Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

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paleobotanic
adjective see paleobotany
paleobotanical
adjective see paleobotany
paleobotanically
adverb see paleobotany
paleobotanist
noun see paleobotany
paleobotany
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1872 a branch of botany dealing with fossil plants • paleobotanical also paleobotanic adjective • ...
Paleocene
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1877 of, relating to, or being the earliest epoch of the Tertiary or the corresponding series of rocks — see ...
paleoclimatic
adjective Date: 1893 of, relating to, or being a climate distinctive to a past geological age
paleoclimatologist
noun see paleoclimatology
paleoclimatology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1909 a science dealing with the climate of past ages • paleoclimatologist noun
paleoconservative
noun Date: 1981 a conservative espousing traditional principles and policies • paleoconservative adjective
paleoecologic
adjective see paleoecology
paleoecological
adjective see paleoecology
paleoecologist
noun see paleoecology
paleoecology
noun Date: 1898 a branch of ecology that is concerned with the characteristics of ancient environments and with their relationships to ancient plants and animals • ...
Paleogene
adjective Etymology: German Paläogen, from palä- pale- + -gen (from Greek -genēs born) — more at -gen Date: 1882 of, relating to, or being the earlier part of the ...
paleogeographic
adjective see paleogeography
paleogeographical
adjective see paleogeography
paleogeographically
adverb see paleogeography
paleogeography
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1881 the geography of ancient times or of a particular past geological epoch • paleogeographic or ...
paleographer
noun see paleography
paleographic
or paleographical adjective Date: circa 1842 relating to writings of former times • paleographically adverb
paleographical
adjective see paleographic
paleographically
adverb see paleographic
paleography
noun Etymology: New Latin palaeographia, from Greek palai- pale- + -graphia -graphy Date: 1806 1. the study of ancient writings and inscriptions 2. a. an ancient manner ...
Paleolithic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1865 of or relating to the earliest period of the Stone Age characterized by rough or chipped stone implements
paleomagnetic
adjective see paleomagnetism
paleomagnetically
adverb see paleomagnetism
paleomagnetism
noun Date: 1854 1. the intensity and direction of residual magnetization in ancient rocks 2. a science that deals with paleomagnetism • paleomagnetic adjective • ...
paleomagnetist
noun see paleomagnetism
paleontologic
adjective see paleontology
paleontological
adjective see paleontology
paleontologist
noun see paleontology
paleontology
noun Etymology: French paléontologie, from palé- pale- + Greek onta existing things (from neuter plural of ont-, ōn, present participle of einai to be) + French -logie -logy ...
paleopathological
adjective see paleopathology
paleopathologist
noun see paleopathology
paleopathology
noun Date: 1893 a branch of pathology concerned with ancient diseases as evidenced especially in fossil or other remains • paleopathological adjective • paleopathologist ...
Paleozoic
adjective Date: 1838 of, relating to, originating in, or being an era of geological history that extends from the beginning of the Cambrian to the close of the Permian and is ...
paleozoological
adjective see paleozoology
paleozoologist
noun see paleozoology
paleozoology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1857 a branch of paleontology dealing with ancient and fossil animals • paleozoological adjective • ...
Palermitan
adjective or noun see Palermo
Palermo
or ancient Panormus or Panhormus geographical name city & port Italy capital of Sicily population 697,162 • Palermitan adjective or noun
Palestine
or Latin Palaestina geographical name 1. ancient region SW Asia bordering on E coast of the Mediterranean & extending E of Jordan River 2. region bordering on the ...
Palestinian
adjective or noun see Palestine
Palestrina
biographical name Giovanni Pierluigi da circa 1525-1594 Italian composer
palette
noun Etymology: French, from Middle French, diminutive of pale spade, from Latin pala; probably akin to Latin pangere to fix — more at pact Date: 1622 1. a thin oval or ...
palette knife
noun Date: 1759 a knife with usually a flexible steel blade and no cutting edge used to mix colors or to apply colors (as to a painting)
Paley
I. biographical name Grace 1922- née Goodside American writer II. biographical name William 1743-1805 English theologian & philosopher
palfrey
noun (plural palfreys) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French palefrei, from Medieval Latin palafredus, from Late Latin paraveredus post-horse for secondary roads, from ...
Palgrave
biographical name Francis Turner 1824-1897 English writer
Pali
noun Etymology: Sanskrit pāli row, series of Buddhist sacred texts Date: 1800 an Indo-Aryan language used as the liturgical and scholarly language of Theravada Buddhism — ...
palimony
noun Etymology: blend of pal and alimony Date: 1979 a court-ordered allowance paid by one member of a couple formerly living together out of wedlock to the other
palimpsest
noun Etymology: Latin palimpsestus, from Greek palimpsēstos scraped again, from palin + psēn to rub, scrape; akin to Sanskrit psāti, babhasti he chews Date: 1825 1. ...
palindrome
noun Etymology: Greek palindromos running back again, from palin back, again + dramein to run; akin to Greek polos axis, pole — more at pole, dromedary Date: circa 1629 a ...
palindromic
adjective see palindrome
palindromist
noun see palindrome
paling
noun Date: 15th century 1. a fence of pales or pickets 2. wood for making pales 3. a pale or picket for a fence
palingenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek palin again + Latin genesis genesis Date: 1668 metempsychosis • palingenetic adjective
palingenetic
adjective see palingenesis
palinode
noun Etymology: Greek palinōidia, from palin + aeidein to sing — more at ode Date: 1579 1. an ode or song recanting or retracting something in an earlier poem 2. a ...
palisade
I. noun Etymology: French palissade, ultimately from Latin palus stake — more at pole Date: 1600 1. a. a fence of stakes especially for defense b. a long strong stake ...
palisade cell
noun Date: 1875 a cell of the palisade layer
palisade layer
noun Date: 1914 a layer of columnar cells rich in chloroplasts found beneath the upper epidermis of foliage leaves — called also palisade mesophyll, palisade parenchyma, ...
palisade mesophyll
noun see palisade layer
palisade parenchyma
noun see palisade layer
palisade tissue
noun see palisade layer
Palisades
geographical name line of cliffs 15 miles (24 kilometers) long SE New York & NE New Jersey on W bank of Hudson River
palish
adjective see pale III
Palk Strait
geographical name strait 40 miles (64 kilometers) wide between N Sri Lanka & SE India connecting Gulf of Mannar & Bay of Bengal
pall
I. verb Etymology: Middle English, short for appallen to become pale — more at appall Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. to lose strength or effectiveness 2. to ...
pall-mall
noun Etymology: Middle French pallemaille, from Italian pallamaglio, from palla ball (of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German balla ball) + maglio mallet, from Latin malleus ...
Palladian
adjective Date: 1731 of or relating to a revived classical style in architecture based on the works of Andrea Palladio • Palladianism noun
Palladianism
noun see Palladian
Palladio
biographical name Andrea 1508-1580 Italian architect
palladium
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from Greek palladion, from Pallad-, Pallas Date: 14th century 1. capitalized a statue of Pallas whose preservation was ...
palladous
adjective see palladium II
Pallas
noun Etymology: Latin Pallad-, Pallas, from Greek Date: 14th century Athena
pallbearer
noun Etymology: 2pall Date: 1707 a person who helps to carry the coffin at a funeral; also a member of the escort or honor guard of the coffin who does not actually help to ...
pallet
I. noun Etymology: Middle English paillet, from Anglo-French paillete bundle of straw, from paille straw, from Latin palea chaff, straw; akin to Sanskrit palāva chaff Date: ...
palletise
British variant of palletize
palletization
noun see palletize
palletize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: 1944 to place on, transport, or store by means of pallets • palletization noun • palletizer noun
palletizer
noun see palletize
pallette
noun Etymology: alteration of palette Date: 1834 one of the plates at the armpits of a suit of armor — see armor illustration
pallial
adjective Etymology: New Latin pallium Date: 1836 1. of, relating to, or produced by the mantle of a mollusk or brachiopod 2. of or relating to the cerebral cortex
palliasse
noun Etymology: modification of French paillasse, from paille straw Date: 1763 a thin straw mattress used as a pallet
palliate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin palliatus, past participle of palliare to cloak, conceal, from Latin pallium cloak Date: 15th ...
palliation
noun see palliate
palliative
I. adjective Date: 15th century serving to palliate • palliatively adverb II. noun Date: 1724 something that palliates
palliatively
adverb see palliative I
palliator
noun see palliate
pallid
adjective Etymology: Latin pallidus — more at pale Date: 1590 1. deficient in color ; wan 2. lacking sparkle or liveliness ; dull • pallidly adverb • ...
pallida Mors
foreign term Etymology: Latin pale Death
pallidly
adverb see pallid
pallidness
noun see pallid
pallidotomy
noun (plural -mies) Etymology: New Latin (globus) pallidus structure within the corpus striatum, literally, pale globe + International Scientific Vocabulary -tomy Date: 1951 ...
pallium
noun (plural pallia or -liums) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin Date: 12th century 1. a. a white woolen band with pendants in front and back worn over the chasuble by ...
pallor
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin, from pallēre to be pale — more at fallow Date: 15th century deficiency of color especially of the face ; paleness
pally
adjective Date: 1895 sharing the relationship of pals ; intimate
palm
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English, from Latin palma palm of the hand, palm tree; from the resemblance of the tree's leaves to the outstretched hand; akin to ...
Palm Bay
geographical name city E Florida population 79,413
Palm Beach Gardens
geographical name city SE Florida population 35,058
Palm Coast
geographical name city NE Florida population 32,732
Palm Desert
geographical name city SW Calif ESE of Riverside population 41,155
palm off
transitive verb Date: 1822 1. to dispose of usually by trickery or guile 2. pass off 2
palm oil
noun Date: 1625 an edible fat obtained from the flesh of the fruit of several palms and used especially in soap and lubricating greases
Palm Springs
geographical name city S California E of Los Angeles population 42,807
Palm Sunday
noun Etymology: from the palm branches strewn in Christ's way Date: before 12th century the Sunday before Easter celebrated in commemoration of Christ's triumphal entry ...
Palma
I. biographical name Tomás Estrada — see Estrada Palma II. geographical name or Palma de Mallorca commune & port Spain capital of Baleares province on Majorca population ...
Palma de Mallorca
geographical name see Palma II
palmar
adjective Date: 1656 of, relating to, or involving the palm of the hand
palmary
adjective Etymology: Latin palmarius deserving the palm, from palma Date: 1657 outstanding, best
Palmas, Cape
geographical name cape Liberia on extreme SE coast
palmate
also palmated adjective Date: 1661 resembling a hand with the fingers spread: as a. having lobes radiating from a common point — see leaf illustration b. having the ...
palmated
adjective see palmate
palmately
adverb see palmate
palmation
noun see palmate
Palmdale
geographical name city SW California NE of Los Angeles population 116,670
palmed
adjective Date: 15th century having a palm of a specified kind — used in combination
palmer
noun Date: 13th century a person wearing two crossed palm leaves as a sign of a pilgrimage made to the Holy Land
Palmer
I. biographical name Alice Elvira 1855-1902 née Freeman American educator II. biographical name Arnold (Daniel) 1929- American golfer III. biographical name Daniel David ...
Palmer Archipelago
or formerly Antarctic Archipelago geographical name islands W of N end of Antarctic Peninsula in British Antarctic Territory
Palmer Land
geographical name the S section of Antarctic Peninsula
Palmer Peninsula
geographical name — see Antarctic Peninsula
Palmerston
I. biographical name 3d Viscount 1784-1865 Henry John Temple English statesman; prime minister (1855-58; 1859-65) • Palmerstonian adjective II. geographical name island ...
Palmerston North
geographical name city New Zealand on S North Island NE of Wellington population 70,318
Palmerstonian
adjective see Palmerston I
palmerworm
noun Date: 1560 a caterpillar that suddenly appears in great numbers devouring herbage
palmette
noun Etymology: French, from palme palm, from Latin palma Date: 1850 a decorative motif suggestive of a palm
palmetto
noun (plural -tos or -toes) Etymology: modification of Spanish palmito, from palma palm, from Latin Date: 1615 1. any of several usually low-growing fan-leaved palms; ...
palmetto bug
noun Date: 1973 chiefly Southern cockroach
Palmgren
biographical name Selim 1878-1951 Finnish pianist & composer
palmist
noun Etymology: probably back-formation from palmistry Date: 1877 one who practices palmistry
palmistry
noun Etymology: Middle English pawmestry, probably from paume palm + maistrie mastery Date: 15th century the art or practice of reading a person's character or future from ...
palmitate
noun Date: 1852 a salt or ester of palmitic acid
palmitic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from palmitin Date: 1857 a waxy crystalline saturated fatty acid C16H32O2 occurring free or in the form of esters (as ...
palmitin
noun Etymology: French palmitine, probably from palmite pith of the palm tree, from Spanish palmito Date: 1855 an ester of glycerol and palmitic acid; especially a solid ...
palmlike
adjective see palm I
palmtop
noun Etymology: 2palm + laptop Date: 1987 a small portable computer easily held in the palm of the hand
palmy
adjective (palmier; -est) Date: 1602 1. marked by prosperity ; flourishing 2. abounding in or bearing palms
palmyra
noun Etymology: Portuguese palmeira, from palma palm, from Latin Date: 1698 a tall fan-leaved palm (Borassus flabellifer) of India cultivated for its hard resistant wood, ...
Palmyra
or biblical Tadmor geographical name ancient city Syria on N edge of Syrian Desert NE of Damascus • Palmyrene adjective or noun
Palmyra Atoll
geographical name island central Pacific in Line Islands area 1 square miles (2.6 square kilometers)
palmyra palm
noun see palmyra
Palmyrene
adjective or noun see Palmyra
Palo Alto
geographical name city W California SE of San Francisco on San Francisco Bay population 58,598
Palomar Mountain
geographical name see Palomar, Mount
Palomar, Mount
or Palomar Mountain geographical name mountain 6138 feet (1871 meters) S California NNE of San Diego
palomino
noun (plural -nos) Etymology: American Spanish, from Spanish, like a dove, from Latin palumbinus, from palumbes ringdove; akin to Greek peleia dove, Latin pallēre to be pale ...
palooka
noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1924 1. an inexperienced or incompetent boxer 2. oaf, lout
Palos
or Palos de la Frontera geographical name town & former port SW Spain SE of Huelva
Palos de la Frontera
geographical name see Palos
Palouse
geographical name 1. river about 140 miles (225 kilometers) NW Idaho & SE Washington flowing W & S into Snake River 2. fertile hilly region E Washington & NW Idaho N of Snake ...
paloverde
noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish, literally, green tree Date: 1854 1. any of several small spiny trees or shrubs (genus Cercidium) of the legume family that have greenish ...
palp
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle French palper, from Latin palpare Date: 1534 touch, feel II. noun Etymology: New Latin palpus Date: 1842 palpus
palpability
noun see palpable
palpable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin palpabilis, from Latin palpare to stroke, caress — more at feel Date: 14th century 1. capable of being touched or felt ...
palpably
adverb see palpable
palpate
transitive verb (palpated; palpating) Etymology: probably back-formation from palpation, from Latin palpation-, palpatio, from palpare Date: circa 1852 to examine by touch ...
palpation
noun see palpate
palpebral
adjective Etymology: Late Latin palpebralis, from Latin palpebra eyelid; akin to Latin palpare Date: 1840 of, relating to, or located on or near the eyelids
palpitant
adjective Date: 1837 marked by trembling or throbbing
palpitate
intransitive verb (-tated; -tating) Etymology: Latin palpitatus, past participle of palpitare, frequentative of palpare to stroke Date: circa 1623 to beat rapidly and ...
palpitation
noun see palpitate
palpus
noun (plural palpi) Etymology: New Latin, from Latin, caress, soft palm of the hand, from palpare Date: 1813 a segmented usually tactile or gustatory process on an arthropod ...
palsgrave
noun Etymology: Dutch paltsgrave Date: 1539 count palatine 1a
palship
noun see pal I
palsied
adjective Date: 1550 affected with or as if with palsy
palsy
I. noun (plural palsies) Etymology: Middle English palesie, alteration of parlesey, from Anglo-French paralisie, from Latin paralysis Date: 14th century 1. paralysis 2. a ...
palsy-walsy
adjective Etymology: reduplication of palsy Date: 1943 slang being or appearing to be very intimate
palter
intransitive verb (paltered; paltering) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1600 1. to act insincerely or deceitfully ; equivocate 2. haggle, chaffer Synonyms: see lie • ...
palterer
noun see palter
paltriness
noun see paltry
paltry
adjective (paltrier; -est) Etymology: obsolete paltry trash, from dialect palt, pelt piece of coarse cloth, trash; akin to Middle Low German palte rag Date: 1570 1. ...
paludal
adjective Etymology: Latin palud-, palus marsh; akin to Sanskrit palvala pond Date: circa 1820 of or relating to marshes or fens ; marshy
paly
adjective Date: 1513 archaic somewhat pale ; pallid
palynologic
adjective see palynology
palynological
adjective see palynology
palynologically
adverb see palynology
palynologist
noun see palynology
palynology
noun Etymology: Greek palynein to sprinkle, from palē fine meal Date: 1944 a branch of science dealing with pollen and spores • palynological also palynologic ...
Pamir
geographical name see Pamirs
Pamirs
or Pamir geographical name mountain region central Asia in Tajikistan & on borders of Xinjiang Uygur, Kashmir, & Afghanistan from which radiate Tian Shan to N, Kunlun & ...
Pamlico
geographical name river E North Carolina, estuary of Tar River, flowing E into Pamlico Sound (inlet of the Atlantic between the mainland & offshore islands)
pampa
noun (plural pampas) Etymology: American Spanish, from Quechua Date: 1704 an extensive generally grass-covered plain of temperate South America east of the Andes ; prairie
pampas grass
noun Date: circa 1851 a South American grass (Cortaderia selloana) often grown for ornament that has showy white panicles borne on tall stems
pampean
adjective Date: 1839 of or relating to the pampas of South America or their Indian inhabitants
Pampeluna
geographical name see Pamplona
pamper
transitive verb (pampered; pampering) Etymology: Middle English, probably of Dutch origin; akin to Dutch dialect pamperen to pamper Date: 14th century 1. archaic to cram with ...
pamperer
noun see pamper
pampero
noun (plural -ros) Etymology: American Spanish, from pampa Date: 1818 a strong cold wind from the west or southwest that sweeps over the pampas
pamphlet
noun Etymology: Middle English pamflet unbound booklet, from Pamphilus seu De Amore Pamphilus or On Love, popular Latin love poem of the 12th century Date: 14th century an ...
pamphleteer
I. noun Date: 1642 a writer of pamphlets attacking something or urging a cause II. intransitive verb Date: 1698 1. to write and publish pamphlets 2. to engage in partisan ...
Pamphylia
geographical name ancient district & Roman province S Asia Minor on coast S of Pisidia • Pamphylian adjective or noun
Pamphylian
adjective or noun see Pamphylia
Pamplona
or formerly Pampeluna geographical name city N Spain capital of Navarra province & once capital of Navarre kingdom population 179,251
PAN
abbreviation peroxyacetyl nitrate
Pan
I. noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 14th century a Greek god of pastures, flocks, and shepherds usually represented as having the legs, horns, and ears of a goat II. ...
pan
I. noun Etymology: Middle English panne, from Old English (akin to Old High German phanna pan), from Latin patina, from Greek patanē Date: before 12th century 1. a. a ...
pan out
intransitive verb Etymology: 2pan Date: 1868 turn out; especially succeed
pan-
combining form Etymology: Greek, from pan, neuter of pant-, pas all, every; akin to Tocharian B pont- all 1. all ; completely 2. a. involving all of a (specified) ...
Pan-African
adjective see Pan-Africanism
Pan-Africanism
noun Date: 1952 a movement for the political union of all the African nations • Pan-African adjective • Pan-Africanist noun or adjective
Pan-Africanist
noun or adjective see Pan-Africanism
Pan-American
adjective Date: 1889 of, relating to, or involving the independent republics of North and South America
Pan-Americanism
noun Date: 1901 a movement for greater cooperation among the Pan-American nations
pan-Arab
adjective see Pan-Arabism
Pan-Arabism
noun Date: 1920 a movement for the political union of all Arab nations • pan-Arab adjective • pan-Arabist adjective or noun
pan-Arabist
adjective or noun see Pan-Arabism
Pan-Cake
trademark — used for a cosmetic in semimoist cake form
Pan-Slavic
adjective see Pan-Slavism
Pan-Slavism
noun Date: 1850 a political and cultural movement originally emphasizing the cultural ties between the Slavic peoples but later associated with Russian expansionism • ...
Pan-Slavist
noun see Pan-Slavism
panacea
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek panakeia, from panakēs all-healing, from pan- + akos remedy Date: 1548 a remedy for all ills or difficulties ; cure-all • panacean ...
panacean
adjective see panacea
panache
noun Etymology: Middle French pennache, from Old Italian pennacchio, from Late Latin pinnaculum small wing — more at pinnacle Date: 1553 1. an ornamental tuft (as of ...
panada
noun Etymology: Spanish, from pan bread, from Latin panis — more at food Date: circa 1598 a paste of flour or bread crumbs and water or stock used as a base for sauce or a ...
Panaji
geographical name town & port W India capital of Goa & formerly capital of Portuguese India population 42,915
panama
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: American Spanish panamá, from Panama, Central America Date: 1848 a lightweight hat of natural-colored straw hand-plaited of narrow ...
Panama
or Spanish Panamá geographical name 1. country S Central America; a republic; before 1903 part of Colombia area (including Canal Zone) 33,659 square miles (87,177 square ...
Panamá
geographical name see Panama
Panama Canal Zone
geographical name — see Canal Zone
Panama City
geographical name 1. city & port NW Florida on Gulf of Mexico population 36,417 2. — see panama
Panama Red
noun Date: 1967 marijuana of a reddish tint that is of Panamanian origin and is held to be very potent
Panama, Gulf of
geographical name inlet of the Pacific on S coast of Panama
Panama, Isthmus of
or formerly Isthmus of Darien geographical name isthmus Central America connecting North America & South America & forming Panama (republic)
Panamanian
adjective or noun see Panama
Panamint Mountains
geographical name mountains E California W of Death Valley — see Telescope Peak
panatela
or panetela noun Etymology: Spanish, from American Spanish, a long thin biscuit, ultimately from Latin panis bread Date: 1847 a long slender straight-sided cigar
Panay
geographical name island Philippines in the Visayan Islands; chief town Iloilo area 4446 square miles (11,560 square kilometers)
pancake
I. noun Date: 14th century a flat cake made of thin batter and cooked (as on a griddle) on both sides II. verb (pancaked; pancaking) Date: 1911 intransitive verb to make ...
pancake landing
noun Date: 1928 a landing in which the airplane is stalled usually unintentionally above the landing surface causing it to drop abruptly in an approximately horizontal ...
pancetta
noun Etymology: Italian, from diminutive of pancia belly, paunch, from Latin pantic-, pantex Date: 1954 unsmoked bacon used especially in Italian cuisine
panchax
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1961 any of various small brilliantly colored Old World killifishes (genus Aplocheilus) often kept in tropical aquariums
Panchen Lama
noun Etymology: Panchen from Chinese (Beijing) bānchán Date: 1794 the lama who is the chief spiritual adviser of the Dalai Lama
panchromatic
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1903 sensitive to light of all colors in the visible spectrum
pancratium
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek pankration, from pan- + kratos strength — more at hard Date: 1603 an ancient Greek athletic contest involving both boxing and wrestling
pancreas
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pankreas sweetbread, from pan- + kreas flesh, meat — more at raw Date: 1578 a large lobulated gland of vertebrates that secretes ...
pancreat-
combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pankreat-, pancreas pancreas
pancreatectomized
adjective see pancreatectomy
pancreatectomy
noun (plural -mies) Date: circa 1900 surgical removal of all or part of the pancreas • pancreatectomized adjective
pancreatic
adjective see pancreas
pancreatic duct
noun Date: 1784 a duct leading from the pancreas and opening into the duodenum
pancreatic juice
noun Date: circa 1666 a clear alkaline secretion of pancreatic enzymes (as trypsin and lipase) that flows into the duodenum and acts on food already acted on by the gastric ...
pancreatin
noun Date: circa 1860 a mixture of enzymes from the pancreatic juice; also a preparation containing such a mixture
pancreatitis
noun (plural pancreatitides) Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1842 inflammation of the pancreas
pancreozymin
noun Etymology: pancreas + -o- + zym- + 1-in Date: 1943 cholecystokinin
pancytopenia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from pan- + cyt- + -penia Date: circa 1941 an abnormal reduction in the number of erythrocytes, white blood cells, and blood platelets in the ...
panda
noun Etymology: French, perhaps from a language of the southeast Himalayas Date: 1835 1. red panda 2. a large black-and-white mammal (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) of chiefly ...
panda car
noun Etymology: from its black-and-white coloration Date: 1967 British a police patrol car
pandanus
noun (plural pandani) Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Malay pandan screw pine Date: 1830 screw pine; also a fiber made from screw-pine leaves and used for woven ...
Pandarus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Pandaros Date: 14th century a Lycian archer in the Trojan War who in medieval legend procures Cressida for Troilus
pandect
noun Etymology: Late Latin Pandectae, the Pandects, digest of Roman civil law (6th century A.D.), from Latin, plural of pandectes encyclopedic work, from Greek pandektēs ...
pandemic
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin pandemus, from Greek pandēmos of all the people, from pan- + dēmos people — more at demagogue Date: 1666 occurring over a wide ...
Pandemonium
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pan- + daimōn evil spirit — more at demon Date: 1667 1. the capital of Hell in Milton's Paradise Lost 2. the infernal regions ; ...
pander
I. intransitive verb (pandered; pandering) Date: 1523 to act as a pander; especially to provide gratification for others' desires • panderer noun II. noun Etymology: ...
panderer
noun see pander I
pandit
noun Etymology: Hindi paṇḍit, from Sanskrit paṇḍita Date: circa 1828 a wise or learned man in India — often used as an honorary title
pandora
noun Etymology: Italian, from Late Latin pandura 3-stringed lute, from Greek pandoura Date: 1597 bandore
Pandora's box
noun Etymology: from the box, sent by the gods to Pandora, which she was forbidden to open and which loosed a swarm of evils upon mankind when she opened it out of curiosity ...
pandowdy
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1805 a deep-dish spiced apple dessert sweetened with sugar, molasses, or maple syrup and covered with a rich crust
pandy
transitive verb (pandied; pandying) Etymology: probably from Latin pande, imperative singular of pandere to spread out (the hand), command of the schoolmaster to the boy — ...
pane
noun Etymology: Middle English pan, pane strip of cloth, pane, from Anglo-French pan, panne, from Latin pannus cloth, rag — more at vane Date: 14th century a piece, ...
paned
adjective see pane
panegyric
noun Etymology: Latin panegyricus, from Greek panēgyrikos, from panēgyrikos of or for a festival assembly, from panēgyris festival assembly, from pan- + agyris assembly; akin ...

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