Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву micr-obtr (6389)

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Moviola
trademark — used for a device for editing motion-picture film and synchronizing the sound
mow
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, heap, stack, from Old English mūga; akin to Old Norse mūgi heap Date: before 12th century 1. a piled-up stack (as of hay or fodder); ...
Mowat
biographical name Farley McGill 1921- Canadian writer
mower
noun see mow II
moxa
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Japanese mogusa Date: 1675 a soft woolly mass prepared from the ground young leaves of a Eurasian artemisia (especially Artemisia vulgaris) ...
moxibustion
noun Etymology: moxa + -i- + -bustion (as in combustion) Date: 1910 the therapeutic use of moxa
moxie
noun Etymology: from Moxie, a trademark for a soft drink Date: 1930 1. energy, pep 2. courage, determination 3. know-how, expertise
moyen-âge
adjective Etymology: French moyen âge Middle Ages Date: 1849 of or relating to medieval times
Moyle
geographical name district N Northern Ireland, established 1974 area 191 square miles (497 square kilometers), population 14,617
Mozambican
adjective or noun see Mozambique
Mozambique
or Portuguese Moçambique geographical name 1. channel 950 miles (1529 kilometers) long SE Africa between Madagascar & Mozambique 2. (or formerly Portuguese East Africa) ...
Mozart
biographical name Wolfgang Amadeus 1756-1791 Austrian composer • Mozartean or Mozartian adjective
Mozartean
adjective see Mozart
Mozartian
adjective see Mozart
mozzarella
noun Etymology: Italian, diminutive of mozza, a kind of cheese, from mozzare to cut off, from mozzo cut off, docked, from Vulgar Latin *mutius, alteration of Latin mutilus ...
mozzetta
noun Etymology: Italian, probably from mozzo cut off Date: 1774 a short cape with a small ornamental hood worn over the rochet by Roman Catholic prelates
MP
I. noun Date: 1921 1. [military police] a member of the military police 2. [member of Parliament] an elected member of a parliament II. abbreviation 1. melting point 2. ...
MPA
abbreviation master of public administration
MPAA
abbreviation Motion Picture Association of America
mpg
abbreviation miles per gallon
mph
abbreviation miles per hour
MPH
abbreviation master of public health
MPhil
abbreviation master of philosophy
mps
abbreviation meters per second
Mpumalanga
or formerly Eastern Transvaal geographical name province NE Republic of South Africa area 30,259 square miles (78,370 square kilometers), population 2,911,000
MPV
abbreviation multipurpose vehicle
MPX
abbreviation multiplex
mR
abbreviation milliroentgen
Mr.
noun (plural Messrs.) Etymology: Mr. from Middle English, abbreviation of maister master; Messrs. abbreviation of Messieurs, from French, plural of Monsieur Date: 15th century ...
Mr. Charlie
noun Etymology: Charlie, from Charles, proper name Date: circa 1941 usually disparaging a white man ; white people
Mr. Right
noun Date: 1860 a man who would make the perfect husband
MRE
abbreviation meals ready to eat
MRI
noun Date: 1982 magnetic resonance imaging; also the procedure in which magnetic resonance imaging is used
mridanga
or mridangam noun Etymology: Sanskrit mṛdaṅga Date: 1887 a drum of India that is shaped like an elongated barrel and has tuned heads of different diameters
mridangam
noun see mridanga
mRNA
abbreviation messenger RNA
Mrs.
noun (plural Mesdames) Etymology: Mrs. abbreviation of mistress; Mesdames from French, plural of Madame Date: circa 1578 1. a. — used as a conventional title of courtesy ...
Mrs. Grundy
noun Etymology: from a character alluded to in Thomas Morton's Speed the Plough (1798) Date: 1813 one marked by prudish conventionality in personal conduct
ms
abbreviation millisecond
MS
abbreviation 1. [Italian mano sinistra] left hand 2. manuscript 3. master of science 4. military science 5. Mississippi 6. motor ship 7. multiple sclerosis
Ms.
noun (plural Mss. or Mses.) Etymology: probably blend of Miss and Mrs. Date: 1949 — used instead of Miss or Mrs. (as when the marital status of a woman is unknown or ...
MSc
abbreviation master of science
msec
abbreviation millisecond
msg
abbreviation message
MSG
abbreviation 1. master sergeant 2. monosodium glutamate
Msgr
abbreviation monsignor
MSgt
abbreviation master sergeant
MSH
abbreviation melanocyte-stimulating hormone
MSL
abbreviation mean sea level
MSN
abbreviation master of science in nursing
MSS
abbreviation manuscripts
MST
abbreviation mountain standard time
MSW
abbreviation master of social welfare; master of social work
mt
abbreviation mount; mountain
MT
abbreviation 1. machine translation 2. metric ton 3. Montana 4. mountain time
Mt
I. abbreviation Matthew II. symbol meitnerium
mtDNA
abbreviation mitochondrial DNA
mtg
abbreviation meeting
mtge
abbreviation mortgage
mtn
abbreviation mountain
MTO
abbreviation Mediterranean theater of operations
Mtwara
geographical name city & port Tanzania in SE mainland
mu
noun Etymology: Greek my Date: 1638 the 12th letter of the Greek alphabet — see alphabet table
Mu-tan-chiang
geographical name see Mudanjiang
Mubarak
biographical name (Muhammad) Hosni 1929- president of Egypt (1981- )
muc-
or muci- or muco- combining form Etymology: Latin muc-, from mucus 1. mucus 2. mucous and
much
I. adjective (more; most) Etymology: Middle English muche large, much, from michel, muchel, from Old English micel, mycel; akin to Old High German mihhil great, large, Latin ...
much as
conjunction Date: circa 1699 however much ; even though
much less
conjunction Date: 1615 not to mention — used especially in negative contexts to add to one item another denoting something less likely
much of a muchness
phrasal very much the same
muchacho
noun (plural -chos) Etymology: Spanish, probably from mocho cropped, shorn Date: 1591 1. chiefly Southwest a male servant 2. chiefly Southwest a young man
muchness
noun Date: 14th century the quality or state of being great in quantity, extent, or degree
muci-
combining form see muc-
mucilage
noun Etymology: Middle English muscilage, from Late Latin mucilago mucus, musty juice, from Latin mucus Date: 15th century 1. a gelatinous substance of various plants (as ...
mucilaginous
adjective Etymology: Middle English muscilaginous, from Late Latin mucilaginosus, from mucilagin-, mucilago Date: 15th century 1. sticky, viscid 2. of, relating to, full ...
mucilaginously
adverb see mucilaginous
mucin
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary muc- Date: 1838 any of various mucoproteins that occur especially in secretions of mucous membranes • mucinous adjective
mucinous
adjective see mucin
muck
I. noun Etymology: Middle English muk, perhaps from Old English -moc; akin to Old Norse myki dung Date: 13th century 1. soft moist farmyard manure 2. slimy dirt or filth ...
muck up
transitive verb Date: 1896 to make a mess of ; bungle, spoil
muck-a-muck
noun see muckety-muck
mucker
noun see muck II
muckety-muck
also muck-a-muck or mucky-muck noun Etymology: short for high-muck-a-muck Date: 1912 an important and often arrogant person
muckrake
intransitive verb Etymology: obsolete muckrake, noun, rake for dung Date: 1910 to search out and publicly expose real or apparent misconduct of a prominent individual or ...
muckraker
noun see muckrake
mucky
adjective see muck I
mucky-muck
noun see muckety-muck
muco-
combining form see muc-
mucocutaneous
adjective Date: 1898 made up of or involving both typical skin and mucous membrane
mucoid
I. adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary muc- Date: 1849 resembling mucus II. noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1898 mucoprotein
mucolytic
adjective Date: circa 1923 hydrolyzing glycosaminoglycans ; tending to break down or lower the viscosity of mucin-containing body secretions or components
mucopeptide
noun Date: 1959 peptidoglycan
mucopolysaccharide
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1938 glycosaminoglycan
mucoprotein
noun Date: 1925 any of various complex conjugated proteins (as mucins) that contain polysaccharides and occur in body fluids and tissues
mucosa
noun (plural mucosae or -sas) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, feminine of mucosus mucous Date: 1880 mucous membrane • mucosal adjective
mucosal
adjective see mucosa
mucous
adjective Etymology: Latin mucosus, from mucus Date: 1646 1. of, relating to, or resembling mucus 2. secreting or containing mucus 3. covered with or as if with mucus ; ...
mucous membrane
noun Date: 1803 a membrane rich in mucous glands; specifically one that lines body passages and cavities which communicate directly or indirectly with the exterior
mucro
noun (plural mucrones) Etymology: New Latin mucron-, mucro, from Latin, point, edge Date: 1646 an abrupt sharp terminal point or tip or process (as of a leaf) • mucronate ...
mucronate
adjective see mucro
mucus
noun Etymology: Latin, nasal mucus; akin to Greek myxa mucus Date: 1661 a viscid slippery secretion that is usually rich in mucins and is produced by mucous membranes which ...
mud
I. noun Etymology: Middle English mudde, probably from Middle Low German Date: 14th century 1. a slimy sticky mixture of solid material with a liquid and especially water; ...
mud dauber
noun Date: 1856 any of various wasps (especially family Sphecidae) that construct mud cells in which the female places an egg with spiders or insects paralyzed by a sting to ...
mud flap
noun Date: 1952 splash guard
mud puppy
noun Date: 1882 a large North American salamander (Necturus maculosus) that has external gills and is gray to rusty brown usually with bluish-black spots
mud turtle
noun Date: 1785 any of a genus (Kinosternon) of American bottom-dwelling freshwater turtles with two transverse hinges on the plastron
Mudanjiang
or Mu-tan-chiang or Mutankiang geographical name city NE China in S Heilongjiang on the Mudan River (310 miles or 496 kilometers flowing NE into Songhua River) population ...
mudbug
noun Date: 1955 crayfish 1
muddily
adverb see muddy I
muddiness
noun see muddy I
muddle
I. verb (muddled; muddling) Etymology: probably from obsolete Dutch moddelen, from Middle Dutch, from modde mud; akin to Middle Low German mudde Date: 1676 transitive verb ...
muddle through
intransitive verb Date: circa 1864 to achieve a degree of success without much planning or effort
muddleheaded
adjective Date: 1759 1. mentally confused 2. inept, bungling • muddleheadedly adverb • muddleheadedness noun
muddleheadedly
adverb see muddleheaded
muddleheadedness
noun see muddleheaded
muddler
noun see muddle I
muddly
adjective see muddle II
muddy
I. adjective (muddier; -est) Date: 15th century 1. morally impure ; base 2. a. full of or covered with mud b. characteristic or suggestive of mud c. turbid with ...
muddy the waters
phrasal to make a situation more confusing or difficult
Mudejar
noun (plural Mudejares) Etymology: Spanish mudéjar, modification of Arabic mudajjan, literally, allowed to remain Date: 1893 a Muslim living under a Christian king ...
mudflat
noun Date: 1813 a level tract lying at little depth below the surface of water or alternately covered and left bare by the tide
mudflow
noun Date: circa 1900 a moving mass of soil made fluid by rain or melting snow; also lahar
mudguard
noun Date: 1886 1. a. fender d b. splash guard 2. a strip of material applied to a shoe upper just above the sole for protection against dampness or as an ornament
mudra
noun Etymology: Sanskrit mudrā Date: 1811 one of the symbolic hand gestures used in religious ceremonies and dances of India and in yoga
mudroom
noun Date: circa 1950 a room in a house designed especially for the shedding of dirty or wet footwear and clothing and located typically off the kitchen or in the basement
mudsill
noun Date: 1685 1. a supporting sill (as of a building or bridge) resting directly on a base and especially the earth 2. a person of the lowest social level
mudskipper
noun Date: 1860 any of several Asian and African gobies (genera Periophthalmus and Boleophthalmus) that are able to skip about actively over wet mud and sand
mudslinger
noun Date: circa 1890 one that uses offensive epithets and invective especially against a political opponent • mudslinging noun
mudslinging
noun see mudslinger
mudstone
noun Date: circa 1736 an indurated shale produced by the consolidation of mud
Muenster
noun Etymology: Münster, Munster, France Date: 1902 a semisoft cheese that may be bland or sharp in flavor
muesli
noun Etymology: German dialect (Swiss) Müsli, diminutive of German Mus soft food, mush, from Old High German muos; akin to Old English mōs food and probably to Old English ...
muezzin
noun Etymology: ultimately from Arabic mu'adhdhin Date: 1585 a Muslim crier who calls the hour of daily prayers
muff
I. noun Etymology: Dutch mof, from Middle French moufle mitten, from Medieval Latin muffula Date: 1599 a warm tubular covering for the hands II. verb Etymology: probably ...
muffaletta
noun see muffuletta
muffin
noun Etymology: probably from Low German muffen, plural of muffe cake Date: 1703 a quick bread made of batter containing egg and baked in a pan having cuplike molds
muffle
transitive verb (muffled; muffling) Etymology: Middle English muflen Date: 15th century 1. to wrap up so as to conceal or protect ; envelop 2. obsolete blindfold 3. a. ...
muffler
noun Date: circa 1536 1. a. a scarf worn around the neck b. something that hides or disguises 2. a device to deaden noise; especially one forming part of the exhaust ...
mufflered
adjective see muffler
muffuletta
also muffaletta noun Etymology: probably from Italian dialect, from Italian muffoletta little muff, diminutive of muffola muff, from French moufle, from Middle French Date: ...
mufti
I. noun Etymology: Arabic muftī Date: 1586 a professional jurist who interprets Muslim law II. noun Etymology: probably from 1mufti Date: 1816 ordinary dress as ...
mug
I. noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1664 1. a cylindrical drinking cup 2. a. the face or mouth of a person b. grimace c. mug shot 3. a. chiefly British ...
mug shot
noun Date: 1950 a photograph of usually a person's head and especially face; specifically a police photograph of a suspect's face or profile
mug up
verb Date: circa 1860 intransitive verb British to study intensively (as for an examination) transitive verb to work up by study
mug's game
noun Date: 1910 a profitless or futile activity
Mugabe
biographical name Robert Gabriel 1924- prime minister of Zimbabwe (1980-87); executive president (1987- )
mugful
noun see mug I
muggee
noun see mug III
mugger
I. noun Etymology: Hindi & Urdu magar, from Sanskrit makara water monster Date: 1844 a usually harmless freshwater crocodile (Crocodylus palustris) of the Indian ...
Muggeridge
biographical name Malcolm Thomas 1903-1990 British writer & social critic
mugginess
noun see muggy
muggy
adjective (muggier; -est) Etymology: English dialect mug drizzle Date: 1746 being warm, damp, and close • mugginess noun
Mughal
variant of mogul
mughal
I. noun see mogul I, 1 II. adjective see mogul I
mugho pine
noun Etymology: probably from French mugho mugho pine, from Italian mugo Date: circa 1756 a shrubby spreading European pine (Pinus mugo) widely cultivated as an ornamental ...
mugo pine
noun see mugho pine
Mugu, Point
geographical name cape SW California W of Los Angeles
mugwort
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English mucgwyrt, from mucg- (perhaps akin to Old English mycg midge) + wyrt wort Date: before 12th century 1. any of several ...
mugwump
noun Etymology: obsolete slang mugwump kingpin, from Massachusett mugquomp, muggumquomp war leader Date: 1884 1. a bolter from the Republican party in 1884 2. a person who ...
Muḥammad
biographical name circa 570-632 Abū al-Qāsim Muḥammad ibn ‘Abd Allāh ibn ‘Abd al-Muṭṭalib ibn Hāshim Arab prophet & founder of Islam
Muhammad
biographical name Elijah 1897-1975 originally surname Poole American religious leader
Muḥammad XI
biographical name died 1527 Abū ‘Abd Allāh Muḥammad Spanish Boabdil last sultan of Granada
Muhammadan
adjective Date: 1681 of or relating to Muhammad or Islam • Muhammadan noun • Muhammadanism noun
Muhammadan calendar
noun Date: circa 1889 Islamic calendar
Muhammadan era
noun Date: circa 1889 Islamic era
Muhammadanism
I. noun see Mohammedan II. noun see Muhammadan
Muharram
noun Etymology: Arabic Muḥarram Date: circa 1615 1. the first month of the Islamic year — see month table 2. a Muslim festival held during Muharram
Mühlenberg
biographical name Henry Melchior 1711-1787 American (German-born) Lutheran clergyman
Muir
biographical name John 1838-1914 American (Scottish-born) naturalist
Muir Woods National Monument
geographical name reservation N California NW of San Francisco containing a redwood grove
Muizenberg
geographical name town Republic of South Africa on False Bay, SSE suburb of Cape Town
mujahedeen
noun plural see mujahideen
mujahedin
noun plural see mujahideen
mujahideen
or mujahedin; also mujahedeen noun plural Etymology: Arabic mujāhidīn, plural of mujāhid, literally, person who wages jihad Date: 1922 Islamic guerrilla fighters ...
mujik
variant of muzhik
Mukalla
geographical name — see Al Mukalla
Mukden
geographical name — see Shenyang
Mukhā, Al
geographical name — see mocha
mukluk
noun Etymology: Yupik maklak bearded seal Date: 1868 1. a sealskin or reindeer-skin boot worn by Eskimos 2. a boot often of duck with a soft leather sole and worn over ...
muktuk
noun Etymology: Inuit maktak Date: 1835 whale skin used for food
mulatto
noun (plural -toes or -tos) Etymology: Spanish mulato, from mulo mule, from Latin mulus Date: 1593 1. the first-generation offspring of a black person and a white person 2. ...
mulberry
noun Etymology: Middle English murberie, mulberie, from Anglo-French mure, moure mulberry (from Latin morum, from Greek moron) + Middle English berie berry Date: 14th century ...
mulch
noun Etymology: perhaps irregular from English dialect melch soft, mild Date: 1657 a protective covering (as of sawdust, compost, or paper) spread or left on the ground to ...
mulct
I. noun Etymology: Latin multa, mulcta Date: 1591 fine, penalty II. transitive verb Date: 1611 1. to punish by a fine 2. a. to defraud especially of money ; swindle ...
mule
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French mul, from Latin mulus Date: 13th century 1. a. a hybrid between a horse and a donkey; especially the offspring of a ...
mule deer
noun Date: 1805 a long-eared deer (Odocoileus hemionus) of western North America that is larger and more heavily built than the white-tailed deer
mule skinner
noun Date: 1870 muleteer
muleta
noun Etymology: Spanish, crutch, muleta, diminutive of mula she-mule, from Latin, feminine of mulus mule Date: 1838 a small cloth attached to a short tapered stick and used ...
muleteer
noun Etymology: French muletier, from mulet, mule, from Old French, diminutive of mul mule Date: 1538 one who drives mules
muley
adjective Etymology: of Celtic origin; akin to Irish & Scottish Gaelic maol bald, hornless, Welsh moel Date: 1840 polled, hornless; especially naturally hornless
Mülheim
or Mülheim an der Ruhr geographical name city W Germany on Ruhr River population 177,042
Mülheim an der Ruhr
geographical name see Mülheim
Mulhouse
geographical name commune NE France in Alsace population 109,905
muliebrity
noun Etymology: Late Latin muliebritat-, muliebritas, from Latin muliebris of a woman, from mulier woman Date: 1592 femininity
mulish
adjective Etymology: 1mule Date: 1751 unreasonably and inflexibly obstinate Synonyms: see obstinate • mulishly adverb • mulishness noun
mulishly
adverb see mulish
mulishness
noun see mulish
Mull
geographical name island W Scotland in the Inner Hebrides area 351 square miles (913 square kilometers), population 1499
mull
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from mul, mol dust, probably from Middle Dutch; akin to Old English melu meal — more at meal Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to ...
mullah
noun Etymology: Turkish molla & Persian & Urdu mulla, from Arabic mawlā Date: 1613 an educated Muslim trained in traditional religious law and doctrine and usually holding ...
mullahism
noun see mullah
mullein
also mullen noun Etymology: Middle English moleyne, from Anglo-French moleine Date: 14th century any of a genus (Verbascum) of usually woolly-leaved Eurasian herbs of the ...
mullein pink
noun Date: circa 1850 an Old World herb (Lychnis coronaria) of the pink family cultivated chiefly for its woolly herbage and crimson flowers
mullen
noun see mullein
muller
noun Etymology: alteration of Middle English molour, probably from mullen to grind Date: 1612 a stone or piece of wood, metal, or glass used as a pestle for pounding or ...
Muller
biographical name Hermann Joseph 1890-1967 American geneticist
Müller
I. biographical name (Friedrich) Max 1823-1900 British (German-born) philologist II. biographical name Johann 1436-1476 Regiomontanus German astronomer III. biographical name ...
Müllerian
adjective Etymology: Fritz Müller died 1897 German zoologist Date: 1898 of, relating to, or being mimicry that exists between two or more inedible or dangerous species (as ...
mullet
noun (plural mullet or mullets) Etymology: Middle English molet, from Anglo-French mulet, from Latin mullus red mullet, from Greek myllos Date: 14th century any of a family ...
mulligan
noun Etymology: probably from the name Mulligan Date: circa 1949 a free shot sometimes given a golfer in informal play when the previous shot was poorly played
mulligan stew
noun Etymology: probably from the name Mulligan Date: 1929 a stew made from whatever ingredients are available
mulligatawny
noun Etymology: Tamil miḷakutaṇṇi, from miḷaku pepper + taṇṇi water Date: 1784 a rich soup usually of chicken stock seasoned with curry
Mulliken
biographical name Robert Sanderson 1896-1986 American chemist & physicist
Mullingar
geographical name town N central Ireland capital of Westmeath population 8077
mullion
noun Etymology: probably alteration of monial mullion Date: 1567 a slender vertical member that forms a division between units of a window, door, or screen or is used ...
Mullis
biographical name Kary Banks 1944- American biochemist
mullite
noun Etymology: Mull, island of the Inner Hebrides Date: 1924 a mineral that is an orthorhombic silicate of aluminum which is resistant to corrosion and heat and is used as a ...
Mulroney
biographical name (Martin) Brian 1939- Canadian politician; prime minister (1984-93)
Multan
geographical name city NE Pakistan SW of Lahore population 742,000
multi-
combining form Etymology: Latin, from multus much, many — more at meliorate 1. a. many ; multiple ; much b. more than two c. more than one 2. many times ...
multi-instrumentalist
noun Date: 1969 a musician who plays two or more instruments
multi-ply
adjective Date: 1926 composed of several plies
multicenter
adjective Date: 1979 involving more than one medical or research institution • multicentered adjective
multicentered
adjective see multicenter
multiculti
adjective Date: 1991 multicultural
multicultural
adjective Date: 1941 of, relating to, reflecting, or adapted to diverse cultures • multiculturalism noun • multiculturalist noun or adjective • multiculturally ...
multiculturalism
noun see multicultural
multiculturalist
noun or adjective see multicultural
multiculturally
adverb see multicultural
multienzyme
adjective Date: 1961 composed of or involving two or more enzymes that function in a biosynthetic pathway
multiethnic
adjective Date: 1966 made up of people of various ethnicities ; also of, relating to, reflecting, or adapted to diverse ethnicities • multiethnicity noun
multiethnicity
noun see multiethnic
multifaceted
adjective Date: 1870 having many facets or aspects
multifactor
adjective see multifactorial 2
multifactorial
adjective Date: 1920 1. having characters or a mode of inheritance dependent on a number of genes at different loci 2. (or multifactor) having, involving, or produced by a ...
multifactorially
adverb see multifactorial
multifarious
adjective Etymology: Medieval Latin multifarius, from Latin multifariam in many places Date: 1593 having or occurring in great variety ; diverse • multifariousness noun
multifariousness
noun see multifarious
multiflora rose
noun Etymology: New Latin multiflora, specific epithet, literally, having many flowers Date: 1829 a vigorous thorny rose (Rosa multiflora) with clusters of small flowers
multifold
adjective Date: 1806 many, numerous
multiform
adjective Etymology: French multiforme, from Latin multiformis, from multi- + -formis -form Date: 1603 having many forms or appearances • multiformity noun
multiformity
noun see multiform
multigerm
adjective Etymology: probably from multi- + germinate Date: 1950 producing or being a fruit cluster capable of giving rise to several plants
multihull
noun Date: 1960 a vessel (as a catamaran or trimaran) with multiple side-by-side hulls — compare monohull • multihulled adjective
multihulled
adjective see multihull
multilateral
adjective Date: circa 1696 1. having many sides 2. involving or participated in by more than two nations or parties • multilateralism noun • multilateralist noun ...
multilateralism
noun see multilateral
multilateralist
noun see multilateral
multilaterally
adverb see multilateral
multilayer
adjective see multilayered
multilayered
or multilayer adjective Date: 1923 having or involving several distinct layers, strata, or levels
multilingual
adjective Date: 1838 1. of, having, or expressed in several languages 2. using or able to use several languages especially with equal fluency • multilingualism noun ...
multilingualism
noun see multilingual
multilingually
adverb see multilingual
multimedia
I. adjective Date: 1962 using, involving, or encompassing several media II. noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: 1967 a technique (as the combining of ...
multimodal
adjective Date: 1902 having or involving several modes, modalities, or maxima
multinational
adjective Date: 1926 1. of or relating to more than two nationalities 2. a. of, relating to, or involving more than two nations b. having divisions in more than ...
multinomial
noun Etymology: multi- + -nomial (as in binomial) Date: 1674 a mathematical expression that consists of the sum of several terms ; polynomial • multinomial adjective
multipack
noun Usage: often attributive Date: 1965 a package of several individually packed items sold as a unit
multiparous
adjective Etymology: New Latin multiparus, from multi- + Latin -parus -parous Date: 1646 1. producing many or more than one at a birth 2. having experienced one or more ...
multipartite
adjective Etymology: Latin multipartitus, from multi- + partitus, past participle of partire to divide, from part-, pars part Date: 1656 1. divided into several or many ...
multiplatinum
adjective Date: 1983 having sold two million or more copies of an album
multiple
I. adjective Etymology: French, from Latin multiplex, from multi- + -plex -fold — more at -fold Date: 1647 1. consisting of, including, or involving more than one 2. ...
multiple allele
noun Date: 1938 an allele of a genetic locus having more than two allelic forms within a population
multiple chemical sensitivity
noun Date: 1988 a variable group of symptoms (as tachycardia, sweating, fatigue, nausea, trembling, and difficulty concentrating) that typically occur in susceptible ...

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