the moon's setting
moonshine
noun Date: 15th century 1. moonlight 2. empty talk ; nonsense 3. intoxicating liquor; especially illegally distilled corn whiskey
moonshiner
noun Date: 1860 a maker or seller of illicit whiskey
moonstone
noun Date: 1632 a transparent or translucent feldspar of pearly or opaline luster used as a gem
moonstruck
adjective Date: 1674 affected by or as if by the moon: as a. mentally unbalanced b. romantically sentimental c. lost in fantasy or reverie
moonwalk
intransitive verb Date: 1984 to dance by gliding backwards while appearing to make forward walking motions • moonwalk noun
moonward
adverb Date: 1855 toward the moon
moony
adjective Date: circa 1586 1. of or relating to the moon 2. a. crescent-shaped b. resembling the full moon ; round 3. moonlit 4. dreamy, moonstruck
Moor
noun Etymology: Middle English More, from Anglo-French, from Latin Maurus inhabitant of Mauretania Date: 14th century 1. one of the Arab and Berber conquerors of Spain 2. ...
moor
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mor, from Old English mōr; akin to Old High German muor moor Date: before 12th century 1. chiefly British an expanse of open rolling ...

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