Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
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Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

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perkiness
noun see perky
Perkins
biographical name Frances 1880-1965 American public official
perky
adjective (perkier; -est) Date: 1855 1. briskly self-assured ; cocky 2. jaunty • perkily adverb • perkiness noun
Perl
biographical name Martin 1927- American physicist
Perlis
geographical name state Malaysia bordering on Thailand & Andaman Sea capital Kangar area 310 square miles (803 square kilometers), population 184,070
perlite
noun Etymology: French, from perle pearl Date: 1833 volcanic glass that has a concentric shelly structure, appears as if composed of concretions, is usually grayish and ...
perlitic
adjective see perlite
Perlman
biographical name Itzhak 1945- Israeli violinist
perm
I. noun Date: 1927 permanent II. transitive verb Date: 1928 to give (hair) a permanent wave
Perm'
or formerly Molotov geographical name city E Russia in Europe population 1,099,000
permaculture
noun Etymology: 1permanent + agriculture Date: 1978 an agricultural system or method that seeks to integrate human activity with natural surroundings so as to create highly ...
permafrost
noun Etymology: permanent + frost Date: 1943 a permanently frozen layer at variable depth below the surface in frigid regions of a planet (as earth)
permanence
noun Date: 15th century the quality or state of being permanent ; durability
permanency
noun (plural -cies) Date: 1555 1. permanence 2. something permanent
permanent
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French parmanant, from Latin permanent-, permanens, present participle of permanēre to endure, from per- throughout + ...
permanent magnet
noun Date: 1828 a magnet that retains its magnetism after removal of the magnetizing force
permanent press
noun Date: 1964 1. the process of treating a fabric with a chemical (as a resin) and heat for setting the shape and for aiding wrinkle resistance 2. material treated by ...
permanent tissue
noun Date: 1875 plant tissue that has completed its growth and differentiation and is usually incapable of meristematic activity
permanent tooth
noun Date: 1836 any of the second set of teeth of a mammal that follow the milk teeth, typically persist into old age, and in humans are 32 in number
permanent wave
noun see permanent II
permanent-press
adjective see permanent press
permanently
adverb see permanent I
permanentness
noun see permanent I
permanganate
noun Date: 1841 1. a salt containing the anion MnO4-; especially potassium permanganate 2. the anion MnO4- of a permanganate
permeability
noun Date: 1759 1. the quality or state of being permeable 2. the property of a magnetizable substance that determines the degree in which it modifies the magnetic flux in ...
permeable
adjective Date: 15th century capable of being permeated ; penetrable; especially having pores or openings that permit liquids or gases to pass through
permease
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary perme- (from permeate) + -ase Date: 1957 a substance that catalyzes the transport of another substance across a cell ...
permeate
verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin permeatus, past participle of permeare, from per- through + meare to go, pass; akin to Middle Welsh mynet to go, Czech míjet to pass ...
permeation
noun Date: circa 1623 1. the quality or state of being permeated 2. the action or process of permeating
permeative
adjective see permeate
permethrin
noun Etymology: per- + methyl + pyrethrin Date: 1976 a synthetic pyrethroid C21H20Cl2O3 used especially as an insecticide
Permian
adjective Etymology: Perm, former province in eastern Russia Date: 1841 of, relating to, or being the last period of the Paleozoic era or the corresponding system of rocks ...
permillage
noun see per mill
permissibility
noun see permissible
permissible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin permissibilis, from Latin permissus, past participle of permittere Date: 15th century that may be permitted ; ...
permissibleness
noun see permissible
permissibly
adverb see permissible
permission
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin permission-, permissio, from permittere Date: 15th century 1. the act of permitting 2. formal consent ; ...
permissive
adjective Etymology: Middle English permyssyf, from Middle French permissif, from Latin permissus Date: 15th century 1. archaic granted on sufferance ; tolerated 2. a. ...
permissively
adverb see permissive
permissiveness
noun see permissive
permit
I. verb (permitted; permitting) Etymology: Middle English permitten, from Latin permittere to let through, permit, from per- through + mittere to let go, send Date: 15th ...
permittee
noun see permit I
permitter
noun see permit I
permittivity
noun Etymology: 1permit + -ivity (as in selectivity) Date: 1887 the ability of a material to store electrical potential energy under the influence of an electric field ...
permutable
adjective see permute
permutation
noun Etymology: Middle English permutacioun exchange, transformation, from Anglo-French, from Latin permutation-, permutatio, from permutare Date: 14th century 1. often ...
permutation group
noun Date: 1904 a group whose elements are permutations and in which the product of two permutations is a permutation whose effect is the same as the successive application of ...
permutational
adjective see permutation
permute
transitive verb (permuted; permuting) Etymology: Middle English, to exchange, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French permuter, from Latin permutare, from per- + mutare to ...
Pernambuco
geographical name 1. state NE Brazil capital Recife area 39,005 square miles (101,023 square kilometers), population 7,109,626 2. — see Recife
pernicious
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin perniciosus, from pernicies destruction, from per- + nec-, nex violent death — more at noxious Date: 15th ...
pernicious anemia
noun Date: 1874 a severe megaloblastic anemia that is marked by a progressive decrease in the number of red blood cells and by pallor, weakness, and gastrointestinal and ...
perniciously
adverb see pernicious
perniciousness
noun see pernicious
pernickety
adjective Etymology: origin unknown Date: circa 1818 chiefly British persnickety
Pernik
geographical name city W Bulgaria S of Sofia population 99,643
Pernod
trademark — used for a French liqueur
Perón
biographical name Juan Domingo 1895-1974 Argentine politician; president of Argentina (1946-55; 1973-74)
peroneal
adjective Etymology: New Latin peroneus, from perone fibula, from Greek peronē, literally, pin, from peirein to pierce — more at diapir Date: 1831 of, relating to, or ...
peroral
adjective Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1908 occurring through or by way of the mouth • perorally adverb
perorally
adverb see peroral
perorate
intransitive verb (-rated; -rating) Etymology: Latin peroratus, past participle of perorare to declaim at length, wind up an oration, from per- through + orare to speak — ...
peroration
noun Etymology: Middle English peroracyon, from Latin peroration-, peroratio, from perorare Date: 15th century 1. the concluding part of a discourse and especially an ...
perorational
adjective see peroration
perovskite
noun Etymology: German Perowskit, from Count L. A. Perovskiĭ died 1856 Russian statesman Date: 1840 a yellow, brown, or grayish-black mineral consisting of an oxide of ...
peroxidase
noun Date: 1900 an enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of various substances by peroxides
peroxidation
noun Date: 1839 oxidation to the greatest possible extent resulting especially in formation of a peroxide
peroxide
I. noun Date: 1804 a compound (as hydrogen peroxide) in which oxygen is visualized as joined to oxygen • peroxidic adjective II. transitive verb (-ided; -iding) Date: ...
peroxidic
adjective see peroxide I
peroxisomal
adjective see peroxisome
peroxisome
noun Etymology: peroxide + 3-some Date: 1965 a cytoplasmic cell organelle containing enzymes (as catalase) which act in oxidative reactions and especially in the production ...
peroxy-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary per- + oxy containing the divalent group O–O
peroxyacetyl nitrate
noun Date: 1963 a toxic compound C2H3O5N found especially in smog
perp
I. noun Date: 1981 a perpetrator especially of a crime II. abbreviation perpendicular
perpend
verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin perpendere, from per- thoroughly + pendere to weigh — more at per-, pendant Date: 15th century transitive verb to reflect on ...
perpendicular
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English perpendiculer, from Middle French, from Latin perpendicularis, from perpendiculum plumb line, from per- + pendēre to hang — more at ...
perpendicularity
noun see perpendicular I
perpendicularly
adverb see perpendicular I
perpetrate
transitive verb (-trated; -trating) Etymology: Latin perpetratus, past participle of perpetrare, from per- through + patrare to accomplish, from pater father — more at father ...
perpetration
noun see perpetrate
perpetrator
noun see perpetrate
perpetual
adjective Etymology: Middle English perpetuel, from Anglo-French, from Latin perpetuus uninterrupted, from per- through + petere to go to — more at feather Date: 14th ...
perpetual calendar
noun Date: 1895 a table for finding the day of the week for any one of a wide range of dates
perpetual check
noun Date: circa 1909 an endless succession of checks to which an opponent's king may be subjected to force a draw in chess
perpetually
adverb see perpetual
perpetuate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Etymology: Latin perpetuatus, past participle of perpetuare, from perpetuus Date: 1530 to make perpetual or cause to last indefinitely • ...
perpetuation
noun see perpetuate
perpetuator
noun see perpetuate
perpetuity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English perpetuite, from Anglo-French perpetuité, from Latin perpetuitat-, perpetuitas, from perpetuus Date: 15th century 1. eternity ...
perphenazine
noun Etymology: blend of piperazine and phen- Date: 1957 a phenothiazine tranquilizer C21H26ClN3OS that is used especially to control psychotic symptoms (as anxiety and ...
Perpignan
geographical name city S France SE of Toulouse near Mediterranean coast population 108,049
perplex
transitive verb Etymology: obsolete perplex, adjective, involved, perplexed, from Latin perplexus, from per- thoroughly + plexus involved, from past participle of plectere to ...
perplexed
adjective Date: 15th century 1. filled with uncertainty ; puzzled 2. full of difficulty • perplexedly adverb
perplexedly
adverb see perplexed
perplexity
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English perplexite, from Middle French perplexité, from Late Latin perplexitat-, perplexitas, from Latin perplexus Date: 14th century 1. ...
perquisite
noun Etymology: Middle English, property acquired by means other than inheritance, from Anglo-French perquisit, Medieval Latin perquisitum, from neuter of perquisitus, past ...
Perrault
biographical name Charles 1628-1703 French writer
Perrin
biographical name Jean-Baptiste 1870-1942 French physicist
Perris
geographical name city SE California population 36,189
perron
noun Etymology: French, from Old French, from perre, pierre rock, stone, from Latin petra, from Greek Date: 1723 an outdoor stairway leading up to a building entrance; also ...
perry
noun Etymology: Middle English peirrie, from Anglo-French peré, from Vulgar Latin *piratum, from Latin pirum pear Date: 14th century fermented pear juice often made sparkling
Perry
I. biographical name Bliss 1860-1954 American educator & critic II. biographical name Matthew Calbraith 1794-1858 American commodore III. biographical name Oliver Hazard ...
pers
abbreviation 1. person; personal 2. personnel
perse
adjective Etymology: Middle English pers, from Anglo-French, from Medieval Latin persus Date: 15th century of a dark grayish blue resembling indigo
Perse
biographical name St. John — see Aléxis Saint-Léger leger
persecute
transitive verb (-cuted; -cuting) Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French persecuter, back-formation from persecuteur persecutor, from Late Latin persecutor, from persequi ...
persecutee
noun see persecute
persecution
noun Date: 14th century 1. the act or practice of persecuting especially those who differ in origin, religion, or social outlook 2. the condition of being persecuted, ...
persecutive
adjective see persecute
persecutor
noun see persecute
persecutory
adjective see persecute
Perseid
noun Etymology: Latin Perseus; from their appearing to radiate from a point in Perseus Date: 1876 any of a group of meteors that appear annually about August 11
Persephone
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Persephonē Date: 1567 a daughter of Zeus and Demeter abducted by Pluto to reign with him over the underworld
Persepolis
geographical name city of ancient Persia; site in SW Iran NE of Shiraz
Perseus
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Date: 14th century 1. a son of Zeus and Danaë and slayer of Medusa 2. [Latin (genitive Persei), from Greek] a northern constellation ...
perseverance
noun Date: 14th century the action or condition or an instance of persevering ; steadfastness
perseverate
intransitive verb see perseveration
perseveration
noun Etymology: Latin perseveration-, perseveratio, from perseverare Date: 1910 continuation of something (as repetition of a word) usually to an exceptional degree or beyond ...
perseverative
adjective see perseveration
persevere
intransitive verb (-vered; -vering) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French parseverer, from Latin perseverare, from per- through + severus severe Date: 14th century to ...
perseveringly
adverb see persevere
Pershing
biographical name John Joseph 1860-1948 American general
Persia
geographical name — see Iran
Persian
noun Date: 14th century 1. one of the people of Persia: as a. one of the ancient Iranians who under Cyrus and his successors founded an empire in southwest Asia b. a ...
Persian cat
noun Date: 1821 any of a breed of stocky round-headed domestic cats that have a long silky coat and thick ruff
Persian Gulf
geographical name arm of Arabian Sea between SW Iran & Arabia
Persian Gulf States
geographical name Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, & United Arab Emirates
Persian lamb
noun Date: 1889 1. a pelt that is obtained from a newborn karakul lamb slightly older than those yielding broadtail and that is characterized by very silky tightly curled ...
persiflage
noun Etymology: French, from persifler to banter, from per- thoroughly + siffler to whistle, hiss, boo, ultimately from Latin sibilare Date: 1757 frivolous bantering talk ; ...
persimmon
noun Etymology: Virginia Algonquian pessemmin Date: 1612 1. any of a genus (Diospyros) of trees of the ebony family with hard fine wood, oblong leaves, and small bell-shaped ...
Persis
geographical name ancient region SW Iran
persist
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle French persister, from Latin persistere, from per- + sistere to take a stand, stand firm; akin to Latin stare to stand — more at stand ...
persistence
noun Date: 1546 1. the action or fact of persisting 2. the quality or state of being persistent; especially perseverance
persistency
noun Date: 1597 persistence 2
persistent
adjective Etymology: Latin persistent-, persistens, present participle of persistere Date: 1826 1. existing for a long or longer than usual time or continuously: as a. ...
persistently
adverb see persistent
persister
noun see persist
Persius
biographical name A.D. 34-62 Aulus Persius Flaccus Roman satirist
persnicketiness
noun see persnickety
persnickety
adjective Etymology: alteration of pernickety Date: 1915 1. a. fussy about small details ; fastidious b. having the characteristics of a snob 2. requiring great ...
person
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French persone, from Latin persona actor's mask, character in a play, person, probably from Etruscan phersu mask, from Greek prosōpa, ...
person-hour
noun Date: 1975 a unit of one hour's work by one person
persona
noun (plural personae or personas) Etymology: Latin Date: 1909 1. a character assumed by an author in a written work 2. a. plural personas [New Latin, from Latin] an ...
persona grata
adjective Etymology: New Latin, acceptable person Date: 1882 personally acceptable or welcome
persona non grata
adjective Etymology: New Latin, unacceptable person Date: 1904 personally unacceptable or unwelcome
personable
adjective Date: 15th century pleasant or amiable in person ; attractive • personableness noun
personableness
noun see personable
personage
noun Date: 15th century 1. a person of rank, note, or distinction; especially one distinguished for presence and personal power 2. a human individual ; person 3. a ...
personal
I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French personel, from Late Latin personalis, from Latin persona Date: 14th century 1. of, relating to, or affecting a ...
personal computer
noun Date: 1976 a general-purpose computer equipped with a microprocessor and designed to run especially commercial software (as a word processor or Internet browser) for an ...
personal digital assistant
noun Date: 1992 PDA
personal effects
noun plural Date: 1818 privately owned items (as clothing and jewelry) normally worn or carried on the person
personal equation
noun Date: 1845 variation (as in observation) occasioned by the personal peculiarities of an individual; also a correction or allowance made for such variation
personal foul
noun Date: circa 1829 a foul in a game (as basketball) involving usually physical contact with or deliberate roughing of an opponent — compare technical foul
personal pronoun
noun Date: 1668 a pronoun (as I, you, or they) that expresses a distinction of person
personal property
noun Date: 1833 property other than real property consisting of things temporary or movable ; chattels
personal tax
noun Date: circa 1935 direct tax
personalise
British variant of personalize
personalism
noun Date: circa 1846 a doctrine emphasizing the significance, uniqueness, and inviolability of personality • personalist noun or adjective • personalistic adjective
personalist
noun or adjective see personalism
personalistic
adjective see personalism
personality
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English personalite, from Anglo-French personalité, from Late Latin personalitat-, personalitas, from personalis Date: 15th century 1. ...
personality inventory
noun Date: 1932 any of several tests that attempt to characterize the personality of an individual by objective scoring of replies to a large number of questions concerning ...
personality test
noun Date: 1914 any of several tests that consist of standardized tasks designed to determine various aspects of the personality or the emotional status of the individual ...
personalization
noun see personalize
personalize
transitive verb (-ized; -izing) Date: circa 1741 1. personify 2. to make personal or individual; specifically to mark as the property of a particular person • ...
personally
adverb Date: 14th century 1. in person 2. as a person ; in personality 3. for oneself ; as far as oneself is concerned
personalty
noun (plural -ties) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French personalté, from Late Latin personalitat-, personalitas personality Date: 15th century personal property
personate
transitive verb (-ated; -ating) Date: 1591 1. a. impersonate, represent b. to assume without authority and with fraudulent intent (some character or capacity) 2. to ...
personation
noun see personate
personative
adjective see personate
personator
noun see personate
personhood
noun see person
personification
noun Date: circa 1755 1. attribution of personal qualities; especially representation of a thing or abstraction as a person or by the human form 2. a divinity or imaginary ...
personifier
noun see personify
personify
transitive verb (-fied; -fying) Date: circa 1741 1. to conceive of or represent as a person or as having human qualities or powers 2. to be the embodiment or personification ...
personnel
noun Etymology: French, from German Personale, Personal, from Medieval Latin personale, from Late Latin, neuter of personalis personal Date: 1837 1. a. a body of persons ...
perspectival
adjective see perspective II
perspective
I. noun Etymology: Middle English perspectyf, from Medieval Latin perspectivum, from neuter of perspectivus of sight, optical, from Latin perspectus, past participle of ...
perspectively
adverb see perspective III
Perspex
trademark — used for an acrylic plastic
perspicacious
adjective Etymology: Latin perspicac-, perspicax, from perspicere Date: 1640 of acute mental vision or discernment ; keen Synonyms: see shrewd • perspicaciously adverb ...
perspicaciously
adverb see perspicacious
perspicaciousness
noun see perspicacious
perspicacity
noun see perspicacious
perspicuity
noun see perspicuous
perspicuous
adjective Etymology: Latin perspicuus transparent, perspicuous, from perspicere Date: 1586 plain to the understanding especially because of clarity and precision of ...
perspicuously
adverb see perspicuous
perspicuousness
noun see perspicuous
perspiration
noun Date: 1626 1. the action or process of perspiring 2. a saline fluid secreted by the sweat glands ; sweat
perspiratory
adjective Date: 1725 of, relating to, secreting, or inducing perspiration
perspire
intransitive verb (perspired; perspiring) Etymology: French perspirer, from Middle French, from Latin per- through + spirare to blow, breathe — more at per- Date: circa 1682 ...
persuadable
adjective Date: circa 1598 capable of being persuaded
persuade
transitive verb (persuaded; persuading) Etymology: Latin persuadēre, from per- thoroughly + suadēre to advise, urge — more at sweet Date: 15th century 1. to move by ...
persuader
noun see persuade
persuasible
adjective Etymology: Middle English, plausible, from Middle French, from Latin persuasibilis persuasive, from persuasus, past participle of persuadēre Date: 1502 persuadable
persuasion
noun Etymology: Middle English persuasioun, from Middle French or Latin; Middle French persuasion, from Latin persuasion-, persuasio, from persuadēre Date: 14th century 1. ...
persuasive
adjective Date: 15th century tending to persuade • persuasively adverb • persuasiveness noun
persuasively
adverb see persuasive
persuasiveness
noun see persuasive
pert
adjective Etymology: Middle English, evident, attractive, saucy, short for apert evident, from Anglo-French, from Latin apertus open, from past participle of aperire to open ...
pertain
intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English perteinen, from Anglo-French partenir, purteiner, from Latin pertinēre to reach to, belong, from per- through + tenēre to hold — ...
Perth
geographical name 1. city capital of Western Australia on Swan River population 80,517 — see Fremantle 2. (or Perthshire) former county central Scotland 3. burgh ...
Perth Amboy
geographical name city & port NE New Jersey on Raritan Bay at mouth of Raritan River population 47,303
Perth and Kinross
geographical name administrative area of E central Scotland area 2051 square miles (5311 square kilometers)
Perthshire
geographical name see Perth 2
pertinacious
adjective Etymology: Latin pertinac-, pertinax, from per- thoroughly + tenac-, tenax tenacious, from tenēre Date: 1626 1. a. adhering resolutely to an opinion, purpose, ...
pertinaciously
adverb see pertinacious
pertinaciousness
noun see pertinacious
pertinacity
noun see pertinacious
pertinence
noun Date: 1659 the quality or state of being pertinent ; relevance
pertinency
noun Date: 1598 pertinence
pertinent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin pertinent-, pertinens, present participle of pertinēre Date: 14th century having a clear decisive ...
pertinently
adverb see pertinent
pertly
adverb see pert
pertness
noun see pert
perturb
transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French perturber, from Latin perturbare to throw into confusion, from per- + turbare to disturb — more at turbid Date: ...
perturbable
adjective see perturb
perturbation
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of perturbing ; the state of being perturbed 2. a disturbance of motion, course, arrangement, or state of equilibrium; especially a ...
perturbational
adjective see perturbation
pertussis
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Latin per- thoroughly + tussis cough Date: circa 1799 whooping cough
Peru
geographical name country W South America; a republic capital Lima area 496,222 square miles (1,285,215 square kilometers), population 22,916,000 • Peruvian adjective or ...
Perugia
geographical name commune central Italy between Lake Trasimeno & the Tiber capital of Umbria population 143,698
Perugino
biographical name circa 1450-1523 Pietro di Cristoforo Vannucci Italian painter
peruke
noun Etymology: Middle French perruque, from Old Italian parrucca, perrucca hair, wig Date: circa 1573 wig; specifically one of a type popular from the 17th to the early ...
peruked
adjective see peruke
perusal
noun see peruse
peruse
transitive verb (perused; perusing) Etymology: Middle English, to use up, deal with in sequence, from Latin per- thoroughly + Middle English usen to use Date: 1532 1. a. ...
peruser
noun see peruse
Peruvian
adjective or noun see Peru
Peruzzi
biographical name Baldassare 1481-1536 Italian architect & painter
perv
noun Date: 1944 pervert
pervade
transitive verb (pervaded; pervading) Etymology: Latin pervadere to go through, pervade, from per- through + vadere to go — more at per-, wade Date: 1659 to become diffused ...
pervasion
noun Date: 1661 the action of pervading or condition of being pervaded
pervasive
adjective Date: circa 1750 pervading or tending to pervade • pervasively adverb • pervasiveness noun
pervasively
adverb see pervasive
pervasiveness
noun see pervasive
perverse
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French purvers, pervers, from Latin perversus, from past participle of pervertere Date: 14th century 1. a. turned away from ...
perversely
adverb see perverse
perverseness
noun see perverse
perversion
noun Date: 14th century 1. the action of perverting ; the condition of being perverted 2. a perverted form; especially an aberrant sexual practice or interest especially ...
perversity
noun see perverse
perversive
adjective Date: 1817 1. perverting or tending to pervert 2. arising from or indicative of perversion
pervert
I. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French purvertir, pervertir, from Latin pervertere to overturn, corrupt, pervert, from per- thoroughly + vertere to turn ...
perverted
adjective Date: 14th century 1. corrupt 2. marked by perversion • pervertedly adverb • pervertedness noun
pervertedly
adverb see perverted
pervertedness
noun see perverted
perverter
noun see pervert I
pervious
adjective Etymology: Latin pervius, from per- through + via way — more at per-, way Date: circa 1614 1. accessible 2. permeable • perviousness noun
perviousness
noun see pervious
Pesach
noun Etymology: Hebrew pesaḥ Date: 1613 Passover
Pesaro
geographical name commune & port central Italy on the Adriatic NW of Ancona population 88,500
Pescadores
geographical name see P'eng-hu
Pescara
geographical name commune & port central Italy on the Adriatic population 121,367
peseta
noun Etymology: Spanish, from diminutive of peso Date: 1801 the basic monetary unit of Spain until 2002
pesewa
noun Etymology: Twi pέsεwa, literally, penny, penny's worth of gold dust Date: 1965 — see cedi at money table
Peshawar
geographical name city N Pakistan ESE of Khyber Pass population 555,000
pesky
adjective (peskier; -est) Etymology: probably irregular from pest + 1-y Date: 1775 troublesome, vexatious
peso
noun (plural pesos) Etymology: Spanish, literally, weight, from Latin pensum — more at poise Date: 1555 1. an old silver coin of Spain and Spanish America equal to eight ...
pessary
noun (plural -ries) Etymology: Middle English pessarie, from Anglo-French, from Late Latin pessarium, from pessus, pessum pessary, from Greek pessos oval stone for playing ...
pessimism
noun Etymology: French pessimisme, from Latin pessimus worst — more at pejorative Date: 1815 1. an inclination to emphasize adverse aspects, conditions, and possibilities ...
pessimist
noun see pessimism
pessimistic
adjective Date: 1868 of, relating to, or characterized by pessimism ; gloomy Synonyms: see cynical • pessimistically adverb
pessimistically
adverb see pessimistic

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