Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
percentage
noun Date: circa 1789 1. a. a part of a whole expressed in hundredths b. the result obtained by multiplying a number by a percent 2. a. a share of winnings or ...
percentage point
noun Date: 1958 one hundredth of a whole ; percent
percentile
noun Date: 1885 a value on a scale of 100 that indicates the percent of a distribution that is equal to or below it
percept
noun Etymology: back-formation from perception Date: circa 1837 an impression of an object obtained by use of the senses ; sense-datum
perceptibility
noun see perceptible
perceptible
adjective Date: 1567 capable of being perceived especially by the senses • perceptibility noun • perceptibly adverb Synonyms: perceptible, sensible, palpable, ...
perceptibly
adverb see perceptible
perception
noun Etymology: Latin perception-, perceptio act of perceiving, from percipere Date: 14th century 1. a. a result of perceiving ; observation b. a mental image ; ...
perceptional
adjective see perception
perceptive
adjective Date: 1656 1. responsive to sensory stimuli ; discerning 2. a. capable of or exhibiting keen perception ; observant b. characterized by sympathetic ...
perceptively
adverb see perceptive
perceptiveness
noun see perceptive
perceptivity
noun see perceptive
perceptual
adjective Etymology: percept + -ual (as in conceptual) Date: 1878 of, relating to, or involving perception especially in relation to immediate sensory experience • ...
perceptually
adverb see perceptual
Perceval
noun Etymology: Old French Date: 14th century a knight of King Arthur who wins a sight of the Holy Grail
perch
I. noun Etymology: Middle English perche, from Anglo-French, from Latin pertica pole Date: 14th century 1. a bar or peg on which something is hung 2. a. a roost for a ...
perchance
adverb Etymology: Middle English parchaunce, from Anglo-French par chance, by chance Date: 14th century perhaps, possibly
Percheron
noun Etymology: French Date: 1875 any of a breed of powerful rugged draft horses that originated in the Perche region of France
perchlorate
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1826 a salt or ester of perchloric acid
perchloric acid
noun Date: 1818 a fuming corrosive strong acid HClO4 that is the most highly oxidized acid of chlorine and a powerful oxidizing agent when heated
perchloroethylene
noun Date: 1873 a colorless nonflammable toxic liquid C2Cl4 used often as a solvent in dry cleaning and for removal of grease from metals
percipience
noun Date: circa 1774 perception 4
percipient
I. noun Etymology: Latin percipient-, percipiens, present participle of percipere to perceive Date: 1662 1. one that perceives 2. a person on whose mind a telepathic ...
percipiently
adverb see percipient II
percolate
verb (-lated; -lating) Etymology: Latin percolatus, past participle of percolare, from per- through + colare to sieve — more at per-, colander Date: 1626 transitive verb ...
percolation
noun see percolate
percolator
noun Date: circa 1842 one that percolates; specifically a coffeepot in which boiling water rising through a tube is repeatedly deflected downward through a perforated basket ...
percuss
transitive verb Etymology: Latin percussus, past participle of percutere Date: 1560 to tap sharply; especially to practice percussion on
percussion
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French percussioun, from Latin percussion-, percussio, from percutere to beat, from per- thoroughly + quatere to shake Date: 15th ...
percussion cap
noun Date: 1823 cap 5
percussion instrument
noun Date: 1872 a musical instrument (as a drum, xylophone, or maraca) sounded by striking, shaking, or scraping
percussionist
noun Date: 1939 one skilled in the playing of percussion instruments
percussive
adjective Date: 1793 1. of or relating to percussion; especially operative or operated by striking 2. having powerful impact • percussively adverb • percussiveness ...
percussively
adverb see percussive
percussiveness
noun see percussive
percutaneous
adjective Date: 1887 effected, occurring, or performed through the skin • percutaneously adverb
percutaneously
adverb see percutaneous
Percy
I. biographical name Sir Henry 1364-1403 Hotspur English soldier II. biographical name Thomas 1729-1811 English antiquarian & poet III. biographical name Walker 1916-1990 ...
Perdido
geographical name river 60 miles (96 kilometers) rising in SE Alabama & flowing S into Gulf of Mexico forming part of Alabama-Florida boundary
perdie
variant of pardie
perdition
noun Etymology: Middle English perdicion, from Anglo-French perdiciun, Late Latin perdition-, perditio, from Latin perdere to destroy, from per- through + dare to give — more ...
perdu
I. noun or perdue Etymology: French sentinelle perdue, literally, lost sentinel Date: 1605 obsolete a soldier assigned to extremely hazardous duty II. adjective or perdue ...
perdue
I. noun see perdu I II. adjective see perdu II
perdurability
noun see perdurable
perdurable
adjective Etymology: Middle English, long-lasting, eternal, from Anglo-French pardurable, from Late Latin perdurabilis, from Latin perdurare to endure, from per- throughout + ...
perdurably
adverb see perdurable
perdure
intransitive verb (perdured; perduring) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French pardurer, Latin perdurare Date: 15th century to continue to exist ; last
père
noun Etymology: French père, from Old French paire, perre, from Latin pater — more at father Date: 1802 father — used after a name to distinguish a father from a son; ...
Perea
geographical name see Peraea
pereant qui ante nos nostra dixerunt
foreign term Etymology: Latin may they perish who have expressed our bright ideas before us
peregrinate
verb (-nated; -nating) Date: 1593 intransitive verb to travel especially on foot ; walk transitive verb to walk or travel over ; traverse • peregrination noun
peregrination
noun see peregrinate
peregrine
adjective Etymology: Middle French peregrin, from Medieval Latin peregrinus, from Latin, foreign — more at pilgrim Date: 1599 having a tendency to wander
peregrine falcon
noun Etymology: Middle English faukon peregryn, from Medieval Latin falco peregrinus, literally, pilgrim falcon; from the young being captured wandering from their nests, which ...
pereion
noun see pereon
pereiopod
noun see pereopod
Perelman
biographical name S(idney) J(oseph) 1904-1979 American writer
peremptorily
adverb see peremptory
peremptoriness
noun see peremptory
peremptory
adjective Etymology: Middle English peremptorie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin & Latin; Late Latin peremptorius, from Latin, destructive, from perimere to take entirely, ...
peremptory challenge
noun Date: circa 1531 a challenge (as of a juror) made as of right without assigning any cause
perennate
intransitive verb (-nated; -nating) Etymology: Latin perennatus, past participle of perennare, from perennis Date: circa 1623 to live over from one growing season to another ...
perennation
noun see perennate
perennial
adjective Etymology: Latin perennis, from per- throughout + annus year — more at per-, annual Date: 1644 1. present at all seasons of the year 2. persisting for several ...
perennially
adverb see perennial
pereon
or pereion noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek peraiōn, present participle of peraioun to transport, from peraios situated beyond, from pera beyond; akin to Greek poros ...
pereopod
or pereiopod noun Etymology: New Latin perion + English -pod Date: 1893 an appendage of the pereon
Peres
biographical name Shimon 1923- Israeli foreign minister (1986-88; 1992-95); prime minister (1995-96)
perestroika
noun Etymology: Russian perestroĭka, literally, restructuring Date: 1986 the policy of economic and governmental reform instituted by Mikhail Gorbachev in the Soviet Union ...
pereunt et imputantur
foreign term Etymology: Latin they (the hours) pass away and are reckoned on (our) account
Pérez de Cuéllar
biographical name Javier 1920- Peruvian U.N. official; secretary-general (1982-91)
Pérez Galdós
biographical name Benito 1843-1920 Spanish writer
Pérez Rodríguez
biographical name Carlos Andrés 1922- president of Venezuela (1974-79; 1989-93)
perf
abbreviation 1. perforated 2. performance
perfect
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English parfit, from Anglo-French, from Latin perfectus, from past participle of perficere to carry out, perfect, from per- thoroughly + facere to ...
perfect binding
noun Date: 1926 a book binding in which a layer of adhesive holds the pages and cover together • perfect-bound adjective
perfect game
noun Date: circa 1949 a baseball game in which a pitcher allows no hits, no runs, and no opposing batter to reach first base
perfect number
noun Date: 14th century an integer (as 6 or 28) the sum of whose integral factors including 1 but excluding itself is equal to itself
perfect participle
noun Date: 1862 past participle
perfect pitch
noun Date: 1949 absolute pitch 2
perfect square
noun Date: 1856 an integer (as 9 or 36) whose square root is an integer
perfect-bound
adjective see perfect binding
perfecta
noun Etymology: American Spanish quiniela perfecta perfect quiniela Date: 1967 a bet in which the bettor picks the first and second place finishers in order — compare ...
perfecter
noun see perfect II
perfectibility
noun see perfectible
perfectible
adjective Date: 1635 capable of improvement or perfection (as in moral state) • perfectibility noun
perfection
noun Etymology: Middle English perfeccioun, from Anglo-French perfection, from Latin perfection-, perfectio, from perficere Date: 13th century 1. the quality or state of ...
perfectionism
noun Date: circa 1846 1. a. the doctrine that the perfection of moral character constitutes a person's highest good b. the theological doctrine that a state of freedom ...
perfectionist
noun or adjective see perfectionism
perfectionistic
adjective see perfectionism
perfective
adjective Date: 1596 1. archaic a. tending to make perfect b. becoming better 2. expressing action as complete or as implying the notion of completion, conclusion, or ...
perfectively
adverb see perfective
perfectiveness
noun see perfective
perfectivity
noun see perfective
perfectly
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in a perfect manner 2. to a complete or adequate extent ; quite
perfectness
noun see perfect I
perfecto
noun (plural -tos) Etymology: Spanish, perfect, from Latin perfectus Date: 1894 a cigar that is thick in the middle and tapers at each end
perfervid
adjective Etymology: New Latin perfervidus, from Latin per- thoroughly + fervidus fervid Date: 1856 marked by overwrought or exaggerated emotion ; excessively fervent ...
perfide Albion
foreign term Etymology: French perfidious Albion (England)
perfidious
adjective Date: 1572 of, relating to, or characterized by perfidy Synonyms: see faithless • perfidiously adverb • perfidiousness noun
perfidiously
adverb see perfidious
perfidiousness
noun see perfidious
perfidy
noun (plural -dies) Etymology: Latin perfidia, from perfidus faithless, from per- detrimental to + fides faith — more at per-, faith Date: 1592 1. the quality or state of ...
perfluorocarbon
noun Date: 1947 any of various hydrocarbon derivatives in which all hydrogen atoms have been replaced with fluorine and that include blood substitutes used in emulsified form
perfoliate
adjective Etymology: New Latin perfoliata, an herb having leaves pierced by the stem, from Latin per through + foliata, feminine of foliatus foliate Date: 1687 having the ...
perforate
verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin perforatus, past participle of perforare to bore through, from per- through + forare to bore — more at bore Date: 1538 transitive ...
perforated
adjective Date: 1578 1. having a hole or perforations; especially having a specified number of perforations in 20 millimeters 2. characterized by perforation
perforation
noun Date: 15th century 1. the act or process of perforating 2. a. a hole or pattern made by or as if by piercing or boring b. one of the series of holes (as between ...
perforator
noun see perforate
perforce
adverb Etymology: Middle English par force, from Anglo-French, by force Date: 14th century 1. obsolete by physical coercion 2. by force of circumstances
perform
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French parfurmer, alteration of perforner, parfurnir, from par-, per- thoroughly (from Latin per-) + furnir to complete — more at ...
performability
noun see perform
performable
adjective see perform
performance
noun Date: 15th century 1. a. the execution of an action b. something accomplished ; deed, feat 2. the fulfillment of a claim, promise, or request ; implementation 3. ...
performance art
noun Date: 1971 a nontraditional art form often with political or topical themes that typically features a live presentation to an audience or onlookers (as on a street) and ...
performance artist
noun see performance art
performative
adjective Date: 1955 being or relating to an expression that serves to effect a transaction or that constitutes the performance of the specified act by virtue of its ...
performatory
adjective Date: 1949 performative; also of or relating to performance
performer
noun see perform
performing
adjective Date: 1889 of, relating to, or constituting an art (as drama) that involves public performance
perfume
I. noun Etymology: Middle French perfum, probably from Old Occitan, from perfumar to perfume, from per- thoroughly (from Latin) + fumar to smoke, from Latin fumare, from fumus ...
perfumer
noun Date: circa 1580 one that makes or sells perfumes
perfumery
noun (plural -eries) Date: 1800 1. a. the art or process of making perfume b. the products made by a perfumer 2. an establishment where perfumes are made
perfunctorily
adverb see perfunctory
perfunctoriness
noun see perfunctory
perfunctory
adjective Etymology: Late Latin perfunctorius, from Latin perfungi to accomplish, get through with, from per- through + fungi to perform — more at per-, function Date: 1593 ...
perfusate
noun Date: 1915 a fluid (as a solution pumped through the heart) that is perfused
perfuse
transitive verb (perfused; perfusing) Etymology: Middle English, from Latin perfusus, past participle of perfundere to pour over, from per- through + fundere to pour — more at ...
perfusion
noun see perfuse
perfusionist
noun Date: 1964 a certified medical technician responsible for extracorporeal oxygenation of the blood during open-heart surgery and for the operation and maintenance of ...
Perga
geographical name ancient city S Asia Minor in Pamphylia
Pergamos
geographical name see Pergamum
Pergamum
or Pergamus or Pergamos geographical name 1. ancient Greek kingdom covering most of Asia Minor; at its height 263-133 B.C. 2. (or modern Bergama) city W Turkey NNE of Izmir ...
Pergamus
geographical name see Pergamum
pergola
noun Etymology: Italian, from Latin pergula Date: 1675 1. arbor, trellis 2. a structure usually consisting of parallel colonnades supporting an open roof of girders and ...
Pergolesi
biographical name Giovanni Battista 1710-1736 Italian composer
perhaps
I. adverb Etymology: per + hap Date: 1528 possibly but not certainly ; maybe II. noun Date: 1534 something open to doubt or conjecture
peri
noun Etymology: Persian perī fairy, genius, from Middle Persian parīk; akin to Avestan pairikā sorceress Date: circa 1780 1. a supernatural being in Persian folklore ...
peri-
prefix Etymology: Latin, from Greek, around, in excess, from peri; akin to Greek peran to pass through — more at fare 1. all around ; about 2. near 3. enclosing ; ...
perianth
noun Etymology: New Latin perianthium, from peri- + Greek anthos flower — more at anthology Date: circa 1806 the floral structure comprised of the calyx and corolla ...
periapt
noun Etymology: Middle French or Greek; Middle French periapte, from Greek periapton, from periaptein to fasten around (oneself), from peri- + haptein to fasten Date: 1584 ...
pericardial
adjective Date: 1654 of, relating to, or affecting the pericardium; also situated around the heart
pericarditis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: circa 1783 inflammation of the pericardium
pericardium
noun (plural pericardia) Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Greek perikardion, neuter of perikardios around the heart, from peri- + kardia heart — more at ...
pericarp
noun Etymology: New Latin pericarpium, from Greek perikarpion pod, from peri- + -karpion -carp Date: 1759 the ripened and variously modified walls of a plant ovary — see ...
perichondral
adjective see perichondrium
perichondrium
noun (plural perichondria) Etymology: New Latin, from peri- + Greek chondros grain, cartilage Date: 1741 the membrane of fibrous connective tissue that invests cartilage ...
Periclean
adjective see Pericles
Pericles
biographical name circa 495-429 B.C. Athenian statesman • Periclean adjective
pericope
noun Etymology: Late Latin, from Greek perikopē section, from peri- + kopē act of cutting, from koptein to cut — more at capon Date: 1658 a selection from a book; ...
pericranial
adjective see pericranium
pericranium
noun (plural pericrania) Etymology: Middle English pericraneum, from Medieval Latin, from Greek perikranion, neuter of perikranios around the skull, from peri- + kranion skull ...
pericycle
noun Etymology: French péricycle, from Greek perikyklos spherical, from peri- + kyklos circle — more at wheel Date: circa 1892 a thin layer of parenchymatous or ...
pericyclic
adjective see pericycle
periderm
noun Etymology: New Latin peridermis, from peri- + -dermis Date: 1849 an outer layer of tissue; especially a cortical protective layer of many roots and stems that typically ...
peridium
noun (plural peridia) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek pēridion, diminutive of pēra leather bag Date: circa 1823 the outer envelope of the sporophore of many fungi
peridot
noun Etymology: French péridot, from Old French peritot Date: circa 1706 a deep yellowish-green transparent variety of olivine used as a gem • peridotic adjective
peridotic
adjective see peridot
peridotite
noun Etymology: French péridotite, from péridot Date: 1878 any of a group of granular igneous rocks composed of ferromagnesian minerals and especially olivine • ...
peridotitic
adjective see peridotite
perigean
adjective see perigee
perigee
noun Etymology: Middle French, from New Latin perigeum, from Greek perigeion, from neuter of perigeios near the earth, from peri- + gē earth Date: 1594 the point in the ...
Périgord
geographical name old division of N Guienne in SW France capital Périgueux
Périgueux
geographical name commune SW France NE of Bordeaux population 34,848
perigynous
adjective Etymology: New Latin perigynus, from peri- + -gynus -gynous Date: 1807 borne on a ring or cup of the receptacle surrounding a pistil ; also having perigynous ...
perigyny
noun see perigynous
perihelial
adjective see perihelion
perihelion
noun (plural perihelia) Etymology: New Latin, from peri- + Greek hēlios sun — more at solar Date: 1666 the point in the path of a celestial body (as a planet) that is ...
perikaryal
adjective see perikaryon
perikaryon
noun (plural perikarya) Etymology: New Latin, from peri- + Greek karyon nut, kernel — more at careen Date: 1897 cell body • perikaryal adjective
peril
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin periculum — more at fear Date: 13th century 1. exposure to the risk of being injured, destroyed, or lost ; ...
perilla
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1900 any of a genus (Perilla) of Asian mints that have a bilabiate fruiting calyx and rugose nutlets
perilous
adjective Date: 14th century full of or involving peril Synonyms: see dangerous • perilously adverb • perilousness noun
perilously
adverb see perilous
perilousness
noun see perilous
perilune
noun Etymology: peri- + Latin luna moon — more at lunar Date: 1960 the point in the path of a body orbiting the moon that is nearest to the center of the moon — compare ...
perilymph
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: circa 1839 the fluid between the membranous and bony labyrinths of the ear
Perim
geographical name island in Bab el Mandeb Strait at entrance to Red Sea; belongs to Yemen
perimenopausal
adjective see perimenopause
perimenopause
noun Date: 1962 the period around the onset of menopause that is often marked by various physical signs (as hot flashes and menstrual irregularity) • perimenopausal ...
perimeter
noun Etymology: Middle English perimetre, from Latin perimetros, from Greek, from peri- + metron measure — more at measure Date: 15th century 1. a. the boundary of a ...
perimysium
noun (plural perimysia) Etymology: New Latin, irregular from peri- + Greek mys mouse, muscle — more at mouse Date: circa 1842 the connective-tissue sheath that surrounds a ...
perinatal
adjective Date: 1952 occurring in, concerned with, or being in the period around the time of birth • perinatally adverb
perinatally
adverb see perinatal
perinatologist
noun see perinatology
perinatology
noun Date: 1969 a branch of medicine concerned with perinatal care • perinatologist noun
perineal
adjective see perineum
perineum
noun (plural perinea) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin perinaion, from Greek, from peri- + inan to empty out; perhaps akin to Sanskrit iṣṇāti he sets in motion ...
perineurium
noun (plural perineuria) Etymology: New Latin, from peri- + Greek neuron nerve — more at nerve Date: circa 1842 the connective-tissue sheath that surrounds a bundle of ...
period
I. noun Etymology: Middle English periode, from Middle French, from Medieval Latin, Latin, & Greek; Medieval Latin periodus period of time, punctuation mark, from Latin & Greek; ...
period piece
noun Date: 1940 a work (as of literature, art, furniture, cinema, or music) whose special value lies in its evocation of a historical period
periodic
adjective Date: 1642 1. a. occurring or recurring at regular intervals b. occurring repeatedly from time to time 2. a. consisting of or containing a series of ...
periodic acid
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary per- + iodic Date: 1836 any of the strongly oxidizing acids (as H5IO6 or HIO4) that are the most highly oxidized acids of ...
periodic law
noun Date: 1872 a law in chemistry: the elements when arranged in the order of their atomic numbers show a periodic variation of atomic structure and of most of their ...
periodic sentence
noun Date: circa 1928 a usually complex sentence that has no subordinate or trailing elements following its principal clause (as in “yesterday while I was walking down the ...
periodic table
noun Date: 1895 an arrangement of chemical elements based on the periodic law
periodical
I. adjective Date: 1601 1. periodic 1 2. a. published with a fixed interval between the issues or numbers b. published in, characteristic of, or connected with a ...
periodical cicada
noun Date: 1890 seventeen-year locust
periodically
adverb Date: 1646 1. at regular intervals of time 2. from time to time ; frequently
periodicity
noun Date: 1833 the quality, state, or fact of being regularly recurrent or having periods
periodization
noun Date: 1938 division (as of history) into periods
periodontal
adjective Date: 1854 1. investing or surrounding a tooth 2. of or affecting periodontal tissues or regions • periodontally adverb
periodontal membrane
noun Date: 1899 the fibrous connective-tissue layer covering the cementum of a tooth and holding it in place in the jawbone
periodontally
adverb see periodontal
periodontics
noun plural but singular or plural in construction Etymology: New Latin periodontium periodontal tissue, from peri- + Greek odont-, odous, odōn tooth — more at tooth Date: ...
periodontist
noun see periodontics
periodontitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1872 inflammation of the supporting structures of the teeth and especially the periodontal membrane
periodontology
noun Date: 1914 periodontics
perionychium
noun (plural perionychia) Etymology: New Latin, from peri- + Greek onych-, onyx nail — more at nail Date: circa 1879 the tissue bordering the root and sides of a fingernail ...
perioperative
adjective Date: 1966 relating to, occurring in, or being the period around the time of a surgical operation
periosteal
adjective Date: 1830 1. situated around or produced external to bone 2. of, relating to, or involving the periosteum
periosteum
noun (plural periostea) Etymology: New Latin, from Late Latin periosteon, from Greek, neuter of periosteos around the bone, from peri- + osteon bone — more at osseous Date: ...
periostitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1843 inflammation of the periosteum
peripatetic
I. noun Date: 15th century 1. capitalized a follower of Aristotle or adherent of Aristotelianism 2. pedestrian, itinerant 3. plural movement or journeys hither and ...
peripatetically
adverb see peripatetic II
Peripateticism
noun see peripatetic II
peripatus
noun Etymology: New Latin, genus name, from Greek peripatos act of walking about, from peri- + patein to tread Date: circa 1931 any of a class or phylum (Onychophora) of ...
peripeteia
noun Etymology: Greek, from peripiptein to fall around, change suddenly, from peri- + piptein to fall — more at feather Date: 1591 a sudden or unexpected reversal of ...
peripety
noun (plural -ties) Date: 1753 peripeteia
peripheral
I. adjective Date: 1808 1. of, relating to, involving, or forming a periphery or surface part 2. a. of, relating to, affecting, or being part of the peripheral nervous ...
peripheral nervous system
noun Date: 1896 the part of the nervous system that is outside the central nervous system and comprises the cranial nerves excepting the optic nerve, the spinal nerves, and ...
peripheral neuropathy
noun Date: 1938 a disease or degenerative state of the peripheral nerves in which motor, sensory, or vasomotor nerve fibers may be affected and which is marked by muscle ...
peripherally
adverb see peripheral I
periphery
noun (plural -eries) Etymology: Middle French peripherie, from Late Latin peripheria, from Greek periphereia, from peripherein to carry around, from peri- + pherein to carry — ...
periphrasis
noun (plural periphrases) Etymology: Latin, from Greek, from periphrazein to express periphrastically, from peri- + phrazein to point out Date: 1533 1. use of a longer ...
periphrastic
adjective Date: 1805 1. of, relating to, or characterized by periphrasis 2. formed by the use of function words or auxiliaries instead of by inflection • ...
periphrastically
adverb see periphrastic
periphytic
adjective see periphyton
periphyton
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek periphytos (verbal of periphyein to grow around, from peri- + phyein to bring forth, grow) + -on (as in plankton) — more at be Date: ...
periplasm
noun Date: 1961 the region in a gram-negative bacterium between the plasma membrane and an outer surrounding membrane that contains especially enzymes and a thin layer of ...
periplasmic
adjective see periplasm
periplast
noun Date: 1853 plasma membrane; also a proteinaceous subcellular layer below the plasma membrane especially of a euglena
perique
noun Etymology: Louisiana French périque Date: 1882 an aromatic fermented Louisiana tobacco used in smoking mixtures
periscope
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1879 a tubular optical instrument containing lenses and mirrors by which an observer obtains an otherwise ...
periscopic
adjective Date: 1804 1. providing a view all around or on all sides 2. of or relating to a periscope
perish
verb Etymology: Middle English perisshen, from Anglo-French periss-, stem of perir, from Latin perire, from per- detrimentally + ire to go — more at per-, issue Date: 13th ...
perishability
noun see perishable
perishable
adjective Date: 1611 liable to perish ; liable to spoil or decay • perishability noun • perishable noun
perissodactyl
noun Etymology: New Latin Perissodactyla, from Greek perissos excessive, odd in number + daktylos finger, toe Date: circa 1852 any of an order (Perissodactyla) of nonruminant ...
peristalsis
noun (plural peristalses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek peristaltikos peristaltic Date: 1859 successive waves of involuntary contraction passing along the walls of a ...
peristaltic
adjective Etymology: Greek peristaltikos, from peristellein to wrap around, from peri- + stellein to place Date: 1655 1. of, relating to, resulting from, or being ...
peristaltic pump
noun Date: 1962 a pump in which fluid is forced along by waves of contraction produced mechanically on flexible tubing
peristome
noun Etymology: New Latin peristoma, from peri- + Greek stoma mouth — more at stomach Date: circa 1796 1. the fringe of teeth surrounding the orifice of a moss capsule 2. ...
peristomial
adjective see peristome
peristyle
noun Etymology: French péristyle, from Latin peristylum, from Greek peristylon, from neuter of peristylos surrounded by a colonnade, from peri- + stylos pillar — more at ...
perithecial
adjective see perithecium
perithecium
noun (plural perithecia) Etymology: New Latin, from peri- + Greek thēkion, diminutive of thēkē case — more at tick Date: circa 1832 a spherical, cylindrical, or ...
peritoneal
adjective see peritoneum
peritoneally
adverb see peritoneum
peritoneum
noun (plural peritoneums or peritonea) Etymology: Middle English, from Late Latin, from Greek peritonaion, neuter of peritonaios stretched around, from peri- + teinein to ...
peritonitis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1776 inflammation of the peritoneum
peritrichous
adjective Etymology: peri- + Greek trich-, thrix hair Date: 1877 1. having flagella uniformly distributed over the body 2. having a spiral line of modified cilia around ...
peritrichously
adverb see peritrichous
periwig
noun Etymology: modification of Middle French perruque — more at peruke Date: 1529 peruke • periwigged adjective
periwigged
adjective see periwig
periwinkle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English perwinke, from Old English perwince, from Vulgar Latin *pervinca, short for Latin vincapervinca Date: before 12th century 1. any of several ...
periwinkle blue
noun see periwinkle I
perjure
transitive verb (perjured; perjuring) Etymology: Anglo-French parjurer, perjurer, from Latin perjurare, from per- detrimentally, for the worse + jurare to swear — more at ...
perjurer
noun Date: 15th century a person guilty of perjury
perjurious
adjective Date: 1602 marked by perjury • perjuriously adverb
perjuriously
adverb see perjurious
perjury
noun Date: 14th century the voluntary violation of an oath or vow either by swearing to what is untrue or by omission to do what has been promised under oath ; false ...
perk
I. verb Etymology: Middle English Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to thrust up the head, stretch out the neck, or carry the body in a bold or insolent ...
perkily
adverb see perky

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.050 c;