Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389) New Collegiate Dictionary
На главную О проекте Обратная связь Поддержать проектДобавить в избранное

  
EN-DE-FR →  New Collegiate Dictionary →  acto-axio axio-buck buck-cobl cobl-deco deco-elec elec-flüg flüg-gulp gulp-innu inob-leni leni-micr micr-obtr obtr-phyl phyl-quin quin-sask sask-soma soma-tano tans-unco uncr-wool


Слова на букву obtr-phyl (6389)

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>
pest
noun Etymology: Middle French peste, from Latin pestis Date: 1513 1. an epidemic disease associated with high mortality; specifically plague 2. something resembling a pest ...
Pestalozzi
biographical name Johann Heinrich 1746-1827 Swiss educator
pester
transitive verb (pestered; pestering) Etymology: modification of Middle French empestrer to hobble, embarrass, from Vulgar Latin *impastoriare, from Latin in- + Late Latin ...
pesthole
noun Date: 1862 a place liable to epidemic disease
pesthouse
noun Date: 1614 a shelter or hospital for those infected with a pestilential or contagious disease
pesticide
noun Date: circa 1925 an agent used to destroy pests
pestiferous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin pestifer pestilential, noxious, from pestis + -fer -ferous Date: 15th century 1. dangerous to society ; pernicious 2. a. ...
pestiferously
adverb see pestiferous
pestiferousness
noun see pestiferous
pestilence
noun Date: 14th century 1. a contagious or infectious epidemic disease that is virulent and devastating; especially bubonic plague 2. something that is destructive or ...
pestilent
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Latin pestilent-, pestilens pestilential, from pestis Date: 14th century 1. destructive of life ; deadly 2. injuring or ...
pestilential
adjective Date: 14th century 1. a. causing or tending to cause pestilence ; deadly b. of or relating to pestilence 2. morally harmful ; pernicious 3. giving rise to ...
pestilentially
adverb see pestilential
pestilently
adverb see pestilent
pestle
I. noun Etymology: Middle English pestel, from Anglo-French, from Latin pistillum, from pinsere to pound, crush; akin to Greek ptissein to crush, Sanskrit pinaṣṭi he pounds ...
pesto
noun Etymology: Italian, from pesto, adjective, pounded, from pestare to pound, from Late Latin pistare, frequentative of Latin pinsere Date: 1937 a sauce made especially of ...
pesty
adjective see pest
Pet
abbreviation Peter
PET
abbreviation positron-emission tomography
pet
I. noun Etymology: perhaps back-formation from Middle English pety small — more at petty Date: 1508 1. a. a pampered and usually spoiled child b. a person who is ...
pet peeve
noun Date: circa 1919 a frequent subject of complaint
PET scan
noun Date: 1980 a sectional view of the body constructed by positron-emission tomography • PET scanner noun • PET scanning noun
PET scanner
noun see PET scan
PET scanning
noun see PET scan
peta-
combining form Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, modification of Greek penta- penta- quadrillion (1015)
Petach Tikva
or Petah Tiqwa geographical name city W Israel population 148,900
Petah Tiqwa
geographical name see Petach Tikva
Pétain
biographical name (Henri-) Philippe 1856-1951 French general; marshal of France; premier of Vichy France (1940-44)
petal
noun Etymology: New Latin petalum, from Greek petalon; akin to Greek petannynai to spread out — more at fathom Date: circa 1726 one of the modified often brightly colored ...
petaled
adjective see petal
petalled
adjective see petal
petallike
adjective see petal
petaloid
adjective Date: 1730 1. resembling a flower petal 2. consisting of petaloid elements
petalous
adjective Date: 1686 1. having petals 2. having (such or so many) petals — used in combination
Petaluma
geographical name city W California N of San Francisco population 54,548
petard
noun Etymology: Middle French, from peter to break wind, from pet expulsion of intestinal gas, from Latin peditum, from neuter of peditus, past participle of pedere to break ...
Petare
geographical name city N Venezuela, a SE suburb of Caracas population 531,866
petasos
or petasus noun Etymology: Latin & Greek; Latin petasus, from Greek petasos; akin to Greek petannynai to spread out Date: 1577 a broad-brimmed low-crowned hat worn by ancient ...
petasus
noun see petasos
petcock
noun Etymology: pet- (perhaps from petty) + cock Date: circa 1864 a small cock, faucet, or valve for releasing a gas (as air) or draining
petechia
noun (plural petechiae) Etymology: New Latin, from Italian petecchia, ultimately from Latin impetigo Date: circa 1784 a minute reddish or purplish spot containing blood that ...
petechial
adjective see petechia
Peter
noun Etymology: Late Latin Petrus, from Greek Petros, from petra rock 1. a fisherman of Galilee and one of the twelve apostles 2. either of two hortatory letters written to ...
peter
I. intransitive verb Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1846 1. to diminish gradually and come to an end ; give out — usually used with out 2. to become exhausted — ...
Peter Claver
biographical name Saint 1581-1654 Spanish Jesuit missionary
Peter I
I. biographical name 1672-1725 the Great czar of Russia (1682-1725) II. biographical name 1844-1921 king of Serbia (1903-21)
Peter II
biographical name 1923-1970 king of Yugoslavia (1934-45)
Peter Lombard
biographical name circa 1100-1160 L. Petrus Lombardus Italian theologian in France
Peter Pan
noun Date: 1904 1. a boy in Sir James Barrie's play Peter Pan who lives without growing older in a never-never land 2. an adult who does not want to grow up ; one who hangs ...
Peter Pan collar
noun Date: 1908 a usually small flat close-fitting collar with rounded ends that meet at the top in front
Peter Principle
noun Etymology: Laurence J. Peter died 1990 American (Canadian-born) educator Date: 1968 an observation: in a hierarchy employees tend to rise to the level of their ...
Peter the Hermit
biographical name circa 1050-1115 French preacher of the 1st Crusade
Peter's pence
noun plural but singular in construction Etymology: Middle English; from the tradition that Saint Peter founded the papal see Date: 14th century 1. an annual tribute of a ...
Peterborough
geographical name 1. city Canada in SE Ontario population 71,446 2. city E central England population 88,346
Peterborough, Soke of
geographical name former administrative county E central England in Northamptonshire; later part of Huntingdonshire & since 1974 in Cambridgeshire
Peterhof
geographical name see Petrodvorets
Peters
biographical name Carl 1856-1918 German explorer
Petersburg
geographical name 1. city SE Virginia population 33,740 2. Saint Petersburg
Peterson
biographical name Roger Tory 1908-1996 American ornithologist
petiolar
adjective Date: 1760 of, relating to, or proceeding from a petiole
petiolate
adjective Date: circa 1753 having a stalk or petiole
petiole
noun Etymology: New Latin petiolus, from Latin petiolus, peciolus small foot, fruit stalk, probably alteration of Latin *pediciolus, diminutive of pediculus, diminutive of ...
petioled
adjective see petiole
petiolule
noun Etymology: New Latin petiolulus, diminutive of petiolus Date: 1832 a stalk of a leaflet of a compound leaf
petit
adjective Etymology: Middle English, small, minor, from Anglo-French, small Date: 14th century petty 1 — used chiefly in legal compounds
petit bourgeois
noun Etymology: French, literally, small bourgeois Date: 1828 1. a member of the petite bourgeoisie 2. petite bourgeoisie • petit bourgeois adjective
petit four
noun (plural petits fours or petit fours) Etymology: French, literally, small oven Date: 1884 a small cake cut from pound or sponge cake and frosted
petit jury
noun Date: 15th century a jury of 12 persons impaneled to try and to decide finally upon the facts at issue in causes for trial in a court
petit larceny
noun Date: circa 1580 larceny involving property of a value below a legally established minimum
petit mal
noun Etymology: French, literally, small illness Date: 1874 epilepsy characterized by mild seizures marked by diminished awareness usually with a blank stare but not by loss ...
petit point
noun Etymology: French, literally, small point Date: circa 1882 tent stitch; also embroidery made with this stitch
petit-maître
noun (plural petits-maîtres) Etymology: French, literally, small master Date: 1711 dandy, fop
Petitcodiac
geographical name river 60 miles (96 kilometers) SE Canada in SE New Brunswick flowing to head of Bay of Fundy
petite
I. adjective Etymology: French, feminine of petit Date: 1784 having a small trim figure — usually used of a woman • petiteness noun II. noun Date: circa 1929 a ...
petite bourgeoisie
noun Etymology: French, literally, small bourgeoisie Date: 1916 the lower middle class including especially small shopkeepers and artisans
petite sirah
also petite syrah noun, often cap P & S Etymology: French petite syrah, literally, little syrah (a grape variety) Date: 1948 a dry red wine of spicy fruitiness made from ...
petite syrah
noun, often cap P & S see petite sirah
petiteness
noun see petite I
petitio principii
noun Etymology: Medieval Latin, literally, postulation of the beginning, begging the question Date: circa 1531 a logical fallacy in which a premise is assumed to be true ...
petition
I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin petition-, petitio, from petere to seek, request — more at feather Date: 14th century 1. an earnest request ...
petitionary
adjective see petition I
petitioner
noun see petition II
Petőfi
biographical name Sándor 1823-1849 Hungarian poet
petr-
or petri- or petro- combining form Etymology: New Latin, from Greek petr-, petro-, from petros stone & petra rock 1. stone ; rock 2. petroleum
Petra
geographical name ancient city of NW Arabia on slope of Mt. Hor, site now in SW Jordan; capital of the Edomites & Nabataeans
petrale
noun see petrale sole
petrale sole
noun Etymology: petrale probably from Italian dialect, a flatfish Date: 1953 a flounder (Eopsetta jordani) chiefly of the Pacific waters of North America that is an important ...
Petrarch
biographical name 1304-1374 It. Francesco Petrarca Italian poet • Petrarchan adjective
Petrarchan
adjective see Petrarch
Petrarchan sonnet
noun Etymology: Petrarch (Francesco Petrarca) Date: circa 1909 Italian sonnet
petrel
noun Etymology: alteration of earlier pitteral Date: 1676 any of numerous seabirds (especially families Procellariidae and Hydrobatidae); especially one of the smaller ...
petri dish
noun Etymology: Julius R. Petri died 1921 German bacteriologist Date: circa 1892 1. a small shallow dish of thin glass or plastic with a loose cover used especially for ...
petri-
combining form see petr-
Petrie
biographical name Sir (William Matthew) Flinders 1853-1942 English Egyptologist
petrifaction
noun Date: 15th century 1. the process of petrifying 2. something petrified 3. the quality or state of being petrified
petrification
noun Date: circa 1611 petrifaction
Petrified Forest National Park
geographical name reservation E Arizona in Painted Desert containing natural exhibit of petrified wood
petrify
verb (-fied; -fying) Etymology: Middle French petrifier, from petr- + -ifier -ify Date: 1594 transitive verb 1. to convert (organic matter) into stone or a substance of ...
Petrine
adjective Etymology: Late Latin Petrus Peter Date: 1841 1. of, relating to, or characteristic of the apostle Peter or the doctrines associated with his name 2. of, relating ...
petro-
combining form see petr-
petrochemical
noun Date: 1942 a chemical isolated or derived from petroleum or natural gas • petrochemistry noun
petrochemistry
noun see petrochemical
petrodollar
noun Date: 1974 a dollar's worth of foreign exchange obtained by a petroleum-exporting country through sales abroad — usually used in plural
Petrodvorets
or formerly Peterhof geographical name town W Russia in Europe W of St. Petersburg
petrogenesis
noun Etymology: New Latin Date: 1901 the origin or formation of rocks • petrogenetic adjective
petrogenetic
adjective see petrogenesis
petroglyph
noun Etymology: French pétroglyphe, from pétr- petr- + -glyphe (as in hiéroglyphe hieroglyph) Date: 1870 a carving or inscription on a rock
Petroglyph National Monument
geographical name reservation Albuquerque, New Mexico, containing rock carvings
Petrograd
geographical name — see Saint Petersburg 2
petrographer
noun see petrography
petrographic
adjective see petrography
petrographical
adjective see petrography
petrographically
adverb see petrography
petrography
noun Etymology: New Latin petrographia, from petr- + Latin -graphia -graphy Date: 1651 the description and systematic classification of rocks • petrographer noun • ...
petrol
noun Etymology: French essence de pétrole, literally, essence of petroleum Date: 1895 chiefly British gasoline
petrolatum
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Medieval Latin petroleum Date: 1887 petroleum jelly
petroleum
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Medieval Latin, from Latin petr- + oleum oil — more at oil Date: 15th century an oily flammable bituminous liquid that may vary from ...
petroleum jelly
noun Date: 1897 a neutral unctuous odorless tasteless substance obtained from petroleum and used especially in ointments and dressings
petrologic
adjective see petrology
petrological
adjective see petrology
petrologically
adverb see petrology
petrologist
noun see petrology
petrology
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary Date: 1811 a science that deals with the origin, history, occurrence, structure, chemical composition, and classification ...
petronel
noun Etymology: perhaps modification of Middle French poitrinal, petrinal, from poitrinal of the chest, from poitrine chest, ultimately from Latin pector-, pectus — more at ...
Petronian
adjective see Petronius
Petronius
biographical name died A.D. 66 in full probably Titus Petronius Niger Roman satirist • Petronian adjective
Petropavlovsk
geographical name city N Kazakhstan population 248,300
Petropavlovsk- Kamchatskiy
geographical name city & port E Russia in Asia on Kamchatka Peninsula population 273,000
Petrópolis
geographical name city SE Brazil in Rio de Janeiro state population 255,211
petrosal
adjective Etymology: New Latin petrosa petrous portion of the temporal bone, from Latin, feminine of petrosus Date: 1741 of, relating to, or situated in the region of the ...
petrous
adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French *petros, from Latin petrosus, from petra rock, from Greek Date: 14th century of, relating to, or constituting the ...
Petrovsk
geographical name — see Makhachkala
Petrozavodsk
geographical name city NW Russia in Europe capital of Karelia on Lake Onega population 280,000
Petsamo
geographical name — see Pechenga
petter
noun see pet III
petticoat
I. noun Etymology: Middle English petycote short tunic, petticoat, from pety small + cote coat Date: 15th century 1. a skirt worn by women, girls, or young children: as a. ...
petticoated
adjective see petticoat I
pettifogger
noun Etymology: probably from petty + obsolete English fogger pettifogger Date: 1576 1. a lawyer whose methods are petty, underhanded, or disreputable ; shyster 2. one ...
pettifoggery
noun see pettifogger
pettifogging
adjective or noun see pettifogger
pettily
adverb see petty
pettiness
noun see petty
petting zoo
noun Date: 1968 a collection of farm animals or gentle exotic animals for children to pet and feed
pettish
adjective Etymology: probably from 4pet Date: 1583 fretful, peevish • pettishly adverb • pettishness noun
pettishly
adverb see pettish
pettishness
noun see pettish
pettitoes
noun plural Etymology: plural of obsolete pettytoe offal Date: 1555 1. the feet of a pig used as food 2. toes, feet
petty
adjective (pettier; -est) Etymology: Middle English pety small, minor, alteration of petit Date: 14th century 1. having secondary rank or importance ; minor, subordinate 2. ...
Petty
biographical name Sir William 1623-1687 English politician economist
petty cash
noun Date: 1834 cash kept on hand for payment of minor items
petty larceny
noun Date: 1668 petit larceny
petty officer
noun Date: 1744 a subordinate officer in the navy or coast guard appointed from among the enlisted men — compare noncommissioned officer
petty officer first class
noun Date: 1917 an enlisted man in the navy or coast guard ranking above a petty officer second class and below a chief petty officer
petty officer second class
noun Date: 1917 an enlisted man in the navy or coast guard ranking above a petty officer third class and below a petty officer first class
petty officer third class
noun Date: 1917 an enlisted man in the navy or coast guard ranking above a seaman and below a petty officer second class
petulance
noun Date: 1610 the quality or state of being petulant ; peevishness
petulancy
noun Date: 1559 archaic petulance
petulant
adjective Etymology: Latin or Middle French; Middle French, from Latin petulant-, petulans; akin to Latin petere to go to, attack, seek — more at feather Date: 1598 1. ...
petulantly
adverb see petulant
petunia
noun Etymology: New Latin, from obsolete French petun tobacco, from Tupi petɨma Date: 1825 any of a genus (Petunia) of tropical South American herbs of the nightshade ...
peu à peu
foreign term Etymology: French little by little
peu de chose
foreign term Etymology: French a trifle
Pevsner
I. biographical name Antoine 1886-1962 brother of Naum Gabo French (Russian-born) sculptor & painter II. biographical name Sir Nikolaus 1902-1983 British (German-born) art ...
pew
noun Etymology: Middle English pewe, from Middle French dialect (Picardy) puie balustrade, from Latin podia, plural of podium parapet, podium, from Greek podion base, diminutive ...
pewee
noun Etymology: imitative Date: 1796 any of various small largely gray or olive-colored American flycatchers (genus Contopus)
pewholder
noun Date: 1842 a renter or owner of a pew
pewit
variant of peewit
pewter
noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French peutre, from Vulgar Latin *piltrum Date: 14th century 1. any of various alloys having tin as chief component; especially a ...
pewterer
noun Date: 14th century one that makes pewter utensils
peyote
also peyotl noun Etymology: Mexican Spanish peyote, from Nahuatl peyotl peyote cactus Date: 1849 1. a hallucinogenic drug containing mescaline that is derived from peyote ...
peyote button
noun Date: 1921 one of the dried discoid tops of the peyote cactus
peyotl
noun see peyote
pf
abbreviation 1. personal foul 2. pfenning 3. picofarad 4. [Italian più forte] louder 5. preferred
Pfalz
geographical name — see palatinate
PFC
or Pfc abbreviation private first class
Pfc
abbreviation see PFC
PFD
abbreviation personal flotation device
pfennig
noun (plural pfennig; also pfennigs or pfennige) Etymology: German, from Old High German pfenning — more at penny Date: 1547 a former monetary unit equal to 1/100 deutsche ...
Pforzheim
geographical name city SW Germany SE of Karlsruhe population 115,547
pg
abbreviation 1. page 2. picogram
PG
I. abbreviation 1. postgraduate 2. prostaglandin II. certification mark — used to certify that a motion picture is of such a nature that all ages may be allowed admission ...
PG-13
certification mark — used to certify that a motion picture is of such a nature that persons of all ages may be admitted but parental guidance is suggested especially for ...
PGA
abbreviation Professional Golfers' Association
pH
noun Etymology: German, from Potenz power + H (symbol for hydrogen) Date: 1909 a measure of acidity and alkalinity of a solution that is a number on a scale on which a value ...
PH
abbreviation 1. pinch hit 2. public health 3. Purple Heart
pH meter
noun an apparatus for measuring the strength or the amount of acid present in a mixture or solution — called also acidimeter
Phaedra
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Phaidra Date: 14th century a daughter of Minos who marries Theseus and falls in love with her stepson Hippolytus
Phaedrus
I. biographical name 5th century B.C. Greek philosopher II. biographical name circa 15 B.C.-circa A.D. 50 Roman fabulist
Phaëthon
noun Etymology: Latin, from Greek Phaethōn Date: 14th century a son of Helios who drives his father's sun-chariot through the sky but loses control and is struck down by a ...
phaeton
noun Etymology: Phaëthon Date: 1742 1. any of various light four-wheeled horse-drawn vehicles 2. touring car
phage
noun Etymology: by shortening Date: 1926 bacteriophage
phagocyte
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek phagein + New Latin -cyta -cyte Date: circa 1884 a cell (as a white blood cell) that engulfs and consumes ...
phagocytic
adjective see phagocyte
phagocytize
transitive verb (-tized; -tizing) Date: 1913 phagocytose
phagocytose
transitive verb (-tosed; -tosing) Etymology: back-formation from phagocytosis Date: 1912 to consume by phagocytosis
phagocytosis
noun (plural phagocytoses) Etymology: New Latin Date: 1889 the engulfing and usually the destruction of particulate matter by phagocytes • phagocytotic adjective
phagocytotic
adjective see phagocytosis
phalaenopsis
noun (plural -nopsis; also phalaenopses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek phalaina moth + -opsis Date: 1846 any of a genus (Phalaenopsis) of ornamental epiphytic orchids of ...
phalange
noun Etymology: French, from Greek phalang-, phalanx Date: circa 1860 phalanx 2
phalangeal
adjective Date: 1831 of or relating to a phalanx or the phalanges
phalanger
noun Etymology: New Latin, from Greek phalang-, phalanx Date: circa 1774 any of various small to medium-sized marsupial mammals (family Phalangeridae) of the Australian ...
phalanstery
noun (plural -steries) Etymology: French phalanstère dwelling of a Fourierist community, from Latin phalang-, phalanx + French -stère (as in monastère monastery) Date: 1846 ...
phalanx
noun (plural phalanxes or phalanges) Etymology: Latin phalang-, phalanx, from Greek, battle line, digital bone, literally, log — more at balk Date: 1553 1. a body of ...
phalarope
noun (plural -ropes; also -rope) Etymology: French, from New Latin phalaropod-, phalaropus, from Greek phalaris coot + pod-, pous foot; akin to Greek phalios having a white spot ...
phallic
adjective Date: 1789 1. of or relating to phallicism 2. of, relating to, or resembling a phallus 3. relating to or being the stage of psychosexual development in ...
phallically
adverb see phallic
phallicism
noun Date: 1884 the worship of the generative principle as symbolized by the phallus
phallocentric
adjective Date: 1927 centered on or emphasizing the masculine point of view • phallocentrism noun
phallocentrism
noun see phallocentric
phallocratic
adjective Date: 1977 relating to, resulting from, or advocating masculine power and dominance
phallus
noun (plural phalli or phalluses) Etymology: Latin, from Greek phallos penis, representation of the penis; probably akin to Latin flare to blow — more at blow Date: circa ...
phanerogam
noun Etymology: French phanérogame, ultimately from Greek phaneros visible (from phainein) + gamos marriage Date: 1861 a seed plant or flowering plant ; spermatophyte
phanerophyte
noun Etymology: Greek phaneros + International Scientific Vocabulary -phyte Date: 1913 a perennial plant that bears its perennating buds well above the surface of the ground
Phanerozoic
adjective Etymology: Greek phaneros + English 2-zoic Date: 1930 of, relating to, or being an eon of geologic history that comprises the Paleozoic, Mesozoic, and Cenozoic or ...
phantasm
also fantasm noun Etymology: Middle English fantasme, from Anglo-French fantosme, fantasme, from Latin phantasma, from Greek, from phantazein to present to the mind — more at ...
phantasma
noun (plural phantasmata) Etymology: Latin Date: 1598 phantasm 1
phantasmagoria
noun Etymology: French phantasmagorie, from phantasme phantasm (from Old French fantasme) + -agorie (perhaps from Greek agora assembly) — more at agora Date: circa 1802 1. ...
phantasmagoric
adjective see phantasmagoria
phantasmagorical
adjective see phantasmagoria
phantasmal
adjective see phantasm
phantasmic
adjective see phantasm
phantasy
variant of fantasy
phantom
I. noun Etymology: Middle English fantosme, fantome, from Anglo-French fantosme phantasm Date: 14th century 1. a. something (as a specter) apparent to sense but with no ...
phantom limb
noun Date: 1879 an often painful sensation of the presence of a limb that has been amputated — called also phantom pain
phantom pain
noun see phantom limb
phantomlike
adverb or adjective see phantom I
phar
abbreviation 1. pharmacopoeia 2. pharmacy
pharaoh
noun Usage: often capitalized Etymology: Middle English pharao, from Old English, from Late Latin pharaon-, pharao, from Greek pharaō, from Hebrew par‘ōh, from Egyptian ...
pharaoh ant
noun Date: circa 1947 a small red ant (Monomorium pharaonis) that is a common household pest
pharaonic
adjective Usage: often capitalized Etymology: French pharaonique, from pharaon pharaoh, from Late Latin Pharaon-, Pharao Date: circa 1828 1. of, relating to, or ...
pharisaic
adjective Etymology: Late Latin pharisaicus, from Late Greek pharisaikos, from Greek pharisaios Pharisee Date: circa 1618 1. pharisaical 2. capitalized of or relating to ...
pharisaical
adjective Date: 1531 marked by hypocritical censorious self-righteousness • pharisaically adverb • pharisaicalness noun
pharisaically
adverb see pharisaical
pharisaicalness
noun see pharisaical
pharisaism
noun Etymology: New Latin pharisaismus, from Greek pharisaios Date: 1583 1. capitalized the doctrines or practices of the Pharisees 2. often capitalized pharisaical ...
pharisee
noun Etymology: Middle English pharise, from Old English farise, from Late Latin pharisaeus, from Greek pharisaios, from Aramaic pĕrīshayyā, plural of pĕrīshā, literally, ...
pharm
abbreviation pharmaceutical; pharmacist; pharmacy
pharmaceutical
I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin pharmaceuticus, from Greek pharmakeutikos, from pharmakeuein to administer drugs — more at pharmacy Date: 1640 of, relating to, or ...
pharmaceutically
adverb see pharmaceutical I
pharmacist
noun Date: 1834 a person licensed to engage in pharmacy
pharmaco-
combining form Etymology: Greek pharmako-, from pharmakon medicine ; drug
pharmacodynamic
adjective see pharmacodynamics
pharmacodynamically
adverb see pharmacodynamics
pharmacodynamics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: circa 1842 a branch of pharmacology dealing with the reactions between drugs and living systems • pharmacodynamic adjective ...
pharmacognostic
adjective see pharmacognosy
pharmacognostical
adjective see pharmacognosy
pharmacognosy
noun Etymology: International Scientific Vocabulary, from Greek pharmakon + -gnōsia knowledge, from gnōsis — more at gnosis Date: circa 1885 a branch of pharmacology ...
pharmacokinetic
adjective see pharmacokinetics
pharmacokinetics
noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1960 1. the study of the bodily absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs 2. the characteristic ...
pharmacologic
adjective see pharmacology
pharmacological
adjective see pharmacology
pharmacologically
adverb see pharmacology
pharmacologist
noun see pharmacology
pharmacology
noun Date: circa 1721 1. the science of drugs including their origin, composition, pharmacokinetics, therapeutic use, and toxicology 2. the properties and reactions of ...
pharmacopeia
noun see pharmacopoeia
pharmacopeial
adjective see pharmacopoeia
pharmacopoeia
also pharmacopeia noun Etymology: New Latin, from Late Greek pharmakopoiia preparation of drugs, from Greek pharmako- + poiein to make — more at poet Date: 1621 1. a book ...
pharmacopoeial
adjective see pharmacopoeia
pharmacotherapy
noun Date: circa 1903 the treatment of disease and especially mental illness with drugs
pharmacy
noun (plural -cies) Etymology: Late Latin pharmacia administration of drugs, from Greek pharmakeia, from pharmakeuein to administer drugs, from pharmakon magic charm, poison, ...
PharmD
abbreviation doctor of pharmacy
Pharos
geographical name peninsula N Egypt in city of Alexandria; formerly an island
Pharr
geographical name city S Texas E of McAllen population 46,660
Pharsala
geographical name see Pharsalus
Pharsalus
or Pharsala or Modern Greek Fársala geographical name town E central Greece in E Thessaly in ancient district of Pharsalia

<< < 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 > >>

© en-de-fr.com.ua - EN-DE-FR 2009-2017 Информация публикуется на сайте для ознакомительного процесса.
 
Выполнено за: 0.045 c;