Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

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obtrusiveness
noun see obtrusive
obtund
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin obtundere Date: 14th century to reduce the edge or violence of ; dull
obturate
transitive verb see obturation
obturation
noun Etymology: Latin obturation-, obturatio, from obturare to obstruct Date: 1610 obstruction, closure • obturate transitive verb
obturator
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin obturare Date: circa 1741 one (as a prosthetic device) that closes or blocks up an opening (as a fissure in the palate)
obtuse
adjective (obtuser; -est) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin obtusus blunt, dull, from past participle of obtundere to beat against, blunt, from ob- against + tundere to beat ...
obtusely
adverb see obtuse
obtuseness
noun see obtuse
Obuchi
biographical name Keizo 1937-2000 prime minister of Japan (1998-2000)
obv
abbreviation obverse
obverse
I. adjective Etymology: Latin obversus, from past participle of obvertere to turn toward, from ob- toward + vertere to turn — more at ob-, worth Date: circa 1656 1. facing ...
obversely
adverb see obverse I
obviate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Late Latin obviatus, past participle of obviare to meet, withstand, from Latin obviam Date: 1598 to anticipate and prevent (as a ...
obviation
noun see obviate
obvious
adjective Etymology: Latin obvius, from obviam in the way, from ob in the way of + viam, accusative of via way — more at ob-, via Date: 1603 1. archaic being in the way or ...
obviously
adverb Date: 1638 1. in an obvious manner 2. as is plainly evident
obviousness
noun see obvious
Obwald
or Obwalden geographical name — see Unterwalden
Obwalden
geographical name see Obwald
OC
abbreviation 1. off center 2. officer candidate 3. on center 4. on course 5. over-the-counter
oca
also oka noun Etymology: Spanish, from Quechua oqa Date: 1604 either of two South American wood sorrels (Oxalis crenata and O. tuberosa) cultivated for their edible tubers; ...
Ocala
geographical name city N central Florida S of Gainesville population 45,943
ocarina
noun Etymology: Italian, from Italian dialect, diminutive of oca goose, from Late Latin auca, ultimately from Latin avis bird — more at aviary Date: 1877 a simple wind ...
Occam
biographical name see Ockham
Occam's razor
also Ockham's razor noun Etymology: William of Occam Date: circa 1837 a scientific and philosophic rule that entities should not be multiplied unnecessarily which is ...
Occamistic
adjective see Ockham
occasion
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin occasion-, occasio, from occidere to fall, fall down, from ob- toward + cadere to fall ...
occasional
adjective Date: circa 1631 1. a. of or relating to a particular occasion b. created for a particular occasion 2. acting as the occasion or contributing cause of ...
occasionally
adverb Date: 1630 on occasion ; now and then
Occident
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin occident-, occidens, from present participle of occidere to fall, set (of the sun) Date: 14th century west 2a
occidental
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or situated in the Occident ; western 2. of or relating to Occidentals • occidentally adverb
Occidental
noun Date: 1857 a member of one of the occidental peoples; especially a person of European ancestry
Occidentalism
noun Date: 1839 the characteristic features of occidental peoples or culture
occidentalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Usage: often capitalized Date: 1870 to make occidental (as in culture)
occidentally
adverb see occidental
occipital
adjective Date: 1541 of, relating to, or located within or near the occiput or the occipital bone • occipital noun • occipitally adverb
occipital bone
noun Date: 1679 a compound bone that forms the posterior part of the skull and bears a condyle by which the skull articulates with the atlas
occipital condyle
noun Date: circa 1860 an articular surface on the occipital bone by which the skull articulates with the atlas
occipital lobe
noun Date: 1882 the posterior lobe of each cerebral hemisphere that bears the visual cortex and has the form of a 3-sided pyramid
occipitally
adverb see occipital
occiput
noun (plural occiputs or occipita) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin occipit-, occiput, from ob- against + capit-, caput head — more at ob-, head Date: 14th century the ...
Occitan
noun Etymology: French, from Medieval Latin occitanus, from Old Occitan oc yes (contrasted with Old French oïl yes) + Medieval Latin -itanus (perhaps as in aquitanus of ...
Occleve
biographical name — see Thomas Hoccleve
occlude
verb (occluded; occluding) Etymology: Latin occludere, from ob- in the way + claudere to shut, close — more at close Date: 1597 transitive verb 1. to close up or block ...
occluded front
noun Date: circa 1938 occlusion 2
occlusal
adjective Date: 1897 of or relating to the grinding or biting surface of a tooth or to occlusion of the teeth
occlusion
noun Etymology: Latin occludere Date: circa 1645 1. the act of occluding ; the state of being occluded: as a. the complete obstruction of the breath passage in the ...
occlusive
adjective Etymology: Latin occlusus, past participle of occludere Date: 1888 1. serving to occlude 2. characterized by occlusion
occult
I. transitive verb Etymology: Latin occultare, frequentative of occulere Date: 1500 to shut off from view or exposure ; cover, eclipse • occulter noun II. adjective ...
occultation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the state of being hidden from view or lost to notice 2. the interruption of the light from a celestial body or of the signals from a spacecraft ...
occulter
noun see occult I
occultism
noun Date: 1881 occult theory or practice ; belief in or study of the action or influence of supernatural or supernormal powers • occultist noun
occultist
noun see occultism
occultly
adverb see occult II
occupancy
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1596 1. the fact or condition of holding, possessing, or residing in or on something 2. the act or fact of taking or having possession (as of ...
occupant
noun Date: 1596 1. one who acquires title by occupancy 2. one who occupies a particular place; especially resident
occupation
noun Etymology: Middle English occupacioun, from Anglo-French occupaciun, from Latin occupation-, occupatio, from occupare Date: 14th century 1. a. an activity in which ...
occupational
adjective see occupation
occupational therapist
noun see occupational therapy
occupational therapy
noun Date: 1915 therapy based on engagement in meaningful activities of daily life (as self-care skills, education, work, or social interaction) especially to enable or ...
occupationally
adverb see occupation
occupier
noun see occupy
occupy
transitive verb (-pied; -pying) Etymology: Middle English occupien to take possession of, occupy, from Anglo-French occupier, occuper, from Latin occupare, from ob- toward + ...
occur
intransitive verb (occurred; occurring) Etymology: Latin occurrere, from ob- in the way + currere to run — more at ob-, car Date: 1534 1. to be found or met with ; appear ...
occurrence
noun Date: 1539 1. something that occurs 2. the action or instance of occurring Synonyms: occurrence, event, incident, episode, circumstance mean something that ...
occurrent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Latin occurrent-, occurrens, present participle of occurrere Date: 15th century 1. occurring at a particular ...
OCD
abbreviation obsessive-compulsive disorder
ocean
noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English occean, from Anglo-French, from Latin oceanus, from Greek Õkeanos, a river thought of as encircling the earth, ocean ...
Ocean Island
geographical name 1. — see Banaba 2. — see Kure Atoll
ocean perch
noun Date: 1943 any of several marine scorpaenid food fishes (genus Sebastes): a. redfish a; also a related food fish (S. fasciatus) b. one (S. alutus) abundant in the ...
ocean sunfish
noun Date: 1629 a large bony fish (Mola mola of the family Molidae, order Tetraodontiformes) having high dorsal and anal fins and a body nearly oval in outline and attaining a ...
oceanarium
noun (plural -iums or oceanaria) Date: 1938 a large marine aquarium
oceanfront
noun Date: 1919 a shore area on the ocean
oceangoing
adjective Date: 1885 of, relating to, or designed for travel on the ocean
Oceania
geographical name the lands of the central & S Pacific including Micronesia, Melanesia, Polynesia (including New Zealand), often Australia, & sometimes the Malay Archipelago ...
Oceanian
adjective or noun see Oceania
oceanic
adjective Date: 1656 1. a. of or relating to the ocean b. occurring in or frequenting the ocean and especially the open sea as distinguished from littoral or neritic ...
Oceanid
noun Etymology: Greek ōkeanid-, ōkeanis, from Õkeanos Oceanus Date: 1842 any of the ocean nymphs that are daughters of Oceanus and Tethys in Greek mythology
oceanographer
noun see oceanography
oceanographic
adjective see oceanography
oceanographical
adjective see oceanography
oceanographically
adverb see oceanography
oceanography
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1859 a science that deals with the oceans and includes the delimitation of their extent and depth, the physics and ...
oceanologist
noun see oceanology
oceanology
noun Date: circa 1864 oceanography; specifically the science of marine resources and technology • oceanologist noun
Oceanside
geographical name city SW California NNW of San Diego population 161,029
Oceanus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Õkeanos Date: 1567 a Titan who rules over a great river encircling the earth in Greek mythology
ocellar
adjective see ocellus
ocellus
noun (plural ocelli) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, diminutive of oculus eye — more at eye Date: 1819 1. a minute simple eye or eyespot of an invertebrate 2. an ...
ocelot
noun Etymology: French, from Nahuatl ōcēlōtl jaguar Date: 1774 a medium-sized American wildcat (Felis pardalis) that ranges from Texas to northern Argentina and has a ...
ocher
or ochre noun Etymology: Middle English oker, from Middle French & Latin; Middle French ocre, from Latin ochra, from Greek ōchra, from feminine of ōchros yellow Date: 14th ...
ocherous
adjective see ocher
ochlocracy
noun Etymology: Greek & Middle French; Middle French ochlocratie, from Greek ochlokratia, from ochlos mob + -kratia -cracy Date: 1584 government by the mob ; mob rule • ...
ochlocrat
noun see ochlocracy
ochlocratic
adjective see ochlocracy
ochlocratical
adjective see ochlocracy
ochre
noun see ocher
ochreous
adjective see ocher
Ochs
biographical name Adolph Simon 1858-1935 American newspaper publisher
ocicat
noun Etymology: blend of ocelot and cat Date: 1967 any of a breed of domestic cats developed by crossing Siamese, American shorthair, and Abyssinian cats and having a short ...
Ockham
or Occam biographical name William of circa 1285-?1349 English philosopher • Ockhamistic or Occamistic adjective
Ockham's razor
variant of Occam's razor
Ockhamistic
adjective see Ockham
Ocmulgee
geographical name river 255 miles (410 kilometers) central Georgia flowing SE to join the Oconee (250 miles or 402 kilometers) forming the Altamaha
Ocmulgee National Monument
geographical name reservation central Georgia at Macon containing American Indian mounds & other remains
Ocoee
geographical name city central Florida W of Orlando population 24,391
ocotillo
noun (plural -llos) Etymology: Mexican Spanish, diminutive of ocote, a resinous pine tree (Pinus montezuma), from Nahuatl ocotl pine, torch made of pine Date: 1856 a thorny ...
OCR
abbreviation optical character reader; optical character recognition
Ocracoke Island
geographical name island off central North Carolina coast between Pamlico Sound & the Atlantic — see croatan
OCS
abbreviation 1. officer candidate school 2. Old Church Slavic; Old Church Slavonic
Oct
abbreviation October
oct-
combining form see octa-
octa-
or octo-; also oct- combining form Etymology: Greek okta-, oktō-, okt- (from oktō) & Latin octo-, oct-, from octo — more at eight eight
octagon
noun Etymology: Latin octagonum, from Greek oktagōnon, from okta- + -gōnon -gon Date: 1639 a polygon of eight angles and eight sides • octagonal adjective • ...
octagonal
adjective see octagon
octagonally
adverb see octagon
octahedral
adjective Date: 1758 1. having eight plane faces 2. of, relating to, or formed in octahedrons • octahedrally adverb
octahedrally
adverb see octahedral
octahedron
noun (plural -drons or octahedra) Etymology: Greek oktaedron, from okta- + -edron -hedron Date: 1570 a solid bounded by eight plane faces
octal
adjective Date: 1948 of, relating to, or being a number system with a base of eight
octameter
noun Etymology: Late Latin, having eight feet, from Late Greek oktametros, from okta- + metron measure — more at measure Date: 1889 a line of verse consisting of eight ...
octane
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1872 1. any of several isomeric liquid alkanes C8H18 2. octane number
octane number
noun Date: 1931 a number that is used to measure the antiknock properties of a liquid motor fuel (as gasoline) with a higher number indicating a smaller likelihood of knocking ...
octane rating
noun see octane number
octant
noun Etymology: Latin octant-, octans eighth of a circle, from octo Date: 1731 1. an instrument for observing altitudes of a celestial body from a moving ship or aircraft 2. ...
octapeptide
noun Date: 1931 a protein fragment or molecule (as oxytocin or vasopressin) that consists of eight amino acids linked in a polypeptide chain
octave
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin octava, from Latin, feminine of octavus eighth, from octo eight — more at eight Date: 14th century 1. ...
Octavius
biographical name — see Augustus
octavo
noun (plural -vos) Etymology: Latin, ablative of octavus eighth Date: 1582 the size of a piece of paper cut eight from a sheet; also a book, a page, or paper of this size
octet
noun Date: 1864 1. a musical composition for eight instruments or voices 2. a group or set of eight: as a. octave 2b b. the performers of an octet
octillion
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, from oct- octa- + -illion (as in million) Date: 1690 — see number table
octo-
combining form see octa-
October
noun Etymology: Middle English Octobre, from Old English & Anglo-French; Old English October, from Latin, 8th month of the early Roman calendar, from octo; Anglo-French, from ...
octodecillion
noun Etymology: Latin octodecim eighteen + English -illion (as in million) Date: 1939 — see number table
octogenarian
noun Etymology: Latin octogenarius containing eighty, from octogeni eighty each, from octoginta eighty, from octo eight + -ginta (akin to viginti twenty) — more at vigesimal ...
octoploid
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1925 having a chromosome number eight times the basic haploid chromosome number • octoploid noun
octopod
noun Etymology: ultimately from Greek oktōpod-, oktōpous scorpion, from oktō- octa- + pod-, pous foot — more at foot Date: circa 1836 any of an order (Octopoda) of ...
octopus
noun (plural -puses or octopi) Etymology: New Latin Octopod-, Octopus, from Greek oktōpous Date: 1758 1. any of a genus (Octopus) of cephalopod mollusks that have eight ...
octoroon
noun Etymology: octa- + -roon (as in quadroon) Date: 1861 a person of one-eighth black ancestry
octosyllabic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin octosyllabus, from Greek oktasyllabos, from okta- octa- + syllabē syllable Date: circa 1771 1. consisting of eight syllables 2. composed of ...
octosyllable
noun Date: circa 1846 a word or line of eight syllables
octothorp
noun see octothorpe
octothorpe
or octothorp noun Etymology: octo- + thorp, of unknown origin; from the eight points on its circumference Date: 1971 the symbol #
ocular
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin ocularis of eyes, from Latin oculus eye Date: circa 1575 1. a. done or perceived by the eye b. based on what has been seen 2. ...
ocularist
noun Date: 1866 a person who makes and fits artificial eyes
oculist
noun Etymology: French oculiste, from Latin oculus Date: 1615 1. ophthalmologist 2. optometrist
oculomotor
adjective Etymology: Latin oculus eye + English -o- + motor Date: circa 1890 1. moving or tending to move the eyeball 2. of or relating to the oculomotor nerve
oculomotor nerve
noun Date: 1881 either of the pair of chiefly motor nerves that comprise the third pair of cranial nerves, arise from the midbrain, and supply four muscles of the eye
oculus
noun (plural oculi) Etymology: Latin, literally, eye — more at eye Date: 1848 1. a circular or oval window 2. a circular opening at the top of a dome
od
or odd interjection Usage: often capitalized Etymology: euphemism for God Date: 1695 archaic — used as a mild oath
OD
I. noun Etymology: overdose Date: circa 1960 1. an overdose of a narcotic 2. one who has taken an OD II. intransitive verb (OD'd or ODed; OD'ing; OD's) Date: 1966 1. to ...
odalisque
noun Etymology: French, from Turkish odalık, from oda room Date: circa 1681 1. a female slave 2. a concubine in a harem
odd
adjective Etymology: Middle English odde, from Old Norse oddi point of land, triangle, odd number; akin to Old English ord point of a weapon Date: 14th century 1. a. ...
Odd Fellow
noun Etymology: Independent Order of Odd Fellows Date: 1795 a member of a major benevolent and fraternal order
odd lot
noun Date: 1913 a number or quantity other than the usual unit in transactions; especially a quantity of less than 100 shares of stock
odd man out
noun Date: 1923 a person who differs from the other members of a group
odd permutation
noun Date: 1927 a permutation that is produced by the successive application of an odd number of interchanges of pairs of elements
odd trick
noun Date: 1837 each trick in excess of six won by declarer's side at bridge — compare book 9
odd-pinnate
adjective Date: circa 1890 having leaflets on each side of the petiole and having a single leaflet at the tip of the petiole — see leaf illustration • odd-pinnately adverb
odd-pinnately
adverb see odd-pinnate
oddball
noun Date: 1948 one that is eccentric • oddball adjective
oddity
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1713 1. an odd person, thing, event, or trait 2. the quality or state of being odd
oddly
adverb Date: 1610 1. in an odd manner 2. as is odd
oddment
noun Date: 1796 1. a. something left over ; remnant b. plural odds and ends 2. something odd ; oddity
oddness
noun see odd
odds
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Date: circa 1520 1. a. archaic inequalities b. obsolete degree of unlikeness 2. a. an amount by which one thing ...
odds and ends
noun plural Date: circa 1746 1. a. miscellaneous articles b. miscellaneous small matters (as of business) to be attended to 2. miscellaneous remnants or leftovers
odds-on
adjective Date: 1890 1. having or viewed as having a better than even chance to win 2. not involving much risk ; pretty sure
oddsmaker
noun Date: circa 1949 one who figures betting odds
ode
noun Etymology: Middle French or Late Latin; Middle French, from Late Latin, from Greek ōidē, literally, song, from aeidein, aidein to sing; akin to Greek audē voice Date: ...
Odense
geographical name city Denmark in N Fyn Island population 174,948
Oder
or Odra geographical name river about 565 miles (909 kilometers) central Europe rising in the mountains of Silesia, Czech Republic & flowing N to join Neisse River & thence N ...
oderint dum metuant
foreign term Etymology: Latin let them hate, so long as they fear
Odesa
geographical name see Odessa 2
Odessa
geographical name 1. city W Texas population 90,943 2. (or Ukrainian Odesa) city & port S Ukraine on Black Sea population 1,101,000
Odets
biographical name Clifford 1906-1963 American dramatist
odeum
noun (plural odea) Etymology: Latin & Greek; Latin, from Greek ōideion, from ōidē song Date: 1616 1. a small roofed theater of ancient Greece and Rome used chiefly for ...
odi et amo
foreign term Etymology: Latin I hate and I love
odic
adjective Date: 1863 of, relating to, or forming an ode
odiferous
adjective Etymology: by contraction Date: 15th century odoriferous
Odin
noun Etymology: Danish, from Old Norse Õthinn Date: 1690 the supreme god and creator in Norse mythology
odious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin odiosus, from odium Date: 14th century arousing or deserving hatred or repugnance ; hateful • ...
odiously
adverb see odious
odiousness
noun see odious
odist
noun see ode
odium
noun Etymology: Latin, hatred, from odisse to hate; akin to Old English atol terrible, Greek odyssasthai to be angry Date: 1602 1. the state or fact of being subjected to ...
Odoacer
also Odovacar or Odovakar biographical name 433-493 1st barbarian ruler of Italy (476-493)
odometer
noun Etymology: French odomètre, from Greek hodometron, from hodos way, road + metron measure — more at measure Date: 1791 an instrument for measuring the distance ...
odonate
noun Etymology: irregular from Greek odous, odōn tooth Date: 1947 any of an order (Odonata) of predaceous insects comprising the dragonflies and damselflies • odonate ...
odont-
or odonto- combining form Etymology: French, from Greek, odont-, odous — more at tooth tooth
odonto-
combining form see odont-
odontoblast
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1878 any of the elongated radially arranged cells on the surface of the dental pulp that secrete dentin • ...
odontoblastic
adjective see odontoblast
odontoglossum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek odont- + glōssa tongue — more at gloss Date: 1880 any of a genus (Odontoglossum) of widely cultivated tropical American orchids
odontoid process
noun Date: circa 1819 a toothlike process projecting from the anterior end of the centrum of the axis vertebra on which the atlas vertebra rotates
odor
noun Etymology: Middle English odour, from Anglo-French odur, from Latin odor; akin to Latin olēre to smell, Greek ozein to smell, osmē smell, odor Date: 13th century 1. ...
odorant
noun Date: 1935 an odorous substance; especially one added to a dangerous odorless substance to warn of its presence
odored
adjective see odor
odoriferous
adjective Date: 15th century 1. yielding an odor ; odorous 2. morally offensive • odoriferously adverb • odoriferousness noun
odoriferously
adverb see odoriferous
odoriferousness
noun see odoriferous
odorize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1884 to make odorous ; scent
odorless
adjective see odor
odorous
adjective Date: 15th century having an odor: as a. fragrant b. malodorous • odorously adverb • odorousness noun Synonyms: odorous, fragrant, redolent, ...
odorously
adverb see odorous
odorousness
noun see odorous
odour
chiefly British variant of odor
Odovacar
biographical name see Odoacer
Odovakar
biographical name see Odoacer
Odra
geographical name see Oder
Odyssean
adjective Date: circa 1711 of, relating to, or characteristic of Odysseus or his journey
Odysseus
noun Etymology: Greek Date: 1616 a king of Ithaca and Greek leader in the Trojan War who after the war wanders 10 years before reaching home
odyssey
noun (plural -seys) Etymology: the Odyssey, epic poem attributed to Homer recounting the long wanderings of Odysseus Date: 1889 1. a long wandering or voyage usually marked ...
Oe
I. abbreviation oersted II. biographical name Kenzaburo 1935- Japanese writer
Oea
geographical name — see tripoli 2
OECD
abbreviation Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development
OED
abbreviation Oxford English Dictionary
oedema
chiefly British variant of edema
oedipal
adjective Usage: often capitalized Date: 1939 of, relating to, or resulting from the Oedipus complex • oedipally adverb, often capitalized
oedipally
adverb see oedipal
Oedipus
I. noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Oidipous Date: 1557 the son of Laius and Jocasta who in fulfillment of an oracle unknowingly kills his father and marries his mother II. ...
Oedipus complex
noun Date: 1910 the positive libidinal feelings of a child toward the parent of the opposite sex and hostile or jealous feelings toward the parent of the same sex that may be ...
Oehlenschläger
biographical name Adam Gottlob 1779-1850 Danish poet & dramatist
oeil-de-boeuf
noun (plural oeils-de-boeuf) Etymology: French œil-de-bœuf, literally, ox's eye Date: 1849 oculus 1
oeillade
noun Etymology: Middle French œillade, from oeil eye, from Old French oil, from Latin oculus — more at eye Date: 1592 a glance of the eye; especially ogle
OEM
noun Etymology: original equipment manufacturer Date: 1968 one that produces complex equipment (as a computer system) from components usually bought from other manufacturers
oenological
adjective see enology
oenologist
noun see enology
oenology
variant of enology
Oenone
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Oinōnē Date: 1566 a nymph who is abandoned by her husband Paris for Helen of Troy
oenophile
noun Etymology: French œnophile, from œno- (from Greek oinos wine) + -phile -phile — more at wine Date: 1930 a lover or connoisseur of wine
OEO
abbreviation Office of Economic Opportunity
OER
abbreviation officer efficiency report
oersted
noun Etymology: Hans Christian Oersted Date: 1930 the unit of magnetic field strength in the centimeter-gram-second system
oesophagus
chiefly British variant of esophagus
oestr-
or oestro- chiefly British variant of estr-
oestro-
see oestr-
Oeta
geographical name mountains central Greece, E spur of Pindus Mountains; highest point 7060 feet (2152 meters)
oeuvre
noun (plural oeuvres) Etymology: French œuvre, literally, work, from Old French ovre, Latin opera — more at opera Date: 1875 a substantial body of work constituting the ...
OF
abbreviation outfield
of
I. preposition Etymology: Middle English, off, of, from Old English, adverb & preposition; akin to Old High German aba off, away, Latin ab from, away, Greek apo Date: before ...
of a certain age
phrasal of a somewhat advanced age ; no longer young
of a piece
phrasal alike, consistent
of a sort
phrasal see of sorts
of choice
phrasal to be preferred
of course
phrasal 1. following the ordinary way or procedure 2. as might be expected
of few words
phrasal not inclined to say more than is necessary ; laconic
of late
phrasal in the period shortly or immediately preceding ; recently
of necessity
phrasal in such a way that it cannot be otherwise; also as a necessary consequence
of one's word
phrasal that can be relied on to keep a promise — used only after man or woman
of record
phrasal 1. being documented or attested 2. being authoritative or sanctioned
of right
phrasal 1. as an absolute right 2. legally or morally exactable
of sorts
or of a sort phrasal in some respects but not entirely or truly
of the essence
phrasal of the utmost importance
ofay
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1925 usually disparaging a white person
off
I. adverb Etymology: Middle English of, from Old English — more at of Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) from a place or position ; specifically away from land ...
off and on
adverb Date: 1535 with periodic cessation ; intermittently
off base
phrasal 1. wrong, mistaken 2. unawares
off Broadway
noun Usage: often capitalized O Etymology: from its usually being produced in smaller theaters outside of the Broadway theatrical district Date: 1954 a part of the New York ...
off camera
phrasal 1. while not being filmed by a television or movie camera
off duty
phrasal free from assignment or responsibility
off guard
phrasal in an unprepared or unsuspecting state
off of
preposition Date: 1567 off Usage: The of is often criticized as superfluous, a comment that is irrelevant because off of is an idiom. It is much more common in speech ...
off one's feet
phrasal in a sitting or lying position

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